Arthur Young.

The farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 4) online

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The beans are fet in rows, at 12 or 14
inches afunder, and kept clean by hand-
hoeing : an uncommon inftance of good
husbandry, with a crop that is fucceeded
by a fallow : the product five quarters per
acre.

About Edgware and Stanmore the ground
is chiefly grafs, richly manured, it lets

from



Holdernejfis is elegantly furnifhed : the chimney-
piece white marble, with fluted Ionic pillars of
Siena ; in the frieze, a tablet, reprefent-
ing painting and fculpture, neatly executed.
Over it a glais in gilt ornaments, very light, in-
termixed wich porcelain figures. There is an
anti-room with books, and a clofet out of it,
with a cafe of china, gilt in a very neat and
elegant manner. Over thefe rooms are feveral
bed-chambers and drefling-rooms. Her lady-
ship's dairy is extremely well contrived for
coolneis, &c.






THROUGH ENGLAND. 91

from 30 s. to 3/. an acre. From hence
I entered the great north road at Barnet ;
there joining the country before travelled,
and where I fhall accordingly take my
leave of you for the prefent,

And now, fir, having finifhed my jour-
ney, I muft proceed to give you a general
view of the articles of the moft confequence,
fcattered up and down in a various manner
throughout the preceding minutes : each
has in numerous places a very different
appearance, owing to variations of foil,
culture, &c. but a. clear and comprehenfive
idea of any one can only be gained by an
average of all circumftances : a perfon,
who cultivates a plant on a foil peculiarly
adapted to it, may probably have a greater
fuccefs, than others are to expect : fome
likewife might, from contrary reafons,
have worfe fuccefs, and yet without proving
any thing generally againft the plant :
all fuch variations mould be taken into a



general account, and an average drawn,
which would then be a fair reprefentation
of the culture.

5 Refpecting



92 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Refpecting the products, and other cir^
cumftances attending common crops, the
rates of labour and provifion, and the par-
ticulars of farms, which are data for the
Hate of the whole kingdom to be deduced
from, with other matters of the fame kind^
I am happy in finding, from very many
perfons, whofe judgment I have the higheft
opinion of, as well as from the critjcifms
of feveral foreign writers (who muft fpeak
unprejudiced) that the deductions I made
in the 4th volume of the Northern Tour,
on this plan, have met with the approbation.
I could wifh, and been pronounced as
important a part as any of the work ;
I fhall therefore, in the prelent cafe, proceed
in the fame path, notwithftanding the
afiertions of fome perfons, who cha-
ractcrifed that volume by mentioning no-
thing concerning it but prolixity ; fuch
readers mould be referred to pretty light
jummer reading for the ladies.

Without further introduction, I mall
proceed to the particulars.

And am, &c. ;



THROUGH ENGLAND. 9:



LETTER XXXII.

CARROTS in the minutes of this Tour
make a diftinguifhed figure : I met with
fo many experiments on this mod excellent
root, that I think there is great rcafon to
expect it will foon become common hus-
bandry ; which would be one of the moll
fortunate circumflances that could poffibly
happen to the agriculture of Britain. It
has been tried in fcarcely any place without
being adhered to : Indeed, we may fafely
pronounce that whoever does juftice to it in
the cultivation, will certainly find it one of
the moit profitable crops in the world ; but
a review of the particulars bringing the moft
material points into one view, will bell:
prove the truth of this afiertion.

Mr. Cope, at Arnold, Nottingham/hire,
Soil. Rich, deep, dark-coloured fand, at

iS s.
Culture. Three earths 12 inches deep.
Manures 50/. t03Z.au acre. Hoes
at the ex pence of 30 s. to 5c s.



94 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Product. 2 1 Tons.

Vfe. Feeding and fatting cows, oxen,
fheep, horfcs, hogs. Cows 2 bufhels
a day. Completely fatted to 12/.
I2J. each, and oxen to 20/. Fats
hogs completely to 12 and 14 ftone
(litA)

Ex fences, - « £. 8 9

Mr, Mellifi, Blytb.

Soil. Rich deep fand, at 20J.

Culture. Ploughs for them. Hoes, at 2 /. 2 j.
No manure.

Product. 20 Tons, at 20 s. a ton.

Vfe. Feeding horfes and cows, and fatten-
ing hogs.

Expencesi - * £.610

Profit. - - 13 18 9

Mr. Wharton, of Carr-houfe*

Soil. Rich fand, at 50 J.
Produce. 20 Tons.

