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Recollections and impressions of James A. McNeill Whistler online

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dehght.

But the visions of beauty were shattered,
Like forms of the mist they were scattered —
As bubbles are blown by a breath —
By the grim, haunting spectre of Death.

The tired body could not respond, and there
where he had worked, on the afternoon of Friday,
July 17, the great painter died.

On the following Wednesday the funeral services
were held in the old church at Chelsea where he
often went with his mother, and he was buried be-
side her in the graveyard at Chiswick.

286



" We have then but to watt — until with the mark of the
gods upon him — there come among us again the chosen —
who shall continue what has gone before. Satisfied that,
even were he never to appear, the story of the beautiful is
already complete — hewn in the marbles of the Parthenon —
and broidered, with the birds, upon the fan of Hokusai — at
the foot of Fusiyama." — Whistler's "Ten o'Clock."



INDEX

Ajaccio, 281

Albany, 33

Allen, Sir William, 35

America, attitude towards, 52-53; desire to visit, 22; trip
to South America, 22-23

American appreciation, 15-17; art, future of, 63-64; char-
acteristics, 64-65

Americanism, Whistler's, 47-48

Ancestors, 25-28

Anecdotes and sayings, as a teacher, 277-281 ; attitude
towards America, 52-53 ; authenticity of stories, 81-82 ;
bailiff in the "White House," 112-113; Balaam's ass,
84-85 ; blue-and-white china, 70 ; Boer war, 45 ;
Carlyle portrait, 123 ; colors and pigments used, 72-73 ;
concerning a sitter, 238-239; concerning birth, 29; con-
cerning Carlyle and Miss Alexander, 121 ; concerning
Chicago, 27; concerning each portrait, 241-242; con-
cerning his portraits, 255; concerning poor lawyers, 148;
concerning purchasers, 265-266 ; concerning sittings re-
quired, 30-31 ; continually polishing, 84-85 ; Dieppe, 34 ;
disintegration of the Royal Society of British Artists,
218; early days in Paris, 86-88; early days in Venice,
92-95; effacing an insult, 43; falling down stairs, 114;
first money earned with brush, 80-81 ; Henry James, 85 ;
his umbrella, 227 ; Hogarth, 55 ; house-painters, 212 ;
late to dinner, 29-30; Leighton, 82-84; in lithography
suit, 103; man whose coat did not fit, 42; "Nana," 151-
153; Napoleon and I, 281; Nature looking up, 214;
necktie of a sitter, 191 ; no artistic period, 73-78 ; old
Delft, 71 ; painting in the dark, 214; " Peacock Room,"
129; of Peter the Great, 35; railway accident, 33-34;
rebuking an admirer, 162 ; rich man's house, 56 ; Ros-
setti, hi; Royal Academy, 116-119; Savoy Hotel, 181;
school, 61 ; selling his pictures, 274-275 ; Stoeckl dinner,
'9 289



INDEX

40-41; story of "The Yellow Buskin," 1 19-120; studio
on ground floor, 229 ; the arrangement in gray, 194 ; the
color of a critic's clothes, 195; the grocer's shop, 193-
194; the millionaire, 276; the model and the red back-
ground, 280; the pupil who smoked, 279; the republic
and Whistler, 281; the Ruskin trial, 144-147; the studio
stove, 231; to the Prince of Wales, 217; trip to Val-
paraiso, 22-23; unwelcome callers at studio, 228; visit
of students to his studio, 134-135 ; " warm personal
enemy," 156; West Point, 36; while in service of Coast
and Geodetic Survey, 37-41

Angelo, Michael, 253

Appearance and characteristics, 36; alertness, 85; a poser,
145^155; approachable, except in studio, 227-^28; as a
story-teller, 224; at home, 222; attitude towards art
and artists, 122; attitude towards nature, 213-216; atti-
tude towards other artists, 56; attitude towards pur-
chasers, 265-272; attitude towards the Royal Academy,
115-119; careless about keeping list of works, 90; cour-
age, 42-43 ; dilatory habits, 37-41 ; dress when a young
man, 41-42; George Moore's theory, 168-172; his Amer-
icanism, 47-78; his dislikes and prejudices, 271-272;
laugh, 119; military spirit, 45-46; no commercial in-
stinct, III; no mystery about his art, 106-108; on the
street, 226; Puritan element, 49-50; refinement, 50;
sense of humor, 82; superstitions, 44; susceptibility to
color intervals, 191-195 ; West Point, 44 ; when twenty,
38-40

Art, abstract use of color, 211 ; and physique, 168-172; early
love for, 35; harmonies in line, 182; his paintings and
poetry, 182; of pure line, 180-181 ; Oriental, 176; purely
sensuous, 180

Artistic period, 73-78

Autograph character of work, 105-106

Balcony," "The, 58

Baptism, 32

Baronet vs. The Butterfly, 266-270

Beauties of form and color, 185-186

Beethoven, 257; relation to, 176

Birth, 28-29, 31-32

290



INDEX

Boston, proposed exhibition of pictures, 20

Bouguereau, 277

Boxall, Sir William, 53-54

Brothers and sisters, s^

Burne-Jones, 176; Ruskin trial, 146

Carlyle, 119; and Froude, 122-123; as a friend, 121-122

Catalogues, 167-168, 265 ; of exhibition in 1892, 160-161 ;
of lithographs, 104. See Exhibitions

