Copyright
Arthur Hassall.

Life of Viscount Bolingbroke online

. (page 19 of 20)
Online LibraryArthur HassallLife of Viscount Bolingbroke → online text (page 19 of 20)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


object of continuing that system which had been formed by
the exertions of the greaj: Tory statesman. Walpole also
clearly recognized the economical and commercial value
to England of Bolingbroke's foreign policy. The Whig
Minister's long tenure of power was in great measure
caused by the determined manner in which he clung to the
Tory Peace policy. By doing so he enabled England to
make rapid industrial progress, to extend her commerce,
and to enjoy some twenty years of peace and prosperity.
It was only when he followed this policy too slavishly,
when he failed to grasp the fact that new problems had



212 HENRY ST. JOHN, VISCOUNT BOLINGBROKE



arisen which required fresh remedies, that public opinion
demanded his overthrow.

The questions of England's interference or non-interfer-
ence in Continental affairs, and of the relative importance
of the army and navy to an insular power like Great
Britain, are still much debated. Chatham and his great
son, Canning, Lord Palmerston, and Lord Beaconsfield,
all had definite views on these subjects. It would seem
that the principles on which Bolingbroke acted are now
beginning to receive universal acceptance. No part, how-
ever, of his foreign policy is more likely to be read with
satisfaction than that which refers to the expansion of
England. He secured for England a firm footing in North
America, from which vantage-ground she was destined to
put into execution, in less than ten years after his death,
by the hand of one of his young patriot friends, a scheme
which he had himself devised, and almost succeeded in
carrying out. He was the first statesman who saw clearly
the importance of checking the extension of the French
power in Canada, and of giving a powerful impetus to the
Colonial interests of Great Britain.

Though he failed to carry his commercial Treaty with
France, he was successful in breaking through the Spanish
monopoly of trade with South America. Cromwell had
attempted in vain to penetrate the wall of religious
fanaticism and commercial exclusiveness which closed the
Spanish colonies to British trade ; it was reserved for a
man whose knowledge of foreign policy was far greater,
and whose determination was fully as strong as that of
the Protector, to effect an arrangement which for the first
time allowed British trade, under certain conditions, with
the Spanish colonies of South America. The verdict of
history has now fully endorsed the wisdom and value of the
Peace of Utrecht — a value which, as we have shown, was
amply recognized by his great Whig rival.



CONCLUSION 213



His writings have been violently, and in many ways
unfairly, attacked. Dr. Johnson and Burke are in great
measure answerable for the popular opinions still in vogue
with regard to his works. Dr. Johnson accused him of
cowardice with reference to the publications of his philo-
sophical speculations. ^

"Sir, he was a scoundrel and a coward: a scoundrel, for charging a
blunderbuss against religion and morality ; a coward, because he had not
resolution to fire it off himself, but left half-a-crown to a beggarly Scotch-
man (Mallet) to draw the trigger after his death."

The charge of cowardice contained in this famous sen-
tence is amply refuted by the fact that Bolingbroke, during
his lifetime, had never scrupled to publish criticisms, re-
markable for their freedom, on religious subjects. Johnson,
who was always looking for an opportunity for reviling
Scotland and its inhabitants, may have been betrayed into
this explosion more by the position of Mallet as literary
executor than by his indignation at Bolingbroke's specula-
tions. Burke is said to have inquired : " Who now reads
Bolingbroke ?" The answer is obvious. Every lover of
English composition in its most perfect form will read
Bolingbroke. Every student of rhetoric will find his
Dissertation on Parties, his Spirit of Patriotism, his Idea of a
Patriot King, invaluable. To the historical student, a perusal
of Bolingbroke's political writings is absolutely indispens-
able for a right comprehension of the ideas held by men of
his day. Unless we know what men were thinking about
in the times under consideration, the mere facts of history
become dry bones. With the aid of Bolingbroke's political
writings, the lives and thoughts of the men of his day are
made real to us. Johnson and Burke in different fashion
both owed much to Bolingbroke, and they repaid the debt
by attempting to kick away the ladder which had aided
their ascent to fame. Burke, indeed, owed more to Boling-
broke than he was perhaps aware of. " We do not," writes