Mr. Stovin, Doaca/lcrt

Soil. Rich fand, at 40 s.

Culture. Trench ploughing from a lay,

but turf carried off. Hoed at expence

8/. 8/, id.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 95

ProducJ. 6 i Ton, at 4 /.

Uje. Pigs bought and fatted on them

boiled, and then fold ; paid 4 /. a ton,

and feeding cart-horfes.

Mr. Cook, Wheatly.

Soil. Light loam on lime-ftone, 10 inches
deep.

Up. Feeding horfes, excellent for the wind.
Mr. Moody, Retford.

Soil. Rich fand, at 40 s.

Culture. Ploughed 12 inches deep ; hand-
hoed clean, 9 inches afunder,

Product. 20 Tons, at 20 s-. ; alfo 25 tons,
at 20 j*.

life* Fatting of oxen of from 80 to 1 10
Hone ; four beafts to an acre 14 weeks*
No food fattens better 3 as well as oil
cake.

Expences. - - £. y ,

Profit. - - 15 o 9

And by dung, ~ 500

About Norivicb.

Sod. A fandy loam, 16 s.

Culture. Trench ploughing ; manure with
10 loads of long dung. Three ho
ings, at 1 /. 1 *.



y> THE FARMERS tour

Mr. Fellowesy S/jottcfiam.
Soil. Light loam.

Culture. Trench ploughed 10 inches ;
manures with 12 loads of yard dung.
Hoes, at 1 /. 1 s.
Product. 600 bufhels.

778 ditto.

350 ditto, being 8 tons
17 C. «/•

1728

576 average.

lift. Feeding horfes.

Expcnccs. - - £. 5 14 o

About Saxmundham.
Soil. Rich fand, at 14/.
Product. 800 Bufhels.
Ufe. Fatting hogs, and feeding horfes.

About IVoodbridge.
Soil. Rich deep fand, at 20 s.
Culture. Trench ploughed 12 inches

deep ; no manuring. Three hand"

hoeings, at from 16 s. to 21 s. per acre.
Product. 698 Bufhels, at 6 d. £. 17 9 o
Vje. Feeding horfes ; allow a bufliel per

horfe^rday, and give no corn. And

fatten hogs completely.






THROUGH ENGLAND. 97

Mr. Aclon, Bramfcrd.
A Tandy loam, at 12 s. 6 d.
Culture. Trench ploughing. No manur-
ing. Three hand-hoeings, 30 s. an
acre.
Producl. 960 Bufhels.

765 Ditto.



1 7 2 S

862 average.
Which, at 8 d. are, - ^,25 10 O
life. Feeding horfes.

Mr. Hiltm, Feverftam.
Soil. Rich black loam, at 4 /.

Product. 1 coo Bufhels.

Expences. - - - jT.g q o

Mr. Taylor t Bifrons.
Soil. Good loam, at 20 s.
Culture. Ploughed 12 inches. Hand-



hoed


twice.


Product.


8 Tons, at 20s,




16 ditto.




10 ditto.




34


-»T-1 • -


1 1 average.



Which, at 20 j. - JTiioq

Vfe, Feeding horfes.
Vol. IV. H



9S THE FARMER'S TOUR

Mr. Le grand, AJh.

Soil. A fandy loam, at 20 s.

Culture. Ploughing 8 or 9 inches deep ;

# manuring, 80 loads compoft, kept

clean by hoeing.

Produce. 30 tons.

20 ditto.



25 average.
Vfe. Horfes ; a ton per week to the team ;

fwine, cows, and fatting wethers.
Expences, - - £-9 1 S 3

Profit, - - - 7 4 9

Value per ton, - - 0170

And/^r bufhel, - - o o 4*

Sir Join Hoby Mill, Bart, at Bijham.
Soil. Rich black loam, at 3 /.
Culture. Three ploughings very deep, and

kept clean by hand-hoeing.
Produtt. 17 Tons, 12 C. ivt. 96 lb. or 700

bufhels, at Sd. per bumel, 25 /.
Vfe. Fattening hogs.
Expences, - - £.8140

Profit, - - 16 6 o

Mr. Burke, at Beconsfield.
Soil. Rich deep loam.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 9$

Culture. Well manured and ploughed 16
inches deep, and kept clean by-
hoeing.
Ufc. Feeding various cattle, but hogs
(even porkers) would not fatten on
them.
There is upon the whole a greater vari-
ation in thefe minutes than I have met with
in molt articles ; but we muft throw
thofe that will admit it into complete
views.

