Arthur Young.

The farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 3) online

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forming a noble fhore, Separates this land from
another promontory almoft at your feet, which
is a fine flope of wood, that clips quite to the
water i its head a cultivated field. The whole

fcene



THROUGH ENGLANTD. 201

fccne is complete, all within the eye's ken ; the
whole great, various and beautiful. Nor is
the northern part of the ifland deftitute of more
rural views, though not in the whole equal in
them to the fouthern. From Cockle ton farm, in
Northivood pariih, a vale winds under a fpread-
ing hill, cut into inclofures, and finely fringed
with wood, on which the views are truly pic-
turefque : the water is not much feen, but it is
varied by an admirable outline of hill and wood,
through which it twice breaks : likewife from
the junction of three lanes, that lead to New-
port, Gurnard, and Ruge-Street, is &en a true
painter's landscape.

The Jfle of Wight has very numerous advan-
tages to recommend it as a moil agreeable fpot
to refide in : no place is happier in the beauties
of a varied country : here are hills, dales, moun-
tains, rocks, wood and water, all in perfection ;
a fea-coaft that has not a perch of fiat land •, it
all rifes boldly from the water : they fcarcely
know what a marm is. The land is admirably
fertile in both grafs and corn ; game, particu-
larly pheafants, in the greateft plenty: all pro-
vifions good, and furrounded by a fca, full of
the fineft fifh in Britain. That it is healthy
cannot be doubted, from the fingularly happy
circumftance of not a phyfician being there.
Quere, Is this the caufe or the effect ?

A fox is another animal not to be found in
this ifland ; confequently they are without a
fpecies of vermin by no means lb innocent — the
hunters of him ; of whom there is too often
reafon to doubt, (at leaft it is fo in my neigh-
bourhood) whether the animal that flies, or
the brute that purfues, be the greater beaft of
the two.



loz THE FARMER'S TOUR



LETTER XXV.

FR O M Cowes I took boat for South-
ampton ; the river which leads to that
town is a very fine one. The town is
large, well built ; and the company which
regularly reforts thither, much enriches and
enlivens the place.

To Winch ejier the country is various >
but has much land that is wafte, and poorly
cultivated. Near the latter city it confifts
chiefly of chalk hills uninclofed. I pafled
from Winchejler, a country I had before
travelled, to Alresford, to view the hus-
bandry of 'James Rodney, Efq. of that
place ; of which, and the management of
his neighbours, the ar.nmon farmers, he
favoured me with the following account.

Experiment , No. i.

Mr. Rodney tried a change of feed, by
procuring 2 bufhels of blue cone wheat
from GlouceJlerjhire> which he fowed on 3
rood of land \ it yielded 24 buihels in
return, which for the land was avaft pro-
duce ;



THROUGH ENGLAND. 203

duce ; had it been fown with their own
feed, an acre would not have yielded more
>than 20.

Experiment, No. 2.

A field of fainfoine lying conveniently
for mowing, but not for feeding; this
: gentleman tried the mowing it for foiling
[horfes, in the fame manner as lucerne,
: clover, or any other grafs. He did this all
laft fummer, and the fame this year. It
has often been afTerted, that mowing fain-
foine more than once deftroys it ; but on
the contrary, this field has fuffered not the
I leaf! from it. The foil is a light loam on
chalk, worth 10;. an acre.

Experiment, No. 3.

Laft year Mr. Rodney made 10 loads of
fainfoine hay ; which from repeated rains
was fo damaged, that his people pronounced
it three quarters fpoiled. He faked it in the
flacking with only 1 bufhel of fait, and it
completely recovered it.

Experiment, No. 4.
Four hogs, porkers, were fattened on
potatoes ; they did extremely well ; no

pork



2o 4 THE FARMERS TOUR

pork was finer, whiter, or fweeter; the
potatoes were boiled, and given without
any barley, peafe, &c.

Experiment, No. 5.

Three acres were fown with colefeed in
1767 ; in the winter there happened a deep
fnow, in which the crop came into life for
the lambs, and was of great fervice. They
were baited in it till May ; and were fold at
15X. each; which was an extraordinary
price, Both the cows and fwine were alfo
fed on it. Afterwards it was feeded, and
he fold the crop for a guinea an acre.

Experiment^ No. 6,

Soot Mr. Rodney tried for wheat, 15
bufhels per acre, at 6 d, a bufhel ; it an-
fwered greatly.