214 HENRY ST. JOHN, VISCOUNT BOLINGBROKE

Mr. Sichel, " accuse him (Burke) of deliberate plagiarism,
but we convict him of unconscious assimilation. None
would have been more surprised than Burke himself to find
how saturated he was with the ideas, opinions, and language
of one whom he was taught to slur and condemn." ^

The attacks on his private life, on his public career, and
on the value of his literary works contain much that is un-
answerable. But most of Bolingbroke's biographers have
either approached the subject of their biography with un-
disguised hostility, or, by enlarging on unimportant details
in his career, have failed to place in their proper proportion
his greatest political and literary achievements. One bio-
grapher, whose whole tone has been, till quite lately, that
generally adopted by historians, speaks of the " ingrate and
cankered Bolingbroke," of his " fell genius," his " subtle
intellect, his showy, sophistical eloquence, his power of
intrigue, his consummate falsehood, his vice and infidelity,"
and concludes, somewhat charitably, by styling him a
" superior fiend " and by quoting Milton's lines: —

" In act more graceful than humane,
A fairer person lost not heaven ; he seemed
For dignity composed and high exploit ;
But all was false and hollow, though his tongue
Dropt manna, and could make the worst appear
The better reason, to perplex and dash
Maturest counsels."

Now, a " superior fiend " would not have stood in an
agony of grief at Pope's bedside. " Fell geniuses " do not
watch puppet shows with little girls on their knees. " In-
grate and cankered " politicians do not write anxious letters
about sick nephews and offer to pay their debts. But it is
not worth while to say more on this subject. These views,
quoted above, merely show the extent to which calumny,
vindictiveness, and malice will pursue the memory of an

^ Sichel, Bolingbroke and Hi's Tjdics. Vol. II., p. 447.



CONCLUSION 215



illustrious statesman. His faults are patent enough, but so
are his virtues. He must have been a delightful companion.

Swift, in a passage already quoted, bears full witness to
his good-nature, his generosity, his excellent taste, his wit,
capacity, good looks, quickness of apprehension, and learn-
ing. But he had the misfortune to offend mortally the great
Whig families, and the hostility of that Venetian oligarchy,
which seldom forgave, pursued him through his life and
after his death with relentless fury. The great Whig
families had, indeed, no cause to love the memory of
Bolingbroke. In 1714 he had seriously threatened the suc-
cess of their Revolution principles, and he had almost
ruined their schemes ; during Walpole's Ministry he had
undermined their monopoly of power, and he had shown the
Tories the way to oust them from office and to consign
them to the cold shade of opposition during most of
George HI.'s and all George IV.'s reign. Could he
expect any mercy from Whig historians ?

No greater compliment could perhaps be paid to his
memory than the interest which is still taken in his meteoric
career, in his soaring ambition, in his keen literary tastes.
As long as there remains a classical scholar, so long may we
look for translations of Homer ; as long as mediaeval history
is studied, fresh monographs on Dante and his divine poem
will continue to appear. And we may say that as long as
human nature with its lights and shades still occupies the
attention of men in each succeeding generation, writers will
be found ready to make fresh studies of this extraordinary
character, in which, as Lord Chesterfield said, " good and
evil were perpetually jostling one another." Most of his
contemporaries are allowed to sleep in comparative peace ;
but who can say that the final word has been said of the
author of the Peace of Utrecht ? His illustrious ancestry,
his fiery ambition, his remarkable and diversified talents,
his position at the head of affairs at one of the most



/



2l6 HENRY ST. JOHN, VISCOUNT BOLINGBROKE

momentous crises in English history, his sudden and most
dramatic fall, all lend a deep interest to Anne's reign.
Then his desertion by the Fates, his banishment into per-
petual opposition just when his powers were at their best,
his struggles against the Whig families, his laborious
attempts to reconstruct the Tory party, all give the domestic
history of George II. a special interest.

