Arthur Young.

The farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 4) online

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of



THROUGH ENGLAND. 265

of foils ; and whether foul with couch or
. feeds.

I fhall, in the next place, compare the
three foils of clay, loam, and fand.



Place.



No. 3

5
6

8

12

24

25
36
38
39
44

45
46

5i
57
58
62

Average,



CLAY.



b 1




b


Price.


P*r








£


100


*






s.


acres.


4




3








31


If


1



5





7


4


I


4








4


I


3


3





7


5


3
4


4


7







2


I










2


I


31


3


3


6


2


I


41


4





6


4


I


4f


6


6


4


4*


I


5


10







4


I


41


8





10


4


I


4


7





8


3f


I


41


6





6


4


I


4


6





8


4


3
%


31


5


Q


6


5




4f


4


6


16


4


I


5


6





5


2i


I


4


6


2





266 THE FARMER'S TOUR
LOAM.



Place.


b




b


P;-


*V?.


\Per








1





jioo











j".


acres.


No. i


4


1 1

1 4


r
D


7





5


2


4


T I

*■ 4


6


5





5


4


41












7


4




21


8





9!


9


51


4


6


7


6


10


IO


2












ii


6%




4


6





8


*3


2|




3*


6





10


J4







3


6







15


32

5 z




4


5





6


*9


2 1




3


3


6


10


20


2


T I
1 4


8


4


6


8


21


2


T I

1 4


3i


4


6


8


22


2




4


4





12

4


23


2




4t


4





32


2




3


2


6


8


35


2




6






7


37


2


1 5


51


4





4


40


41




5


8


6


5


41


3f






7





5


42


4


tI


5


7





6


43


4




5


7





5 i


47


4






6





6


48


4






5





5


49


5


T I
1 t


4


7





9


5o


4




4


8





5


52


4




4


6


6


4


53


3i




4


5





5


54


4




4


5





4


55


4




5


7


6


6


56


4










8


59


6













THROUGH ENGLAND. 267

Place,



No. 60
61

£3
64

65
Averages,



b


2"


b 1


100


4










4










4










4


I


H


9 °


6


5


I


5


7


6


J 1


I


4i


6


H













SAND.



No. 16

17
iS

26
27
28
29

30

3 1
33

34



Averages,



Clay

Loam
Sand



2


I


5


5





6


2


I|


5


4





6


2


I


5


4


6




2


2


4i


4





8


2


2




2


6




2


2


5


2


6


4


2


2|


4


2


6


6


2


2


4


2


6


5


2


2


5


2


6


6


2


u


4


2




6


2


if










2


If


4f


3


10


6






1







Recapitulation,



31


1


4


6 2


3f


1


41


6


2


^ J


41


3 10



7
6



z6$ THE FARMER'S TOUR

Upon this little table I muft congratulate
the reader, on the proportions being fo
regular, and in very few inftances broken ;
we find that in many particulars, the nature
of the foil is, as it ought to be, a guide.
From loam and clay to fand, every column
is unbroken ; and from clay to loam the
price and ftrength per ioo acres decline*
as the foil is light ; but the fame number
of horfes in a plough, and^the daily work
being the fame in thefe foils, is a contra-
diction.

I mould however obferve, that fand
being in every particular fo much below
the other foils, is greatly, I apprehend,
owing to fuch numerous minutes in Nor-
folk and Suffolk^ where their manage-
ment is fo good.

Refpe&ing the comparifon between horfes
and oxen, fome minutes were taken, which
will tend to throw a light on that part of
rural oeconomy.
Mr. Cook. Three oxen in harnefs plough

as much as four or five horfes.
Lawton. Four oxen in a plough, and

will do as much as four horfes.
Wombwell. Four in a plough ; but horfes

gain ground among them,






I



THROUGH ENGLAND. 269

Bootham and Camvick. Oxen laid afide.

Rye. Many oxen ufed; they increafe every
year. On dry land better than horfes,
but not on wet foils, not from weight,
but going double. An ox put to
w r ork at three years old, then worth
6/. work him two years, and he is
then worth 10/. This makes the
annual cxpence of an ox only 2/.
Ss. /\d. that of a horfe 10/. 15 s. 6 J.
fuperiority of the ox 8/. js. id. One
horfe cofts as much as four and a half
oxen. On ftraw alone they do fix
hours work.

Hawkburft. Oxen moft ufed ; they prefer
them greatly.

