Arthur Young.

The farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 4) online

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ceeds, is in favour of the former. I
am not furprized at this, for mowing
will always make the land cleaner from
w r eeds, an effect particularly obferved at
Hajiead ; but the made of a thick crop is
the great object, in fummer ; be it what it
may, it will breed fo putrid a fermentation
in the foil, as to work a far greater and
infinitely more regular improvement*
than the random dunging and flaleing of
cattle *i All experience proves the benefit
of thick fhade in fummer. That this
comparifon may be the better underftood,
I fhall compare the practice with the foil.



* I have treated the point of feeding and mowing
meadows at large, in my Courfe of Experimental rfgri-
culture, Vol. II. p. 372.



M 4



i68 THE


FARMER'S


TOUR


Place.


Soil.


Which beft.

Feeding
Mowing


Biifworth
Wombwell


Clay
Sandy loam


Majjingham
Earlham


Sand
Sandy loam


Mowing
Ditto


Flog hundred


Ditto


Ditto


Ha/lead
Toiingsberry
Carjhalton
Beconsfield


Clayey
Clayey
Chalk loam
Loams


Feeding

Ditto
Ditto
Mowing



If we were to reafon on this point, we
fhould naturally fay that feeding mull be
beft on light foils, and mowing on heavy
ones ; becaufe the one wants to be trodden
to make them more compact, and the other
to be opened and rendered loofe, the uni-
verfal effect of mowing crops. But in
this table fuch an idea is not juftificd : the
advantages of mowing are fo fuperior, that
they fucceed even on fandy loams much
better thztn feeding. The Jlqftead feeding
mould be thrown out of the queftion ; be-
caufe they acknowledge that the crops
are cleaneft after mowing.

But as feveral places appear oq. the fide

of



THROUGH ENGLAND. 169

f feeding, and three of them on c'
n which it is impc to be lb, let me

^queft, that fome gentleman will a:
M point, by fair"

ng one half through the j
nd m : for hay.



LETTER



170 THE FARMERS TOUR



LETTER XXXIX.

IN the Tour I made through the North
of England \ in the year 1768, I gained
an uncommon variety of intelligence, con-
cerning the culture of the great Scotch
cabbage, which it was very remarkable
had been planted for feveral years in York-
Jhire by many fpirited gentlemen, and ap-
plied by them conftantly to hufbandry ufes,
without the publick knowing that fuch a
plant exifted. The regifters of experiments,
which I inferted in that Tour, kindled a
curiofity throughout many counties, to
try the merit of it, which has produced
more experiments, feveral of which I am
favoured with in the prefent work. Perhaps
I may venture to hint, that this circum-
ftance is one proof of the utility, which
may poffibly attend fuch an undertaking
as this of publifhing provincial and locaj
cuftoms, for the information of the nation
in general.

Befides



THROUGH ENGLAND. 171

Befides feveral trials on the Scotch cab-
)age, I have met with another fort, the
North American, cultivated by fome gen-
:lemen in Northamptonfiire, Derby/hire
&c. which feems to bid fair to be a moil
rapital article of Britijh hufbandry, as
ippeared in the preceding minutes.

Bringing all my intelligence concerning
;abbages into one view, will affift the reader

" in completing the idea of the culture,
which he may have gained from the experi-

: ments, regiftered in the Six Months Tour.

Mr. Booth, at Glendon.

. Soil. A red, light, rich loam, at 10 s.

Sort. The Dutch cabbage.

Culture. Sows in Auguft, and the latter end
of February ; pricks out both ; plants
the firft in March, and the latter in
May or June ; plants in fquares of
two feet ; keeps clean by hand-
hoeing ; gives a year's fallow, plough-
ing 12 inches deep in October, and
manures with 40 loads an acre.

Vroduci. The Dutch cabbage comes to

fo high as 40 lb.
Ufe. Feeds them on the ground with
rams,



ts.



172 THE FARMERS TOUR

Duration. They generally decay in J a
nuary.

Mr. Kendal, at Alfreton.