Mr. Rodney ufes a Norfolk wheel plough,
with a pair of horfes and no driver; it
anfwers greatly, but none of the farmers
follow the example ; they all ufe 4 horfes
and a driver.

Farms around Alresford rife from 60 /. t(
300/. a year; but in general from 120/. to
140/,

Th(






THROUGH ENGLAND. 205

The foil is a light loam on chalk ; but
the hills are clay; rents, 6/. to 10/.

The rent from hence to Crux Eajlen 5/.
or 6 /. much at 2 s. 6 d. and 3 s.

To Winchejicr 6s.

To Southampton, on an average, 8x #

To Tortfmouth \os.

To Bafingftoke 6 s. to 8 J.

To Andover 6 s.

The courfe of crops here;

1. Turnips 5. Wheat

2. Barley 6. Barley or oats
3. Clover, ray-grafs, 7. Clover, &c.

and trefoile, two and then fome add

years 8. Oats.
4. Summer fallow

Another :

1. Peafe or tares 4. Clover 2 years

2. Wheat 5. Fallow

3. Barley 6. Wheat.

Both are ftrange courfes. They plough
three times for wheat ; fow 3 I bufhels an
acre ; but Mr. Rodney only 3. The crop 2
quarters.

For barley they give but 2 ploughings ;

fow 4 or 5 bufhels an acre, and gain in

return 3 \ or 4 quarters. For oats only

5 one



2o6 THE FARMER'S TOUR

one ploughing ; fow 5 or 6 bufhels of feed;
the crop 4 quarters. They give 2 or 3
earths for peafe ; fow 4 bufhels ; never
hand-hoe them ; the mean produce 2 quar-
ters. They do not cultivate any beans.

For turnips they plough 3 or 4 times ;
hand-hoe them once ; and the beft farmers
twice ; feed them all off with fheep.

Their clover they mow firft for hay, and
then for feed ; but much is fed with fheep:
Tares they fow for the fame purpofe.

There is much fainfoine in this country 5
they mow it firft for hay, of which they get t
1 I ton an acre; after which they eat it
with weaning lambs and other cattle ; the
after-grafs worth 5 s. an acre.

In refpect to manuring, they all fold
their fheep in winter as well as fummer>
except j nil while the lambs are young and
weak ; they fold their new fown wheat ;
a practice whicK they find very advanta-
geous.

Paring and burning is known here for
breaking up old fainfoine ; the price 1 /. 1 /.
an acre ; and fow oats, turnips, or fome-
times wheat on it if they defign to lay it
again to fainfoine. The firft crop is tm>

nips j






THROUGH ENGLAND. 207

nips ; the 2d, Barley ; 3d, Oats ; 4th, a
Fallow ; 5th, Barley and Sainfoine.

Lime the duke of Bedford tried on chalk
land, in the way to Andover, but it did no
good.

They confine their cattle to the farm-
yard in winter, and flack their hay at
home ; but none of them chop their ftub-
bles.

Their fences are very bad, they Lave no
ditches, and very little plafhing ; but their
herdle hedges, woven like herdles, they
execute extremely well : the expence per
rod, 3 \ feet high, is 4^/. wurkmanfhip,
and 1 s. fluff and carriage.

The beft meadows let at 50 j-. an acre.
In the fpring they feed them with lambs ;
in May water them ; then they take a crop
of hay of 1 I or 2 ton an acre ; then water
again and feed down with cows : an acre
would be fufficient to fummer feed a cow.
and yield fome fheep feed befides.

Their breed of cattle is the fhort- horned;
they give 2 \ or 3 gallons of milk a day ;
are let at 3/. but pay in total produce 6/.
Their winter food ftraw ; but have a little
hay at calving.

1 Flocks






2c8 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Flocks of fheep rife from 300 to 1500 01
ftock flocks. The profit lamb and wool.
Lamb, - - £.0 10 o

Wool, - - 020

0120

They keep them in the winter in their
lays ; but give fome turnips in the fpring.

In their tillage they reckon 5 horfes"
neceffary for 1 00 acres of arable ; ufe 4 in
a plough, and do an acre a day ; the depth
4 inches ; and the price 8 s. They break
up their ftubbles before Cbriftmas : ufe only
wheel ploughs. They pra&ife the cutting
flraw into chaff. In hiring and flocking
farms, they reckon 1400/. neceffary for
200/. a year.

Land fells at 32 years purchafe.

Tythes are chiefly gathered.

Poor rates ia 6d. in the pound: 35
years ago but one pauper ; now 80/. a year.