His age was the age of great men. Marlborough, Somers,
Shrewsbury, Godolphin, Harley, Walpole, Swift, Pope,
Pulteney, and Carteret were all his contemporaries. It was
an age of political and literary giants. Seldom has England
been possessed at any one epoch of so much political talent.
But Bolingbroke towers above them all in those qualities
which make a statesman. In his power of grasping oppor-
tunities, in his splendid abilities, in his marvellous oratory,
in his endeavour to elevate and expand the views of men,
he was far superior to any of his contemporaries. Once
only did he lose his head, and for that fatal error England
paid dearly. The author of the Peace of Utrecht, and of
the reconstruction of the Tory party, the advocate of Parlia-
mentary freedom, and of the union of the people and the
King, may well be pardoned one error in judgment. " Lord
Bolingbroke," said Disraeli in 1832, was "one of the ablest
men who ever lived." The recognition of his merits by
French writers shows that Bolingbroke's diversified talents
are appreciated beyond England's four seas. " His name,"
it has been said, " may be tracked in history by a luminous
streak, such as a shooting star leaves behind it in its
glancing and glittering dash across the sky." Whatever
view is taken of certain episodes in his career, no one will
now dispute his title of The Great Lord Bolingbroke.



INDEX.



Abjuration Bill, 14, ig6
Account of the State of Parties on

the Accession of George I., 154
Act of Settlement, 14, 79, 167,

19 ^ 193; of Attainder, 118,

121
Adam de Port, 3
Addison, 17, 42, 66, 173-175, 186
Africa, 67
Aix-la-Chapelle, 118, 120, 151 ;

peace of, 153
Akenside, 129
Alari, Abbe, 64, 121
Alberoni, 211
Algerine Pirates, 134
Alliance, the Grand, 14, 26, 27,

45. 51, 52, 53. 68, 150
Almahide, 9

Almanza, battle of, 28, 31, 62
America, North, 54, 70, 212;

South, 71, 212
Amherst, 130
Angelica Pillesary, 6
Anglesea, Lord, loi
Anne, Queen. 14, 16, 18, 22, 25-

33. 36, 3S, 39. 41. 45. 47. 56,
58, 66, 69, 73, 74. 77 83, 86-88,
9098, 100, 102, 103, 113, 124,

129. 143, 164, 167, 173-178. 184.

187, 190, 209, 216
Arbuthnot, 130, 175
Argeville, 143, 149, 151, 167,

169
Argyll, Duke of, 36, 95, 97
Ashby V. White, 18
Ashdown Park, 167, 168
Asiento, the, 71, 212
Assembly of Divines, 4
Athens, Three Letters on the History

of, 131



Attainder, Act of, 107, 109, 118,

121
Atterbury, 43, 84, 95, loi, 118,

174
Austria, 45, 46
Austrian Succession, War of the,

123, 150-151
Avignon, 114 ; letter from, 116,

117
Aylesbury Election, 25
Azzurini Conti, 63



Ballad, A New Court, 135
Bank of England, the, 17, 44
Barons' War, the, 165
"Barrier," the, 11, 55, 69
Barrier Treaty, remarks upon the,

59. 174
Bastille, the, 63

Bathurst, Lord, 34, 143

Battersea, i, 5, 149, 151, 155, 156,

169, 170 ; Church, 3
Baur, 207
Bavaria, 24, 150
Beaconsfield, Earl of, 173, 195,

197, igS, 212, 216
Bedfordshire, 4
Beggars' Upera, the, 179
Bellevue, 106
Bell Tavern, 49
Berkeley, Earl of, 119
Berwick, Duke of, 104, 110-112,

115
Blaithwayte, 21
Blenheim, battle ot, 23, 25, 174,

174 ; Poem on, 174, 175
Bletso, Oliver St. John of, 4
Bolingbroke, Henry St. John,

Viscount: his early years, 1-19 ;

Secretary of War, 22-34 ; i^^



217



2l8 HENRY ST. JOHN, VISCOUNT BOLINGBROKE



retirement, 35-39 ; Secretary for
the Northern i3epartment, 40
97 ; in exile, 97 121 ; his op-
position to Walpole, 128-146 ;
his later years, 149-156 ; his
literary efforts and surround-
ings, 172 187 ; his opinions, 188-
208; Lady (the first), 10, 87:
(the second), 118, 121, 155, 156

