Arthur Young.

The farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 3) online

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fow from 14 pecks to four bufhels per acre ;
mean produce 25 bufhels.

They fow fcarce any oats.

They fow three or four bufhels an acre
of peafe, and get 20 in return : they
plough but once for either peafe or beans ;
they Jet many of the latter, at the expence
of 1 s, a bufhel, and uie four or five per
acre ; and what is as great a mark Of vil-
lainous hufbandry as can any where be
met with, they are at this charge to fet
them promifcuoujly ; and as to weeding or
hoeing, they ufe neither, only turn in
their fheep to have a meal on the weeds :
the crop 20 bufhels*

Their clover they mow once for hayj
and get one or one and a half ton an acre,
and then feed it : they reckon the whole
fummer of a good crop, however applied,
to be worth from 40 s. to 3/. : they never
lave the firft growth for feed, thinking it
would be too rank to yield much.

They low winter tares in OBcber^ eat
them in fpring, and then five them for

feed ;



THROUGH ENGLAND. 4 i 5

feed; the whole crop worth 30 s. an acre;
inftead of which a good crop in foiling
horfes would pay 4/. or 5/.

Turnips are often fown after peafe the be-
ginning of July on one earth, and after wheat
the latter end of Augufi. In general of late
years, thefe crops have been had not worth
1 o s. an acre, often not 1 s. but on fandy land,
and well dunged, fome crops have turned
out worth 20 j. an acre.

On what they call improperly a fummer
fallow, which is on ground ploughed in
the fpring, and ftirred fometimes once, and
commonly twice afterwards, and dreffed
with dung, or lime and earth, they
fow turnip feed broad-caft, and have on an
average a crop worth 20 s. per acre, feldom
more ; for they never hoe or weed, except
the ketlock is very plenty in it.

In refped: of manuring, they mix the
head lands, or, as they call them, the
Forelands, of the field with dung; fome
with dung and lime, and fpread them
on the lands. If dung only, about 12
cart loads to an acre. If dung and lime,
7 loads of the former, and 10 hogfheads,
or about a chaldron of the latter. Some

drefs



4*6 THE FARMER'S TOUR

drefs with foap afhes, earth, and dung$
moftly on pafture or meadow, and fome-
times on arable; 10 or 12 hogfheads of
the afhes per acre, and 6 loads of dung.
Thefe manurings on the arable laft three
crops, and on grafs land 5 or 6 years.

Good grafs land lets from 20 s. to 40 s;
an acre ; and much near Taunton at higher
rates. As Somerfetfoire is one of the
counties, in which corn is generally dearer
than in moft others of the kingdom, I en-
quired particularly, whether it was com*
mon to plough up good grafs land to turn
it into arable, on account of high prices
of corn; I was anfwered, that no fuch
thing was known or heard of; but on the
contrary, much arable land was in fome
places laid down to grafs.

An acre of good grafs they reckon will
fatten a beaft of 36 fcore ; but feeding a
cow requires 1 \. Their breed of cattle the
long horned : a good one will give 6 lb. of
butter a week, from 6 gallons of milk a
day. The annual product 7/, If let, the
price is 5/. or 5/. 5 J. A dairy maid can
can take care of 10 cows. The winter
food is hay and flaw ; to 12 cows 12 acres

of



THROUGH ENGLAND. 417

of ftraw are neeeflary, and 20 tons of hay*
They winter keep them in the fields.

There are many beafts fattened ; heifers
and home-bred oxen, which they buy in at
Candlemas ', put them directly to hay, and
then to grafs ; buy at from 3 /. to 5 /. fell
at harveft at 8 /. They reckon each beaft
fhould pay 2 J", a week at grafs.

Swine fatten from 18 to 25 fcore.

In general, the Hocks of fheep are fmall,
from 20 to 100. Very few farmers fold
them; the breed chiefly Dorfcts: the profit
on keeping all forts on an average js. to
10 j. a head. In wintering ewes it runs to
1 2 s. or 13/. Some keep the Devonftire
breed without horns, which are reckoned
to eat more, but not make a propor-
tionable return. The winter food, befides
grafs, is turnips and hay.