Soil. Rich loam on quarries, at 20 /. t

Culture. In March he plants beans ii
fingle rows, four feet afunder, an(
after that fets a row of cabbages be-
tween the rows of beans ; keeps then
clean by earthing up.

Producl. Twenty cart loads per acre, wortl
about 6 /. They rife fome to 2 3 lb.

TJfe. Given to cows, which yield vaftl;
more milk on them than on any othe
food, and the cream and butter hav
not the leaft bad tafte ; gives half
cart-load a day to feven or eight cows

Sir Robert Burdett, Formark.

Soil. Rich fandy loam, at zos.

Sort. The North American.

Culture. Digs two fpits deep, and rich!
manures and limes ; planted in ro
three feet every way, the firft week ir|
April-, kept quite clean from weed
by hand-hoeing.

Product. Many of them 50$. each,

Average in 1769, - 3

In 1770, «* v ~ 3c



D



oth Average value per acre, 36 o



an



THROUGH ENGLAND. 173

The latter is - 65 tons per acre.
The former, - 76 ditto.

141



70 Average.






ml



rail



Value in 1769, by fatting oxen and
fheep, 39/. 8j-. which is per ton 10/.

£•39 8 o

Sixty-five tons, at ioj. 32 10 o

Total, - - 71 18 o



Tfe. Fatting great oxen and fheep : never
beafts fatted better or fooner.

Duration. In perfection the beginning
of October ; and none lafls longer
than 'January.

Col. St. Leger, at Parkhill.

Soil. Thin loam on lime flone, at 2 s. 6 d.

Sort. Great Scotch.

Culture. Planted on a fummer fallow ;

ploughed fix times, and manured

with 12 loads an acre of rotten

dung ; row* four feet by 20 inches.

5 Seed



ror



m






i 7 4 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Seed part fown in September anc
part mFebruary ; the firft twice prickec
out ; the feeond at once into field
hand and horfe-hoed.

Vfe. They were given to dry cows, calves
and fheep ; they all did exceedingly
well on them.

Produfi. One acre was more than a;
good as three of turnips ; and as thr
average of the latter is 35 j, the cab-
bages amount to 5*/. $s.

Mr. Mellifi, at Blyth.

Soil. Rich fand, at 20/.

Sort. Great Scotch.

Culture . Manured for 12 loads an acr<,
farm yard compoft ; fown in February
and planted the end of May in fquarei
of two feet ; kept clean by hand-
hoeing.

Froducl. Average value 7/. per acre.

Vfe. Sheep bought lean at 14^. and fok
from them fat at Its*

Mr. Wharton, Carr-Houfe.
Soil. Rich fand, at 20 s.
Sort. Great Scotch.
Culture. Sown in Augujl, pricked ou

lr



THROUGH ENGLAND. 175

in Oclober, again in March, and into
field the middle of June ; land pre-
pared by five ploughings and 10 loads
an acre of farm-yard dung ; kept
clean by horfe and hand-hoeing.
Product. Average cabbage 21 lb. 12 oz.
or 47 tons per acre.

Given to fatting beafts, milch cows,
young cattle, and fwine ; for beafts
they anfwered but indifferently ; cows
give a vaft quantity of milk, but
ftrong, though ventilated ; but kept
pigs and in excellent order till put
up' to fatting ; anfwered beft in this
manner. Mr. Wharton on the whole
prefers a crop of turnips worth 3/
fuppofe the acre of 47 tons worth
about 50/. it may be called 1 s. a ton,

Candidates for Doncafter Premium,



hi!.



Mr. Crtrw/e,


54 1 Tons


Mr. Wright ,


£H


Mr. Wharton,


4M-


Mr. Ilervey,


- 29


Mr. Turner, -


28 I


Mr. Hewet, -


H


Mr. Hall, at Swaitk


Rich Joani, at 20s.





i 7 6 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Sort, Great Scotch,

Culture, Well fallowed and manured as'
for turnips ; fown in February, and
planted in June in rows four feet
afunder, and two feet from plant to
plant \ kept quite clean by horfe and
hand-hoeing.

