Arthur Young.

The farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 4) online

. (page 18 of 25)
Online LibraryArthur YoungThe farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 4) → online text (page 18 of 25)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Walberton
Northern part
Ijle Wight
Southern Ditto
Alresford
Giibury
Critchill
A4oretQH
Came
Leigh
Taunton
Donnir.gton
Becom field

Averages per
i c /. a year,



Ren


'ms.

\Ac.


Co
•>*

r^
J*"


1 ^
9




r




Co

R
a




"5


'2C0


£■

225


I-

79


60


'£•

86


I-

:1


I-

340


£•

; «37


ICO
















300


60
















250


IOO
















500


100


300














400
550


IOO
















I coo


300


300


1158


79


IOO


124


30 210


1898


IOO














!


400


500
















3000


300


550


865


241


100


132


1 3° 545


2013




300














700


IOO
















300


ICO
















300


300
















1500


300
















3000


IOO
















500


ICO
















400


300
















2000


200
















1200


300
















2000


ICO
200
















300

650


IOO
















500


400
















1500


200
















1000


200
















75°


200
















1400


IOO
















500


500
















2000


3 C0 ,




605


132


150


120


9 1


178


1275


5 00
















3000


100
















300


100I
















300


ICO
















500


ICO










__(






300






273 70


70


56J 28J


146


54°




»








■~~~""i


i







THROUGH ENGLAND. 387

This account turns out far better than
I expedled, and fhews, that this part of
the kingdom is by no means badly flocked ;
almoft five rents and an half being an ample
allowance, though not for the befl
management, yet for very good common
ihufbandry, and is far fuperior to the fame
. average drawn in my Northern Tour. The
article live Jiock amounts to a confiderabl©
•fum, which is ever a fign of good hus-
bandry. Furniture, again, equals imple-
ment's, at which I before expreffed my
[furprife ; but being found in two fuch
[journies to agree, one cannot refufe affent
|to that proportion ; but I continue in think-
ling, that the latter ought much to exceed it.
The great importance of a farmer flocking
[his land well, which can be only done
I by pofleffing plenty of money, is fhrongly

exemplified in feveral inftances in the
tinutes of this Tour. In the article, live

tock, it is of more efpecial confequence ; Mr.
tBakeioell of Di/hley's farm, is a proof
[of this ; and honeft William White* %> at
iMoreton, another ftriking proof, that great

numbers of cattle ar.? the fupport of a

farm.

e c 2



388 THE FARMER'S TOUR



LETTER LVIL



TYTHE is an article, which here
demands attention : the true ftate of
the kingdom's agriculture cannot be known,
unlefs the compofitions for the tenth are
difcovered, and fome idea gained of the
proportion between the parts where it is
taken in kind, with thofe in which it is
compounded.



Places.


Compounded or


§






►o


?


g


o




Gathered.




5"




k


**


<2


$






**






bo .^


^








s.d.


S.d.


s.d.


s.d.' s.d.




s. a


Hemp/lead


Comp.
















Blifworth


3 5. 6 d, per acre
















Hazelbcecb


Gathered
















Glendon


4 s. 6d. per acre
















Slhienby


Gathered
















Radburn


Comp.


5 °


5 o


2 6








i J


Tiddfwell


Moftly free
















Cbejlerfield


Comp.
















Doncojler


Gathered
















Broadfworth


Ditto
















Wombivell


Moftly gathered


•5 o


5 o


3 o


3 ©








Bootham


is. bd. in £.
















Canwick


Comp. inclof.
free


5 6


2 6


2










Sw'rnebead


All gathered
















Leveringtori


Gathered

















THROUGH ENGLAND. 389



Places.



Runclon

Maffingbam

Snettijham

Warham

Aylfnam

£arlbam

Sracon jf/b

Fleg Hundred

Hadleigb

Colcbejler

Toungsberry

Cbeam

Feverjham

Beakjburn

Sheffield Place

IValberton

JJle of Wigbt

Mr es ford

Gilbury

Crhchill

Came

Mapperton

Leigh

Donnington

Harleyford
Beconsfeld

Averages,



Compounded or
Gathered.


Si


7*


O


k


s
"5-"


P

^1




s.d.


s.d.


s.d.


s.d.


s.d.


S.d.


Comp. 20 d. an














acre














'Comp.