In their tillage they reckon {ix. oxen and
two horfes necefTary to 50 acres : fome
will do with four oxen and two horfes.
They ufe four oxen and one horfe in a
plough ; but in the firft earth fix oxen.
The yearly expence of a horfe 7/. or 8 A
They do not break up their ftubbles for
a fallow till after fpring. In- clay they

Vol, III. E e ftif



418 THE FARMER'S TOUR

flir three or four inches deep; in light
land five. Firft ploughing clay 5 s. in light
land 4.J. ; afterwards and harrowing 4.J. in
cither.

Refpecting the comparifon betwen horfes
and oxen, it turns here upon the improve-
ment in the value of the ox, and the de- '
cline in that of the horfe : the latter is kept i
as cheap as the former ; for they give no t
oats : but they reckon that every ox im-
proves 50 s. a year in his growth, all the
while they work him : fo that this is fuf-
ficiently decilive.

They know nothing of cutting flraw
into chaff; but very wifely throw away
all their corn yields.

In hiring and flocking farms, they
reckon that three rents will flock.

Land fells at 24 years purchafe. Poor
rates 10*/. in the pound, and all paid by
landlords ; 20 years ago 5 d. and 80 years
ago nothing. The cuflom of landlords
being at this expence, is attended with very
mifchievous confequences ; for tenants dif-
penfing it, they give very little attention
to the amount, or to the propriety of the
expenditure. At Taunton 3/. 6d. The

employment






THROUGH ENGLAND. 419

employment of the women, &x. fpinning,
and ftrange to tell, no drinking of tea !

Leafes from 7 to 2 1 years. The farmers
carry their Corn from three to eight miles J
land-tax 1 j-. 8 d. at Tauntoji 2 s.

There are many orchards throughout
this country. In planting a new one, it
is 10 or 12 years on a clay foil before it
becomes profitable, but fooner on fand .
and on clay will laft good an hundred years.
They never bear every year, only every
fecorid, and then yield on an average io
hogfheads per acre, and the price from
20 s. to 2 5 j. a hogfhead. Some people
have fold from 3 /. 3 s. to 5 /. 5 j-. a hogf-
head. The total of expence is 5 s. a
hogfhead. The forts in moft efteem are,

The white fowers*

Cackagee.

Royal wildings,

Red ftreak.

Golden pippin.

Twenty-four bufhels of apples make a
hogfhead of cyder.

LABOUR.

One fhUling a day all the year, with 3, 4,
or 5 pints of beer or cyder.

E e 2 The



4 2o THE FARMER'S TOUR

The fame at hay-time and harveft, meat
and too much drink.

Reaping wheat, 4-f. 6d. per acre and bind-
ing, or 6d. more and let up, without
drink.

Beans pulled by the ftitch, or 10 fheaves,
at i j". 6 d. per fcore flitches, without drink.

Mowing barley, is. ^d. or is. 6d. without
liquor.

Oats, is. without liquor.

Grafs, i J". 6 d. without liquor.

Hedging and ditching, fmgle fences, from
2d. to Sd.. a perch of 20 feet; double
fences from /\.d. to is. ditto.

Thrafhing wheat, 2 s. a quarter.

■ Earley, from 1 /. to is. 2d. or 31.

per fcore bufhels.

Oats, 2 s. ditto.

Beans, Sd. a quarter.

IMPLEMENTS, &c.

A waggon, 14/. to 18/.

A cart, 8 /. to 9 /.

A plough, 25/.

A harrow . 2 ,0 s'J ; d ra gs , 3 5 j*.

An oaken roller, from 20 s. to 40 s.

1 A fey the,



THROUGH ENGLAND. 42c

A fcythe, from is. 6d. to 5/.

A fpade, 3/. or home-made, 4^. 8d.