Sheffield-Place. Oxen beft on light foils,
becaufe they do not go in a row on
heavy ones.

Taunton. Horfes kept as cheap as oxen,
for no oats given; but every ox im-
proves 50 s. a year in his growth.

Sir Charles Tynte. Four oxen in harnefs
do the work of fix or feven and one
horfe.

Donnhigton. Oxen do not anfwer fo well
as horfes.

Mr. Burke. Four oxen in harnefs, as much
as four to fix horfes of the farmers.



270 THE FARMERS TOUR

The firft object here that requires at-
tention, is the importance of working oxert
in harnefs. Mr. Cook's, Sir Charles < Tynte\ i
and Mr. Burke's intelligence on this head,
is as clear, fatisfactory, and decifivc, as
any one can wifh. With Mr. Cooke three
oxen do as much as four or five horfes
in the farmer's team. With Sir Charles
Tyjite four perform the work of fix or {even
in yoaks and a horfe ; and with Mr. Burke
four equal five or fix farmers horfes. From
all which, and the particulars mentioned
at large, it is evident, that the old objection
againft oxen of being flow, has in this way
no foundation ; of which indeed I was an
eye witnefs at Mr. Cooke's, feeing his oxen
walk as faft in a heavily loaded cart, as
any horfes could do. This therefore is
the proper method of ufing oxen, and in
which the fuppoied fuperiority of horfes in
fo many counties would at once vanifh :
in this method alfo the objection to them,
On account of poaching, is anfwered ;
that comes from their being in yoaks ne-
ceffitated to tread the land in fome Cafes ;
but in harnefs they are worked like horfes
at pleafure, either in pairs, or one before
another. Reafon tells us that it would be
amazing were this fuperiority not found ;

fof



If



1



THROUGH ENGLAND. 271

for hi yoaks, befides the weight on their
necks, which is very grievous, they draw
unequally, if one ox hangs back, or is in
any poiition, except exactly even with his
fellow, both muft be wrung, and draw in
a twifted pofition, in which it is impofiible
for them to exert their ftrength, and he
who moft exerts himielf, fuffers more from
the traniverfe pofition of the yoak and bow,
than from carrying moft of the weight.
For all which reaibns, united with thofe
general advantages that attend oxen, how-
ever worked, it is much to be wiflied, that
the practice may become general.

Even in yoaks, their fuperiority to horfes
in profit is very clearly decided in two
places. About Rye each ox improves 50/.
er ann. while worked : it is exactly the
me at Tauntm, At the former the ex-
enceof an ox 2/. 8j. \d. of a horfe \oL
i$s.6d. fuperiority of the 0x8/. ys, id.
or four and a half to one. Now no two
odes can poffibly do the work of nine
if- : oxen, yoak them how you will ; but
s; Iwhere will the comparifon be, if yon
fl fi fuppofe thefe oxen i:i harnefs ? under
tf I the fame advantages mentioned of the above
kBthree gentlemen?



272 THE FARMERS TOUR

I furely need not obferve, that the mere
contrary affertions of the other places can-
not be thought to counterbalance fuch
minute companions.

The prejudice againft oxen met with
in many places, that have left off ufing J
them, have arifen either from the high
prices of live ftock, as obferved in my laft
Tour, or from the ridiculous practices
of ufing an immoderate number in a plough,
even to a dozen, until the beafts made fuch
a firing, that two or three drivers were
neceffary. Such unprofitable cuftoms, in
which the ploughmen and labourers heartily
concurred, from always liking to work ltt
in a poflee, brought the cuftom of them
in general into difufe, and horfes were
naturally , preferred ; but a preference
founded on fuch abfurd comparifons, muft
not be accepted by the more enlightened
parts of the kingdom.

If the ufe of oxen in no greater drafts
than really neceffary, once comes to be
underftood, they will be more generally
ploughed than at prefent ; but especially
if the working them in harnefs becomes
common. The circumilance of each ox,;
in a proper ly Item, paying 50 s. per ami.
2 in






ml



THROUGH ENGLAND. 273

in his growth, and the horfe on the con-
trary growing annually worfe ; the one
fubject to numerous diforders, the other
to fcarcely any ; the one requiring oats>
and in fome counties eating them in enor-
mous quantities, up to 10 or 12 bufhels
per week to a team of four ; the other
never having any ; the one requiring
good hay, befides his oats ; the other fup-
porting fix hours work on good ftraw
alone ; the one requiring no (light expencc
in cleaning and attendance ; the other
wanting neither. If all thefe, and fome
other points, are confidered with the
attention they deferve, the facts afferted
by the Rye farmers, that one horfe cofts
is much as four and a half oxen, will
be thought no extravagant idea : and let
my one reflect on the preceding minutes,
md determine if there is any fuch difference
in their fervice. In harnefs, an ox appears

<M blearly to be as good as a horfe ; but if he
s only half as able, what a prodigious
ldvantage is it to fave two and a half in

i^-Mfour !