Us. m£.














2 s. an acre














3*- ^ £•














,Comp.














\is. 9d.m£.














I3 x. per acre














'4 s. per ditto














|3J. 6d.per£.

iComp.

Gathered


46


46


2 3




1 6


I


IDitto














(Ditto














iComp.














^Gathered














3 s. 6d.lnjr.

jGathered














4s. 6 d. in £.














is. 6d. in £.


4


4


4


40




2


2 s. in £.














•Both; comp. 3 s.


4


3 °


2 6


2 6






an acre














Gathered














Gathered


48


4


2 8


3 2


1 6


i 6


35. 3^ in the


pound, and 3;.
\d. per acre








1 -







9

S.d.



Twenty-three places compounded ; eighte*
gathered.

C c 3



39o THE FARMER'S TOUR




LETTER LVIII.

EXT, you muft allow me, Sir, to
give a table of the value of the foil
at the market price ; being the years
purchafc at which land is fold. This is
an object of no flight value in political
arithmetic ; for the rife of that price at
various periods fince the beginning of the
laft century, has been often produced
as the grand proof of the great increafe
in value, which refults from an increafe
of foreign commerce ; and to mew how
much indebted the landed intereft is to
trade. The argument was ufed ftrongly
by D^Avenant, and has been repeated
ten thoufand times fince ; it is certainly
a fenfible one, but when adopted by weaker
writers, has been pumed like moft others
too far ; for the lands of England have
rifen in value not fo much in direct propor-
tion to the progrefs of our foreign com-
merce, as to the increafed quantity of
money in Europe^ which has raifed the.
price of all forts of commodities, not only

in






THROUGH ENGLAND. 391

In countries poiTefTing foreign commerce,
but alfo in thofe which have none ; for let
inter co urfe, home trade, and other circum-
ftances be at ever fo low an ebb, flill money
will preferve fomething of that level, fo
ingenioufly flated by Mr. Hume ; and as
an inftance, that the rile in the value of
land in England is not wholly owing to
foreign commerce, I quote Poland^ which
pofleffes no foreign commerce, and yet
the value of the lands in that country,
I am informed on good authority, has rifen
very confiderably in the laft 170 years;
and this mould be fufficient to make thofe
writers, who are ever haranguing on the
advantages of commerce, in oppofetion to
thofe refulting from agriculture, with fuch
unguarded vehemence, more cautious in
their general affertions. None but a fool
or a madman can affert, that an extended
commerce will not raife the value of land,
but it does not therefore follow, that its
effects mould take place to the exclufion of
all others : all our exported commodities
of our own growth and products, fuch as
wool, leather, tin, copper, &c. &c. would
without any help from foreign commerce
C c 4 raife



3.92 THE FARMER'S TOUR

raife the value of land, by bringing a price
proportioned to the quantity of money
jn Europe,



Places.

Hempjlead

Blifworth

Hazelbeecb

£htenby

Dijbley

Radburn

Ttddfwdl

Lawtoi

Blythe

Doncajler

Broadfwortb

Wombwell

Bootham

Canwick

Summer Cajlle

Leverington

Majfingbam

IVarhavi '

Earlbam

Br aeon AJh

Fleg Hundred

Hajicad

Colchejhr

Youngsbcrry

Feverjham

Beakjburn

Sheffield Place

TValberton

IJle of Wight

Alresford

Gilbury

Lymington

Critchill

Jldoreton

Came '



Rent




ITears


I. s.


d.


Pure.


O IO





28


O 12





32 1


o 17





31


16





32 I


16








14


P


371


16








8





35


10





40


2 10





50


6





36


16





40


10








7


6


35


8





3*1


18





27 1


8





28


8


6


271


16





27


15





32


15





26f


14


6





16








O 12








I O





25


O 14





31


10





29


I





32


O 12





31


8





32


10


6


30


10







12








I 11









Land-ikX)
at 4 s. in
the pound
yields

s. d.






THROUGH ENGLAND. 395



places.




Rent.


Years


Land-taxy




/.


s. d.


Pure.


at 4. j. in

the pound
yields

s. d.


