Arthur Young.

The farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 4) online

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Cbeam



In fummcr.



I s. O d. J per
koicper week



JVbieb J,
beji,






la
ith



b



1 acre
turnips,
i.oolhee.
1 r days/



230 an acre :


Wethers


week.


beft.


Jin a ftandino




fold on ftraw




for turnips,




J 134 and 30




} lambs in fix




weeks, made





28 loads of


dung, at 10s.




from 5 loads




and 40 trui's




of oat draw ;




eat 2 acres of




turnips ; clear




profit by dung




7.1. is. 6 d.




per acre.




300 two acres




in 3 weeks.








THROUGH ENGLAND. 287



FJd.



Valued.



Folding hired
at 40 j. an
acre.



Steep pe
are.



All the



Never.
Never.



Summer.



year.



All the year.



Never.

All the year.

Never.

Summer.



Only wethers

all the year.
Ditto.



Ditto.



Summer,

wethers in

winter.
Summer.



4 fheep
to an ac
clover or
trefoilc



3 to an
acre on
the
downs.



Quantity
folded.



WbkbSil

bejl.

IOO ewes equal
to 140 we-
thers.

Wethers fo
much better
than ewes,
that never
fold the latter.

8 fheep to a
lqu.are perch.



Fold of an ewe
worth 1 i.



ioco
J 5



wortn
a night.



1300 ftc:;,



1 pertwi (Half the year.

- " [Some in fumm.

f tcr. [Very few.

* 'j Down I All the year



jofliei

quire
20oacres
grafs, &
20 tons
of hay.

1 A 1 -•-?
ftr acre



300 fhe"p 400
fquare yards



100 wethers,
ic acres, twice
in a place.



ioco fheep an
acre in a night
once.

I150 fheep 30
acres.



a Iheep 1000 thirty
'• 2;res.



zoo an acre in
a week.



Ewe fold beft,
3 to 2.



Wethers ; they
are kept by
fume merely
for folding.



Wethers ; ewes
will net bear
la winter ; Sc
make more
dung than
ewes.

Vv ethers, ditto.

Ewes beft in.
fummsr.



Ewes beft from
puking more

water.



288 THE FARMERS TOUR



Placet.

B. Cannont

JIarleyford
Mr. Burke
Becomjield

Average of fuch
particulars as
are reducible
to numbers.



Fold.

All the year.

Very few,
All the year.
Only wethers.



Valuti. \Sbeefper
acre,




S^iantity | Wbiib
folded. _ ] btfl

2C0 an acre in Equal
10 nights.



fiU



ioo fheep 14
acres per ann



Thefe two averages are the medium of
extremely various accounts, including
fome that hardly know what folding is,
others that run their fheep quickly over
a great breadth of land, and feveral that
fold only in the fummer. None of them
nearly equals the profit made by Mr. Ar-
buthnot, by means of littering his fheep,
which amounts to 22/. 19/. per 100 per
ann, if that article is deducted, the average
is no more than 4/. 9^. 4*/. which mews
that, upon the whole, this article of folding
(principally from not continuing it through
winter) is but poorly conducted.

The fyftem of winter folding has been
ftrangely neglected ; at Maffingham in
Norfolk^ it is reckoned much the beft ;
and the flovens of Dorfetfiire have found
out, that the fold at Michaelmas is much
better than in the heighth of fummer ;
and yet the fame blockheads leave their

yard-






THROUGH ENGLAND.

yard-dung fpread to a three months fum-
mer fun. But in //•'. they are \.

enough to winter fold their ewes as well
as wethers, and at lambing time, or in
Very bad weather, litter them with ftraw.

The management is upon the whole fo
bad, that it will be trufting to a furer guide,
to follow fome of the fingle articles of intelli-
gence, where it is good, and fupply what
is wanting in one, by another.

At B:akjburn, the hiring price of fold-
ing, is 40 j-. an acre.

At Findon^ 300 fheep, 400 fquare yards ;
this is ioc — 10 acres.

Youngsberry, 100 fheep, 20 acres.

Cheain^ ditto 1 2

Moretoiiy ditto 10 twice in a

place.

Majjingham, ditto 7

As Youngsberry fo much exceeds, I fliall
reduce it half, which will allow a double
folding to equal the reft, as they certainly
muPc be; the average of them then is nine
acres and a half, which at the above price
of 40 s. comes to 19/. per ann. for 100
fheep. Againft which calculation, I do not
think there ftand any good objections.

