Arthur Young.

The farmer's tour through the east of England : being the register of a journey through various counties of this kingdom, to enquire into the state of agriculture, &c. ... (Volume 4) online

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field,
; ; ' Averages,

Vol. IV.



o

I 2
IO

13



14 o



OIOO



17

10

13

o
10

IO
12

5

o

12

o



16
m



;o 14 1



10
10

J S
1 1

o

c



15 o



IO
IO

o



5 ©



o o



o o



2 IO O



15 o



10 I



o



10

o

10

10

10
o



Sundry artvmftneeu



One acre will, in the
field, fatten a beait
of 40 or 50 fcore.



16



Has kept 30 besfts 3
months on 5 \ acres
drilled.



194 THE FARMERS TOUR

It is much to be regretted that fo many
places fhould continue in the unprofitable
pra&ice of not hoeing : In this companion,
the hoed ones are the moft valuable, not-
withstanding the general circumftance of
being fcarcer in countries that do not hoe.

General average of hoed and unhoed, 2 /,
2 s. $d.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 195



LETTER XLI.



TH E intelligence on the culture of
Hops, inferted in the preceding
minutes, well deferves to be drawn into
one point of view, being much more im-
portant, upon the whole, than any account
of them I remember to have read ; particu-
larly in refpett of the expences and produce.
The general opinions concerning hops are
extremely various ; fome have an idea of
their being prodigioufly profitable, while
others affert it to be a culture that anfwers
poorly ; and this diverfity is found even
in the midft of the hop grounds of Kent.
A want of knowledge in thcie points is
generally owing to the cultivators not keep-
ing regular accounts.



flu*.

Mr. Brown,

Ordfal,

Mr. Jacob, Fe

•verjham,

Sir T. Hales,

Pre/ion,

Canterbury,

Hawkburjl,

Averages,



3 10



Sell. j Rent.
/. s. d.
black bog, 30

feet deep
rich black

mould
rich loam
ditto

ditto black 3
loam



1 18 10



Expatces.SProduci) I

!. :. rf.T.C^J/. s. d.

to o o'o 8 072 o o

f I

i
23 15 CO 10 o 30 o o



PerCw.
/. s.d.
900

300



13 960 8 2 44 4 8
7 0J36 8 7
o 11 057 4 11*5 4 1
7 o : ji o 0300



Profit.

I. s. d.
62 00

650



5 4 I 20 15 J

4 1



19 1 6io 8 2 43 9 8 ; 5 2 o 29 80



* Supplied from the preceding like*

O z



1 96 THE FARMER'S TOUR

The great point in this table, is the profit
made by planting hops in a bog, which is
amazing ; and although 9 /. feems an extra-
vagant rate, yet if we take 5, the product
will be 40/. per acre y and the profit 30/.;
an improvement which fhould make the
poffefTors of fuch waftes reflect on what
they have in their power to execute.

In lefs favourable circumftances, hops
appear to be a moft profitable article, and
much to exceed common hufbandry. If
the column of profit was complete, the great
advantage of them would be more ftriking,
as may eafily be conceived from that of
product



THROUGH ENGLAND. 197



LETTER XLII.

IN feveral parts of the minutes of this
Tour are inferted the regifter of various
experiments in the new husbandry, on dril-
lingwheat, barley, oats, peafe, beans, turnips,
&c. and the journey paifed thro' a part of Kent,
in which drilling moft crops is common
husbandry ; it will therefore be proper to
draw into one point of view all the intelli-
gence received of this kind. Some material
circumftances may appear from fuch a
review, which would not otherwife be
gained ; for the average of many perfons
trials on various foils, and performed with
various innxuments, muft give a better idea
of the drill culture, than the trials of a
fingle perfon confined to one foil, and
ufing perhaps but one or two implements.
It is grown of more confequence than ever,
to have juft ideas of the real merit of dril-
ling, as the partizans of the culture become
every day more numerous — as experi-
ments very fuccefsful are frequently pub-
O 3 lifted,