Bonaparte, 82

Booth, 66

Bothmar, 63, 156

Bouchain, 54

Bourbons, the, 24 28, 45 47, 53,
54. 57, 58, 60-76, 130

Bourbon. Duke of, 120

Boy Patriots, the, 167

Brandon. Sec Hamilton

Bridges, 74

Brihuega, battle of, 48, ^2>

Bristol, 5 ; Bishop of, 51

Bromley, 10, 14, 36, 43, 51, 86,
95. 103

Brougham, Lord, 162

Brutus, Tragedy of, 185

Bubb-Doddington, 186

Buckinghamshire, 50, 95, 132

Bucklersbury, 33, 117, 167, 168,
177

Burgess, Daniel, 6, 7

Burgundy, Duke of, 61

Burke, 22, 173, 198, 213, 214

Burlington, Earl of, ig8

Bute, 195, 196

Buys, 75

Byng, Admiral, 113



Cabinet, the, 22, 28, 29

Calais, 103. 149

Canada, 54, 76, 212

Canning, 173, 212

Carlos, Don, 136

Caroline, Queen, 145

Carteret, 119, 120, 128, 145, 146,

149-152, 216
Catalans, the, 70, 84
Catalonia, 53
Cato^ 66, 186
Cevennes, the, 24
Chanteloup, 72, 143, 169
Charing Cross, loi



Charles T., 4, 5, iii, 209 ; Charles
n., Ill, 156; Charles II. of
Spain, II ; Charles V., 36, 67;
Charles VI., 36, 61-62, 67, 130,
135. 150; Charles XII., 185,
186 ; the Archduke, 24, 36, 53

Charles Edward, 104, 152, 166

Chatham, 53, 128, 192, 212

Chesterfield, Lord, 137, 146, 151,
155, 164, 183, 215

Chevalier de Rohan, 184

Christ Church, 7, 8, 14, igg

Chubb, 187, 199

Church, the, 25, 38, 81, 84, 85

Churton Collins, Professor, 185

Cicero, 160

Cid, 63

Cinque Ports, the, 87, 103

Circuit of London, the, 2

Clarendon, 93

Cobham, 137, 146

Cockpit, the, 95

Collins, 187

Colonies, 20, 67, 70, 71, 211, 212

Commercial Treaties with France,
71, 72, 83, 86, 137

Commercial Treaties with Spain,

71. 90, 93

Commercy, 107, 114

Committee of Secrecy, 105, 106

Common Council of London. 92

Compton, Sir Spencer. See Wil-
mington

Conduct of the Allies, the, 57, 59,
130, 174, 190, 195

Congreve, 175, 178, 186

Cornbury, Lord, 72, 143, 147, 170

Cornwall, 113

Cowper, William, 26, 33, 40, 47

Council of Regency, 97, loi

Craftsman^ the, 1^0 seq., 177, 179

Craggs, 93. 94

Crimean War, the, 198

Crisis, the, 90, 174

Cromwell, 5, 37, 71, 209, 212

Cyder, 174

D

Daily Courani, the, 55
Danby, 2

Danish War of 1864, 198
Dante, 215



INDEX



2ig



D'Anvers, Caleb, 130, 134
D'Argenson, Count. 121
Darlington, Countess of, 120
Dartmouth, Earl of. 15, 40, 50, 52,

86
D'Aumont, Due, 168
Davenant, 8
Dawley, 122, 143, 177-179, 182,

186, 187
Death of Marianne, 184
Defoe, 50, 174

Deism, 167. 186, 187, 205-207
Delany, Mrs., 170
De Quincy, 181
Derby. 38
Descartes, 202, 203
D'Eu, 3
De Vere, 132
Devonshire, Duke of, 21
D'Iberville, 78

Dissenters, Shortest Way with, 174
Dissertation on Parties, 138, 162,

193, 194, 213
Dover, 118

Drummond, J., 47, 55, 66
Drury Lane, 103
Dryden, 9, 173, 175, 185
Dublin, 180
Dubois, 120
Diinciad, the, t 78- 181
Dunkirk, the, 135
Dutch, 16, 21, 27, 28, 30, 35, 53,