The employment of the poor women
and children fpinning. They drink tea
twice a day.

All the farmers have leafes,

Par*



I



THROUGH ENGLAND. 209

Particulars of a farm.
650 Acres, all arable 10 Tares
160/. Rent 8 Men

loo Sainfoine 4 Boys

80 Wheat 1 Maid

100 Barley 3 Labourers

100 Oats 16 Horfes

80 Fallow 6 Cows

50 Turnips 1000 Sheep

10 Peafe 40 Swine.

20 Clover
Returning to Southampton, I coafted
I round the river by Redbridge, &c. and
li crofled a part of New Forejl to Gilbtiry, the
:| feat of William Milford> Efq.
J That gentleman's grand-father, and
father, being great planters, he was able to
give me fome very valuable intelligence con-
. cerning planting of various ufeful trees.

Experiment, No. 1.
| A plantation of cedars of Leba?ion y filver
firs, fpruce firs, and pinafters of 40 years
■ growth, is fet in fquares of 6 feet. Thefe
1 were meafured.
The cedars contained 151 feet of timber,
worth 1 s. the top 1 s. or 16 s. 6 d* each :
35 feet high.
Vol. III. P Some



210 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Some of the filvers 50 feet high; 35 feet

of timber, at 9 d. the top 2 s. ; or 1 /.

8 j. zd.
The medium filver, 131 feet ; top 1 s. or

1 1 s. 3 d.
The fpruce ditto 38 feet high ; 17! feet of

timber, at gd. top 2 s. ; in all 15^. 3 d.
Pinafters.



No. 1


12 feet.


2


35


3


33


4


J 7


5
6


33
x 9


7


*7



Average 23, at yd. and the top ij-. 6d.;

in all 1 8 J", gd.

Cedars, i6j". 6d. — Silver, 11s, 3 </.— •
Spruce, 15 J - . 3^/. — Pinafter, 18 J-, gd.
Hence it appears that the pinafter is of
thefe the moil profitable ; and next the
cedars ; the average value of the four, is
15 s. $d. An acre of land left in fquares
of 6 feet, contains 12 10 trees; the value,
at 15 j. 5^. amounts to 932/. 14J.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 211

Expe?:ccs per acre.

Firft raifi ng, planting, fencing,

&c. See Vol. I. p. 332. £.3 o o

Rent and rates, at 12^. for 40

years, - - 24 o o

Reparation of fences, fuppofe 1 10 o



28 10 o



Product exclufive of thinnings, 932 14 o
Expences, - - 28 10 o

Profit, *■ - 904 4 o

Which is pei' acre per ann. 22 1 1 o

This profit is furprizingly great ; much
J. exceeding any thing that hufbandry can
produce.

To reap above 20/. an acre from the firft

day of planting, exclufive of thinnings, is

\ a profit that proves how fine a refource

landlords have for railing large fums of

. money, who can wait fuch a period for

the return. But had thefe trees been cut at

20, 25, or 30 years, there can be no

doubt but the profit would have been very

great, though not fo high as 40 years.

The value of the fee-fimple of land, foon

P 2 after






212 THE FARMER'S TOUR

a ter planting, bears no proportion to that
of the timber on it. Is not this, therefore,
a ready way to double, treble, and qua-
druple eftates ?

Experiment ^ No. 2.

In another plantation of 38 years growth.
The Scotch firs contain 8 feet of timber, at
6d. a foot; and the top is. this is 51.
They are 39 feet long.

Spruce in the fame 29 feet long; 4 feet
timber, at 6d. and the top ij*. ; this is
2 j. 6d.

Silver, 30 feet long ; 5 feet of timber,
at 6 d. ; top 1 j. or 3 s. in all.

Experiment^ No. 3.

In another plantation of 45 years growth,
planted 6 feet fquare. The fpruce are
on an average 36 feet long, and contain
9 I feet of timber, at 8 d. ; the top is.6d»;
in all 7/. lod.



The Scotch 34 feet long ; 12 £ of timber,
at 8</. ; the top 2 j. ; in all ioj. 4*/.

The filver 40 feet long ; 1 1 I of timber,'
at 8 d. ; top 1 s. 6 d. ; or 9 J. 2 </.



lie



THROUGH ENGLAND, 213

The fpruce, - £. o 710
The Scotch, - o 10 4

The filver, - 092



Average



12 10 trees on an acre, at 9/.