The firft enquiry I mall make is into
the value of the carrots: all the minutes
do not contain this material information ;
many of them do ; but fome valuations
being by the ton, and others by the
bufhel, I mall give both rates, by calcu-
lating the bufhel to weigh 56 lb. which is
the average of many bufhels I have weighed
myfelf : in the preceding tour other
weights are mentioned : but it was in
compliance with the ideas of the various
perfons concerned. The rates marked
with an afterifm are thofe minuted, the
others are calculated;

'Hi



ioo THE FARMERS TOUR





Value per


Value


CROPS.




ton.




per bujh.




I


s.


d.


s. d.


Mr. Cope, the felling price,


i








o 6*


Mr. MelliJJ?, ditto,


i








o 6


Mr. Siovin, fatting hogs,


4


o


0*


2 O


Mr. Moody , fatting oxen,


i





0*


o 6


At Woodbridge, felling price,


i








o 6*


Mr./to, ditto,


i


6


8


o 8*


Mr. Taylor, value,


i





o*


o 6


Mr. he grand, fatting fhecp,


c


14


c*


o a%


Sir J. Mill, ditto hogs,


i


6


8


o 8*


Average,


i


7


si


o it



Upon this table I muft remark, that the
high price of Mr. Stovi?i\ carrots is by no
means to be rejected, becaufe the expen-
diture was uncommonly accurate : 26 hogs
were bought lean and fold from carrots
fat, which is of all others the faireft me-
thod of trying the value ; it is alfo weight
not meafure that was depended on; the
latter is not always accurate ; and I may
further remark, that the value is not at all
impeached by the other prices, becaufe
none of the other applications were fimi-
lar : Sir "John Mill's crop was given to
hogs, but raw, whereas Mr. Stovin's were
boiled : there is no abfolute authority-
extant, that boiling will make fo great a

difference,



THROUGH ENGLAND. 101

difference, but we do not know the con-
trary. Hence therefore, the price of 4/.
^r ton, or 2 s. a bufhcl, muft undoubtedly
be relied on as accurate, and the luperiority
of it to the other prices attributed to the
circumftances Df giving them boiled to hogs'
We may divide the table thus.

Roiled for hogs.



1.


s. d.


1.


s.


d.


Mr. Stovbii 4





1


2


O


Raw to


hogs.








Sir J. Mill, 1


6 8


i





8


Fattenin


% oxen.








Mr. Moody, 1





1


O


6


Fattening JJjeep.








Mr. Legrandi


14


1


O


4


Selling prices.








Mr. Cope, 1





O


O


6


Mr. Mellifi, 1





O


O


6


U r oodbriage, 1





O


O


6


Mr. Acton* 1


6 8


O


O


8


Average, 1


1 8


1 °


O


6f


Feeding


borfes.









Mr. Taylor,



H



102 THE FARMER'S TOUR

In the next place, I mall give the pro-
duels in both tons and bufhels. Thofe
marked are the quantities minuted, and
the others calculated at $6 lb. a buihel.



Mr. Cope,
Mr. Mcllijh,
Mr. TV hart 072,
Mr. Stovin,
Mr. Moody,
Mr. Ffllowes,
Sax?nundbam,
Woodbridge,
Mr. Afton,
Mr. Hilton,
Mr. Taylor,
Mr." Le grand,
Sir John Mill,



Average,



ons.



#



21



#



20



Bujhels.
840
800
800
260
900

576*
800*
698*
862*

1000*
440

1000
700



744



Thefe products are great, and fhew
plainly, that carrots will in genera*
yield a very confiderable quantity of food.
Eighteen tons of fo rich and iblid food .rauft
go very far in fattening or keeping any
kind of cattle. But on this head, we have
in two articles the exact truth,

Mr.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 103

Mr. Moody found that 20 tons fattened
four beads, weighing on an average 95
done (14$.) during 14 weeks, each bead
having qlb. of hay per diem.

But the fatting feafon for fuch large
beads lading from the fird of November to
the end of March, or near it, may be called
20 weeks, confequently an acre of 1 8 ton
12 C. wt, will completely fatten about
three beafts during that time ; it is not an
exact proportion, but near it. Hence we
find, that if the carrots are applied to
fattening fuch large oxen, three mud be
procured to every average acre. The very
purchafe of the beads will therefore be near
40/. per acre, beiides hay. This fliews
clearly, that the Culture of carrots, for
fattening oxen, can be undertaken by
nobody that has not a great plenty of mon?y
always ready.