Vol. IV. U Another



290 THE FARMER'S TOUR*

Another way of calculating it will be, to
include the advantage of littering in winter.

Suppofe them folded in the com-
mon manner half the year,
paying, - - £.9100

The other half year to confume
in proportion to Mr. Arbnth-
jiot's exoeriment feven acres,
which will laft juft 26 weeks ;
thefe at 2 /. 2 s. 6 d. per acre,
are, - - - 14 17 6



Total profit by fold of 100 fheep
per ann. - - 24



7



This, all things ccnfidered, is the fyftem,
at which every man mould aim ; and that
he may equal the latter part of it, which
appears the mod difficult, cannot be doubted,
lince Mr. Arbuthnot bought his ftraw at
the high price of 20j\ the trufYed load;
whereas in nine tenths of the kingdom,
it is to be had for lefs than half that price,
and ftubble, fern, &c. in many places got
much cheaper. As to the health of the
fheep, they are much better off on warm
beds, well fheltered, than lying on th
wet ground ; but the common IViltJhm
practice mews, that there is no objectio
on that account.

Refpedting



THROUGH ENGLAND. 291

Refpecting the comparifon between an
ewe and a wether fold, opinions feem
inuch divided; but if the univerfal practice
be conlidcred, where fheep are well under-
flood, of folding the latter in winter, while
they do not venture it with ewes, the
fupeiiority of fuch a Hock in this refpect
cannot, I think, be difputed.

But this notion of not folding ewes in
winter is totally inadmiffible ; common
practice in Norfolk, TViltfiire, &c. fhews
plainly, that it is an abfurdity ; and in-
dividuals have proved it ; Mr. Burke
has conftantly practifed it at Beconsfieldy
contrary to the practice of that neighbour-
hood, and with uniform fuccefs. Land-
lords ought therefore ftrenuoufly to endea-
vour to change this practice; and if they
can bring in the ufe of the ftanding fold
well littered, it will be fo much the better.



U 2



292 THE FARMER'S TOUR



LETTER XLIX.



TH E next article I mall review is that
of cows, in which will probably
be found as many variations as in fheep ;
the averages of the circumflances concern-
ing them, are much worthy of attention ;
not only to know the general fact, but alfo
the means of remedying bad management.
I mud, as in the Tour through the Northern
Counties, reduce weight of hay to acres,
by the rule of I C. wt. for every i s. rent
when no rent is named, one ton and \
per acre.



3-
4-
5-
6.

7-
8.

9-
lo.
ii.

12.

13-
14.

*5-



Place.



llodjlon
Bl'ihoo, tb

Sueniy

Tdi.n
D:jh ey
Aifreton

TiddJweR

Chejierfdd
Laivton
Gateford
Blytbe

Doncajler
Broad 1



Rent of\ g» , « ^

Grjji. 5 |§s 3

r? f* ^

S- S. a-

. s- «. S a S



5

7
2

5

ib

5
5



6 1
c 1
o I



o 1
o 2
O I

oi§

O I±

o 1 1

O I
O.I

13



Product.


Lett fur.


sS


i*
§


ta


S








ts


>>^


»g


Si


'-•






s;


a*





~W


'.. J. d.




V







<->








~t


3


c


?








fi


s

„ [
1 2




~5




600






5


10


20


L


500






<i


J 5


10


L


500






3






L


500






•5






L


5100






6 2"






L


700






3





10


L


570






3






J.

L


600






5







L


400






1 L

~ -


6




L


700






3


6




L


6 i




-


3 5

4 1


10


M

S








2






s



■7

7v



;:-



THROUGH ENGLAND. 293



Vkct.



Wbmb-well

\evcr\r,gton

{untie;:

mttijbam

Varlam

M&em

hz

fdleigh
'afield
Wtgiterry

for,.;,:

Learn
\ddbgicn

-

I

r. Turner

tto
ilury

I White

ir.e

Chard

gb

union

•cmsf.cld



. 1






Rent

Graj.


'


S 3

3


S5




Si.


.




6


a




!>1










R.I


6.










4 '








1. s.


d.


-1


1


5.


A t.




: s.


.:'.


.-1
5



8








1


c








6 10











4


.




s


1




If






4











:.


