Arthur Penrhyn Stanley.

The life and correspondence of Thomas Arnold, D. D.; late head-master of Rugby school and regius professor of modern history in the University of Oxford online

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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

RIVERSIDE






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WORKS OF
ARTHUR PENRHYN STANLEY, D. D.

DEAN OF WESTMINSTER.



LECTURES ON THE HISTORY OF THE JEWISH CHURCH

Part I. — Abraham to Samuel. With Maps and Plans, i vol., Svo. Library

Edition. Cloth, ;^4.oo.

Cheaper Edition, i vol., crown Svo, cloth, $2.50.
The S.\me. Part II. — From Samuel to the Captivity, i vol., Svo. Librarj-

Edition. Cloth, $4.00.

Cheaper Edition, i vol., crown Svo, cloth, $2.50.
The Same. Part III. — From the Captivity to the Birth of Christ, i vol., Svo.

Library' Edition. Cloth, $4 00.

Cheaper Edition, i vol., crown Svo, cloth, S2.50.
LECTURES ON THE HISTORY OF THE EASTERN CHURCH.

With an Introduction on the Study of Ecclesiastical History. New and

cheaper Edition, i vol., crown Svo, cloth, $2.50.
SINAI AND PALESTINE. New and cheaper Edition. 1 vol., crown Svo,

cloth, $2.50.
LECTURES ON THE HISTORY OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND.

Delivered in Edinburgh, 1872. i vol., izmo, cloth, $1.50.

*#* Seis of tlie above Six Volu7nes (Jn a box). Price $14.00.

THE LIFE AND CORRESPONDENCE OF THOMAS ARNOLD, D. D.
Late Head Master of Rugby School. New Edition, two volumes iii one.
Uniform in size with cheaper edition of Stanley's Jewish Church, i -,ol.,
crown Svo, cloth, $2.50.

Sent post-paid on receipt of price by tlie PublisJiers,

CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS.

743-745 Broadway, New York.




THE



LIFE AND COERESPONDENCE



THOMAS ARNOLD, D.D.,

LATE HEAD-MASTER OF RUGBY SCHOOL, AND REGIUS PROFESSOR
OF MODERN HISTORY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.



ARTHUR PEMHYN STANLEY, D. D.,

DEAN OF WESTMINSTER.
TWO VOLUMES IN ONE.



Ca l vinW. i ieyr.o l d:



NEW YORK:
CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS,

SUCCESSORS TO

SCRIBNER, ARMSTRONG & CO.



rREFACE.



The sources from which this work has heen drawn
have necessarily been exceedingly various. It was in
fact originally intended that the several parts should
have been supplied by different writers, as in the in-
stance of the valuable contribution which, in addition
to his kind assistance throughout, has been furnished
to the earlier part by Mr. Justice Coleridge ; and
although, in its present shape, the responsibility of
arranging and executing it has fallen upon one per-
son, yet it should still be clearly understood how
largely I have availed myself of the aid of others, in
order to supply the defects of my own personal knowl-
edge of Dr. Arnold's life and character, which was
confined to the intercourse I enjoyed with him, first
as his pupil at Rugby, from 1829 to 1834, and thence-
forward, on more familiar terms, to the end of his
hfe.

To his family, I feel that the fewest words will best
express my sense, botlv of the confidence which they
reposed in me by intrusting to my care so precious a
charge, and of the manifold kindness with which they
have assisted me, as none others could. To the many



1\- riJKFACK.

attached frleiuls of liis enrlicr years, the occurrence of
whose names in the following j)ages makes it unneces-
sary to mention them more ])arlicnlarly here, I would
also take this oj)portunity of expressing my deep obli-
gations, not only for the readiness with which they
have given me access to all letters and information
that I could require, but still more for the active
interest which they have taken in lightening my re>
sponsibility and labor, and for the careful and most
valuable criticism to which some of them have allowed
me to subject the whole or the greater part of this
work. Lastly, his pupils will perceive the unsparing
use I have made of their numerous contributions. I
had at one time thought of indicating the various
distinct authorities from which the chapter on his
" School Life at Rugby " has been compiled, but I
found that this would be impracticable. The names
of some of those who have most aided me will be
found in the Correspondence. To those many others,
who are not there mentioned — and may I here be
allowed more especially to name my younger school-
fellows, with whom I have become acqiiainted chiefly
through the means of this work, and whose recollec-
tions, as being the most recent and the most lively,
have been amongst the most valuable that I have re-
ceived — I woidd here express my warmest thanks for
the UKjre than assistance which they have rendered
me. Great as has been the anxiety and difficulty of
tliis iindertaking, it has been relieved by nothing so
much as the assurance which 1 have received through
their co-operation, that I was not mistaken in the esti-
mate I had formed of our common friend and master,
and that the influence of his teaching and example



PR1':I'-ACE. V

continues and will contimio to produce the fniits
which he would most have desired to sec.