1 d. are, - - 549 10 o

Deduct — raifing, &c. 3 00

Rent, &c. 45

years, at 12 s. 27 o o

Reparations, 1 10 o

3 1 1 o o



Profit, - - 518 o o

r hich is per ann, - - 1 1 1 o o

Experiment^ No, 4.

In another plantation, the growth of
which is j 7 years, and the trees at 7 feet
fquare.

The Scotch firs, top and all, are worth
is. each.

The fpruce, 1 s. 6 d.
Average, 1 s. 3 d.
At 7 feet fquare, there are 888

on an acre, which at 1 j. 3 d.

are, - £. 55 IQ °

Carry over> • 55 10 o



2i4 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Brought over, - jC«55 io °

peduct — raifing, &c. £.3 o o
Rent 1 7 years,

at 6 s. 520

Reparations, 1 jo o

. 9 12 o



Profit, * - 45 18



Ox per armiim> - - 2 14



Here we fee an initance of making 2/.
14-r. per acre per ann. from the firft planting
of poor land, at 6.r. an acre : and I mould
remark that this plantation is on a hill ex-
pofed to the fouth-weft; which wind here
blows with a fury that none can exceed, as
all the trees in the country bear ample tefti-
mony, by turning their Wafted heads from
it. No hufbandry will with fo little, or
rather with no trouble, hazard, or expcnce,
equal this profit on fuch poor land. And
\% is made in the term of 17 years;
which admits of fo many men to plant*
and expect themfelves to reap the profit.

"Experiment, No. 5.
In another plantation of Scotch firs of 30
years growth - 3 the diflance 3 feet fquare ;

the



THROUGH ENGLAND. 215

the trees are on an average 2 s. 6d. each.
This wood was never thinned.
On an acre, at 3 feet, are 4840

trees, which at 2 s. 6 d. come

to.. _ - - - £.605 o ©

Deduci: — railing,

&c. £-3 ° °
Rent, at

8x. 12 o o

Reparations 1 10 o

— : 16 10 o



Profit, - - 588 10 o



Which is per ann. - 19 18



This aftonifhing profit offers one very-
material lefibn, which is, that ncceflity
does not require a plantation to be thinned
with a view to profit, for though the trees
come to a much larger fize, yet the fuperior
number in the other cafe, more than make
amends at a lower value ; but perhaps a
mean conduct would be moft advantageous ;
viz. not to thin till the trees are of fome
value, for inftance, 1 s. each, or 9 d. ; then
they would raife money; but thinning in 5
P 4 or



216 THE FARMER'S TOUR

or 10 years after planting, they amount to
nothing but fire-wood.

Experiment, No. 6.
In another wood of Scotch firs unthinned t
of 30 years growth, an oblong piece of
ground was meafured, of 26 feet long, by
8 broad ; and every tree in it valued :



No. 1.


-


£■0


O


6


2.


-


O


O


3


3.


-


O





8


4-


-





O


6


5





O


I





6,


it


O





8


7<


,


O


I





8.


-


O


I





9


»


O





2


10,


. •»


O


2


6


11


,


O


2





12,


ym





I


6


IS


*■





O


3


H


, <"





I





15


t «•





O


6


16,


, *





Q


3


*7«


m





2


6


18


»


Q


2





19,


m,


O


I


6


20,


<r


O


I


6






I


I


3



THROUGH ENGLAND. 217

The piece of land contains 208 fquare
feet : there are 209 fuch pieces in an acre ;
the amount would there-
lore be, - - L* 222 l °

Deduct expences as in No. 5, 16 10 o



Profit, - - 205 11 o



Or per ann. - - 6 15



This is vaft profit, but not near equal to
the other ; which I attribute to their (land-
ing in fpots fo very thick, for many of them
were only 1 2 or 18 inches afunder — regu-
larly planting in fquares muft undoubtedly
be necefTary.

Experiment '; No. 7.

In another plantation of 34 years growth,
at 6 feet fquare. The fpruce are worth
3 j. 6d.

The Scotch, 3 s. 6 d.

The filver, 5 s.

Average, 4/.
On an acre 12 10, at 4/.

come to £. 242 o o

Carry over, - 242 o o



2iS THE FARMERS TOUR

Brought over, - £« 2 4 2 ° o
Deduct — raifmg,

&c. £. 3 o o

Rent,at8x. 13 12 o

Reparations 1 10 o



18 2





223 18





6 11






Profit,
Or per ann.



Experiment : , No. 8.