In fattening flieep, Mr. Legrand's trials
inform us, that 20 wethers, of 30/^. a
quarter, will eat a ton a week, and 4C ii't.
of hay ; and that they are 20 weeks in
fatting ; the average acre will therefore
fat 18 1. This at 25J. come to 23/. per
acre, befides hay. We alfo find by the
H 4 fame



io 4 THE FARMER'S TOUR

fame gentleman, that four horfes mould
have a ton a week. But at Woodbridge they
give but 14 C. wt, per wepk. The average
of thefe two accounts is ijC.ivf.; the
average acre of 1 8 \ tons will therefore feed
a team of four horfes 2 1 wieeks ; that is,
from the firft of November to the end
of March. Seven weeks, or a third longer,
would laft till lucerne, &c. was ready, fo
one acre and one third is fufficient for
wintering four horfes without oats : this
is a very important article.

In feeding milch cows, Mr. Cope of

Arnold, gives each two bufhels a day ; this

is a ton and a hzlfper month. In a winter

of fix months a cow would therefore cat

nine tons, confequently an acre would

winter feed two cows : but this would bv

no means anfwer ; for one cow would eat

in value 12/. in winter : hence it is clearly

proved, that no one but a fool will give a

cow meat enough to keep her in good

oi der, of a fort that will fat an ox ; for in

this inftance the cow's butter would cofl

you perhaps $s. or 6 .r. a pound, at the

fame time that the ox in fat would pay

you coniiderable profit, I never fee cows

well



THROUGH ENCLAND. 105

well kept in winter (that is on any thing
but ftraw) without being extremely clear,
that money is daily loft by them. If they
calve early, they muft have hay or green
food ; for the former they can never pay,
and I much queftion whether they near
pay even for turnips.

From thefe data we may fee, that a
fmall quantity of land, cultivated under
carrots, will enable a man to keep great
flocks of cattle. Suppofe, for inflance
that he has ten acres of this root annually,
and that he keeps eight horfes, his flock on
carrots may be,

On 2 ]■ acres, the horfes, - 8

On 3 3 acres, fheep, - 60

On 4 acres, oxen, - - 12

In what other hufbandry will ten acres
of land be made to winter keep eight horfes,
and fatten twelve oxen, of 95 ftone, and
60 wethers, worth 45/. a-piece ? In no
other application of the land can any
thing like this be done.

In the next place we mould review the
cxpences, the value of the crops, and the
protito 3





Rent





Expenceh


i


Value.


Profit




o


iS


c


8


9





21


O





12


11





I


o





6


2


CV20








•3


18





2


lO


o


-


-


*~


*7


9


6*


-


-


-


Z


o


o


""


-





26








-


-


-


2


o


o


7


9


3


22


10





15





9


O


16


o


s


H





'9


18


6*


'4


4


6


o


H


c







-


2 7


H


2*


-


-


-


I


o


o




-




»7








-


-


-


o


12


6




-


"~


28


13


4


-


-


-


4


O


o


9


o





34


6


10*


2 5


6


iO


i


o


o


-


-




1 1








-


-


-


i


o


o


9


*5


-i


'7


10





7


H


9


3


o


o


8


H


c


23


6


8


14


12


8


i


II


n


7


17


7


22


16





H


*5


6



106 THE FARMER'S TOUR



Crops.

Mr. Co/*,
Mr. Mdlijh,
Mr. Wharton,
Mr. Stot'in,
Mr. Jfw$#,
Mr. Felloives,
Saxmundham,
TVoodbridge,
Mr. ^?oa,
Mr. Hilton,
Mr. Taylor,
Mr. Zf Grand,
Sir 7. il////,

Averages,



The firft objecl that calls for our atten-
tion in this table, is, the richnefs of the
foil ; the average of the rents being a gui-
nea and half an acre ; this is an uncommon
degree of fertility; befides which natural
richnefs, fome of the crops are amply
manured ; this evidently fhews that
great fuccefs, fuch for inftance, as here
appears, much depends on the foil either
being naturally extremely fertile, or ren-
dered fo by the force of manures. The
true carrot foil appears plainly to be the
rich black mould, the putre folum^ at three
or four pounds an acre rent. This is the

land



Thefe articles valued by the average rate.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 107

land which yields the greateft crops. But
carrots, at the fame time, thrive nobly in
inferior foils. The average rent of th e
Saxmundham ones, Mr. Felfowes and Mr.
Acton, is but 14J. id. and yet the average
product of thole three, is fo high as 25 l t
8 s. Sd.; which fhews how well it will an-
fwer on land of no extraordinary fertility.