Milton Abbey


o


8 6




2 O


Alapperton


o


16 o




O 9


Henlade


I


o o


24


i 8


Taunton








2


Donnington


o


15 o





2 6


Harleyford


o


15





2 8


Becomfield





13


2 7 f




Averages, ,


3il


2



I have added the land tax, what is
really paid in the pound, at a 41. cefs,
at a few places, where I gained that in-
formation.

Thirty one and a half years purchafe is
inferior to the average of the countries
travelled in the Northern Tour ; which
might have been expected from the huf-
bandry being better, and the rent higher ;
when eftates are perfectly cultivated, and
Jet at their full value, they will of courfe
fell for fewer years purchafe, than when
improvements are poffible or probable ; it
is wafte tracts that fell the higheft in this
kingdom.



394 THE FARMER'S TOUR



LETTER LIX.

MANURING is an article that de-
mands fome attention here, but the
minutes in this Tour, of the application of
various forts, are fo numerous, that it may
be difficult to give fo clear an idea of each
kind, as one could wilh ; the only method
that promifes fuccefs, is to form a table for
each, drawing all the intelligence into one
view. The foils that in good hufbandry
do not require ample improvement of this
fort, are fo extremely rare, that we may
pronounce this article to*be one of the mod:
important, if not the firft, in hufbandry ;
it is a fubjed: on which the common farmers
think in large, very juftly ; they are all
fenfible of the great confequence of ma-
nures, and if any fpirit is exerted on their
farms, it is much but this is a principal in
it. The great matter in difpute, and a
point it is of which we are wonderfully
ignorant, is the variations in manures^
which ought to take place in confequence
4 . of



THROUGH ENGLAND. 395

of variations of foil ; how far thefe minutes
will throw light on any one article, can
only be difcovered by examining the feveral
accounts of each, and this I fhall attempt
in the prefent letter, beginning with

LIME.

Mr. Booth. The foil a rich red loam.

Quantity. Six quarters.

Ufe. For turnips of vifible ufe, and alfo

to the barley after.
Quenby. The foil a rich clay.
Quantity, Ten or 12 quarters, at 50 s.
Ufe. It opens and mellows thefe rich clays

greatly.
Duration. It lafts 8 or 9 years.
Difiley. The foil clayey or fandy loams.
Quantity. Ten quarters, at 1 s. 4a 7 . a

quarter at the pit.
Ufe. For turnips or wheat, to which it

does good ; but more to the barley,

clover, and wheat.
Alfreton. The foil a hazel loam on a (tone

bottom.
Ufe. On cold land for wheat.
Quantity. Two cart loads, at 6 s. a load.
RaSurn. The foil rich clavs.
Quantity. Two to three waggon loads, at



3$6 THE FARMER'S TOUR

1 4 j. coft, and i$s. carnage per load;
total 3 /. 10;. to 4 /. per acre.

Duration. Lafts good 7 or 8 yearsl.

Chat/worth to TiddfwelL The foils lime-
ftone, and grit ftone land; the lime
does great fervice on the latter, but
not on the former.

Quantity. Twelve horfe-loads for wheat,
at 6 d. each, befides carriage.

TiddfwelL The foil a light dry loam, on
rocks of limeftone or grit-ftone.

Ufe. Improve moors from the ling; the
lime without any tillage kills all the
fpontaneous growth, and brings up a
fine growth of white clover, &c. It
improves bog if only 2 or 3 feet deep,
and lafts 20 years.

Quantity. On land quite covered with
ling, 360 bufhels per acre ; on whiter
land 160 to 280; the expence 1 d. \
per bufhel.

Chefierfield, Hazel loams and fome clay.

Quantity. One hundred bufhels, at 30 s.

Ufe. They lay it on for every thing.

Gateford. Sand, clay, and limeftone land.

Quantity. A chaldron at 1 1 s. carriage
included.






THROUGH ENGLAND. 397

Ufe, For turnips they find it of very great

ufe.
Duration, Three or four years.
Colonel St. Leger. Soil a thin loam on

limeftone.
Ufe. Tried it on grafs-land in various
quantities ; of no ufe.
Tried lime from Derbyflnre.
No. 1. 180 bufhels per acre, left in
heaps, and then ipread.

2. 180, fpread out of the cart.

3. 32 Bufhels, ditto.