In another plantation of 29 years growth,
a part was meafured, of 40 feet long by
23 broad, and contained 20 trees ; valued,,
after meafuring, as under.

Value.



No. 1
2

3

4

5
6

7
8

9
10

n



£.0 10 o

O 2 Q



O
O
O
O
O

o
o
o
o



3
7

7
1

4

4
6

7



o
o
6
o
o
o
o
o
o



THROUGH


ENGLAND. 219


No. 12.





c


Volt*

6





J3-


-





6


6


14.


i-





8





*5-


-





4





16.


-





6





x 7-


-





6


6


J&


-





5





19.


-





4





20.


-





4






566

There are 47 pieces in an acre, cpnfe-
quently the value would be £. 250 5
Deduct — railing, £.3 00
Rent, at 2s,

6d. 3 12 6

Reparation, 1 10 o



826



Profit, 4« - 242 2 6

Orperann. - - 870

Experiment, No. 9.

In another plantation of 30 years growth,
Scotch firs, at 6 feet fquare, are worth oa
an average $s. each.



220 THE FARMER'S TOUR

1210, at §*. - jC-3 02 i0 *

Dedudt — raifing,&c. £.3 o o
30 Years rent,

at 5/. - 7 10 o

Reparations, 1 10 o

■ 12 o



Profit, - 290 10 o

Or per ann. - 9160



Experiment, No. 10.

In another plantation, at 8 feet fquare,
of 19 years growth. The value of the
trees are as follow ;
Silver firs, 3 s.
Scotch^ 3/,
At 8 feet there are 680 on an

acre, which at 3 j. come to £. 102 o
Deduct^-raifing, &c. 300
Rent, 1 2 s. 1 1 8 o
Reparations, 1 10 o



15 18 o



Profit, - - 86 2 b



Or per ann. - - 4 10 o



THROUGH ENGLAND. 221

Experiment^ No. 1 1 .

In a wood, 48 years growth of pinafter*
1 o feet fquare, they are come to 48 feet of
timber, at 9*/.; 1/. 16 J.; and top 2s. ; 1/.
18/. each.

At 10 feet, there are 435 trees
on an acre; which, at 38/.
come to - - jT. 826 2 O

Deduct — raifing,&c. 300
Rent, at

I2J. 28 16 o
Reparation, 1 10 o

33 6 o



Profit, - - 792 16 o

Or per ann. - - 16 10 o



Recapitulation.
Experiment, No. 1. Silver, Profit per

Cedars, acre per ann,

Spruce,

Pinafters,
Growth 40 years, - £.22 11 o

No. 3. Scotch,

Spruce,

Silver,
45 Years growth, - 1 1 1 o o



222 THE FARMER'S


TOUR


Experiment


, No. 4. Scotch,


Profit per




Spruce,


acre per ann.


1 7 Years,


No. 5. Scotch,


£•2 14


30 Years,


No. 6. Scotch,


19 18


30 Years,.


No. 7. Spruce,
Scotch,
Silver,


6 15


34 Years,


No. 8. Scotch,


6 11 •


29 Years,


No. 9. Scotch,


870


30 Years,


No. 10. Scotch,
Silver*


9 16


19 Years,


-


16 10




No. 11. Pinafter


>


48 Years,


-


16 10


40 Years,


- C~- 11





45>


1 1 10




34»


6 11





48,


16 10


1


Average,


14 5









i



THROUGH ENGLAND. 223



30 Years,


- £.


10


18










6


l 5





29


-


8


7





3o


-


9


16





Average,


11


4





1 7 Years,


2


14





19,




16


10






Average, - 9 12 o



34 to 45 years, 39 - 13 10 8

29 and 30, 291, - - 11 4 o

17 and 19, 18, - - 9120

Hence it appears that on an average of
thefe plantations, the profit per zcreper atwum,
from the firft planting, is proportioned to the
age of the wood ; the longer they are left,
the greater the profit.

The vaft benefit of planting to pofterity,
never yet admitted a moment's doubt; but
I would here principally endeavour to mew,
that the young man who plants thefe quick
growing trees, may, according to the com-
mon courfe of nature, expect to reap the
profit.

5



224 THE FARMER'S TOUR

No. i. 40 years, total profit, £.904 n o

518 o o

223 18 o

792 16 o



3.


45>


7-


34>


11.


48,


Average,


No. 5.


30 years,


6.


3°>


8.


29,


9-


30,


Aver


age,


No. 4.


1 7 years,


10.