ProducJ, Came to the average weight of
1 2 lb, which is 2 9 tons 1 3 C. wt. the
value 3 /. or 2 J*, a ton.

life. Fattening fheep, which throve well
on them.

Mr. Howman, Bracon-AJh.

Soil, A ftrong clay.

Sort. Turnip cabbages and Reynold's cab-*
bage turnip.

Culture, Sown in April, and planted in
July ; thofe that were left in the feed-
bed the beft ; froft deftroyed the turnip j
cabbage.

Vfe, Horfes, cows and fheep, eat them
very freely.

Mr. FelfoweS) at Shcttefiam.

Soil, Sandy loam.

Sort, Great Scotch,

Culture, Sown in March, and planted in

May,



i






THROUGH ENGLAND. 177

May, in fquares of two feet fix inches ;
manured with 20 loads dung an acre.
"rodutf. Fifteen tons 16 C. wi. 88 lb. per
acre.

Mr. Aft on, at Bramford.

ml. Good turnip loam.

far/. Great Scotch, fown for but proved
a bad fort ; and Reynolds 1 s cabbage tur-
nip; fown firft w T eek in April ; plant-
ed in June ; the Scotch three feet
by two ; Reynolds 1 s two by 1 8 inches j
kept as clean as a garden.

y roduc7. The common cabbage il. 16s.
io\d. by feeding cows, at 2;.a
week*

Tfe. Milch cows ; and the butter excellent,
without any tafte.

Mr. Arbuthnot, at Mitcham,

oil. Brick earth loam;

ort. Various kinds.

Culture. Ploughed 14 inches deep, and
planted in September, rows equally di-
ftant, 1 8 inches and two feet, and the
plants one foot in the rows; kept
perfectly clean.

'roduft. il. 1 8 j. 6d.
Vol. IV. N



178 THE FARMERS TOUR

life. Feeding ewes and lambs in April and
May.

Sir Thomas Hales, Beak/bourn.

Sort. The Lombardy cabbage.
Product. They rife to bo lb. a cabbage.

Mr. Reynolds, at Addifiam.

Soil. Light hazel loam.

Sort. Great white cabbage, and alfo the
cabbage turnips.

Culture. Ploughs deep, and plants in
rows of two feet by 20 inches ; fows
in April, and plants in June.

Producl. Of the cabbage turnip, on an
average, 33 tons, at 4 s. 6d. a ton, or
j I. 8 s. 6d.per3.cre. 1 C. wt. better than
2 C. wt. of common turnips.

TJfe. Of great utility in feeding all forts
of cattle ; and late in the fpring, cows
give fine and fweet butter.

Mr. Taylor, Bifrons.

Soil. Good loam, at 20 s.

Culture. Plants them between the rows

of beans.
Producl. 3/. 2



THROUGH ENGLAND. 179

Mr. Jeffarty Minfter.

Soil. Rich loam, at ijs.

Sort. Reynolds's cabbage turnip.

Culture. Rows two feet by 20 inches, horfe

and hand-hoed.
Produbl. Thirty-five tons, and five of

fprouts.
Duration. Fed off with Iheep late in April.

Mr. Edward Petty Minfter.

The fame foil, fort and culture; crop ex-
ceedingly fine.

Mr. Anderdoiiy Henlade.

Soil. Good loam, at 20s.

Sort. Turnip cabbage, cabbage turnip,
great Scotchy and boorcole.

Duration. The turnip cabbage kept found,
and without any mealinefs, till May,
and fheep fonder of them than of
turnips ; both this and Reynolds's, in-
creafes vaftly in weight by green moots,
without the root being the worfe ; Rey-
nolds's is heavier five times over by
being left.

r. c. ^ ib.

Product. Brown boorcole, 6 7 o 16

Scotchy - - 6 17 3 o

Common turnips, - 11 14 © ©

N 2







180 THE FARMERS TOUR

Sir "John Mill, Bijham.
Soil. Rich deep black loam, at 3 /.
Sort. Unknown.
Culture. In rows three feet by two, kept

clean.
Product. Nineteen tons ; common turnips

24 tons.