Vol. IV.



^74



THE FARMER'S TOUR



LETTER XLVIII.



THE rlrft object in the farmers live
ftock, that demands attention, is
Sheep. An animal of mch immenfe im-
portance to the agriculture, manufactures, f
and commerce of the kingdom, cannot be
too minutely confidered ; — the points ma-
terially to my purpole, are the averag
prod uds and profit — and the caufes of t
variations, which an attentive review ma
poffibly difcover ; all thefe circumftances
ought clearly to be known, in order to i
carrying the advantage, accruing from J"
meep, as high as poflible. There are fome j •'
great evils in this part of our domeftic ceco-ife,
nomy, but they rauft be fully known, be-' 1 ''
fore any one can attempt a cure.



Place.

1 . Hempftead,

2. Tring,

3. Blifivorth,

4. Glendon,

5. Qitenby,
Ditto,

6. Til ton,



Rent.
s. d
IO O

10 c

12 O

10 o
IO o

15 c

16 o



Flecks. Profit.

\l. s. J.

20 to 300!© 14 o
o 10



60— 1 60
100 — 500

40 — I 20
fat ftock
ditto

So — uto



:o io o

jo 9 6

jo 8 9

jo 14 o

\o 14 o

J^ n o



Fleece.
lb.



4
61



3

61



Fit

s. <



R:



'■!■■>,
i



3
o'

Floods an(

O Floods> 1



ft

H



; V



THROUGH ENGLAND. 27



/3



'. A*eton,
.R'burn,

-. L/kve//,
. t/ierfcld,
' . uifJton,
X ford,

3 be,
ljr : j mbzvell,

J bam,
<K < wwi,

. •/:;■;■
:i .

C$4 yteber.d,

. Z r Sutton,

Wington,

Ion,

Ingham,
\ifham,
\batn,

7m,

>am,

'ad,

\jsbury,
Yen,



J?.-.-.;.






1 00 60 to 1 jO
o 14 o



16 o

17 o
8 o

10 o



100 — 1000



80 — IOO
200 — 2O0C
10 0! ico — 600
16 o ( fatting

50 — 200



10 o



:..'



>altcn,
\ r fba7ti,
I 'burn,
Yld

trrtoi,

Ht 'ight,

"tit ford,

mm,



7 6 50-

8 o 100 — 1<



:oo



o o fatting

o oditto
18 o 100 — 600
14 o 100 — 450



8
12

8

H
16

H
12

12

10



300 — 1700
200 — Soo
500 — 700

300 — 600

20 — 80
I 00 — 400



IC

o

14 o
10 o



100 — 300

wethers

ewes
o! 200 — 2000
o

: 100 — 300



1 00



o o



300 — 1200
10 o icco — 1500



8 O

10 o



|o I



300 — 1500
100 — -1000
400 — 5C0



Profit.

s. d.

4 6

6 o
12 o

5 ©
9 °

7 6<

6 6
6 8

19 o

15 6
o o

19 o
9 6

8 6
8 o

10 3
8 o
8 6

10 o

I I o

8 6
12 6

10 6
15 o

10 o
o o



I o o
0128

3 12 O

o 10 6

OIIO



Valut
Fiftce. of

[Fleece.



4

4*
3
4
13



s. d.
4 O

I 6 Lime, and limeftone
I fand.



Springs.



Qinck growinggrafs<



6


4 o-

I 6 Water ori land iii
! winter.



O Floods on grai",

6
6\

e\

o



: Herbs that grow
in wet places.

2 Oj

2 ° Springs and (op,
2 O 1 ,



* Onlv winter,



276 THE FARMER'S TOUR



Place.
42. Moretcn,



43. Came,

44. Milbourn,

45. Ditto,

46. Milton Abbey,

47. Near Dor-
chejler a flock,

4S. Mapper ton,
49. Zf/g-£,



50. Taunton,
5 i . Kingja'oivn,
5 2. Cannons,
53. Donnington,



54. Becensfeld,



Averages,



Rent.