*9>



609


16





588


10





205


11





242


2


6


290


10





33i


13





45


18





86


2





66









Average,



In 41 years, 100 acres of land will yield
the profit of 60,980/.

In 30 years, that quantity of land will
yield in profit 33,165/.

In 18 years, 100 acres will yield in profit
6,600 /.

It is to be remembered that all expences
Of the rent, &c. &c. are deducted; thefe
fums are neat profit.

Nor can any other application of the
1 land



Y.-i III. /•.-. \\\




c



^^JI[^, /7 .




THROUGH ENGLAND. 225

land equal this of planting ; for the an-
nual profits of 14/. $s. of 11/. 4 j. and
//. 1 2 s. much exceed any crop that
liufbandry can yield. Mofl of the land,
on which thele plantations are made, is of
1 middling quality ; fome of it very bad ;
a poor hungry fpringy gravel. Now fuch
land, managed in the bell manner pofiible,
would never near equal the great annual
profit of 9/. 12J. per acre, which may be
gained by any farmer hiring land on a
rwenty-one years leafe, by planting and
Ktting down his own trees.

How many men come to their e'ftates at
from 20 to 25 years of age. Suppofe fuch
andlords to plant 100 acres, they reap more
han 6o,oco/. by that time they are 65.
That fum of money would fureiy be no
iifagreeable acquisition at any age! — and
vhat renders this fyftem of planting pe-
suliarly important to the country in gene-
al is, that thefe trees do not feem to be
lice in foil — poor ones that do not anfwer
veil in hufbandry, arc as profitable in
lianting as any ; and great numbers of
he waits and ill-cultivated lands in this
angdoin might be thus applied, to vail:

Vol. III. Q_ advantage,



;..



226 THE FARMERS TOUR

advantage, not only to the amount of all
our importations from the Baltic, but al fq j
to another object, perhaps yet more im-
portant, to the faving all young oaks, &c.
that are in fo many parts of the kingdom
cut down to wafte, rather than fend to fea-
ports, &c. for fir.

It is no trifling quantity of land that
might be annually cleared of firs of all fort9
in this kingdom, at a very advantageous
price.

Mr. Mitford has made fome general
obiervations on this fubject that are of im
portance. Firft, The filver fir he finds t
Hand the fury of the fouth-wefr wind muc
better than any other ; where the fpruce ar^
Shattered in pieces, and even the Scotc,
turn their heads from the blaft, the filve
preferve themfelves perfectly erect : one ir
particular, 40 years old, which Rands fu
expofed on a hill to that furious quarter
is now 45 feet high, and meafures 40 fe£
of timber, worth is. a foot.

There is another fmgulanty in this fi
that defervcs mention : it will bear imme
diate ufe without contracting. Mr. Mil
ford cut down a large one in July, and ii U

5 tb






THROUGH ENGLAND, 227

the I her following it was fawn and

laid in a floor in his library, and this
without fuftcring the lead contraction from
that time to the prcfent, which is more
than two years. This quality of the wood
will for many ufes render it uncommonly
yaluable.

It is further obfervable, that, however
ftunted a filver fir is from being dripped on

Iby other trees, if the obftructions to its
growth are removed, though it be many
years old, it will then take a frefn. and vi-
gorous growth, as if nothing had ever
delayed its progrefs.

I mould remark, that the preceding
prices were taken on the foot by I
Miiford\ carpenter, who mcafurcd thofe
trees that were timber, and valued the reft.
r lThe prices are fuch as he would have
Igivcn, and fuppcfmg the pure
Jit the expence of felling and taking aw.
The neighbourhood of that vaft tract of
tfaile country, called New Forejl, made
ne delirous of gaining what intelligence I
:ould concerning its prefent ftate : my in-
onxiation was not fo extended as I could
Q^2 Willi ;



228 THE FARMER'S TOUR

wifh ; but in fomc particulars it was de-
cifive.

After the numerous encroachments that
have been made, there yet remain 80,000
acres. Relative to the rights enjoyed by
the neighbourhood of it, they are various :
the inhabitants of fome manors have a
right of commonage ; but no other right ;
others have a right to cut turf-; but none
of commonage : fome have that of firing-
wood ; but neither turf nor common : and
a few have all three.

The foil is extremely various ; from
very poor land, covered with a ftinted ling,
to extreme rich foils, that yield good grafs;
and others that are covered with fern and


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Online LibraryArthur YoungThe farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 3) → online text (page 9 of 19)