Character. See Appearance and characteristics

Chelsea, Carlyle as neighbor and sitter, 121-122; Carlyle's
description, 109-111; death and last illness, 285-286;
early days in, 109 ; his last home, 281—286 ; the bailiff,
112-113; "White House," 112-113; "White House"
occupied by a critic, 114

Chicago, grandfather founded, 26—27

Chinese and Japanese art, 181 ; autograph character of
Japanese art, 105-106 ; blue china, 61 ; degradation of
Japanese art, 78 ; influence of, 55

Chiswick, buried at, 286

Coast and Geodetic Survey, 39-40

Color, " ability to feel," 208 ; abstract composition, 197 ; and
the musical scale, 195-196; art of pure color, 180-181 ;
beauties of, 185-186; decoration, 128-135; first color
harmonies, 58; his own explanation of, 178-180; illus-
trated in different pictures, 211 ; in Italy and Greece, 198;
of sculptor, 206 ; range of color-notes, 189-191 ; Rus-
kin's attitude towards, 158-160, 199-208; Ruskin trial,
145-146; sense of, lost, 183-184; supreme as a colorist,
173; the house-painter and decorator, 186; used imita-
tively, 204, 207, 209; Whistler's susceptibility to, 191-

195
Colorist. See Color
Commercial side, lacking, 265-276
Conversation, a lost art, 149-151
Courage, 33, 36, 42-43
Criticism, language of, 161
Criticisms in America, 15-16
Critics, arraignment of, in catalogue, 98-102, 160-161, 167'

168
Critics and criticisms, attitude towards, 162-165 ; early criti-

291



INDEX

cism of Turner, 142-143; George Moore, 168-172; his
attitude towards, 155-157; his color harmonies not un-
derstood, 184; is the painter the final judge? 162-165;
order of appreciation, 173-175 ; Ruskin's attitude towards
color, 158-160; "Voice of a People," 165-167

Dealers, attitude towards, 276

Death and last illness, 285-286

Decoration, 127-133 ; as a decorator, 131-135 ; in home in
Paris, 220-222; "Peacock Room," 128-131, 209

Dieppe, 33-34

Dress, 41-42

Eden, Sir William, 267-270

England's indifference, 47-49

Englishman's stupidity, 16

Etchings, appreciation of a collector, 96-97 ; of Haden, 96 ;
catalogues of, 91 ; early French criticism, 60 ; " French
Set," 90 ; Haden collection of, 96 ; his first, 88-89 ! his
" Venice Set," 91 ; " Thames Set," 91 ; " Twenty-six
Etchings," 91

Exhibitions, 1868, 177; 1893, 65; at Antwerp, 263; at Chi-
cago, 263; at London, 265; at Paris, 1894, 24, 264; at
the Royal Academy, 114-119; criticisms of, 98-101; his
catalogues, 99-101 ; light and background required for
his pictures, 134-139 ; of etchings, 1883, 97 ; of litho-
graphs, 104 ; reluctant about exhibiting, 262-264 ; Soci-
ety of American Artists in 1903, 284-285 ; Society of
British Artists, 136; special, 120-121 ; with artificial
light, 135 ; " Yellow and White," 98, 132

Family, 25-28 ; brothers and sisters, 32 ; father, 27-28, 35 ;
mother, 28; mother's diary, 34-35

Fine Arts Society, 121

Foreword, 7

Form, appreciation of, 203

Fort Dearborn, grandfather built, 26-27

French art, influence of, 57-60; criticism, early, 59-60

Frith, 177 ; Ruskin trial, 146

Fur Jacket," " The, 65

Gainesborough, 249, 250

Gentle Art of Making Enemies," "The, 32, 154-155

Glasgow and the Carlyle portrait, 124 ; school, 55

292



INDEX

I

Gleyre, 57, 59, 79

Gold Screen," " The, 58

Greece, art of, 63

Grosvenor Gallery, 119

Haden, 32, 88-89, 9^

Hague, The, illness at, 281-284; letter from, 282-284

Hanging of pictures, 124-128 '

Harmonies, symphonies, and nocturnes, his explanation of,
178-180

" Hermes," by Praxiteles, 261

Hogarth, 55, 249, 250

Honors and awards, 264 i

Impressionism, 72

Ingres, copy of painting by, 80-81

Interior decorator, 127-128

International Society, 121

Irish ancestors, 25, 47 ,

Italian painters, influence of, 71-72 J

Japanese art and influence of, 55. See Chinese and Japanese

art • j

Khayyam, Omar, 243 1

Lange Leizen," " The, 58

Leyland, F. R., 128-131 i

Light and background for pictures, 134-139 ; as distinguished
from color, 160

Lithographs, naming of, 183

Lithography, 102-104, 180. See Exhibitions, Catalogues

Lowell, 31-32

Manet, 249-250

Marines, 24, 274-275

Marriage, 219

Method. See Work

Miss Alexander, 50, 119

"Mona Lisa," 251

Moore, " Modern Painting," 168-172

Mother, diary of, 34-35 ; portrait of, 53-54, 58, II5

Music, 176-177; and color, 193; and painting, 179; and the
color scale, 195-196 ; range of sounds, 186-188 ; the un-
educated ear, 196; "truths of sound," 203-204