The average expence rifing to 7 /. 1 7 s.
yd. indicates that the hufbandry is correct
and fpirited ; indeed, fuch noble crops
muft not be expected without great ex-
pences. From that fum we find, that any
perfon who would cultivate ten acres of
carrots to advantage, muft appropriate 78/.
15/. lod. to the work, befides the fum
requifite for buying cattle, which is about
35/. an acre; or for ten 350/. It is from
hence plain, that they will never be much
cultivated by common farmers, whofe huf-
bandry, in general, is fo bad, from a want
of money to carry on better.

The product of 22 /. 16 s. and the clear
profit of fourteen guineas an acre, are the
material proofs of the excellency of the
hufbandry. On ten acres you reap a clear
advantage (all expences paid) of 1 47 /. 15 j.

What



io8 THE FARMER'S TOUR

What other culture will equal this ? Com-
mon husbandry mult be extended over a
large tract of land to yield fuch a profit,
and what a vaft difference between this fum
arifing from 10 acres, admirably cleaned
and richly manured, and the general run
of crops, which foul and exhauft the foil,
and are attended by numerous expences
arifing from the quantity of land. Nor is
this the only point, for the dung arifing in
the expenditure of the crop is of vaft con-
fequence in the improvement of other fields.
This circumflance leads me to a further
examination.

An acre of 20 tons produced, in fatten-
ing oxen, as much dung as was worth 5 /.
cxpence of ftraw, for litter, deducted.
This new value is therefore exactly 5 s.
per ton on the crop.

Mr. Legrandy of Ajh, from attending
for fome years, very minutely, to the im-
provement of his grals, by fattening fheep
on carrots ; determines the benefit from
each acre of 20 tons, to be 3 /. ; which is
3 s. per ton on the crop.
Mr. Moody, - - JT. o 5 o

Mr. Legrand, - - 030

Average, - - 040



THROUGH ENGLAND. 190

Confequently the dung anting from the
crop of 18 I tons, comes to 3/. 14^. This
taken into the account, and calculated to
all the crops, will enable us to have a com-
plete view of their moil important circum-
fhnces.



Crops.

Mr. Cope,
Mr. Mellijh,
Mr. Wharton,
Mr. Sto-vin,
Mr. Moody,
Mr. Fellovjes,
Saxmundkam,
Woodbridge,
Mr. A&oth
Mr. Hilton,
Mr. Taylor,
Mr. Legrand,
Sir . Mill,



This table includes the moft material
circumftances of the experiments on car-
rots. Had the article, Expences, been com-
plete, the column of profit would have
been the fame ; but the profit may be cal-
culated in another manner.









ProduSi






Tens.


At per ton.


Value.




Profit.


21


I 4


c


25 4





16 15


20


« 4





24 O


c


17 18


20


1 1 1


5


t3* H


2


- - -





4 4





2 7 6





- - -


22±


I 4





27





19 10 9


H f


1 1 1


5


22 l6


6


17 2 6


CO


1 1 1


5


t3» '4


2


- - -


I ~


' 4


c


20 8


c


- - -


2« 1


1 10


8


32 19


4




2 5


1 11


5


39 6


10


30 6 10


1 1


1 4





'3 4


c


_ - _


2 5


18





22 10





12 14 9


17*


1 10


8


26 16


8


18 2 8


T. Civt.
18 12


*i 11


5


26 10


8


iS i3 7.

















t There is a fmall difference in thefe products,
owing to fractions, one being calculated, originally,
from the bufhel, and the other from the ton.

* The old average price with addition of 4 t.



no THE FARMER'S TOUR

Product, - - £.26 10 8

Expences, - - 7 17 7

Profit, - - - 18 13 1



Which remainder coming fo near to the
other average, gives us no flight reafon to
fuppofe, that the average of the feven
crops, whereof the profit is minuted, is
very near the average of the whole thirteen,
had they all been exprefTed.