54, 55, 59-63, 67-69, 136, 150



East Indies. 67

Edgehill, Battle of, 4

Edinburgh, 107

Eldon, Lord, 196

Electoral Prince, 90

Electress, Dowager, the, 91

Elizabeth, Queen, 3, 71, 165

Emperor, the, 26. 28

Empire, the Holy Roman, 24

Entresol Club, 121

Epistolary Essays, 183

Erasmus, 207

Essays by Bolingbroke, 198, 199

Essay on Criticism, 179

Essay on Man, 182

Estcourt, Sir W. , 6

Eton, 7



Eugene, Prince. 24, 28, 60

Evans, General, 168

Examiner, Letter to the, 46, 47, 48,

174
Exchange, the, 87

Excise Bill, the, 136, 137, 139, 145



Faubourg St. Germain, 155

Ferriole, Madame de, 64

Fielding, 129

Finch. Lord, 119, 121

First Vision of Camelick, 131

Flanders, 24, 28, 48, 59, 67

Florence, 42, 165, 187

Fontainebleau, 62

Fox, C. J., 106, 141. 192

France. 12, 13, 26, 27, 30, 32, 35,
46. 47. 49. 51-77, 84, 90. 97,103,
106-118, 120, 121, 123, 134, 135,
136, 146-148, 150, 151, 158, 184,
185, 211, 212

Francklin, 135

Frederick the Great, 6, 146, 147,

150, 159
Frederick, Prince of Wales, 127,

146, 147, 151, 154, 194
Fremd, Dr., 7, 175

French Revolution, the, 42



Gallas, 55, 56, 75

Gaultier, 53. 54, 92

Gay, 173, 175. 177. 179, 186

George I., 12, 22, 78, 102, 104,
no, 116, 121, 123, 132, 133,
134, 159, 180, 187, 209, 210;
George IL, 22, 123, 127, 134,
139, 145. 152. 159, 166, 177
209, 216; George III., 22, 102,
192, 194, 195, 197, 215 ; George
IV, 215

Germans, 21, 37, 38

Gertruydenberg, 35, 37

Gibraltar, 24, 70, 133, 134

Gladstone, Mr., 173

Godolphin, 15, 16, 21, 23, 29, 49,
64, 74, 81, 82, 89, 164, 216

Gcdstow, 3

Golden Square, 93

Gordon, General Alexander, 114



220 HENRY ST. JOHN, VISCOUNT BOLINGBROKE



Grand Alliance, the. Sec p. 217
Grande Chambre, President of the,

155
Grandison, Viscount, the first, 4 ;

the second, 5, 9
Grant Robertson, Mr., 195
Gravelines, 114
Gregg, 31, 32
Grenville, 146
Guardian, the, 175
Guiscard, 49, 50, 74
Gulliver's Travels, 179

H

Hague Conference, the, 35, 37, 53,
Halifax, Lord, 11, 13, 14, 17, 33,

174
Hamilton, Duke of, 58, 65

Hampden, John, 5

Hanmer, Sir T., 72, 85, 104

Hanover, 12, 45, 82, 86, 90, 91, 93,

97, 119, 120
Hanoverian Tories, 84, 85, 119,

129, 138, igo
Harcourt, Sir Simon, 14-16, 32,

36, 40, 44, 49, 95, 119. 121
Hare, Thomas, 102
Harley, 10, 13, 14, 16. 23, 28-33,

39, 40, 44 seq., 50, 78 scq., 94,

97. 98, 100, loi, 103-105, 107,

117, 119, 121, 166, 182, 175, 196,

216
Harrington, 152
Harrop, Mr,, 165, 189
Hartington, 177
Hastings, Battle of, 3
Haversham, Lord, 33
Havre, 113

Hedges, 12, 14, 16, 30
Heinsius, 53, 63
Henriade, the, 179, 185
Henry IV. of France, 154 ; Henry

