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Asa Oscar Tait.

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Heralds of the Morning







"Watchman, what of the night?"
"The morning cometh."



HERALDS

of the MORNING

The Meaning of the Social and Political Problems

of To-day and the Significance of the

Great Phenomena in Nature






'Watchman, what of the night? Watchman, what of the night? T6e^wat{-.^rrai) say.'flie morning
Cometh, and also the night: if ye will inquire, inquire^f;; iutn ya, oome.'''-rIf"Jgh„ , , ,



ASA OSCAR TAIT



One Hundred Seventieth Thousand -Re-revised

MOUNTAIN VIEW. CAL.

PACIFIC PRESS PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION

Portland, Ore. Kansas City, Mo. Calgary, Alberteij, Canada

It. O. Dup.
Order Div.




.fopyi^ighted 1899, 1905, 1906, by
*. : * ^- O- TAIT

JJll rights reserved.



Copyrighted 1909, by

"Pacific "Press "Publishing Jlssocialion

Jill rights reserved.




CONTENTS.



Chapter Page

13



Foreword

I. Watchman, What op the Night?
II. He Will Come Again

III. This Same Jesus

IV. Shall so Come in Like Manner
V. We May Not Know the Hour

VI. Know That He Is Near
VII. Watch Ye Therefore
VIII. Great Deceptions
IX. Prophetic Outlines .
X. The Good News op the Kingdom to All the World 84
XI. A Remarkable Century
XII. The Bible Among the People .

XIII. The Gospel's Progress

XIV. What Many People Shall Say



XV. The Prevalence of Crime — A Sign of Our Times 158

XVI. Judgment Is Turned Away Backward . . .166

XVII. The Earth Is Filled with Violence . . . 186

XVIII. The Social Vice « . 195

XIX. Maintaining the Form, but Denying the Power . 210

XX. Lovers op Pleasure . . • % . . . . 224

XXI. Ye Have Heaped Treasure for the Last Days . 231

XXII. And the Nations Were Angry .... 258

XXIII Divine Restraint of the Spirit of War . . . 310

XXIV. The Voice of the Elements . ■ . . . . 320

XXV. The Testimony op the Earth 348

XXVI. When Ye Shall See All These Things . . . 336

XXVII. And There Shall Be a Time of Trouble . . 370

XXVIII. The Earth Was Lightened by His Glory .i . 382

XXIX. Our Refuge and Fortress . . . -V ■ "^^^

XXX. In This Generation ^ . 398

XXXI. The Triumphant Victory and Everlasting Reward 406

vii



17
27

38
45
52

56
61
67

80



113
123
141



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



The morning eometh ......

"Watchman, what of the night?" (chapter heading)
Society banded into factions . . _.

The dove of peace lies wounded and dying
•What will be the end of all these threatening dangers'?

The long roll sounding

The Omnipotent Power that balances the worlds in space

Earthquakes and tidal waves

He will come again (chapter heading)

' * All that are in the graves shall hear His voice ' '

Drifting toward the vortex

Heralds trumpeting the morning

The Consoler .......

Shoals and rocks along the farther shore

"This same Jesus" (chapter heading)

' ' At the pool of Siloam "

' ' Behold how He loved him " . . .

Shall so come in like manner (chapter heading)

"And He shall send His angels"

"Shall so come in like manner"

We may not know the hour (chapter heading) .

"The swelling of the buds in the spring-time"

" As a thief in the night " .

Know that He is near (chapter heading) ■ .

Watch ye therefore (chapter heading)

The magicians in Moses' time . . .

Great deceptions (chapter heading)

A charmer .......

The Shepherd

Prophetic outlines (chapter heading)

The good news of the kingdom sent to all the world (chapter headir.

A remarkable century (chapter heading)

Edward Entwistle (The first locomotive engineer)

The "Rocket" (The engine which Mr. Entwistle drove)

Overland in the middle of the nineteenth century

The DeWitt Clinton engine and train

The 20th Century Limited ....

The latest most powerful locomotive in the world

The first working telegraph instrument

The first and the second East River bridges .

First steamer carrying mail across the Atlantic

Steamer "Lusitania" docking at New York .

Arrival of ' ' Lusitania ' ' on her maiden voyage .

A great railway station . . . . •

The old ' ' Franklin hand-press " .

The Hoe double octuple printing-press

Robert Fulton

viii



Frontispiece
'17
18



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



IX



Samuel F. B. Morso

Peter Cooper

(Jharles Goodyear

Sir Henry Bessemer

(J. H. McCormick

Guglielmo Marconi

James Watt

Thomas A. Edison

Cyrus W. Field

The ' ' Great Eastern ' ' laying the Atlantic cable

M. Edouard Belin and his telephotography apparatus

Outdoor picture transmitted by telephotography

Harvesting fifty years ago ....