2






1


(


»i














6










1


c


















6








1





>i






6









5

6 1


8


20 13


'


1


I








5 5


c














1


(












3 6


6




S


:t ;i


r.


1


c


2


c


t






- 15


c




6






z


c


I


c


t






3 7


6






10






1


c


I*






4 15











6








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1


I*






5 9





4 4







5








1


c


z






4 10





4







S




- T :




1 10


c


J ?














H











1


c


I






5 °











4


10






1 10


c


I






5









5


3


15 10




» 5


c








4



















1 5


c








5


ck
















1


c


I






5 °


ok














1


t








7









1 of


5


20


*<


1


c


























> 15


c


















4






s


1 1


I








5


















r


c












3 12


6


•7§


5 T




1:




15


c


■]






5 5





3 10







- T . .
34 'j


L


2 10


c


i

4






6





3







2|


s


15


c


I






5





3 °





6


3" 6


!


1 10


t


I


*








3 12


6+


4


2f S


"*&


2


c




I

*


'It


5 «


6


3 "


6


5




I


11 L


1 J 5


c






1


5 2


6


i-4 U





6


4




jl°l L


2 c















5 5















1


c








6





4 °


o|












2 10


c








.6 10





4 10


"•1












il JO


c


I










4















I 10


c


1'




1 C


7 *5





5 J S


ol


6






S


Il 10


c


■■i




I**


7





5 »


6


6


C




1 : L


« 5


c












4







?








3


c


























[2


c








4 '°









4*


2





L


|


c




±


1 !


Ii


5 5

I5 10




>




7


3




L





; 4 - i


2


7


4 9 J 3












l










; —






1



fTurnips

* Clover
ar.d ray.

§By fuck-
ling.

4 Alder-

.

the
i
for hogs
into t he
bargain.

***Andf

acre bar-
ley ft raw

% And i

acre ftraw

for litter,

which

makes

5 loads of

rotten

dung.

jl&halfac.
after grafs.

And 1 i
acre draw.

* And 1
aci e draw

••Muuch

fuckilirg.



U 3



294 THE FARMER'S TOUR

From thefe averages it appears, that
the mean rent ofgrafs land is I /. 6s.8d.
per acre, of which average grafs a cow
eats one acre and one third in fummer*
and as much hay in* winter. Thus fed fhe
gives four gallons per diem of milk, which
makes rjlb. of butter a week, on a medium,
of making cheefe or not : fomething better
than one hog is kept to every cow. Under
thefe circumftances they let at 4/. 3/. 2d.
and the whole product is 5/. 10;. confe-
quently the mean profit of thofe who hire
them is 1 /. 6 s. icd. a head. How far thefe
products make cows anfwer, will bell
appear from calculating their expences.

Rent of two acres and two thirds

ofgrafs, at i/.6s.Sd. - £.3 11 o
Tythe and rates, fuppofe4.f. in

the pound, - o 14

Mowing, czc. Sec. one acre and

one third of hay, - 010

Suppofe all aihilance from ftraw

only, - - o 10



o






Total



5 5



Which expence of five guineas is re-
turned by 4/. 3 J", id. let : but if the whole
produce is reckoned, then the account
will be,



THROUGH ENGLAND. 295



5



O



As above, - - £.5

A dairy-maid's wages and board
1 3 /. me takes care of 13; ib
this is - - 100

Wear and tear, &c. of dairy utcn-
fils, - -



o



Firing, at leaft, - 076



6


l 7


6


5


10





1


7


6



Total,
Product,

Lofs,



That this account is exact, I do not
pretend ; all that is wanting here to be
proved, is that cows thus conducted are un-
doubtedly unprofitable. I do not think
the excefs if any thing is great ; for in
many parts the dairy men have the keeping
a mare and colt, and all the fwine of the
farm -yard ; therefore let thefe be calculated,
and then the eftimate again examined;
and I think no perfon will believe, that
cows are among the profitable articles of
the farmer.