Thus including the value of the dung in
the account, I muft be allowed to think
totally neceffary : It is as much a part of
the product as the cafh, and a good huf-
bandman will always have it as ftrongly in
view. The bell farmers in the kingdom
make a very conliderable difference between
the price of a crop of turnips, to be drawn
and carted from the land, and to be fed
on it with fheep ; in one cafe they will fell
at 30 s. but in the other not under 3/.
This clearly fhews that the manure arifmg
from the crop, they efteem a principal part
of it : it is on this account they .will have
turnips that coft. them 40 j. or 50 s. an
acre, and fell them for 30 j. Nor is it
poflible, too often, to inculcate the real im-
portance



THROUGH ENGLAND, m

portance of hoeing crops, which, in con-
fuming, yield great quantities of manure.
It is thefe crops which keep the fields of a
farm in fine order, and increafing in ferti-
lity : they are the foundation of great pro-
duds Cx corn ; in a word, the eilence of
good hufbandry ; and I mould here remark
on the preceding trials of carrots, that we
do not yet fee the ivhok product refuiting
from them, for, beiides the vaft benefit the
land receives from the carrot tillage, and
inceflant hoeings, there is the remaining
value of the manure, the whole expence of
which is, in feveral of the trials, carried to
the account of carrots, though all the fuc-
ceeding crops of the courfe are greatly
benefited by it.

The clear profit of e i g ■ h t e e n guineas
per acre, on a crop which cleans and ame-
liorates the ground in a very high degree,
is fo confiderable, that all good hufband-
men who are fituated on fands or rich
loams, fhould eagerly embrace the culture.
I ill venture to aflert that they, in no
other article, will equal it. And as it ap-
pears from the experiments, both of Mr.
Moody and Mr. Legrafid, that carrots may

fuccci lively



ii2 THE FARMER'S TOUR

fucceflively be cultivated on the fame land
with increafmg profit ; a man who has but
one or two fields of the right foil, may
every year have thofe in carrots ; which
would prove peculiarly advantageous : To
extend the idea a little, let us think of an
hundred acres of land yielding a profit of
near two thousand pounds a year
Such a fpace of ground, indeed, fo culti-
vated, would require a capital, appropriated
to that alone, of above four thoufand
pounds ; but then the profit would be 50/.
per cent.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 113



LETTER XXXIII.

THE culture of potatoes is another
article of huibandry highly de-
ferving the attention of ail perfons, who
are delirous of advancing their hufbandry
to perfection. The following minutes
will inew, that few crops can in profit
be ranked with them.

Mr. Kendal, at Alfreton.

Soil. Dry crumbling loam on quarries,

at 20J-.
Culture. Kept clean by hoeing, &c.
Product. Six hundred bufhels, at 1 s. ;

30/.
Vfe. Applies ail to flitting brawns, boils

them, and mixes two bufhels of rye

or barley meal to 20 of potatoes ;

more fattening than corn alone.

About Cajlleton.
So.'l. Light loam on lime-ftone.
Culture. In rows, and alfo the lazy-bed
method ; keep them tolerably clean.
Vol. IV. I



ii4 THE FARMER'S TOUR

ProduB. Four hundred bufhels, at 2 J". ;
40/.

About Chejlerfteld.

Soil. Hafel loam, at 1 7 s.

Culture. Plough four or five times, and

manure 20 loads an acre.
Produfl. Thirty pounds an acre ; this, at

the Cajileton price of 2 s. a bufhel, is

300 bufhels.

Mr. Wharton, Do?icafter.

Soil. Rich fand, at $os.

Culture. Plants in equally-diftant rows?
three quarters of a yard afunder ;
manures with twelve loads an acre
rotten dung ; only the knots or eyes
ufed for fets ; earthed up with hand-
hoes feveral times.

Produce. 1767, — 242 Bufhels.

1768, — 242

1769, — 300

J 77°> — 7 J 9



Total* 1503



Average, 375



J&X is. 4*/. JT. 24 16 6



THROUGH ENGLAND. 115

life. Applied chiefly to fattening fwine ;
fats porkers with them ; generally
boils them, and mixes half a peck
barley-meal to fix bufhels of potatoes ;
alfo in half fattening bacon hogs.
Expences, - - {.9 8 10

Profit, - - 15 7 2

Mr. Cook, Wheatley.
Soil. Light loam on a lime-ftone.
Culture. Planted in rows three feet afunder ;



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