The Correspondence has been selected from the
mass of letters preserved, in many cases, in almost
unbroken series from first to last. One large class —
those to the parents of his pupils — I have been un-
able to procure, and possibly they could not have
been made available for the present work. Another
numerous body of letters — those which were ad-
dressed to scientific or literary men on questions
connected with his edition of Thucydides or his His-
tory — I have omitted, partly as thinking them too
minute to occupy space wanted for subjects of more
general importance ; partly because their substance or
their results have for the most part been incorporated
into his published works. To those which appear in
the present collection, something of a fragmentary
character has been imparted by the necessary omis-
sion, wherever it was possible, of repetitions, such as
must necessarily occur in letters written to different
persons at the same time, — of allusions which would
have been painful to living individuals, — of domestic
details, which, however characteristic, could not have
been published without a greater infringement on
privacy than is yet possible, — of passages which, with-
out further explanation than could be given, would
certainly have been misunderstood. Still, enough
remains to give in his own words, and in his own
manner, what he thought and felt on the subjects
of most interest to liim. And though the moch; of
expression must 1)e judged by the relation in wliich lie
stood to tlioiis in tlie Sixth Form. 4. General Effect of
his Intellectual Teacliing. — III. The Scliool Chai)el. — Services.
— Communion. — Confirmation. — Sermons. — IV. Personal In-
tciTourse with the Boarders in his own House, and witli his Schol-
ars generally. — V. General ]\esults of his Head-mastership at
Rugby. — Letter from Dr. Moberly UG



CHAPTER IV.

n ENTERAL LIFE AT KUGBY,

Intellectual Advance on coming to Rugby. — His Views and
Writinjis. — 1. Practical Element. — Interest in Public and Na-
tional Life. — Vehement Language on Political and Ecclesiastical
Subjects. — Conservatism. — Jacol)inism. — Popular Principles. —
Liberal Principles. — II. Speculative Element. — Design of Three
Great Works. 1. History of Rome. 2. Commentary on the
Scriptures. 3. " Christian Politics," or " Church and State." —
Private Life at Rugby. — Domestic Circle. — Ffiendsiiips. — In-
tercourse with the Poor. — Life at Pox How . . . .174



CHAPTER V.

LIFE AND CORRESPONDENCE, AUGUST, 1828, TO AUGUST, 1830.

Hopeful View. — First Volume of his Edition of Tbucydides. —
Essay on the Social Progress of States. — Pamijldet on " Tlie
Christian Duty of conceding the Roman Catholic Claims " . . 219



1. To J. T. Colerid^rc, Esq. Entrance on his Work at Rugby . 221

2. To Kev. F. C Blaciistone. First Imjjressions of Rugliy . 222
5. To tlie same. Diflerences of Ojiinion ..... 2-J3
i. To Mrs. Evelyn. On tlie Death of her Husband . . ,224

5. To Rev. J. Lowe. Pam])iilet, Clergy and Statisiiien . . 225

6. To Itev. J. C. Hare. " Defence of Niebulir." — Pamphlet " On

Roman Catiiolic Claims." — Estimate of tlie Past. — Spirit

of Chivalry 22"

7. To Rev. Dr. Hawkins. Pamphlet " On Roman Catiiolic

r;iaims." — Toryism. — Ignoraiict; of the Clergy . . . 22S

8. To the Parent of a Pupil iiolding Unitarian Opinions . . 230



Xll CONTENTS.



9. To Rev. G. Cornish. Domestic Happiness. — Pamplilet. —

Si'liism . . . . . . . . . .231

10. To Rev. F. C. Blaekstone. Idolatry — How far api)lieal)lo to

tlie Clmrcli of Koine 2.34

11. To Kev. J. Tucker. Tiiouiilits of ]Mni



Online LibraryArthur Penrhyn StanleyThe life and correspondence of Thomas Arnold, D. D.; late head-master of Rugby school and regius professor of modern history in the University of Oxford → online text (page 1 of 74)