* 9 8 THE FARMER'S TOUR

lifhed, and as the London and Dublin So-
cieties feem pretty much to patronife it.
The latter, to my great furprize, thinks"
no other object worthy recommending to
the very ingenious Mr. Baker, than the
comparifon of the broad-caft and drill
hufbandry ; although I will venture to af-
fert, that the providing winter and fpring
green food for cattle - r the comparative
merit of manures, and the culture of the
artificial grafles, are any of them of
ten times the importance. The new huf-
bandry receiving fuch particular attention
at prefent, without the real merit of it being
generally known, fhould make one anxious
to lay before the publick, in as clear a light
as poffible, the refult of the information;
received concerning it.
Tring. The better fort of farmers drill
peafe in rows two feet, and hand-hoe
twice ; product 35 bufhels ; and clean
fo well, that wheat always follows j
in the common way the product but
20 buihels.
Mr. Booth. Drills peafe, and hand-hoes ; t
product one quarter and a half/^r acre.
Col. St, Leger. Dibbled beans in double

rows*



THROUGH ENGLAND. 199

rows, eight inches, with 18 inch in-
tervals ; hand-hoed well. ; product
greater than ever known in the com-
mon way ; wheat followed, which
yielded 27 bufhels an acre.
Mr. Hall. Rouncival peafe, rows 18 inches
afunder ; clean as a garden, and finer
than any broad-caft.
Leverington. Many farmers drill their
beans, 10 pecks per acre, inflead of
four bufhels fown; clean by horfe-
hocing ; crops four quarters inftead of
three, and wheat follows ; as clean as
a garden.
Walpole. Drill beans in every fourth
furrow ; kept clean by horfe and
hand-hoeing ; much finer crops than
common.
Mr. Ctinham. Ditto, product five and a
half quarters per acre, and then five
quarters of wheat over 60 acres.
Mr. Felloives. Wheat in equally diftant
rows, 18 inches afunder; kept quite
clean ; product per acre two quarters
five buihels.
Siixmundham. Beans in drills, hoed twice ;
product four and a half quarters,
O 4



200 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Woodbridge. Peafe drilled, and kept quite
clean by hand-hoeing ; product three
and a half quarters ; beans dibbled in
rows, equally diftant, 16 or 18 inches ;
hand-hoe at 8 s. ; product of the horfe
bean from five to feven and a half
quarters, and of Wind/or ticks four or
five quarters, at 40 s. to 3/. a quarter.

Colchejier. Peafe drilled ; hand-hoe them
as clean as a garden ; get to fix quar-
ters an acre, average four ; dibble
beans in rows, nine inches afunder ;
keep them clean as peafe ; crops from five
to 10 quarters ; average fix and a half.

Mr. Ducket. Drills his turnips from 12.
inches to two feet afunder ; wheat
and oats from nine to 12 inches ; keeps
them clean by hand-hoeing ; the
crops much better than in the broad-
caft mode ; fows clover before the
laft hoeing, and hoes it in.

Mr. Arbuthnot. Drills wheat, barley, peafe,
beans, and turnips ; four rows of
wheat in general, at fix inches, on
ridges three and a half feet wide ;
fome double rows ; peafe and beana
various diftances ; turnips at two
3 and



THROUGH ENGLAND. 2.1

and three feet ; average product of
drilled , 23 bufhels; of beans

27 and a half; of barley one quarter
feven bufhels ; peafe have not fuc-
ceeded ; turnips middling.
Mr. William Neal. Drilled hotfpur peafe,
the rows equally diftant, 10 inches j
broad-caft at fame time.