The Bible among the people (chapter heading)

Combined harvester and thrasher

Hammer, anvil, and forge ....

"Boots and shoes were slowly made by hand"
The steam-hammer at work ....

' ' The simple needle and thimble were the implements '

"To-day she has a machine" . .

' * The carpenter did everything by hand ' '

Eailroad train passing through the old Chinese Wall

The Gospel's progress (chapter heading) .

John Eliot .......

College class training for the missionary field .
Bible House, New York .....

Count Nicholas Ludwig Zinzendorf
Bartholomew Ziegenbalg .....

Christian Frederick Schwartz ....

John Schudder, M. D.

Bible House, London .....

Vestibule, Bible House, London
Corner on bound-stock floor, Bible House, London
Cases of Scriptures, warehouse, London .
William Carey .....

Henry Martyn

Eeginald Heber

Robert Morrison

Adoniram Judson

Ann Hasseltine Judson

Bible cart, Japan,

Bible boat, Siam,

"What many people shall say" (chapter heading)

Mary L. Whately

Samuel Gobat

Robert Moffat .

John Williams .

David Livingstone

John C. Patteson

Griffith John

John G. Paton .

John Wilson, M. D.

John Wilkinson

Alexander Duff

J. Hudson Taylor

Thomas J. Comber



104
lUf)

lun

106
106
107
107
108
108
109

no

111
112
113
114
115
115
116
118
119
120
121
123
123
124
125
126
126
127
127
128
129
131
133
134
135
136
136
137
137
138
139
141
142
142
143
143
144
145
146
146
147
147
148
149
150



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



(chapter heading)
spending her money

(chapter heading)



inf)



William Duncan . . . .

Alexander M. Mackay

Egerton R. Young ....

Samuel Adjai Crowther

James Chalmers ....

John Kenneth Mackenzie, M. D.

Mary Reed . • .

Pandita Ramabai . . .

The prevalence of crime a sign of our times (chapter heading)

"The same day that Lot went out of Sodom" .

"As it was in the days of Noah " .

"Judgment is turned away backward" (chapter heading)

"The earth is filled with violence" (chapter heading)

The social vice (chapter heading)

' ' He that is without sin among you ' '

Maintaining the form but denying the power

"How the great leading 'Christian America'

"Lovers of pleasure" (chapter heading)-

"Ye have heaped treasure for the last days"

An alley of poverty, Chicago . . .

Lodging-house for the poor

' ' Misery . . . exists in these sweat-shops

"And the nations were angry" (chapter head

British navy ......

War-ships of the world ....

Admiral Farragut 's flagship

Monitor "Florida"

Battle-ship ' ' Connecticut ' ' on her trial run
Prize-winning gun crew of the ' ' Albany ' '
Trophy won by the ' ' Albany 's ' ' crew

Target for naval gun practise .
British battle-ship ' * Dreadnaught " .
American battle-ship "North Dakota"
British cruiser "Indomitable"

Submarine torpedo-boat ' ' Plunger ' '

Battery at siege of Sebastopol

Modern coast defense mortar battery

Russian submarine mines from Kerr Bay .

Mine exploding under a battle-ship

Hudson Maxim .....

Armor-plate pierced by shell from modern canu

Actual penetration of shell from big cannon

The Rodman cannon of Civil War times

Buffington-Crozier disappearing gun of to-day

Modern three-inch field gun

Gun crew operating one-pounder rapid-fire gun

The infantry rifle of 1861

The infantry rifle of 1909

The Wright brothers' air-ship .

The Count Zeppelin air-ship

War automobile .....

Brazilian battle-ship "Minas Geraes"

Divine restraint of the spirit of war (chapter

Tlie voice of the elements (chapter heading)

Eruption of Mont Pelee ....

Union Street, San Francisco, after the earthquake of 190(



on dec



head



k of



ship



150

151
151
152
153
154
155
156
158
159
160
166
186
195
208
210
!18, 219
224
231
236
237
249
258
263
264
266
267
268
270
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
280
281
282
284
285
288
289
292
293
296
297
302
303
305
309
310
320
323
325



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIOXS



XI



Redwood tree split by San Francisco earthquake of 1906
Work of the Hongkong typhoon of 1908
Village overthrown by Calabrian earthquake of 1907
Work of storm in Tahiti, 1906 ....

' ' The whole land shall be desolate '"'...