Earl of Holder neffe^ Sion.
Soil. Good loam.
Sort. Large winter cabbage from New-

bury.
Culture. Planted in fquares of four feet;

horfe-hoed both ways.
Product. Many from 25 to 30 ; at the

average of 15 lb. 18 tons 4 C. -wt. per

acre.
Ufe+ Fattening oxen.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 1S1



e - "



&3 ^



~ £ £ ~ "i ^-*3 v -^ '






„ £



u t: 9



«oo> - ' >



O c/; •>



■as



^, ZS






o * o o o
o o >^ o o

0>0 ^ N «



OvC<£ O
VO00 0C 9

N c* r-» to



f^ ^- ** On ^ ^






<U . _ «J C






_ _ — _ _

M *f ci -4- rt



O O O v© O O

o o c « o



" . _• o w
fa fe fe »£ fe £ -°b

~~0 0~O~ O O O O C O O
O^ONOuiOr^oOO

M 0000 M 0«*^to



J






5>

So t> ■



-2 ^ ■* ?



SI






The average weight, exclufive of Sir
Robert Burdet's, 29 tons 4 C. wt. value
4/. 8 s. yd. The amazing product of this
American cabbage opens a new world in
hufbandry, and being fo peculiar, muft be
thrown out of the queftion. The other
crops do not, upon the whole, raife fo great
an idea of this hufbandry, as upon other
occafions have appeared : but upon this
N 3 variation



182 THE FARMERS TOUR

variation I muft obferve, that here are fo
many forts of cabbages, that they may,
and certainly do, differ as much as cabba-
ges and turnips : on this account, the table
muft be divided into forts, that we may
thereby know what conclufions are to be
drawn from- each.



North American.










Tons. )


^dW,






L


J.


d.


Sir R. Bur defy


70 | 36










True Scotch.






Col. St. Lege*)


-


5


5





Mr. MeMJh,


-


7








Mr. Qro&le,


54 i


_


-


M


Mr. Wharton,


47


2


10


O


Mr. Wright,


S l l


_


_


_


Mr. Harvey,


29


-


-


-


Mr. Hall,


291

42
1


3

4





O


Average,


8


9


Cabbage turnip.






"Mr. Reynolds,


33


7


8


6


Mr. J effort,


40

36




-


-


Average


-


-



THROUGH ENGLAND. 183



Various forts.



Mr. Kendal,
Mr. FelloweS)
Mr. Atlon,
Mr. Arbathnot)
Mr. Taylor,
Sir John Mill,
: Earl of Holdernefs,



Fou



i$i



J 9
18



/.
6

2

2

3



Value.
j. d.

O O
l6 IO

18 6

o o



17 I 3 18 5



The Lift of thefe tables muft be confi-
dered only as a general proof, that any
kind of cabbage will, in good management,
turn out a profitable culture.

The true Scotch, in point of weighty
makes a great figure; the average product
of 42 tons, fhew what an immenfe quantity
per acre may be expected of this cabbage
under a good culture. But in the value,
the cafe is very different.

But here we muft remark, that the aver-
age 4/. 8 .r. Q)d. takes in a crop on a thin
limeftone, of only is. 6 d. an acre ; it is
aftonifhing it fhould come to 5 /. 51.; two
other articles that decide it, are ?vlr. Whar-
ton 47 tons for 2 /. 1 o s. and Mr. Hall 2 9 I
N 4 for



£.0


10


o


O


I


o


O


2


o


o


4


6


o


4


4



184 THE FARMER'S TOUR

for 3 /. ; the firft, 1 s. a ton, the fecond, 1 s. ;
by the way, a difference of half is very
great, and mews that no juft rule of valua-
tion has been followed. Here I mall draw
into one view the value, per ton, of all that
contain the information.
Sir Robert Burdet,
Mr. Wharton,
Mr. Hall,
Mr. Reynolds,

Average,

But how extravagant the difference of
cabbages, paying with one perfon 1 s. and,
with another 10 s. ! Such variations prove
how little we know the real honefl truth.
But as to the 1 s. I leave it to any perfon of
half an hour's winter experience in hufban-
dry, to judge if a ton of green food can be
worth fo little ; whether a ton of hay at
40 j. can qo as far as 40 ton of cabbages !