Producl, drilled, ^3 00

Broad-caft, - 250

Superiority, - 030

The price Ss. a bufhel.
St. Mary Cray. Peafe they drill in equally

diftant rows, two feet.
Dartford. Peafe and beans drilled and

hand-hoed; producl from four to fix

quarters an acre.
Nortbjleet. Peafe and beans drilled, and

hand and horfe-hoed ; wheat after

them ; producl:, peafe four to feven

quarters ; beans four to eight.
Sittif/gburn. Peafe and beans drilled, hand

and horfe-hoed : producl, peafe three

and a half quarters ; beans, five to

eight quarters.
Feierfiam. Peafe and bsans drilled in rows,

18 inches



202 THE FARMER'S TOUR

1 8 inches afunder ; hand-hoe the
peafe, and horfe and hand-hoe the
beans ; crops from five to feven quar-
ters ; average five and a half.
Beahfburn. Drill peafe and beans equally"
difiant, at 20 inches ; both horfe and
hand-hoe them ; product three and
a half quarters peafe, and five of beans*
Mr. 'Taylor, Wheat equally didant, 10
inches afunder ; hand-weed and horfe-
hoe with a narrow fhim ; product
four quarters per acre ; beans in double
rows, at 16 inches, on four feet
ridges ; horfe-hoed ; crop four quar-
ters : in this method he plants cabbages
in June, in the middle of the intervals*
and horfe-hoes them after the beans
are off ; crop four quarters, and cab-
bages 3/. Oats in equally diftant rows*
1 1 inches afunder ; hand and horfe-
hoed, and clover harrowed in ; the"
crop four and a half quarters ; , and
the cleaned clover in the country.
Mr. Reynolds. Turnips in equally didant
rows, 18 to 24 inches afunder ; horfe
and hand-hoed, the crops better*
than broad-cad ones, up to 38 tons

per



THROUGH ENGLAND. 203

per acre. Wheat in equally diftant
rows, one foot, horfe and hand-
hoed ; product 20 bufhels, broad-cad
adjoining 14; the former exceeded
the latter by 1/. us. yd. per acre.

Trefton. Beans in rows, 18 to 24 inches ;
kept quite clean by horfe and hand-
hoeing ; crops five quarters 3 wheat
always after them.

IJle of Thanet. Beans drilled and horfe-
hoed ; crop four to five quarters, on
an average.

Margate ditto. Wheat, barley and oats,
equally diftant, nine inches ; hand
and horfe-hoed with a fhim ; beans and
peafe 16 to 24 inches: crops; beans
four and a half quarters, peafe four
quarters, wheat four quarters, barley to
eight quarters ; five and a half average.

Mlnjier ditto. Wheat, barley, and oats,
ditto : crops, wheat three and a half,
barley five and a half, oats feven,
peafe four quarters, beans four; w T heat
after pulfe.

Dover. Beans, at 18 inches, hand and
horfe -hoed; crop four quarters;
wheat after.



204 THE FARMER'S TOUR

Sandgate. Beans drilled, hand and horfe-«
hoed; crop four quarters; wheat aftef
them.

Mr. Poole, Tried TuWs wide intervals for
many years ; but found repeatedly,
that they would not anfwer ; he then
contracted them to equally diftant,
which have proved regularly pro-
fitable.

Wheat, barley, and oats, at nine
inches.

Peafe, double rows, at nine inches,
with intervals of two feet ; turnips at
20 inches ; crops of barley, five t
feven quarters.

Mr. Turner. Beans drilled, hand-hoe;
once ; crops, four to feven quarters ;
average five.

Mr. Andercbn. Wheat double rows, on
five feet ridges ; produced per acrei
No. 15. Clear crop, B. 10 2 o
No. 16. Another crop, 831

No. 17. Another, - 19 o 6
No. 18. Another, 13 2 o

No. 19. Another, 801

Average, * 12 o o



THROUGH


ENGLAND.


205


Profit and lofs


on thefe


crop


s.




No. 15. Profit,


-


£■


1


3 1


No. 16. Ditto,


-




1


4 z


No. 17. Ditto,


-




1


1 5


No. 18. Ditto,


-




1


15 5


No. 19. Ditto,


n







4 °


Total,


5


8 1


Average,


1


1 7



Broad-caft compared with it.

Produce. Prrifit.
B.P.G.
No. 15, Broad-caft, 1320
Drilled, 10 2 o



Superiority, 300



No. 1 6, Drilled,



8



Broad-caft, 401



Superiority, 430



/.


s.


d.


0,


10


2


I



d


1


I


7


1


I


4


2,


L


*/?.




1





10



250



No. 15, Rent, £. 1 o o^racre.
No. 16, r- 050

No. 17, - o 12 o

No. 18, - 0120

No. 19, - o 10 o



2o6 THE FARMER'S TOUR

BARLEY.

No. 2 1 . Four and 8 rows on
a ridge produced per acre
clear crop, - B. 20 o

Profit, - £.220

No. 22. Equally diftant rows, at one
foot, produced 3 quarters 2 bufhels.

No. 21. Compared with broad-caft.

It produced, clear crop, B. 22 o o

Drilled, 20 o



Superiority, - 20



Profit, broad-caft, £. 2 4 8

Pitto, drilled, - 220



Superiority, -02 8 ;

OATS.

Drill and broad-cajl compared.