Shoeing, is. Sd.

A fhovel, 3 J - . 6d.

Hook, is. 6d.

Hatchet, is. 6d.

Reap hook, 2 s. 6d.

Mattock, is. 6d.

Weeding iron, j\d.

Beetle and wedges, ioj".

Gloves, wear a year, is. (yd.

Pit-axe, 2j. Sd.

Rooting mattock, ij-. 6d.

PROVISIONS.



Wheat bread,


4 | lb. for 6 d.


Cheefe,


-


id.\ to 4-d. per lb.


Butter,


-


6


Beef,


-


3


Mutton,


-


3


Veal,


-


«"*


Pork,


-


2 I, 3d.


Potatoes,


-


6 d. a. peck.


Candles,




7 /<fr /£.


Soap,


n


7
E e 3 Labourer's



422 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Labourer's houfe-rent, i /. ios.
— — — firing, 2 qs.
• ! — tools, IOJ.

BUILDING,

Bricks, 1 8 s. per thoufand.

Plain tiles, 24.1-.

Pantiles, 45 j 1 . and 50 s.

Oak timber, from 2 /. to 3 /. per ton.

Elm, from 20/. to 25 s.

Mafon, per day, 20 d. and beer.

Carpenter, per day, i8</. and beer,

Thatcher, 8 s. per 100 laying reeds.

T/je particulars of a farm.

138 Acres 2 Horfes

42 Arable 6 Oxen

96 Grafs 6 Cows

138/. Rent 18 Young

12 Wheat 12 Fat

10 Barley 8 Swine

10 Clover 80 Sheep

5 Beans 1 Man

j Peafe 1 Boy

4 Fallow 1 Maid

3 Orchard 1 Labourer,



THROUGH ENGLAND. 423

Mr. Anderdon of Henlade has formed a
variety of experiments, and kept very
accurate minutes of them : he was fo
obliging as to favour me with the following
particulars.

LUCERNE,

Experiment, No. 1.

After various fmall experiments, the
fuccefs of which was favourable, Mr. An-
derdon tried the following.

Culture, expences, and produce of twq acres %

1767.
Culture,
The foil a rich, reddifh, brown, fandy
loam ; a good brick earth ; fallowed in
1766; receiving {even ploughings, which
brought it very fine and clean from weeds ;
but this was only apparent, for the refult
fhewed that a drilled crop or two of turnips
would have cleaned it better. May 2d,
1767, drilled it; with Willey^s plough,
drawn by 2 men inftead of horfes, on ac-
count of the finenefs of the foil ; the rows
equally diftant, 2 feet 6 inches : 4/^. 5 oz 4
of feed. The plants came up fufficicntly
E e 4 thick ;



424 THE FARMER'S TOUR

thick ; but many were rooted up in weed-
ing, and the vacancies fupplied by trans-
planting. In June hand-weeded. July
28th, and Augufi ift, horfe-hoed with a
fhim : repeated it the fame month : and in
September hand-hoed and weeded again.
November 11, a bout with a fmall fwing
plough in the intervals, turning a furrow
from the plants, and throwing up a ridge
in the center of the intervals ; except a few
rows to fee the difference, which, the next
fpring, was very great ; where it was not
done fo, many weeds.

It was cut twice ; the firft produced
12C. ivt. of green lucerne. The fecond,
4 \ C. wt. : given to horfes, &c. ; and the
value calculated at is. a C. wt,

Expences.

1766, 1767. Four ploughings,

at 4/. - £. 1 12 o

Three ditto, at 3 s. - 018 o
Seed, at 8d. - o 2 101

Carriage, - - o o 41

Picking and burning

couch, - 1 10 o

Comport, headland mix-
ed with lime, and

Carry over, - 4 3 3



THROUGH ENGLAND. 425

Brought over, - £-433

carriage, and ibap-

afhes, and wood ditto, 211 o
Weeding and horfe-hoe-

ing, - 2 17 Z\

Cutting and carrying, at

2d.2iC.wt. - o 2 8 1
Two years rent, - 400
Tythe, - - 060

14 ° 3

ProduB.
16 C. wt. 1, at is. 1- o 16 3

Lofs, - - 13 4 o

Or ^ter acre, - - 6120

Experiment^ No. 2.
1768.