4. Slightly drefied with rotten farm-
yard dung.

No. 4. yielded half as much again as any •
and No. 2. and 3. better than No. 1.
Blytbe. The foil fand.
Quantity. A chaldron, at 16 J", including

expences.
Ufe. Beft when mixed with earth and dung.
Duration. Lafts good 2 years.
Wombwell. The foil a rich fandy loam.
Quantity. Six quarters per acre.
Ufe. Sow it on clover land wheat after it

is come up : it kills all poppies and

many other weeds j and deftroys much

twitch.
At Bootham. Mr. Greetham laid 4 or 5.



398 THE FARMER'S TOUfl

chaldron an acre on one place ; a lefs
quantity in another place ; and in a
third, mixed dung and lime together.
The refult was, that the large quan-
tity alone, beat all the reft. It was
ten years ago, and he now fees, to a
foot, in every crop where the lime
was laid. The foil a black fand on
gravel.

Canivick. The foil thin loam on limeftone.
Lime has been tried, but it did little
good. They difcover the nature of it
by dropping it in water ; if it is good,
it comes out foft and greafy ; if bad,
it is gritty.

Sir Cecil Wray. The foil a good loamy
fand. Half a field drefled with farm-
yard compoft, and half limed for
wheat ; fainfoine feed harrowed in in
•' the fpring. The half limed better than
the other feveral years, by \ a load
an acre.

Snettifiam. Light fandy loam. Lime
from chalk tried ; it did good, but not
comparable to made.

Feverfiam. The foil a rich black loam.

Quantity. i6oBufhels, at 3 d.

Duration. Two or three years.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 399

Ufe. Of very great ufe both on wet foils,

and alio on fands.
Witjiubbie. The foil rich vale fand, and

light loam on chalk.
Quantity. 160 bufhels.
Ufe. A great improvement.
Hawkhurjl. Soil, clay, and fand.
Wuantity. A waggon load an acre, at 1 /•

1 s. at the kiln.
Duration. Two crops.
Heff'el. Soil black peat moor.
Quantity. One, or 1 \ load an acre. A

kiln of 6 loads cofts 12/.; generally

40 s. or 3 /. an acre.
Sheffield Place. Soil chiefly clay.
Quantity. 4 or 5 loads an acre, 30 bufhels

each, at \os. befides carriage.
Duration. Lafts 3 crops, wheat, oats, and

clover.
Mapper ton. Soil a rich loam, or clay.
Quantity. 20 Hogfheads, each 4 bufhels,

at 20 d. a hegfhead.
Ufe. Always mix it with earth ; reckoned

the beft huibandry.
Duration. 4 or 5 years.
Leigh. Soil, clay on gravel.
Quantity. 10 to 20 hogfheads, at 2 s. a

hogfhead.






4oo the Farmer's tour

life. Mix it with earth.
Duration. Three crops.
Mr. Clayton. Tried lime, 80 bufhels, irf
one field, an acre, againft dung and
woollen rags in another ; the latter the
greater produce, but the wheat much
blighted ; whereas the limed not at all.
Mr. Burke. Sowed iot> bufhels an acre on
pafture ; the foil a gravelly loam ; did
no good.
Thefe minutes on the ufe of lime are
extremely various, but they prove fome
important points which much deferve no-
tice. Relative to foil, we find that it agrees
with almoft all ; not only w r ith thofe that
are rich and fertile, but likewife fuch as
are poor ; the fands of Gateford, and the
foreft ones of Blythe are fuch, and yet lime
is beneficial, which is owing to its binding
thefe loofe foils.

At Chatfwortb and Canwick it fails, the^
foil a thin loam on limeftone.

On old pafture it feems inefficacious from

Col. St, Leger\ and Mr. Burke\ intelli- r

i 1
gence.

On black moory peat land, the effect

univerfally great.

The greateft effecl: is in the peak of

2 Derby*



THROUGH ENGLAND. 40*

Der/yjkire, where it converts wafte foils
into fine paftures, without tillage ; but the
fort is a ftrong ftone lime, and burns foft and
foapy. It is alfo obfervable that the quan-
tity is very great, rifing to 360 bufhels.

The Wombwell minutes fhew, that it
has a ftrong effecl: in killing weeds.