Upon the journey in feveral places,
I afked the reafon of their keeping cows.
On giving my reafons for thinking them
difadvantageous, the general anfwer I re-
ceived was their confuming that food,
U 4 why:h



296 THE FARMER'S TOUR

which they could not apply to other ufes : L i'<
and in fome places, this is partly fatisfac-

the number is extremely few: i
for an idea of this may be formed from the
rent of the land applied to them on an ave- :i
rage, which is 26 s. 8<r/. ; a circumftance,
which alone mews that it might be applied
to any thing; land of 20s. an acre would
fat an ox as well as feed cows. But where
the grafs of a farm is too poor for grazing,
and at the fame time too wet for fheep,
which is die cafe with great tracts o£ coun-
try, then cows muft be kept. Grazing
of variations enough to allow all
food produced by a farm, to be
i i it. The good grafs, all hay,
ftraw for litter, turnips, &c. fo that every
man rri; iage if he has good

grafs land ; and that it will prove much
more pi ?, than the fyftem of cows

here explained, cannot for a moment be
doubted.

For cows to be an advantageous article,
there are feveral requifites neceffary, nvany
of which are neither underftood or thought
of in nine tenths of this tract of country.

The mod material point is the winter
food ; as to ftraw, they mould have what

they



THROUGH ENGLAND. 297

hey will eat and make into dung ; for
:he manure gained will well pay for it ;
juthay is an article totally to be ftruck off;
Iraw alone, when dry, and ftraw with
urnips, when they give milk, mould be
he fyftem. This change would make a
-aft di iTerence ; and that it is quite prac-
icable, appears from the conduct at Aylfoam
Ear/ham in Norfolk, where turnips
Qt fupply the place of hay. In Suffolk,

he/ underftand this point fo well, that
hey will keep no cow that calves before
4pril ) if they can pofhbly help it, that
traw may be the only food till very late in
he fpring.

Another point is that of hogs, and this
»ught to be the grand profit of the dairy.
Uifterns to keep the warn during fum-
ner, againft it is wanted in winter, are
ibfolutely requifite ; and in the ufe of it>
lot given promifcuoufly to flock hogs,
hat will live on turnips and the farm yard;
mt only to fows with pigs, and weaned
)igs, due regard being alfo had to feeding
he hogs half and three fourths grown, and
he fows, on clover in fummer, which is a
ink in this chain of management. With
proper attention to this fyftem, the cows
5 would



298 THE FARMER'S TOUR

would pay, on a moderate computation,
zos. a head more than at prefent, which
with faving all the hay, and fubftituting
turnips in their room, would convert this
article from a lofing into a profitable one.

The breed is another point of no flight
importance ; for if fmall mongrel breeds
are found to exceed for the pail, others
of near twice the fize, the faving would be
prodigious, and there is good reafon to
think this the cafe.

Having thus remarked what was necef-l
fary on cows in general, from the average
of all circumftances, throughout the whole!
Tour, I mall in the next place divide the]
table according to product.



Prodiiti under 5 /.



Places.


Rent. \Produ3. \ L


eft at.


D.


M.


H.




1. s. dk s . dk


s.


d.








No. 11


1 00400








*\


5


17


1 00400








2


2


2 5


1 04 15




6|


6




27


1 04 10 04








5




31


1 50400,




1 ,






54


2 04 10 0'




M


2




Aver.


c 4 24 5 104





o 5 l|


^


4



Breed'

L

M
M
M



THROUGH ENGLAND. 299
upwards , wider 6 /.



ip



N



7.

3 >
41



29 1

30 1

32 1
3 1

33 !

3: !

39°
41 o

43 2
45 |i
55 *



3
o

o

15

o
10

5
o
1

>5
'5

o

15
10



°5
°5

°5

J 5



. j. d

o





10

7
5
9



I?// #/.



°5
05



°5
°5



c
o
c
o
o
o





o

o

o

o

°'3

°3

6J3

^4

o



4 4



3f . #.

3

3

of



10

o

1 1

12



O

ojo

65

c6



7 3



BrceJ.

L

L

L

L

L

M

M

M



L

M

L

L

L



verages i 3 25 3



j;3



66



3t 10



Product at 61. and upwards > under 7/.



No.



2


1


7


;


1





*3


1


5


I':


1





20


1





40


2


! 3


47


1


O


48


2


1 D



616 o

06 o

o!6 6

c 6

06 o

G 'J IO



I vera ires 1



06














9


10













5





c










3


5


c










r





c








B


8


20





3










z|







+

















+


10











3


1


16


8


8


4§8











L
L

III
S
M
S



Producl at nl. and upwards.






No. 7

12

■34

5 1
Averages



5
10


10

[O



c 7
°7
°.7

°7

°7



7 °7 3 °5







3

3



6





10!
6


5


20


6


5


6




1
^


7


V 3











3 oo THE FARMER'S TOUR
R ecap it ulation.