"The tornado . . . whirling with fury"

Wreckage after the hurricane of Ponce, Porto Rico, 1908

Work of tornado in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama

"Hast thou seen the treasures of the hail"?" .

Breckenridge Hall after Galveston storm .

Merced Temple, Valparaiso, after her earthquake of 1906

Harbor Street, Kingston, Jamaica, after her earthquake

Messina before her earthquake of 1908

Street in Messina after her earthquake of 1908

The testimony of the earth (chapter heading)

Crop destroying insects ......

"When ye shall see all these things" (chapter heading)

"And there shall be a time of trouble" (chapter heading

The earth was lightened witn his glory (chapter heading)

I saw another angel having great power .

"The desert shall rejoice and blossom as the rose"

"Our refuge and fortress" (chapter heading)

He brought His people out of that dark land

In this generation (chapter heading)

Measuring the movements of the heavenly bodies

The navigators locating their vessel ....

"Jesus is soon to be seen coming in the clouds of heaven
The triumphant victory and everlasting reward
' ' I John saw the Holy City "



, 1908



of 19(^7



34S, .3



.50. 3.



52, 354,



326
328
329
331
332
333
334
335
337
338
340
342
344
345
348
356
366
370
382
385
390
391
394
398
402
403
405
406
414



"Henceforth I call you not, servants; for the servant
knoweth not what his lord doeth: but I have called you
friends; for all things that I have heard of My Father I
have made l-nown unto you."

' ' Ye have not chosen Me, but I have chosen you, and or-
dained you, that ye should go and bring forth fruit, and that
your fruit should remain : that whatsoever ye shall ask of the
Father in My name, He may give it you. ' ' — The Apostle John.



r£3 1« 1916



FOREWORD



AMONG the most expressive and beautiful words of the
English language is the noble, tender term, "Home."
Among the sweetest songs ever sung by loving lips is "Home,
Sweet Home," given to a needy world by One who never
had a home, yet whose heart ever cried out for what the
world never gave him. His very homelessness voiced
sweeter and deeper the longing of every true human heart.

Among the l)lessed occurrences that surround the home,
"be it ever so humble," is the "Home-coming" of loved
ones. This is especially true when a loving father has been
long gone and is about to return. What thought and action
it arouses and inspires. How it quickens heart and eye
and hand and foot. How often and anxious the inquiries
of the mother as to when he is coming. What- prepara-
tions are begun to welcome him. How short the days seem
to do the work which ought to be done. How long the days
seem when the separation is brought to mind. How slowly
roll Time's chariot wheels. Over and over say the chil-
dren : ' ' Father is coming, the best, the strongest, the wisest
friend on earth. He is bringijig back for each one of us
some ])eautiful and appro])ri^t^ift. He has sent various
gifts during his absence, ne'wiiTbring better ones at this
home-coming, and bestow them with his own hands; and
l)est of all, he himself will come. We shall look into the eyes
that have so many years looked upon us in love. We shall
be clasped by the hand that helped and sheltered and
shielded us in trouble and danger. He will call us by name,
fold us in his arms, and kiss us glad greeting. And then,
too, he will take us to a better home for a while till this
home is made far more beautiful than we have ever
dreamed it could be made."

Thus the thoughts of the loving children run on, and
the glad mother recounts the nobleness of character in

13



14 FOREWORD

times antedating the children. At last preparation is over,
the last touch is given, and mother and children lovingly,
impatiently wait. Surely there is no event in that home
like the home-coming of the one who is to all the others
chiefest in the household.

We all know it to be at least ideally true ; yet it is but
a faint picture of a greater, more far-reaching, more
l)lessed, spiritual fact, around which cluster all the greater
glorious events of the Christian life.

''The earth is the Lord's, and the fulness thereof." He
made it to be a glorious home forever for the family of
man. But sin entered, and the home was marred, and the
trail of the serpent may be traced over the fairest of earth's
domain. With the entrance of sin came death; and the
earth, designed as the abode of the living, would have be-
come a vast charnel-house had it not been for the constant,
abundant blessings of grace poured out upon it from the
inexhaustible storehouse on high.

"When the fulness of the time came," the Son of God,
with all-glorious divinity veiled in humanity, truly God
and truly man, came unto His own, but "His own received
Him not." The vast majority would not receive Him as
the only Saviour. But earnest souls did receive Him, and
found Him to be the Son of God, the Saviour, Friend, and
Brother of men.