I. s. d,
O IZ o



Flocks.



I. 1. </.

500 to 1000 o 10 o



Pro/Tr.






OIIO
D IO O
D IO O

8 6
5 ^

o 16 o

o 12 6



I o o
0150
o 15 o

»5



13



o 13



500 — 13000
2000

400 — 1700
13000

IOO — 700
100 — 700



20 IOO



to 3 or 400



to 3 or 400
fat flock



8 6

3 IO O
086
OIIO

o 10 o

9 °
^ 13 3



8 6
3 14 6

D 12 O
12 6



I O O



o 11 8



3i



Sf



Value

°f
Fleece
J.



2 6

2 6

1 8

2 6
2 6

2 o

2 6



14

Watered mea<U ;
ver rot in
fpring, but
after-grafs fur
rots till the
tumn waterii I
after which I
The word 1
for rotting, cu,
by watering.



Stagnant watei
low meads,
much rain in
mer on clays.



AH watered n
rot, turn in I
you will. Sp
have nothifl
do with it.
ewe ever
while it h
lamb by the



Here we find that the average profit on
iheep throughout this Tour, amounts to
iij-. §d. the average fleece to 5 \ lb. and
the value of it to 2 s. 8 d. The profit is, I

think,



THROUGH ENGLAND. 277

think, very low, confidcring how rich a
tract this journey runs through ; but few
parts of rural management feem lefs undcr-
ftood than this of fheep ; for in Dorfetff:ire y
where they boaft of nothing elfe, I before
fhewed how near they were to be a lofing
article. To difcover what circumftances
have the greateft influence, I fhall divide
the table according to profit.

Profit to 5 s.



Place.

No. 9.
13



Average,



1 4



Rent. \Flocks
l. s. d. rife to



o 14 o!
o 10 o



Profit.
I. s. d.
046
20000 5 o



Fleece. 'Value.



lb.

4*
3



o 12 o



o



4 9i 3r



d.
6



Profit from $s. to iox.



Place.


Rent.


Flocks


Profit.


Fleece. '


Value.




1.


j. */. rife to


1.


j. d.


0.


s. d.


No. 2.





10







10


4




3-





12


1600


10


C!




4-





10


5000


9 6


5




5-





10


120.0


8 9




2 3


10.





16 0, 1 0000


6




1 6


14.





10 0. 6000


9 °


4




15-





16 0! jo


7 ^


x 3




16.





10 oj 2000


6 6


H


1 6


*/•





7 6 5000


6 8




1 3


22.





14 0, 4500


9 6




1 6


^3-





8 -o, 17000


8 6




1


24.





12


; 800





8




1



278 THE FARMER'S TOUR



l
Place.

No. 26.
27.
28.

3°-
34-
42.

43'
44.

45-
47-
48.

50.
Average,



Place.



1 Rent. \Floch
\l. s. d.rife to
p 14 o
[o 16 o
jo 14
b 12 o



No.



7-
1 1.

25-

29.

3 1 -
3*

3S.

39-
40.

41.

46.

49.



Prsyfr l/fc?. '^/«<?.






H








12








11








10








10








5


6





16





I








Q


12





1








s. d.
8 o
600J0 8 6
800 10 o
p 8 6
3000 10 o

I OOOp 10 o

50000 8 6

20000 10 o

200010 8 6

1300010 10 o

7000 9 o

ioo'o 8 6



lb.
31



s.



d.






1540



088



3i



5i



o
6
6

8
6
o



Profit from \os. to \$s.



Rent. Plocks \


Profit. r


Fleece. >


Vali


^,


I. s. d.rife to /. .••« d.


lb.


j •


</,


10 cj 30c


D 14 O








!o 10 fat


3 14 O


8


4





15 0! ditto !


3 14 O


8






16 01 120,


13 O


6|


3





io 17


O 12 O


4






8 6| 700


10 3




1


3


12 406


O I I O


6


3





b 10 oj 300


O 12 6




3


6


10 o 1 2000


J5




2





IO TO O I5OO


12 8




2





:0 8 Oj I5OO


12




2





jo IO O IOOO


10 6








15 50c


OIIO




2





jo 8 6 1700


OIIO


4


2


6


p 12 6; 70c


13 3




2


6


Io 15 o>


14 6




1 2






THROUGH ENGLAND. 279



Place. \ Rent. I Flocks \ Profit.
I. s. d. rife to
No. 52. o 15 o :

53- ° l 5 o 400



Average, o 12 o 878



Fleece. Vahu.