Under 5 /.
5/. to 6/.
61. to 7/.

7 I. upwards



Rent.
I. s. d.
1 4 t
1 3 2
1 9 o
170



ProduB. I Lett at. E.
I. s. d. I. s. d.



4 5 i°

5 3 3

6 3 3

7 3°



5



400

3 '5 6
3 16 8
3 9






From fhefe averages it appears, that
the product, though not regularly depend-
ing either on grafs, butter, milk or hogs
yet is there a general dependance for th<
average of the two nrft. and the two laft,
that is all to 6 /. and all above 6 /. thee
both grafs, butter, milk and hogs, woulc
correfpond with product, and alfo the
letting price ; whereas in the table at pre
fent there are fome manifeft contradictions.
Nothing in thefe mediums give us the!
leaf}; reafon to change our opinion, refpect
ing the conduct of this part of the farmer's
flock.






A



THROUGH ENGLAND. 301



LETTER L,



f I ^ O difcover the real price of provifions
JL in every county, and to know the
general averages of the whole kingdom, be-
comes every day a more intercfting object;
opinions on this point, inftead of being en-
lightened in proportion as knowledge is
gained, too often remain in fufpence ; the
fixed rates of all forts of eatables confumed
1 by the poor, the mod advantageous to them
and the nation in general, is unknown,
and hig ble ; nor can it ever be

well ur the real prices

brought to light. Before we can cliicover
1 what ought to Z'e, we muft kr: ! .t //.

I had the fatisfadHon of laying before the
public in my Lift Tour, exact i. "on

on this heee, through a, very c
part of the kingdom.

I have, in this journey, made (irnilar
enquiries, and mall proceed to draw

us together in one view, that ti».c
refuk may be clearly underftood.

!



302 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Butchers meat, butter, cheefe, and bread,
demand the mod attention. I give the
average of meats, and the diftance of each
place from London.



I



Places.



1. Hempjlead,

2. Triftg,

3. Bliji'.'orth,

4. Hazel beech,

5. Glcndon,

6. Quenby,

7. Difiley,

8. Alfreion,

9. Radburn,

10. Tiddf-jjell,

1 1 . Cbejterfield,
IZ. Laavton,

1 3 . Broad/worth,

14. Wamhwell)

15. Boot bam,

16. Snvinebead,

1 7. Lcveringto?'.,
1 3. Runclon,

1 9. Snettijham,

20. Warhaniy

21. Ayljbam,

22. Nortuicb,

23. Hadleigb,

24. Youngsberry

25. Peterjham,

26. Cuddington,

27. Fever/bam,



to

1*



be



22

3°i

61
77

78



106

135
122
146

134,
142.

'73 :
172
12S

98

90.

ioo|

1 12

no'

120

106'

60'

24
10

x 3 !
1145



t^ 1 p>i fa.|



rf. d. \d.

/:4 +
i 42 J 1

S 3f 3f

5 4l 4!

6 ? i ;, x

J L ■ 1 3 2 3 2
II 6 '4 14

|6 4 3*

1 6 k k

l i> 3l

: 6 z-.4i 3f

- 3f'3*

w

6



3l 32

,3 3x
|4|U 3i
f 6*4 34



f6
i:6i



3 E*

4 I3z

3 3i

4 3y

i7 2fl3i

, 4
I «t 4 4

i,84»3i"4
19 4i4t



:S

d.

31

4

i

+

3j
3|

3 >

3i

4
3

3!
3a

3

3z
3f

J,

J:

3i

3f
3^

3i

3i

3^



S



•*


^




ci


c











<■»


d.


d.


4


4


4


4


3


3l


3


3|


31


3*






J4.


3 7


32-


, r


.'7.


3i


Ik


*3z


3|


3*


3^



3i

4
3l

3i

3
3*

;4

3i

3
|3f

!3f



; 3 t

|3|
3*
3 1
3*

3}
3 ;
3|

3i

3i



jl J2'



h ,5



4i

3

4^

4f
4i



3?

4

I4t



* Two parts wheat, and one rye. f Part barlej

% Not minnted ; fupplied therefore by the average of tl

prices before and after.

j| Oat cakes.