Four and 8 rows on a ridge,

produced clear, B. 27 2 1 5
JBroad-caft, - 21 3 4 4

Superiority, 5301



Drilled, profit, - £.0 19 3

Broad-caft, - 020



Superiority, - o 17 3

1 r — — —





2


]




£■


5


J 7


11




o


*7


91




2


l 9


7



THROUGH ENGLAND. 207

BEANS.

Broad-cajl and drilled compared.
Broad-caft, grofs crop, B. 35 2?,
Prilled, - 15 1

Superiority,

Broad-caft, profit,
Ditto drilled,

Superiority,

Another drilled crop produced eight
bufhels per acre.

PEASE.

Broad-cajl and drilled compared,
J^o. 27. Broad-caft, clear

crop, - B. 15 3 o o

Drilled, - 8270

Superiority, - 7010

No. 28. Drilled, Increafe

per acre, - B. o 2 7 o
Xofs, broad-caft, 3^5°

Superiority, - 3260






2o£ THE FARMER'S TOUR

M. Coombs. Drills peafe in rows equally

diftant, 20 inches; cleans them by

horfe and hand-hoeings ; product 30

bufhels per acre.
Donnmgtcn. Drill their peafe, rows equally

diftant, 15 inches; hand and horfe-

hoe ; product four quarters.

Beans at 18 inches, hand-hoe j crop

four and a half quarters.
Mr. Coivjlade. Wheat in equally diftant :

rows, 1 8 inches, hand-hoed ; the crop

three and a half quarters.

Another crop at one foot, hand

hoed, three and a half quarters ; broad

caft adjoining five quarters.

Drills all his peafe and beans ; pro

duct four and a half quarters.
Reading. Drill their peafe at 18 inches, and

hand-hoe ; the crop three and a half

quarters.
Harkyford. Peafe drilled, equally diftant

rows, and horfe-hoed ; crop three and

a halj 7 quarters.
Mr. Clayton. Wheat equally diftant, five

inches, hand-hoed ; not equal to

broad- caft.

Having



THROUGH ENGLAND. 209

Having thus given a general review of
all the trials in drilling, we mud, in the
next place, draw each crop into one view,
that the clearer idea may be had. I mall
•begin with

BEANS.



Crops.

Leverington

Mr. Canham

Saxmundbam

Woodbr'idge

Colchejler

Mr. Arbutbnot

Dartford

Northfieet

Sittingburn

Feverjham

Beak/barn

Mr. Taylor



Pre/Ion
Vhanet
Ditto
Ditto
Dover
'andgate
Mr. Turner
Mr. Anderdon
Do7inington
VIr. Cowjlade

Average



D [fiance. Seed

Every 4th fur.

16 or 18 inch.
9 Inches
Various



18 Inches

20 Inches

Double rows,
16 inc. on 4
feet ridges

18 to 24 inch.

16 to 24 inch.
18 Inches



18 Inches



Produc

4



4 o



What follows*

Wheat

Ditto 5 qrs

Wheat

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Barley

Wheat

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto



4 4



Vol. IV.



2io THE FARMER'S TOUR

From this account the importance of
the drill culture of beans is fufficiently
clear : four and a half quarters an acre are
a product far beyond the average of broad-
caft crops. But the bean is peculiarly
adapted to this hufbandry ; the ftalks are
ftrong, keep erect, and no weather has
power to beat them down, or even to
entangle them like wheat ; fo that thi
horfe-hoe is admitted with the greate
eafe, and without any damage, which i
feldom the cafe with any other corn crop ; .
and that horfe-hoeing is of infinite confe-
quence in improving the crop, and keep-;
ing the land quite clean, has never been
doubted ; indeed the conftant practice of
all the Kentijh common fanners fhews clearly
enough that they find it highly profitable.

But the advantage, perhaps, the greater!
of this careful bean culture is that crop ;
being made a fallow for wheat; all Kent i <
concurs in this courfe; it is the fame with :
the belt farmers in the marfli-land clays of \
Norfolk ; let any perfon judge of the jj
merit of that hufbandry, which makes the 5
fallow year yield four and a half quarters
of beans per acre, which are certainly a 1
product of above 5/. The fame regular

practice



THROUGH ENGLAND. 211



practice finds the advantage of fowing
wheat after them, which would not be the
cafe, if they were net to all purpofes a real
fill low.