VH., 10, 165
Herrenhausen, 120
Hill, Abigail. See Masham
Hobbes, 207

Holland, 28, 46, 62, 114, 150
Homer, 215
Honest Jury, or Caleb Triumphant,

the, 134
House of Lords, 13, 15-18, 25-27,

66, 85, 107, 121. 149, 163



Howard, Mrs., 127
Hudibras, 186
Hungary, 67



Iddesleigh, Lord, 173

India, 76

Indies, West, 27, 32, 57, 71

Ireland, 21, 97, 153, 175, 179,

180
Italian Duchies, the, 135, 136
Italy, 9, 26, 61, 62, 64, 135, 136

J

Jack of Newbury, 10, 33
Jacobites, the, 15, 33, 63, 77-

79. 82, 84, 91, 93, 94, 101-104,

106-117, 123, 139-141, 158, 166,

190, 196, 210
James I., 159, 166
James Edward, 21, 77, 78, 80,

82, 84, 92, 106-117, 166, 167,

193
Jenkins' Ear, 146

Joanna, Lady, 2, 5, 6, 7

Jersey, Lord, 9, 16, 21, 22, 53,

82
Johnson, Dr., 129
Joseph, Emperor, 26, 28, 36, 46,

53, 60, 67, 68

K

Kendall, Duchess of, 121, 127

Kensington, 95

Kent, the Lord Chamberlain, 22,

38
Kentish Petition, 13
King, Archbishop, 63
Kitcat Club, the, 51

L

Land Tax Bill, 25
La Ligue, 184

Lansdowne, Lord, 103, 104
La Source, 117
Lead am, Mr., 30, 170
Leake, Sir J., 51
Lechler, 199

Lecky, Mr., 37, 159, 164, 165
Leicester House, 127
Leslie Stephen, W., 179-181
Letter from the Hague, A, 1^5



INDEX



221



Letter from Avignon, Ii6

Letter to Sir William Wyndham. i8,

43, 46, 78, 79. 105, 116, 190
Letter to M. de Poiiilly, 117
Letter to the Examiner, 46
Letters on the English, 186
Letters on the Spirit of Patriotism, 189
Letters on History, 143
Letters on the History of Athens, 131
Lewis, Erasmus, 94
Lincoln College, 8
Locke, 187, 203, 204, 207
Lockhart, 84, 91 ; papers, 89
London Gazette, the, 58
Long Parliament, the, 2
Lorenzo de' Medici, 187
Lorraine, 90. 107, 108, 135, 136
Louis XIV., 2, II, 12, 15, 24,

26, 27, 35, 47, 57, 61, 62, 64. 69,

76, III, 112, 155, 158, 184-186;

Louis XV., 61, 75
Luxborough, Lady, 155
Lydiard Tregoze, 5, 62
Lyons, 106
Lyttelton, 146, 151

M

Madrid, 70

Maintenon, Madame de, 118

Malcontent Whigs, the, 138, 140,

141. 147, 191, 193
Mallet, David, 154, 198, 213
Malplaquet, Battle of, 35
Mansell, 22, 32
Manton, Dr., 6, 7
Mar, Lord, 84, 86, 95, 113, 114
Marchmont, 142, 149-151, 153,

170; Papers, the, 192
Maria Theresa, 150, 153
Marlborough, Duke of, 2, 14, 16,

21, 23, 28, 30-34, 37-39, 45, 47,

48. 55, 79-82, 98, 105. 154, 164.

166, 190, 216 ; Duchess of, 30,

36, 39, 47, 186
Masham, Mrs, (Abigail Hill),

29, 31.58, 87, 90,93
Mediterranean, the, 25, 70
Mesnager, 54, 55
Middle Ages, the, 42
Middleton, 109, x.
Milan, Pacification of, 6r
Milton, 185, 214



Mississippi Scheme, the Great. T17

Monk, 82

Montague, Lady Mary, 173

Montrose, 114

Moore, Arthur, 92

Moral Essays, 198

Morley, Lord, 173, 184, 187

Murray, 151

N

Naples, 62, 136

Napoleon, 76

National Debt, 37, 47

Naturalization Act, 48

Navy, the, 20, 76, 212

Newcastle, Duke of , 4

New Court Ballad, A, 135

Newfoundland, 53, 70

Newton, Sir Isaac, 201

Nimeguen, i, 2

Nonconformists, the, 6, 15, 17,

22, 43, 44, 48, 85, 124
Norfolk House, 146
Norfolk Lanthorn, the, 133
Normanby, Lord, 16
North, Lord, 141, 195-197
Northern Department, 52
Nottingham, Lord, 16, 21, 22, 33,

57, 58. 80, 85, loi, 120
Nova Scotia, 65
Nystadt, Treaty of, 211

O

Occasional Conformity, 16-18, 25,

58. 85, 136

Occasional Writer, the, 136, T43
October Club, 49, 80, 89, 96
Ode to St. Cecilia's Day, 9
Orford, 13, 38