I s. d
o 12 o
o 12 6



o 12 8



#.



J. </.

2 6



Profit from 15 s. upwards.



Place.

No. 18

20
21

35
37
54



Average,



Rent.

. s. d.

8 o

o o

o o

18 o

10 o

o o

13 o



Flocks 1 Profit.

rife to ] I. s. d.

1 0000 19 o

fat o 15 6

ditto 1 1 00

6000 19 o

1 00

1200 1 00

40ofat 1 o o



Fleece,
lb.

9k



o it o



8000 19 o



Val
s.




3

5
6


O
6



4





2





2






9M 3 9



Recapitulation.



Place. Rent. Flocks Profit. Fleece. Value.





1. s. d.\


rife to




lb.


To 5 j.


12


2000


049


31


5 j. to 10 J, 12


1540


8 8


5\


ioj. toi5J.p 12


878


12 8


6


exclufive.










At 1 5 s.


15


800


19


91



x.


</.


1


6


1


9


2


5



3 9

The little dependance there is, in gene-
ral, on the foil for the profit of fheep, is
clearly evinced from the rent being exactly
the fame in the three firft articles, while
T A. the



280 THE FARMER'S TOUR

the profit varies from 4 .r. 9 d. to 1 2 s. 8 d, ;
■which is, upon the whole, very remarkable,
and mews that general good hufbandry,
and a tolerable breed, are of more confe-
quence than richnefs of land : but when it
rifes to the fertile marfhes of Lincohifiirc,
with their very large breed, the cafe changes,
as may be fuppofed.

As profit increafes, the fize of the flocks
decreafes ; the fall is unbroken : This
proves that the large flocks are generally
a poor breed of fheep, or cKe the hufbandry
very bad ; but the fatting fyftem is plainly*
from the whole courfe of the enquiry, the
mofl profitable, and the fmaller flocks in-
clude all thefe.

Profit, wool, and value of the fleece, are
all connected, as one might fuppofe them
to be; the three columns are in regular
gradation.

It is a very important enquiry to difcover
that management of fheep which is moft
profitable on given foils ; thefe minutes
will not completely anfwer it, but they
enable us to form a nearer idea than gene-
ral notions.

In my obfervations on the Dorfetfiire
hufbandry, I endeavoured to fhew that their

3 breeding



THROUGH ENGLAND. 281

breeding fyftem was remarkably unprofit-
able, from their applying vaft tracts of
land to keeping a few fheep ; but as this in-
feriority did not fo much proceed from a
defect in breeding, in general, as from a
want of turnips, &c. it is not fo mudi to
the purpofe, as the inftance of the beft far-
mers in Norfolk, who have changed their
management, and inftead of conftant breed-
ing flocks, now keep annual fattening ones.
They buy in wether lambs, f year old, in
Auguji ; keep hardily through winter; to
gralTes in fummer, folding conftantly ; foon
after Michaehnas to turnips, and fold fat
from Candlemas to May-day ; four to 1 acre
of grafs, and ten to 1 acre of turnips. I
have been the more particular in this repe-
tition, as I conceive it is on all, except rich
grazing ground, the mod profitable iheep
management.

The firft winter and the fecond fummer
they are folded, which pays for their keep-
ing, as they live in a hardy manner, and
even in winter only eat the leavings of the
fat ftock at turnips, by which means that
crop is eaten clean ; never the cafe if only

one ftock feeds them. In the fummer thev

j

have the clover and ray-grafs, which im-
prove



282 THE FARMER'S TOUR

prove them in flefh at the fame time that
they ftand the fold, and being iinifhed on
turnips, there is the great advantage of fel-
ling at the molt profitable time of the year.
All thefe circumitances are of confequence.
But this management further anfwers well,
in proportioning the turnips and clover, fo
that all may be confumed by one flock if
the farmer likes it ; there mould for this
fupport of the fheep be about double the
quantity of grafs to that of turnips, which
is juft what one would wifh, as it agrees
with that beneficial courfe of,

i. Turnips 3. Clover 2 years

2. Barley 4. Wheat.

And to fhew that there is a real profit
on this application of thefe crops, I fhall
form a flight calculation of this fheep ma-
nagement on fuch foils, and under fuch
circumftances, as thofe in the weflern parts,
of Norfolk where it is pradifed.