§ Not minuted ; fupplied from the Quenby price.
% Wheaten and oat ; awerage.
** Not minuted; fupplied from the preceding.
\\ Coarfe joints fold. XX The London prices.



m
mi

TO

vk

otbc

k
pat
If no
teats ;
No
1!! the
hfcn
Tod



!>.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 303



Places.

28. Rye,

29. Sheffield PI.

30. Walberton,

31. Ijk Wight,

32. C fit chill,
3 3 . Moreton,

34. Taunton,

35. i?. Canons,

36. Harleyford,

37. Beconsfield,

Averages,






t=



^



6*i*

55 %

100 2

us"!
1371!

8o| 2
29 2
27 i|



iba


r>


1 B


Cf,






' 5




r-


d.


-


4i


i 6


4


8


4


8


2 i


6'

°4


i!;


°4


2


6


3*


61


- <

34


7i|4


,'•:■


•]'



I|6i3i3i






4
3 J

4

3v

3

3f

3

, 1
- 1

4

3



SI ^

SI 2



d. \L
4 4
3*3
4 3l

4 |3i
3 3
2I3

2 2i

5 4
5 4



^



d.

4

3i

31

3l

3

3

•i

3

4l

4



3t3f 3r



Before I divide this table, I mull be
allowed to remark, that none of thefe prices
are extravagant ; and if we reflect that the
courfe of the Tour runs much through the
counties furrounding the capital, from
whence we may conjecture that labour is
high ; if this is confidered, thcfe rates mull:
not be thought high. Bread, the principal,
is low ; butter, though not an article of
great importance, is moderate ; cheefe is
by no means high ; and the average of all
meats at 3 </. f, no one will conceive to be
at all oppreiTive : but bread at 1 d. \ brings
all the reft, fuppofing them high, to be
moderate upon the whole.

To difcover what influence the capital
may have on thefe prices, we mull divide
according to diftancc.



304 THE FARMER'S TOUR



Fifty miles around London.



No. i.

o

24.

25-

26.

27.
29.

36.

37-

Average,



Bread,


Butter.


d.


d.


I


1


I

I 1

4-

I *
*


7*
8|
9


li

4


9
6


2




U


11


If


71



Cbeefe.
d.

Al
41
4
4^

O.I.

4i
4
4
41

4,



Average

Meats.

d.

4

4

4

4i

41

41

31

41

4



Fr(?;w 50 to 100 #z//£f.












y/ *rrfgr




Bread.


Butter.


Cheefe.


Meats.




d.


4.


d.


d.


No. 3.


I


5


4*


3i


4-


I


5


1


31


5-


2

A-


6


4^


1
D2


6.


I


6


3i




16.


ii


4*


4


■2 x
D5


J 7-


if


6|


4


3 X


18.


U


6





n 1


23-


if


71


4


3i


28.


*|


7
/


41


4


3o-





8


4


3^


31-


if


8


2 -


31


32.


2


61


if


3


35-


2


6|


*
3*


3


Average,


"IT


6|


2! 1

1 1


0$



THROUGH ENGLAND. 305



From 100 to 150 miles.



B niter,
d.

6k
6
6
6

7
6|

6

6

6

6|

7
61





Br sad.




d.


No. 7.


I


8.




9-


I


10.


I


1 1.


i


12.


1


ts-


1


19.


if


20.


i|


21.


If


22.


H


33.


H


34-


if


Average,


ii




1



6-





Avcrag*


Chcrfe.


Meats.


d.


d.


ol


1


51


0*


4




4


3*


4


3*


4


2l

5 +


4^


or





3l


4


3*


3


3*


4


3*


2I


Zl


2


3


si


OX


'


— — —


31


1



From 150 ft> 170 #///e\r.



No. 13;
14.

Average,



50 Miles,
50 to 100
iooto 150
150 to 170



1 1



7*



3i
3*



Recapitulation*



Ii


7*


41


ii


61


31


ii


6*


3*


M


?i


31



3*
+



Vol. IV,



X



D



06 THE FARMER'S TOUR



It is here to be obferved, that the refult
of fcarcely any table can be more natural than
this ; the effect in each column is fuch as
might be expected. Bread is uninflu-
enced in its price by the neighbourhood
of the capital, arifing from the eafe with
which wheat is transported, and from
all places that have a regular demand in the
way of trade, (for fo wheat at London may
be called) being better fupplied than others
with any commodity. This equality of the
price of bread throughout England, is
a proof of the excellent internal police of
corn, which obtains, in this kingdom,


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

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