The vacancies of the rows were filled up
with lucerne plants, and here and there a
few of burnet. It was kept clean by three
horfe-hoeings and feveral hand-hoeings.
Cut thrice. The firft was 3 ton 2 C. wt. 2
quarters ; from the 20th May, to 23d of
jfune. The fecond from 6th July to 8 th
of Atiguji ; 3 tons igC.wt. 27$. The
third finiihed about a week before Michael-
mas 1



426 THE FARMERS TOUR

mas; 3 tons iC.ivt. 2 quarters: chiefly
given to horfes, and working oxen ; they
did very well upon it, and were worked
hard. The aftergrafs eaten by fheep till
the end of November. June 6th, in the
night, two cart horfes eat 1 C. wt. Four
plough oxen having 4 C. wt, given, they
eat 3 C. wt, 1 quarter, befides what na-
tural grafs they eat in the field — but they
left the largeft ftalks of the lucerne>
which is never the cafe with horfes.

Expences.

February 27, &c. Two men
hand-hoed the rows in 2 i days
with D-utch hoes, - £. o 510

March 1. Filling vacancies, in 1
Three horfe-hoeings ; a man, boy,

and horfe, one day each, 090

Weeding twice, - - 2 4 10 £
Cutting and carrying, at 2d. C.wt. 1 14 o
Rent and tythe, - 2 3



o



8 7 11

Produd?.

Tons.. C. irt. £>uar. lb.

Firft, 32 20
Second, 3 19 o 27
Third, 3 2 20

10 4 o 27at20j. 10 4 3

Carry over, - 1 o 4 3



THROUGH ENGLAND. 427



Brought over,
Aftergrafs,


- £■


10
O


4
10


3




Expences,
Profit,


«■


IO

8

2


7
6


3

9*

5*


Or per acre, -


1



j


2 i

X 4-



Experiment, No. 3.
1769.

Mr. Anderdonh memorandum.

" Thjs fpring the lucerne was very fer-
viceable ; for the feafon being backward, I
fhould have been obliged to have kept my
plough horfes and oxen on hay till June,
and to have fpring eaten my meadows,
with other ftock, much later than I did, or
have fold them to great difadvantage."

The latter end of this year fome more vacan-
cies were fupplied with frefh plants. Twice
horfe-hoed — once harrowed ; and the rows
hand-hoed thrice. It was cut three times.
The firrt. from the 17th of May, to the ift
'July, 6 ton 1 C.ivt. 3 quarters, 14 lb.
The fecond from the 13th July to 12th
Aug ll ft\ 4 ton 19 C.wt. 2 4. lb. Third,
3 from



4^8 THE FARMERS TOUR

from 1 6th Augufi to 23d September ; 2 ton
17 C. iv f. 3 quarters, 2 5 lb. The after-
grafs kept 73 ewes and rams 6 days ; and
36 hog fheep 4 days.

Expences.

Two horfe-hoeings, - £.0 6 o
Harrowing, - - 028

Hand-hoeing, - - o 11 9I

Filling vacancies, - -060

Cutting and carrying, at 2 d. 2 6 6
Rent, &c. - -230



5 J 5 nf
Produce.

7c«/. C. tot. guar. lb.

Firft, 6 1 3 14
Second, 4 19 o 24
Third, 2 17 3 2 5

13 19 o yat 20/. 13 19 o
Aftergrafs, - - o 15 o



14 14 o
Expences, - 5 15 11

Profit, - - 8180



Or /^r acre, - - 4 9



THROUGH ENGLAND. 429

Experiment, No. 4.

1770.