From the benefit and the duration being
fo much greater in Derbyfoire than elfe where
there is great reafon to attribute much to
quantity ; in wafte foils efpecially, too much
can hardly be laid on, becaufe diffolving
the roots of the fpontaneous growth require
a moft powerful application. Of their
ftrong ftone lime, 360 bufhels are probably
equal to 5 or 600 of chalk lime : but what
are 5 or 6 quarters an acre — no uncommon
portion ! Experiments on the quantities
of lime, proper for given foils, are much
wanting.

MARLE.
Mqffingbdm. The foil fand ; and light

fandy loam.
Quantity. Seventy loads, ufually ; bur

now 35 or 40, and then as much more

in 3 or 4 years.
Duration. Twenty five years.
Mr. Carr. Has found that the bad forts
Vol. IV, D d. of



4 o2 THE FARMER'S TOUR

of marie efiervefce with acids more
than the good ; but falling quickly in
water, and turning it w r hite, is the
beft rule to judge by.

Snettifham. The foil a light fandy loam.

Quantity. Eighty loads an acre.

Sort, A fine fat, white marie.

Duration. From 14 to 20 years.

Warham. Soil, a light fandy loam.

Quantity. Sixty lords an acre, at expencc
of 30 j. ; after ij 6 years, 25 or 30
loads more, and then after 10 cr 12
years they repeat it again.

life. It lafts 15 or 16 years in perfection '-
they are convinced, that the benefit of
repetitions is very great. Compofls of
marie and dung they find excellent ; fo
that if they would ufe 1 o loads an acre
of dung, they will not fubftitute more
than 12 of that compoft.

Ayljham, The foil a fandy loam.

Quantity. Twelve loads, as much as 5
horfes can draw.

Duration. Lafts 20 years.

Ufe, They always mix their yard dung
with marie ; the fort is chiefly a grey,
foft, and foapy marje.

Ear. Thev always form comports

'5 of



THROUGH ENGLAND. 403

of marie and farm yard dung, mixing
them well together, and fpreading fo r
turnips. This practice they find great
ufe in.

Mr. Thompfon. Soil a loamy fand ; the
deeper it is dug he finds it the better ;
lays 40 to 70 loads an acre, but
generally mixes with dung. It
deftroys weeds almoft at once, parti-
cularly ketlocks and poppies. They
were common in his fields, but have
difappeared fince the marling.

Fleg Hundred, The foil a rich mixed
loam.

Ufe. They bring it from Norwich to Yar-
mouth by water, and then from 4 to g
miles by land ; the whole expence
js. ^d. per cart load.

Mr. Aclon. Light good loam.

Quantity. Fifty to 90 loads of clayey marie,
that eftervefces ftrongly in acids.

Ufe. The greatefl efFedt is clearing the
land of weeds.

Colchefer. The foil a fandy gravel and
brick earth.

Quantity. Seven waggon loads an acre.

It comes from Kent by ihipping.

D d 2 They



404 THE FARMER'S TOUR

They give js. to 9 J. a load for it, and

carry it even to 10 miles.
life. Does the beft, and lafts the longeft

on ftiff foils.
Duration. On flifr land 30 or 40 years:

on fands and gravels 15.
Toungsberry. Clays, and floney lo?ms.
Quantity. Twenty loads an acre of chalk.
Duration. Six or 7 years.
life. It does beft on the heavy foils.
Morden. The foil clay, and ftrong loam.
Quantity. Twelve loads, at ^d. and 3 J". 8 d.



carnage.



life. Generally mix with dung and earth,

call it chalk.
Duration. Six or 7 years.
Cbeam. The foil a chalky loam.
Quantity, Twelve loads an acre.
Ufe. They reckon it does beft on ftrong

land ; it mellows and makes it

kindlier.
Duration. Six or 7 years*
Cuddington. The foil clay.
Quantity. Twenty loads.
Ufe. Not as an enricher, but to make the

clay work more mellow.
Carjhalton. The foil a light loam on chalk-
Quantity. Thirty loads; the expence 20 s m

but



THROUGH ENGLAND. 405

but the farmer finds one horfe and two

fmall carts.
U/e, It is a hard chalk, that makes the

land mellow, and cleans it from weeds;

land that bears wild forrii wants chalk.
Duration. Forty years.
Hawkhurjl. The foil, fand and clay.
Sort. Red, grey, blue, and yellow ; blue

thev reckon beft.
Quantity. Two hundred and fifty or 300

loads an acre, 8 bufhels each, 5 s. per

ico load digging; four pair of oxen,

and a horfe and 2 or 3 boys for drivers,

4 carts, each 2 oxen and 1 horfe carry

100 loads a day.
Duration. Lafts from 5 to 8 years.
Ufe. On light Tandy foils it brings great

crops, but not on w r et ones ; it binds

fuch fo clofe, that the water cannot

get off.
Sheffield Place. Soil chiefly clay.
Quantity. Three hundred loads an acre, each