What an amazing difference is there
between this moft advantageous practice,
and the courfe of, 1. Fallow, 2. Wheat,
3. Beans ; w r hich is yet the practice through-
out the Vale of Aylefbury^ and many
other clay countries ! And in which the
beans are fown broad-caft, and weeded
by fheep. What fhameful, execrable
hufbandry!

PEASE.



Crops.

'Tring
Mr. Booth
IVaodbridge
Cclchejlcr
Mr. Neal
Dart ford
Northjieet
Sittingburn
Beakjbum
Thanet
Ditto

Mr. Anderdsn
Mr. Coombs
1 Donnir.gton
Mr. Coufade
Reading
vhyford

Average



Dijiance.
2 Feet

10 Inches



20 Inches
16 10 24 in.

20 Inches
15 Inches

18 Inches



Produce What follows-.
Wheat



Wheat

Wheat

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Bitta



212 THE FARMERS TOUR



Drilling in this table alfo appears a mofl
beneficial culture for peafe ; three quarters
five bufhels are a great crop; and many
products riling from four to more than
five fhew how advantageous the practice
is. Every one mull be fenfible, that the
broad-call mode will not on an average
nearly equal it.

WHEAT.

Crops.



Mr. Fellow es
Mr. Arbuthnot



Mr. Taylor

Mr. Reynolds

Thanet

Ditto

Mr. Anderdon

Mr. Cowjlade

Ditto

Average



Dijlance.
1 8 Inches


Produce
% B.
2 5


4 Rows at 8 in.
on 3 | feet


2


7


ridges
io Inches


4





12 Ditto


2


4


9 Ditto
Equally dift.
2 Rows on 5 f.
1 8 Inches


4

3

i

3




4
4
4


i Foot


3


4




3


i



Horfc-hoc3

Ditto

Ditto
Ditto
Ditto

Hand-hoe



The product of wheat thus cultivated,
on companion with the old method in gene-
ral, is not here fo much the object, as the
general importance of admitting the hand
and horfe-hoe ; which keeps the land clean
and in much finer order than it can be
in the broad-caft way.



THROUGH ENGLAND. 213
BARLEY and OATS.



Crops.
Mr. Arbuthnot

Mr. Tayhr

Tbanet

Ditto

Ditto

Mr. Poole

Mr. Anderdon

Ditto



Average



Sort.



Barley



Oats

Barley

Ditto

Oats



Dijiance.

Double rows,
3, 4, and 5
feet ridges

n Inches

9 Ditto

Ditto

Ditto



Barleyiojnch
BarleyjiFoo t
Oats IDitto



Prod.



Horfe



4 Ditto



4 4



Ditto
Ditto
Ditto
Hand



It is very clear from this table, that clofe
drilling is on dry foils very beneficial, fince
the Kentt/h farmers have invented horfe-
hoes (fhims) that will work in nine inches;
and one practice of great importance (fo
great indeed that without it any product
would be comparatively ufelefs) is the
fowing clover over the crop, and covering
it by the laft hoeing, hand or horfe ; which
is much fuperior to the common mode of
rolling it in.

Comparifons of the old and new methods.
Several of the preceding gentlemen have
formed comparative trials between the two
modes, which muft by no means be palled
over. P 2



214 THE FARMER'S TOUR



53


ft.


HIM
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ftq


N O


■^J» i-^i\0 "» ~i"^0 w-> w> r>.




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^


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O ~


O - - M O O N










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"* ■&


o"tJ <D • - cE "iS cE C2 "5


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4J <J

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la^^Wi'i


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JD M|rt


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tJ- c<->


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* c










t>




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to <n


5 » 3






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* y o * *i




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N -+■


N M -. N W




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<5 rt


.£> 8 S 2 JT -> S j>


p






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J3 -C


*-• rc-d^Cw "^ ^ ci




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fc£.


v.

o




££




1

3


'S






ss


^ §




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•*•

^2




a


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is

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CiJ lu"22SS







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ss


fi^l^OQfiflPPS









THROUGH


ENGLAND. 215


In cam, new fuperior,




£


3 1


Ditto,


-


-




in 9


Ditto,


-


-




250


Ditto,

Total,

Average,
Ditto old ditto,


£■


I 4


3


17 3


4 *7 l


15 1


Ditto,


-


-




18 10


Ditto,


-




-


1 7 1


Ditto,


-


-




028


Ditto,
Total,




m




2 19 7


633



Average, - £.147

I do not offer thefe tables as fatisfactory
evidence, but only as hints to fhew that
the comparifon fhould be further enquired
into. The real truth is, that drilling and
horfe-hoeing on the Kentifi fyftem of clofe
rows, are mod advantageous ; but the broad-
caft much exceeds the Tullian fyftem of
wide intervals.