December 22d, 1769, cropt feveral moots
of lucerne 4 inches long ; {hot forth fince
the autumnal eating. The 29th and 30th
ditto, 6 and 7 inches long ; and meafured
one left, 10 inches.

Horfe-hoed four times, and hand-hoed
four times. The compoft, mentioned be-
fore, carried on to the land and fpread ; it
was made the firft year, but not ufed then.
Lady-day and April t>e plants appeared
much damaged by the frofis and cutting
winds ; which is attributed to its being fo
forward and full of fap.

The firft cutting, May 2 2d, to July 21ft,
per acre, 4 ton 1 C. <wt. z quarters 1 8 lb.
The fecond from July 21ft, tu 25th of Au-
gu/i; 2 ton 16 C. list. 1 quarter zolb.
N. B. This would have been more confidcr-
ablc, had there not been a delay in the firft,
which was injurious both to that and this ;
the leaves dropping off, at laft, on the firft
cutting. The third from the 25th Augujl y
when the plants were 20 inches high, to
1 oth of Odiober ; 2 ton 2 quarters 24 lb.



430 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Expences.
Driving and fpreading the com-

poft, - - - £.0 12 o

Four horfe-hoeings, - 0120

Four hand ditto, * * o 16 8

Cutting and carrying, - 2197

Rent, &c. - - 230



Produce.

Tons. C. ivt. Quart. Ih.

THirti. per

acre, 4 I 218

Second, 2 16 1 20

Third, 2 o 2 24



8 18 3 6

2



7 3 3



17 17 2 12
Aftergrafs,



Expences,

Profit,

Or per acre.



17 17 6

050

18 2 6

7 3 3

10 19 3
5 9 7*



THROUGH ENGLAND. 431



>a O cj O t^ O

• O co O O
^. o H ^. ^

o

7 o





H


O


1-4


HI


O




M


*


O



o

Hi






o

1-1 o



O MNh



■S -< t^^- el co
to

a



-3



G?0



O M PO



Cj 00 rt oco I

fc>H O ^^O CO J
O



f^CO O O

vO O O t^»

t-^ t^ i>» r^





*


«o


CO


CO








M


r^


co


HH





<rl



CO


•0


rt





CO


fc*


HH


LO



3



T






40




v^5


«3




H


*-t


01







>•


*


H


<


-J



432 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Obfervations.

No common hufbandry in this country
will near equal this very confiderable profit.
The lofs of the firft year is, with lucerne,
ever to be expected ; the preparations
mould be perfect, and confequently expen-
five ; and the produce is never any thing
of moment ; but in fucceeding ones the
cafe changes greatly ; the profit rifes from
i/. 3 s. id. to 5/. 9 j. clear, per acre; and
from the appearance of this plantation, I
have little doubt of its lafting thefe 20 years.
Mr. Anderdon has done it juftice in keeping
it clean, and the profit of the crops has
repaid him amply. What hufbandry more
defirable than a crop which will yield a
clear profit of 550/. a year from 100 acres
of land ! And this not by a product of diffi-
cult or confined fale, but that may be mul-
tiplied to any extent without a diminution
of price.

The fuccefs of this trial mews that rows
equally diftanr, 2 feet 6 inches alundcr,
are very proper for drilling lucerne. The
application of the crops prove that not
only cart horfes, but alfo ploughing oxen
hard worked, may be fubfifled to great

advan-



THROUGH ENGLAND. 433

advantage on lucerne alone: and alio that
in late fprings, this plant is of uncommon
ufe in preventing the meadows being eaten,
and in laving hay.

This circumftance is one of the grand
objects of modern hufbandry : a fpring
moot, every one muft be fenfible, is more
likely to anfwer the purpofe than any
vegetable that arrives at perfection in au-
tumn ; becaufe it muft be in a decline in
March and April) however ufeful it may
then prove.

SAINFOINE.

Experiment^ No. 5.

The firft trial of this grafs was made ill
a field of 4 f acres ; a ftoney foil 0.1 i.'me-
flone ; reckoned about 5 s. an acre value.