Before He went away. He told them He would come
again, — that His going away would be like that of a noble-
man, who "went into a far country to receive for himself
a kingdom, and to return." As priest on the Father's
throne, Jesus Christ, through angelic and human ministers,
has been gathering out subjects for His everlasting king-
dom — this earth made new by God's creative power. That
work is about completed ; the long roll of the ages is nearly
finished; the characters inscribed "before the foundation
of the world" "in the Lamb's book of life" are nearly all
wrought out ; the tested and polished stones for the eternal,
spiritual temple of God are nearing the end of their num-



FOREWORD 15

bering; the gifts of His Spirit, brought anew into exercise
in His church, will soon perfect that church, that He may
present her to Himself, a beautiful church, "not having
spot, or. wrinkle, or any such thing," but "holy and with-
out blemish, ' ' clad in the robes of His own glory. And then
comes the Home-coming of the Master, the triumphant, glo-
rious finale of all earth's sorrow and travail. The Master
of the house comes to remove for a time to the heavenly
mansions His loved ones, while the marred and blasted
earth passes through its last stage of disintegration prior
to its re-creation as the eternal home of the souls saved
by grace. "The bondservant [of sin, Satan and his own]
abideth not in the house forever: the Son [Christ and His
own] abideth forever." And Christ is coming to complete
the great and all-absorbing work of the universe, the vin-
dication .of the character of God and the salvation of every
trusting, faithful soul.

And, reader, this unworthy foreword only seryes as an
introduction to the pages following, written by my friend
and brother, Asa Oscar Tait. In them are arrayed some
of the many evidences of God's word which show that
the great Home-coming of our Lord and Master is nigh.
In plainest, clearest language, by illustration and quota-
tion, are the evidences rehearsed, fortified, and demon-
strated. "Christ is coming" is the fitting close to every
chapter. The whole work is vibrant with the intensity
of the times through which we are passing. Read its pages,
ponder' its sublime and awful facts, receive its truth ; and
then, when the great drama shall have closed, may you be
among those who shall, with glad hearts filled with heav-
enly melody, welcome the Home-coming of the King.



%:£t^4.Qf^^



Editorial Rooms ''Signs of the Times/
Mountain Vieiv^ Cal.



}m-



^■1





CHAPTER ONE

ANY serious and perplexing \.
problems, social and political,
are confronting the world
These problems are not mere theories in
the minds of fanatics, neither are they con-
fined within the narrow limits of one or two nations; but
thoughtful men everywhere see the dangers that are threat-
ening the whole world, and are in dread before the alarm-
ing conditions of our time. As we meet persons on the
street, in the shop, on board the train, — anywhere and ever}^-
where, in this nation and in that, — we find them earnestly
and seriously discussing the portents of danger that thicken
as the days pass by.

The great amassing of wealth ])y a few men in each of
the various nations of earth is without a parallel in history.
The consequent murmurings of the discontented classes
strikingly remind one of the turbulent conditions in France
on the eve of her great Revolution and Reign of Terror.

On every one of the three hundred sixty-five days of
the year, the newspapers come to us laden with their recital
of crime. Murder is of daily occurrence. Highway rob-
bery, l3old and arrogant, as well as petty thievery, is a source

2 17




[



"Society has banded itself into factions and organizations,
each struggling to gain the mastery."



of continual annoyance, and to many persons it is a cause of
dread and fear. Embezzlers, defaulters, bribers, and bribe-
takers have become alarmingly numerous. Millions of dol-
lars are every year fraudulently taken by these, the basest
of all methods.

Men and women are madly chasing after wealth; they
are recklessly and foolishty seeking enervating pleasures,
and delving into dissipations ; they hurl their whole beings
into the am])ition to shine and outdo in society, and in these
and similar worldly pursuits they are constantly being
plunged into failure. Hence there follows the daily record
of the suicides who coweringly seek to the embraces of the
pale monster as a refuge from the despairs they have cre-
ated in their own breasts.

Our large cities in particular, and most of the smaller
places in general, are filled with immorality and vice.
Drunkenness is every year hurling a vast multitude to the
lowest depths of debauching degradation. Public houses
of prostitution disgrace our streets, and to this open shame
must be added the daily records of broken marriage vows
along with all the rest of this unspeakable torrent of pol-
lution.

18



WATCHMAN, AVHAT OF THK NIGHT? 19

These social cancers have so completely polluted the
very fountains of societ}' that many conclude that honesty
and straightforward integrity are only the ideals of dream-
ers. The money-god is so supreme in the mind that it is
confidently asserted that ' ' every man has his price. " " Only
approach him in the right way, and offer him the proper
bribe," it is affirmed, "and he will yield." Everywhere is
heard the mocking jeer at the thought of any one possess-
ing absolute virtue, purity, honesty, and integrity.