100 fheep require 25 acres of

clover; rent, &c. of it at 12s.

fee vol. II. p. 15, - £. 15 o of
Tythe and town charges, 1 15 o

£eed, -^ - 5 ° °

Carryover, 21 15 o, .

I i






W



1






THROUGH ENGLAND. 283

Brought over, - £.2115 o

Ten acres of turnips.

ent, - ' £. 6 o o

Tythe and rates, o 10 o

4Ploughings,at zs. 6d. 5 o o
Seed, harr. and tawing, 015 o
Manuring, - 500

Hoeing, - 300



ear,


tl

i
ni
u
the



20 5 o

j. 00 Wethers, fuppofe at 10s. 50 o o
jSuppofe a fhepherd at 18/. to

1000, the joth is, - 1 16 o



Total, - - 93 16



Produff.
1 00 Wethers, fat in April, &c.

at22J. - - no o o

Wool, at2x. - - 1000

jManure from feeding 10 acres

turnips with them fat, at 25. r. 12 jo o
ft. winter and a fummer's fold

lean, at one fquare yard per

fheep, is 7 \ acres, worth 30 s. n 5 o



Total, - - 143 15 o

Expences, - 93 16 o



Profit,



This account I believe is realized on

an average ; the turnips and clover pay

\L Ss. per acre profit; this is a degree

I of






Ik



284 THE FARMERS TOUR

of advantage, which will admit many 4
deductions ; for if thofe crops paid but i
10 s. or even 15 s. it would be a much more to
beneficial application of them than many ik!
in ufe. They are confidered as fub- c cj
ordinate to corn ; many farmers would If, t
not think themfelves badly off, if theyrftra
only payed their own expences, from their j id
being lure means of getting fine corn
crops.

This eftimate is made with a view to
the Norfolk breed ; but if better (heep were
taken, for infiance Dorfetjhire or Wiltjkire
wethers, I apprehend the profit would be
more confiderable.

In fome places, where fheep are well
understood, their time of buying in is May\
but that is not fo well ; the price will be
much higher, and the farmer will lole thefloce
advantage of winter feeding his ground,
and at the fame time fuffer the lofs of eating
his turnips with only one flock ; an object
of real confequence, but not well under-
flood in nine tenths of the kingdom.

That I am moderate in the rife from 1 os.
to 22J-. appears from their buying thefe
lambs about Aylfiam at ioj-. in Augujl, and
felling the following April or May at i8x.

V/herea



THROUGH ENGLAND. 285

Vhereas I reckon only 4/. more for keep-
g them a year longer ; the Aylftam prac-
is uncommonly profitable, but it does
t confume the clover, which is neceflary.
Refpe&ing the rot ; if the reader throws
is eye over that column, he will at once
that the accounts are fo amazingly
mtradictory, that nothing is to be ga-
hered from them. Every one knows,
or hat moiflure is the caufe, and that fine
jlry downs never rot ; but
i Is it water that falls in rains and ftagnates ?
rai \ That falls in rain and flows ?
Floods from ftreams ?
Floods in fummer or floods in winter ?
Water from fprings that ftagnates ?
Water from fprings that flows ?
Water from particular foils ?
There are two or three pieces of intelli-
gence, which inform us what will rot;
id, ,mt perhaps the moft material point is to

■enow what will not rot.
jjeel; Mr. Bake*wellh account, and that at
\Ioretoriy feem to be the moft explicit.

I (hall in the next place review the accounts
,)f folding, and quantities of food applied
;o keeping fheep.



h



ilk



[0&



286 THE FARMER'S TOUR



Places.

Glcndon

Tilion

Alfrcton ■

lidf-well

Cbejferfiild

Blytbe

Wombivell

Bootham

Lpverington.



Fold.



Valued.



Fold all, even is. yd. per ico
fatting fheep. a week

Never.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto.



Runclott
Majp.ngham

Snettijham



Warbam

JJylpam

Earlham

Woodbridge

Ilajiead

Cbkbefter

Youngsbcrry



All.

All, except at

lambing ;

winter heft.
All the year.



Alltheyear,ex.

lambing.
All the year.
Never.
All the year.
Never.
Ditto.
Only in fumm.



Sheep per
acre.



I :n
winter



I ofcole-
feed will
keep 12
from
Micha
elmas to
Cbrift,



Quantity
fdded.



€00 fold 40
acres per ann



4 to an
acre clo-
ver, 10
to an ac
turnips.



Mr. ArbKtl«!ct j All the year.


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Online LibraryArthur YoungThe farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 4) → online text (page 12 of 25)