For the drilling, the feed box of Mr. Wil-
leyh plough was firft filled with two quar-
terns of feed, and one added afterwards
every bout, fowing two rows ; and it
is obfervable, that the feed box drops more
with only a quartern of feed in it, than if it
is fuller.

Vol. III. F f The



434 THE FARMER'S TOUR

The holes intended for peafe or wheat
were ufed on this occafion.

The feed coft 4^. yd. a bufhel. The bar-
ley fown with it, as under, turned out a good
crop ; for which the fainfoine was the worfe.

All the grafs, except what was fown with
the barley, was hand-weeded the firft fum-
mer (1767) at great expence ; which, fays
Mr. Anderdon, was another inftance of my
being here, alfo, too hafty in laying down
to grafs, before I had two or three amelior-
ating crops to improve the land and kill the
weeds.



April 14, 15.


Sowed as follows.






\




Acres.


Seed.








B.


p.


3. I. Broad-caft with bar-








ley,


-


I I


9





2. Drilled


alone on








ridges, 30 double rows, 1








foot afunder;


intervals 2








feet 6 inches,


-


I


I


°*


3. Drilled


(with broad-








call: barley) on 1 6 ridges ;








double rows,


1 foot afun-








der ; intervals the fame as








No. 2.




1
2





2!



Carry over, - 3*10 2 §



THROUGH ENGLAND. 435

Brought over, - 31 10 i\
No. 4. Drilled in equally
diftant rows, 8 \ inches a-
funder, without barley, 1 I 2 \

5. Sown broad-call with-
out barley, - - \ 2 2



41 14 3



ProduBs.



No. 1
2
3
4
5

6.'



4 t



1

T:ns.


768.
C. ivt.


i 7 6 9 .

Tans.


I


M


2 |


O




O


I

I


5


I I

4



1770.
Tew.



5



No. 1

2

4
5



1768.

Per acre.
C. ivt.

9
20
26

33
S3



121

'39
164



1769.

P<rr arr*
C.tvt.



^5

35
33

zo

26



1770.

Per tf erf .
C. soft

26

3 2
40
26
40



139



164



3)4 2 4
5)Hi

28, or 1 ton 8 C.-ar.
^fr acre /f r «a».



* This is in another field, fome of it broad-caft ; feme
drilled 2 k feet, and fome 10 inches : the drilled beft.



436 THE FARMER'S TOUR

No. 3, where the fainfoine failed, was
ploughed up before the winter, 1768, and
lay fallow till the fpring, 1769; when
barley was drilled in rows, 9 inches afun-
der, and a fingle row of fainfoine between
every two rows of corn : fo that the grafs
was 18 inches afunder. OcJober 4th,
1768, the forwardeft ftalks of the drilled
after-grafs were two feet high.

Part of the broad-caft, with barley, lying
wet, promifed to produce very little ; but
fpreading 10 bufhels of wood-afhes upon
it the 22d March, 1768, improved it vaftly,
which induced him to fpread about 1 o hogf-
heads of lime rubbifh on part of the equi-
diftant rows, in December , 1769; and to
mix 52 I hogfheads of lime, and put one
load of dung with a headland of earth in the
fummcr, 1769 ; which was carried out and
fpread on fome part, of each fort, of the
differently fown fainfoine, in February,
1770, except what lay oppofite the fain-
foine drilled in fpring, 1769, and is in-
tended to be fpread thereon.

The wide intervals were horfe-hoed, 2d
December, 17b*], in 1768, and in the fpring
1769; but were much out of order in the

fpring,



THROUGH ENGLAND. 437

fpring, 1770, (when they were again
horfe-hoed) for want of proper hoeing
before the winter, 1769; that being, as he
found from experience, as neceflary a time
of the year for horfe-hoeing grafles, as any ;
and he thinks the fame in refpect of wheat,
if executed with judgment and caution,
and the crop be drilled in due feaibn to
admit of it.