Reformers, filled with noble impulses, have sought for
the cause of all this evil that has come in like a deluge. They
have attempted to drive out the houses of shame and to
abolish the dens of vice and crime. But on the very thresh-
old of their efforts they are ever confronted with the ap-
]3alling fact that the officers of the law are to an alarming,
yes, an overwhelming extent in league with this vile and
criminal class. Hence the detection and arrest of the crimi-
nal is becoming more and more difficult.- -And even if he is
arrested, technicalities and quibbles, prolojiged through one
court after another, defeat the purpose%.of the law, and
make "courts of justice" a mockery. In consequence of
this condition of things, mobs are becolning more com-
mon and violent, and lynchings' and riotings are rapidly
increasing; and, incredible though it may seem, men oc-
cupying high stations in
life, even editors of some
of the great journals of
the time, are uphold-
ing "this lynch form
of executing justice."

It passes without

contradiction that "The dove of peace lies wounded and dying."




20 . HERALDS OF THE IMORNING

politics have degenerated into a sort of disreputable busi-
ness, at wliieli men work for the "boodle" there is in it.
From the lowest offices in the village or township on up to
many of the highest positions of the state and nation,
bribery and fraud are freely used to elect the candidate
who will be the most lavish in dividing the "spoils of of-
fice" with his political friends, among whom the patron-
izing corporations and combinations that supply the treas-
uries of the political bosses may be reckoned as the most
exacting in their demands. Yet instead of this condition
of things exciting a healthful and wide-spread sense of in-
dignation and protest, it is altogether too generally treated
with jesting and indifference. Even when honest and vig-
orous effort is put forth by men here and there to bring
the law-breakers to justice, they are confronted with the
urgent protest that business is being ruined by attempting
to punish the "merchant princes." The question is not.
Are dishonest and defrauding schemes ruining the world?
but. How may we keep things in line for capturing the
greatest number of dollars?

We have been promised that the field of politics would
produce statesmen — diplomats, who, by their powers of
arbitration rather than hy the sword, would keep the na-
tions of earth in the highway of peace. Indeed, it has been
a dearly cherished thought — and all should applaud such
kindly, humane sentiments — that the civilization of the
morning of the twentieth century would form an impreg-
nable fortification, bej^ond which the barbarities of war
could never go. But instead of the realization of these
exalted hopes, we hear the long roll sounding, and the great-
est armies that the world has ever known are falling into
line, and the most formidal3le navies recorded in history are



WATCHMAN, AVHAT OF THE NIGHT?



21



patrolling the seas. The weapons of modern warfare are

sufficient, it would seem, to

inspire terror in the bravest

breast; but notwithstanding

the destructiveness of the

present war implements,

there is no lack of men — and

women, too, for that matter

— who are impatiently eager

to exchange the pursuits of

peace for the hazardous risks

of the modern battle-field.

There is to-day a general
quarreling a n d uneasiness
among the nations, and they
are straining every resource
to increase their fortifica-
tions, armies, and navies.
Settling like a heavy cloud
over the minds of men, there
is a deeioening conviction
that a universal war can not
be averted. The suddenness
with which the nations of the
whole world are inflamed to
the highest degree of the
war fever, as well as the triv-
ial matters that frequently
arouse these fighting pas-
sions in men, give evidence
of the pent-up volcanoes of

of -pi -pp. nrif] 4-11 o 4^0 1»^ 1 . "What is the world coming to? What will be

OHlie, dllU Uie leaillU Cai- the end of all these threatening dangers?"




22



HERALDS OF THE INIORNING



nage and final results, sliould this international war spirit
develop into a general conflict, are a source of nmch
uneasiness and deep concern.

When computing the perplexities of open warfare among
the nations, account must also be taken of the various in-
ternal factions that threaten the national life of every king-
dom, empire, and republic. Society has Ijanded itself into
factions and organizations, each struggling to gain the
mastery, and this struggle is marked by a notably growing
intensity and a manifestly increasing belligerent determina-
tion.. All the Avorld powers are contending with their dis-
contented revolutionary elements at home, yet anxiously
struggling to keep them in leash for the still greater con-
test in the field of international strife.

While these topics of the social and political world are
presenting so many strange and perplexing features, "old
mother earth" herself has laid aside her usually quiet habits,
and is participating in the general unrest. Cyclones and
hurricanes, earthquakes and tidal waves, and strikingly
fearful volcanic action are no longer among the unusual
things, neither are they confined to a few localities. But



Online LibraryAsa Oscar TaitHeralds of the morning : the meaning of the social and political problems of to-day and the significance of the great phenomena in nature → online text (page 1 of 27)