Upon the drill huihandry in general,
P 4 as



216 THE FARMER'S TOUR

as it appears in the minutes of this Tour,
I have to remark, that the methods purfued
in Kent, with relation to beans and peafe>
feem to defer ve univerfal imitation ; becaufe
I know not any foils or circumftances that
can make an exception. The fame ob-
fervation is undoubtedly to be made with
refpect to wheat, barley, and oats, on fuch
foils as drilling is practifed on in Eajl Kent
and the IJle of T^hanet, viz. light loams,
dry enough, always to be ploughed and
kept on the flat ; as they do with their
turnwreft ploughs, leaving not one furrow
in a whole field : the fuccefs there met
with in this hufbandry is fo great, that
no unfavourable conclufions can poffibly
be allowed : and I may further remark*
that fuccefs alfo depends much on the im-
plements ufed being ftrong, fimple, and
in commom life : this is the cafe in Kent,
where drill ploughs, and variety of horfe-
hoes, are found in every farm yard.

But on foils, that are fo heavy or wet
as to require ridge work, I am clear from
thefe minutes, that (beans excepted) the
broad-caft mode will be found much the

morl:



THROUGH ENGLAND. 217

moft profitable; and I may alfo affirm,
that in refpect of good implements for the
drill culture, no part of the kingdom,
Kent excepted, though not the Society's
room, is near perfection.



LETTER



218 THE FARMER'S TOUR



LETTER XLIII.

GAINING certain information con-
cerning the rental of the kindom is*
one of the moft important objects of this.'i
Tour; fuppofed amounts, varying in dif^l
fcrent periods, have for this century pafl
been calculated by ingenious political arith-jf
meticians, and numerous important reflec-
tions founded on the refult : I apprehend
the neceffity of calculating on real authority,
inftead of fuppofition, whenever it can be
gained, mud be manifeft to every one, 1
and in proportion as the reflections of thofe
politicians are of confequence, fo much
will be the advantage of calculating the
average, from the various minutes of this
and fimilar journeys.

Fom North Minis, through St. Albarfs
and Hempjlead to Trhig, within four miles
of Aylejbury the foil is of moderate fer-
tility ; rents from $s. to 2 or. but principally
at 10/; the average I reckon 1 1 s. This u
a tract of 28 miles through the country,
4 which



THROUGH ENGLAND. 219

which Ellis calls the Chiltern, From thence*

; through the vale, 14/. About Hockfion

16 s. Winjlow from 2 8j\ to 3/. average

35 j-.; thence to Buckingham 15J. ; from

Buckingham, through Towce/ier to North-

-. ampton, is alfo rich clay about Toivceflcr^

and five miles towards Northampton, from

: 20 s. to 3/. average 28 s. Here we muft

if. flop : this is a line of 37 miles, all a very

• rich foil ; the average of the averages is

: . 11s. and is I believe near the truth.

From Blifivorth, about which rents are
nd 8/. to 20/. average 12 s. through North-
- ampton, the country improves ; it is a fine
red loam ; for fome miles from Northamp-
ton, from 20s. to 40 j-.; average 25 s. About
! Hazelbeach, inclofed, 15.^025^.; but fome
\ large open fields from 2 s. bd. to 8j. w T ill re-
J duce the other to 16/. From Hazelbeech to
■■• Kettering the fame. About Glendon, the
average 15 J - . From Hazelbeech to ^uenby
' Hall moftly grazing country ; inclofures
, i8j-. open fields \os. average of both 15s,
, About Tilton on the hill 1 6 s. From Tilton
• to Leicejler and Loughborough chiefly
grazing, 16 s. About Dijhly various foils,

i6j\



220 THE FARMER'S TOUR

i6x. From thence to Nottingham the
fame.

Here ends the rich country ; it is a line
of 129 miles ; average of the whole, as
nearly as I can calculate, 1 7 s.

From Nottingham to Arnold about the
town fome rich at 30 j-. ; about Arnold, at]
1 8j. but much foreft: at 5/. general average'



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