May n, 12, 13, 1767, fowed three
pecks of fainfoine, broad-caft, without
corn, on about I of an acre ; and drilled
2 1 pecks on almoft 32 perches, in a field
near the other, and the foil much the fame,
viz. 6 rows, 3 feet afunder, and 20 rows,
10 inches afunder ; alfo fowed a fmall patch
of land in the laft field, broad-caft — thefe
parcels making | of an acre, are called No.
6. in the preceding table.

The 24th Jufyy 1767, the three feet
intervals were horfe-hoed.

The equi-diftant rows in this field were
beft at hay-making, 1768, but the after-
grafs of thofe horfe-hoed, turned out bell
before Michaelmas. All the fainfoine in
this field thrives, except one part that is
damp ; the other parts feeming well adapted
F f 3 to



438 THE FARMER'S TOUR

to it; and as the quantities of feed here
fown, teem proper ones, Mr. And rdon
concludes, in future, to fow 3 buf! jis on
an acre, broad-caft, well cleaned of weeds.
Nor does the fame quantity by this expert
mtn;, at prefent, appear to be too much
for an acre. in equi-diftant rows, 10 inches
afunder,

Thefe experiments were all (except the
broad-caft with corn) hand-hoed and weeded
the firft and fecond years ; and Mr. Ander-
don recommends both horfe and hand-hoe-
ing every year, fumcient to keep it clean.

The broad-caft, without corn, coft, in
cleaning, about half as much as the drilled
the firft year.

The three feet intervals, and fome of the
equi-diftant rows (parts of No. 6.) were
horfe-hoed before Chrijlmas^ 1769, and
fhewed the great advantage of it in their
gay and lively appearance early in the fpring,
1770.

Obfcrvations.

Drilling fainfoine makes, I think, a better

figure here, than I any where remember to

have read. The beft of all the methods

foHowed, is drilling in equally diftant rowsj

at



THROUGH ENGLAND. 439

at eight inches and a half afunder : the
broad-caft (with and without barley equal,
which is obfervable) the worft of all :
Double rows at one foot, with two feet
fix inch intervals, yielding fo much more
than the broad-caft, is very remarkable.
The profit of this grafs on thefe foils is in
general decifively proved. And it is
evident from them, that no application
of fuch poor land at 5 s. which is by no
means favourable for any corn crop, can
be equal to this of fainfoine. Pity that
fuch poor hills are not univerfally occu-
pied by it. There are many fuch tracts
on the hills of Somerfetjlnre.

BURNET.

Experiment, No. 6.

May 16, 1766, fowed a piece of old
orchard ground with Rocqueh burnet in
drills and broad-caft : it was broken up the
year before, and yielded turnips, but had
no manure. Augujl 29, cut and gave it
to oxen and cows, together with white
F f 4 beet ; .



44° THE FARMER'S TOUR

beet ; feme were fonder of one, fome of
the other. Oclober 14, cut it again, being
1 1 i fine flourifhing ftate, better than fome
latent ; cut the fame day in Attgi'jl, and
now age.

The cows v M eat the burnet well
an - rh; but a mare very greedily, and was
fonder of Rocque's burnet than of a plant
or two from an old natural praftnre trans-
planted, which has a ftronger aromatic
fmell than the former, though that was
very ftrong ; but the mare was fonder ne£t
day of lucerne than of burnet. Middle of.
December cut it again.

1767, February 14, cut it 3 inches
high.

The end of this month it was eaten off
by pigs. March 27, cut it 5 inches high,
April 12, again the fame heighth.

May 9, ij fourth time, 7 or 8 inches
high; fome moots 12 to 14. June 9, a
fifth time, 12 inches high : fome 18 or 20,
July 6, cut it the fixth time, eight or nine
inches high ; fome 18 or 20. Avgujl 5,
the feventh cutting, 12 inches high. Sep-


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Online LibraryArthur YoungThe farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 3) → online text (page 17 of 19)