I fhall, however, include it, and take
the average of 4^. Ad. as a valuation of
thofe crops whofe weight is minuted, but
not the value, and give thereby as full a
view of thefe experiments as poffible.



THROUGH



Mr. Kendal,

Sir R. Bnrdet %
Col. St. Leger,
Mr. Mellijh,
Mr. Wharton,
Mr. Crowh\
Mr. Wright,
Mr. Hervey,
Mr. i£z//,
Mr. Fe Howes,
Mr. ./#fc>«,
Mr. Arbuthnot,
Mr. Reynold,
Ml Taylor,
Mr. 7#W,
Sir y. Af///,



r*.







47
54*

Si*

29

29!
J 5



of

o
o
o
o



40

10



Jiarl of Holdernejje, 1 8



ENGLAND.

Value.
I. s.

6 o

36 o

5 5

7 °

2 10

11 16 oat 4/.
11 3 oat 4 j".

6 5 o at 4 j.
300;

3 8 o at 4 j.
2 16 10

2 18 6
786

3 o o|

8 13 o at 4 s.

4 2 oat 4<f.
3 18 o'at4J-.



is 5



4^/.
j\d.
j\d.

j\d.



Average, 37 I 7 7 3



4</.

4 4
4</.



In the application of the crop, there is
fome very material intelligence that we can
fully depend on,

COW S.

Mr. Kendal. They give more milk than
any other food. Cream and butter have
not the leaft tafte.

Mr. Wharton. Give vaft quantities of
milk, but ftrong.



i36 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Mr. Aclon. The butter excellent, with,

out the Ieaft tafte.
VLx.Arbuthnot. * The butter, while the cows
were fed on the cabbages from Northam-
tonfiire^ was exceedingly good, but
tafted ftrong the moment they were
put to the Scotch.
Mr. Reynolds. They give fweet butter and
milk.
The point of fweet butter is flill unde-
cided, from Mr. Arbuthnofs difcovering a
difference between forts.

OXEN.

Sir Rob. Burdet. Fats them as quick and

well as poffible.
Earl of Holder neffe. Fats them well.

SHEEP.

Sir Rob. Burdet. Fatted them well.

Col. St. Leger. Did extremely well on

them.
Mr. Mellifh. Sheep bought lean, at 14 J.

and fold fat from them, at 21 j.
Mr. Hall. Fat Iheep throve well on them.



* Not in the minutes, but I have received the in-
formation fince.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 187

HOGS.

Mr. Wharton. Found them of very >reat
utility (beyond turnips) in keeping a
large flock of ftore fwine.
From all which it clearly appears, that
tbbages are uncommonly beneficial in feed-
ing and fattening oxen and fheep, and
keeping fwine.

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

It may be thought very furprizing, that
vegetable cultivated by fuch numbers of
erfons, mould not yetbe thoroughly known ;
ut if the cafe is well confidered, it will
ot be difficult to account for fuch feeming
contradictions ; and this enquiry may per-
haps lead the way to more accurate ideas
in future.

The culture of cabbages, as food for cat-
tle, has been profecuted under a general
idea of fupplying the place of turnips late in
the fpring ; and this notion has run through
the cultivators of all the various forts, and
at both the feafons of fowing ; hence has
arifen one grand error in the culture, and
from which feveral of the enemies of cab-
bages have been led into their miftakes.