Orleans, Regent, 64, 114, 120, 184
Ormonde, 21, 51, 61, 86, 95, 103,

107, III, 112
Orrery, 74
Oudenarde, 34
Oxford. See Harley
Oxford, University of, 7, 8, 14



Pacification of Milan, 61
Painted Chamber, Conference in,

17
Palatinate, the, 37

Palmerston, 212



222 HENRY ST. JOHN, VISCOUNT BOLINGBROKE



Pardo, Convention of the, 146
Paris, 62-65. 103, 104, 106, no,

112, 121 ; Peace of, 76
Parke, Gilbert, 102
Parnell, 50. 175, 178
Partition Treaty, the first. 11 ;

the second, 26
Patrick, Simon, 6
Patriot King, idea of a, 146, 154,

160, 193-197. 213
Patriotism, the spirit of, 144
Patriots, the Boy, 146, 151. 167
Pelham, Henry, 150, 151
Pelhams, the, 151, 152, 196
Pericles, 132
Peterborough, 28, 48, 79, 103, 177 ;

House, 177
Philip v., 1 1, 12, 26, 35, 36, 53, 70,

75
Philips, John, 175

Pillesary, George, 6

Pitt, the Elder, 22, 70, 76, 128,
146, 151, 154, 169, 195, 197,
212 ; the Younger, 42, 71, 76,

195
Platen, Madame de, 120

Plato, 204

Political Comspondence, Boling-
broke's, 161

Polvvarth, Lord, 118, 146, 150,
192

Pope, 7, 117, 130. 141. 144, T49,
154, 161-169, 170, 173, 175, 177-
184, 186, 198, 214, 216

Polish Succession War, the, 135,
136

Popish Plot, 2

Portland, 13

Portsmouth, 95

Portugal, 24

Pouilly, Letter to M. de, 187

Poulett, 40

Pragmatic Sanction, the, 135

Preston, 113

Pretenders, the. See James Ed-
ward and Charles Edward

Prince of Wales, Frederick, 127

Prior, 9. 42, 50, 54, 65, 87, 104,

105, 173. 175, 176. 17^. 186
Privy Council, the, 22, 98, 191
Public Spirit of the Whigs, the, 87,

174



Pulteney, W., 93, 94, 106. 126,
128-130, 134, 138, 139, 145, 146.
152, 167, 193, 216; D., 128,
129

Pyrenees, the, 75

Q

Quadruple Alliance, the 133, 211

R

Raby, Lord. See Strafford, 53,
56. 67

Ranke, von, 94

Rape of the Lock, the, 179

Reading Abbey, 33

Rebellion of 1715, 112 n6, 123;
of 1745, 152

Reflections on Innate Moral Princi-
ples, 187

Reflections in Exile, 116

Regents, the, 97, loi

Remarks on the History of England,
132

Remarks on the Barrier Treaty, 59,

174
Remusat, Count, 166

Resolution (Whig) of 1707, 27

Review, the, 175

Revolution of 1688, the, 16-17,22,

37, 44, loi, 191, 215
Robinson, Dean, 40 ; Bishop, 51
Rochester, the Earl of, 9, 16, 21,

26, 33, 36, 40, 50, 80, 186, 196
Rooke. Admiral, 25
Ruccellai Gardens, the, 187
Ryswick, Treaty of, 10-12, 22



Sacheverell, 38, 39, 124

St. Cecilia's Day, Ode to, 9

St. Clair, 106

St. Germain's, 114

St. John. Sir Henry, 116; Sir
John, 3 ; Oliver, 3, 4 ; Lord, 4,
156; Walter. 2, 5. 7, 34, 156;
George, 6. 170; Frederick, 6;
Henry (Viscount Bolingbroke),
6 et seq.

St. Pierre, Abbe Charles, 121

Sandys, 147

Satires and Epistles of Horace imi-
tated, 182, 183



INDEX



223



Savoy, 24, 61, 64, 130
Schaub, Sir Luke, 120
Schism Act, 17, 90, 93 ; the Whig,

123
Schutz, 90

Scotland, 18, 26, 109, no, 113,114
Scott, Sir Walter, 47
Scottish Union, the, 26, 30


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19

Online LibraryArthur HassallLife of Viscount Bolingbroke → online text (page 19 of 20)