20 bufhels.
Duration. Seven or 8 years.
W albert on. The foil a rich mellow r loam.
Quantity. Forty loads, each 30 bufhels.
Duration. Twenty years.
IJle of Wight. The foil a fandy loam.
D d 3



4o6 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Quantity. Thirty loads, each 40 bufhels>
5 miles, price is. carriage 6 s.

Duration. Twelve years.

U/e. It is a hard chalk, does beft on ftiff
land.

IJle of Wight 'i Some of their lands always
the better for it.

Ditto. Soil a ftoney loam.

Quantity. Fourteen to 20 waggon loads an
acre, as much as 5 or 6 horfes can
draw, which is 3 tons : 3 d. cofl 5 s. car-
riage.

o

Duration. Forty or 50 years.

Gilbury. The foil a heavy loam on gravel.

U/e. They think that both chalk and
clayey marie will be attended with no
effect, if laid on land that has before
been under chalked, until the firft
quantity is quite worn out. A farmer
fuppofed marie to enrich land more
than chalk, (N. B. the chalk is marie)
but he preferred chalked land, becaufe
it might be worked on all occafions,
and with lefs ftrength ; marie land,
if at all clayey, becoming mortar
with a little wet, and brick with a
little fun.
MUbourn. Soil a light loam on chalk,



THROUGH ENGLAND. 407

Quantity. Eighty loads, each a ton.
Duration. Twenty years.
Vfc. On new broken up land, kills the
roots of the furz, and could get no
crops on it without it.
; Beconsjlcld. Soils various, clays and loams.
' Quantity. Fifteen to 20 loads.
Vfc Mellows and makes it plough the
better ; and after grubbing up a wood,
the land mufl be chalked to fweeten
it.
In thefe minutes I have found it necciTary
I- to rank what is called chalk under the head
I marie, becaufe I found on trial all their
t chalks to be real marie, and fome of them
I remarkably flrong.

(It appears very evidently that marie
agrees with both ftiff and light foils ; the
I great fuccefs attending it in Norfolk, Ihews
I how well it anfwers on very light fandy
1 loams, and on fands : but numerous mi-
nutes, where it is tried on both heavy and
flight land, prove it bsft on the former : this
is the cafe at Coichefer, Youngsberry, Che am,
and the Ijk of Wight ; and at thefe and
others they remark a flrong effect in its
mellowing the land, and making it work
better ; by which we are to underftand,
F d 4 that



4o8 THE FARMER'S TOUR

that it renders wet lands drier, and flirT
ones more friable ; fo that both may be
ploughed earlier in the fpring, and one
earth have the effect in pulverization of
feveral. It alfo appears to clean the foil of
weeds ; but from whence this effect arifes
is difficult to conjecture, as it poffeffes, on
comparifon with lime, a very weak diffol-
vent quality.

A queftion not clearly underftood in
relation to this manure, is its enriching
quality. Is it a fertilizer, or poffeffed of no
other effect than giving tenacity to fand,
and friability to clay ? I think, from the
experience of various poor lands marled in
Norfolk, that it is a great fertilizer : it
is difficult to comprehend how mere adhefion
of parts, naturally poor, can produce fuch
great crops : but the virtues of marie are
not to be known by the common trials :
Mr. Carres experiments, which mew that
marie with the greateft effervefcence with
acids, is oftentimes the word, are ftrongly
to the point : and I have feveral times found
a great effervefcence in fora'e forts, not
much effeemed by the farmers : let me
further add, that falling in wafer, efferk
acids, effervefcing in water, and

dejiroymg






THROUGH ENGLAND. 409

defiroying the acidity of vinegar, are all
diftinct qualities ; marie poffeffing one,


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 20 21 22 23 24 25

Online LibraryArthur YoungThe farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 4) → online text (page 18 of 25)