The



i88 THE FARMER'S TOUR

The culture of this plant for late fpring
food — and the moft profitable culture of it
in general, are perhaps very different things.
From attentively confidering the various
intelligence I have received, I am clearly of
opinion, that cabbages ought to be ufed
before they decline in the leaft, that is,
while all their loofe leaves are frefh and
green ; this will univerfally be before Chrift-
mas ; and if planted in the fpring, at Mi-
chaelmas, then mould fat oxen or fheep be
put to them without the leaft view to late
fpring food ; and that this will prove the
moft profitable conduct, I have not a doubt.

The vaft importance of 40 or 50 tons of
food well adapted to the autumn fatting of
cattle is unaccountably loft fight of, for
rambling after late fpring food, which is
quite another enquiry, and perhaps of much
inferior importance. And this ftrange
infatuation leads people to value crops by
their ufe in the fpring, which ought to have
been confumed before Chriftmas. A gen-
tleman weighs part of a crop in November ;
it turns out 40 or 50 ton ; he leaves it to
the fpring, when it pays him only 40 s. or
50 s. ; then, fays he, cabbages are worth
1 only



THROUGH ENGLAND. 189

only 1 j. or 2 j - . a ton; forgetting, that
' inftead of 40 tons, he has not, at the time
of confuming, perhaps 20.

I am led into theie reflections from Mr.
Crowle's getting above 50 tons ; and, as I
am informed, reporting very unfavourably
of the culture. How ftrange is this ! Is it
pofTible for a man to be pofleffed of 50 tons
of what will undeniably fatten both oxen
and fheep, and yet not know what to do
with it ? Here comes in another confidera-
Bon.

t j. Gentlemen keep cows for their families- .
fome milked, fome dry — young cattle —
hogs, &c. &c. their cabbages are fometimes
confumed in a mifcellaneous manner, and
f 0| turn out unprofitable : no wonder ; it
i, ■ would be fo with any other food : thefe
, 1C | applications, if accurately accounted for,
m i are all unprofitable ; four or five acres go
j, . one knows not how, that (referved for the
|ar purpofe) would have fattened, perhaps, 20
oxen or 100 wethers.

For thefe reafons I am induced to declare,
that cabbages have not fair play till they

are applied to fattening cattle or fheep

and at the time when the crop is in perfec-
tion. Is not this opinion ftrongly corrobo-
rated






190 THE FARMER'S TOUR

rated by the great profit made by thofc
gentlemen who thus apply their crops ?

That the true Scotch cabbage will ftand
till May without burfting or fprouting, I
know to be an undeniable fad: ; but if
weighed in December, and again in May y
there will be a wonderful difference.

In my Northern Tour, I fpoke of feed- j!
ing cows, but I am inclined to change my
opinion, partly from a winter's experi- ti
ence, and partly from reflection : an ani- fi
mal that yields little or nothing for half the *
year, can never pay for a winter food that
will fat an ox which pays a daily profit
from the hour of putting up.

Upon the whole, I beg leave to recom-i
mend a better confideration of the applica- \ i
tion of cabbages, than feems hitherto to i
have been praclifed by many cultivators : |
gaining great crops feems very well under-'
flood ; but what we now want, is to dif- j
cover the value of them, in which enquiry, I
let me particularly mention the completing i
the fatting of 'oxen , or wethers that have had \
the fummer *s grafs. Putting lean ' cattle or
fheep to cabbages, will tell you nothing, I
and it is the fame with turnips*



THROUGH ENGLAND.



191



LETTER XL.



THE culture of TiTrnips being
among the clearer! proofs of good
hufbandry, when managed on the princi-
ples found moft advantageous in the well
cultivated counties, deferves particular at-
tention. It cannot fail of being ufeful to
fee the average products of this root under
various circumftances.



z



Places.

1. Hempjlead,

2. Tringy

3. Blifvjorth,



Scil.



ftoney

loam
loam on

chalk
clayey,

&c.
red loam
clay

oam
Tandy

ditto

8. Cbatfxvorth\oa.m
taTUd/well,

9. About limeftone
! Tiddfiwell, loam

10. Chejlet— hazel
' field, loam

11. Lawton, limeflone

:::



4. Glendon,

5. Quenby,

6. Dijhley,

7. For mark,



Rent.