National influence, 61-78

293



INDEX

Nature and art, 213-216; and color, 216; and music, 215

Naval Academy, 27

Nocturnes, 119. See Pictures

Nude, attitude towards, 50-51

Painting and music, 179; flat tones, 212; his manner and

mode of, 231-237
Paris as an art centre, 62-63 ; early days in, 86-88 ; home

life in, 222-224; in 1855, 79; Rue du Bac, 219; studio,

131, 132

Pastels, 106-107

"Peacock Room," 128-131, 209; trouble over payment, 129-
130

Phidias, 253

Philadelphia, 120

Physical appearances. See Appearance and characteristics

Picture galleries, 124-128

Pictures, arrangement of, by periods, 211; "At the Piano,"
114, 210; Carlyle portrait, 123-124; estimation of, 261;
exhibition of, to visitors, 133-135 ; " Falling Rocket,"
140 ; hanging of, a lost art, 124-128 ; hanging of portrait
of his mother, 115; " Lange Leizen," 210; marines, 212;
naming of, 178, 183, 185; "Nocturnes," "Harmonies,"
and " Symphonies," 210, 211 ; present prices of, 114-115;
"The Princess of the Land of Porcelain," 58, 128, 210;
"Little Rose, Lyme Regis," 273; story of "The Yellow-
Buskin," 1 19-120; Symphonies in White, IL and IIL,
210; "Thames in Ice," 210; "The Balcony," 210;
"The Gold Screen," 210; the Japanese group, 210, 211;
"The Music Room," 210; "White Girl," 59-60, 109,
210, 282 ; " The Yellow Buskin," 65. See Portraits

Pom fret, 36

Portraits, classification of, 248; color compositions, 258;
difference between Whistler and Velasquez, 256-258;
each one to be a masterpiece, 241-242 ; his best, 261-
262; Irving as Philip II., 119; Lady Campbell, 119;
likeness, 258-262; manner and mode of painting, 231-
237; Miss Gilchrist, 119; of Lady E , 269; portrait-
painting, 244; sittings required, 30-31, 235; wraith-like
quality, 255

Praxiteles, 261

294



INDEX

" Propositions" and " The Ten o'Clock," io8

Providence, 32

Puritan element, 49-50

Racial influence, 61-78

Raphael, 253

Rembrandt, 67, 175, 244, 253, 254, 255, 256; essentially

Dutch, 67
Reynolds, Sir Joshua, 247, 249, 252
Rosa Corder, 119
Rossetti, III

Rossi, Carmen, school of, 277-281
Royal Academy, attitude towards, 114-119; exhibitions at,

etc., 114-119
Royal Society of British Artists, 217
Rue du Bac, 219
Ruskin and flat tones, 212; attitude towards color, 158-160,

199-208 ; attitude towards early criticism of Turner, 143 ;

color in his home, 207-208 ; his limitations, 165 ; suit,

140-149
Savoy Hotel, 181

Sayings. See Anecdotes and sayings
School, no American, 61-63 > of Carmen Rossi, 277-281
Sculptor and portrait busts, 245-246
Society of British Artists, exhibition of, 136
Sounds, range of musical, 186-188
Springfield, 33
St. Petersburg, 27-28, 34-35
Stonington, 32, 35

Stories. See Anecdotes and sayings
Studio, description of, 230-231; in Paris, 229
Swinburne, 74, 177
Taylor, Tom, 146
Teacher, as a, 277-281
'' Ten o'clock," no artistic period, 73-78
Time, dilatory habits, 37-41 ; indifference to, 29-31 ; never

prompt, 30
Travel, dislike for, 33-34; effect of, on artists, 69-70
Turner and color, 199 ; early criticism of, 142-143 ; Whist-
ler's appreciation of, 56
Valparaiso, trip to, 22-23

295



INDEX

Velasquez, 60, 175, 244, 251, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257; essen-
tially Spanish, 68; influence of, 71 '
Venice, early days in, 92-95 \
" Voice of a People," 165-167 ,
Water-color, his first, 106 I
Webster, Daniel, letter to, 35-36 !
West Point, 35-36 ,
Westerly, 32 ;
" White Girl," 53, 283

"White House." See Chelsea '

Will, 240 ;

Witticisms. See Anecdotes and sayings ;

Work always a pleasure, 90-91 ; as a decorator, 128-135 ;
colors and pigments used, 72-7^ ; description of method,
231-237; exhibition to visitors, 133-135; facility in exe-
cution, 23 ; his attitude towards a sitter, 238-239, 241 ;
painting in the dark, 213-214; volume of, 104-105
Yellow Buskin," "The, 119, 256 I



THE END



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Online LibraryArthur Jerome EddyRecollections and impressions of James A. McNeill Whistler → online text (page 18 of 18)