/. s. d.



Value I Ditto

hoed, \unboed.

I. s. d.l s. d.



O IO 02 2 O

IO Oj2 IO Oj

o 14 02 o oj

O IO 0,2 2 OJ

o 18 0J2 5 o

o 16 03 o c

O 15 C 2 10 O

O04 OO

o 15

o 17 o;i 17 6



Sundry circurnftanct*
Feed all witjj (beep.
Ditto.

Ditto.

Ditto,



Many unhced aot fa
high.



3 C O. Various ufes.



Ditto.

I 15 O 0ne acre will finifli

the fitting fowr
beit; of 40 ftoAe in
flailing.



192 THE FARMER'S TOUR



Places.
12. Gate/ord,



Soil.
fand



13. Blythe, ditto

14. Doncajler, ditto

15. Broad/
i\) or thy

16. Woomh-
ivell,

17. Retford,
iS. Boot bam,

1 9. Cannvick,

20. Sir CV«7
Wr'aj,



21. Run3on,

22. Ma/fmg-
ham,



23. Snettif-
ham,

24. Burnham
to #W/j,

25. War ham,



26. Earlham,

27. Bacon AJh,

28. Mr. .&>



29. ShoUtf-
bam,

30. /V^,



imeftonc

fand loam

fand
gravel
limeilone
ditto



Rent
I. s. d.



01003 50



fandy
ditto



ditto
ditto
ditto



ditto

clayey
ditto



loam

fandy
lcam



o 16 o



o 14 o
a 3 o



o 12 o
o 14 o
o 10 o

o 16 o

o 15

16 o

o 14 o
o 15 o



Value

baed.

I. s. d.



Sundry clrcumjlanctt.



2 7



I IO O

i 7 o

1 15 o

2 IO O
I IO O



2 OO

2 O O

3 3 o



Ditto

unhoed

I. s. d.

1 ICO One acre will, in ftal
ling, fatten 5 or
beafts.

206

2 00
I 5



2 40

1 15 o

2 O O



Both feed and carry off



Twice fucceffively, th
firft 40 j. the fecon
50 j.

400 fat fheep will eaj
an acre every day
one acre drawn an
carried to bullock;
will go as far
three on the land.



Fat beads of 50 ftondj
in the field ; barlql
better than aft(
iheep alone.



Feeds his horfes
them to great advar
tage ; -| an acre wi
winter a cow.



Buy lean beafts at 5,
about Mickaelmo,
and put them to tu
nips ; i'cH fat i
April, at 8 /. 8 s.
9 /. Three rood wi
fatten a beaft of
ftone, (14/i.) c
Norfolk wethers.









THROUGH ENGLAND. 193



PL



Ra-



I Soil.

I.
fandyloam o

fandv o



Rent.



31. Mr
mey,

32. Beecle.

33. Saxwund- ditto o
bam,

34. Mr. Atlon, ditto loam o



35-

36.

37-



Hadleigb, loam



Haftead,
Colchejler



jclayey
loam



12

16

12

H
16



oed.
d.

300



fa/

I beet



Ditto

I. s.d



clayey &c. 012 c



<:{i






ditto loam o

I
rich loam i

chalk

rich loam o



38. Youngs-
berry,

39. Peterjham, fandy

40. Morden, clav

41. Cbcam, chalk

42. Carjhal- ditto
ton,

u 43. 5/. M.
1 Cray,

44. Fe-ver-
Jham,

45. Beaks-
burn,

46. $ 97^

" 47. Mr. Poole, clayey

48. Findon, ,light

49. JfteWigbt, loam

50. Ditto, itoney
m.CritchilU limeitone

52. Mcreton, loam

53. C«,-w^, jdit. on ch.

54. Bridport, lo;.m

55. Leigh, clay

56. Taunton, ditto

57. Kings- loam
Si « fj <&ww,

|j8. Rund-ivay,

59. Donning- ditto

ittoi' '60. Becons- loam



Online LibraryArthur YoungThe farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 4) → online text (page 8 of 25)