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Illustrated standard guide to Norfolk and Portsmouth and historical events of Virginia 1607 to 1907 online

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ILLUSTRATED



STANDARD GUIDE,

TO

Norfolk and Portsmouth




City Hall — Bank Street, opposite City Hall Avenue

AND

Historical Events of Virginia

1607 to 1907



Jamestown Exposition Edition



PUBLISHED BY THE

STANDARD LITHOGRAPHING AND PUBLISHING CO.

NO RFOLK, VA.



.rfMnwpBxw"" 1 ' 11 — '

HAKY of QONGKCSS

vo Qopits Received

IAV 20 «9or

Copyright Entry
-o^y I- 0, 'jo/-
ISS^ ^| XXc, NO




Copyright, 1907, hy
The Standard Lithographing and Publishing Co.



CONTENTS



An Introduction to Norfolk and Portsmouth . . Page 5

Railroads " 10

Steamship and River Lines . " 12

Trolley Lines " 15

Automobile Lines " 17

Cabs, Hansoms, and Carriages " 17

Baggage Transfer Companies 19

Hotels "21

Summer Resort Hotels 29

Restaurants and Cafes 29

Boarding Houses 33

Post Office Substations 37

•A Tour Of Norfolk and Portsmouth " 39

Theaters and Other Places of Amusement ..." 53

Summer Resort Theaters 57

Parks ..." 57

Churches 59

Cemeteries 69

Seaside Resorts 71

River Steamer Trips 77

The Jamestown Exposition 87

The Jamestown Conventions . 94

Historical Events of Virginia 103



An Introduction to Norfolk
and Portsmouth



A few years after the permanent establishment of Jamestown
(about 1619 a. d.), subordinate colonies were formed- and settle-
ments effected along the shores of Chesapeake Bay and its
tributaries, and, from among the sites selected along the Eliza-
beth River by the early English pioneers, Norfolk and Ports-
mouth have grown from what were once groups of log cabins,
surrounded by thick forests and stockaded against Indian
attacks, to prominent cities whose gates are now thrown open to
%he commerce of the world.

"Norfolk Towne" was founded August 16, 1682. The oldest
charter granted was to "Norfolk Borough" in 1736, and super-
ceded by the city charter in 1845. Portsmouth was incorporated
as a city in 1752, and Berkley (now the eighth ward of Norfolk)
was incorporated in 1890. While these are the principal cities,
numerous towns and outlying suburbs, such as West Norfolk,
South Norfolk, Pinners Point, Lambert's Point, Huntersville,
and Sewell's Point, located closely around, will within a very
short time unite with Norfolk and Portsmouth into "Greater
Norfolk."

No more admirable location for a great city can be found any-
where along the Atlantic Coast, and the coming of "Greater
Norfolk," the "Metropolis of the South," is as inevitable as the
rising of the sun toward which the "Eastern Gateway of the
United States" opens.

Modern business houses have replaced the structures of
colonial and ante-bellum days. Palatial hotels have arisen as if
by magic. Immense manufacturing plants, great banking
institutions, railway systems, and steamship lines concentrated
here indicate the wonderful progress of Norfolk and Portsmouth
along commercial, manufacturing, and agricultural lines. New
residential sections are quickly becoming densely populated.
Beautiful churches point their spires heavenward, and schools
with unsurpassed facilities evidence the rapid growth and
transformation of Norfolk and Portsmouth into one great city.




City Hall — Bank Street
6



INTRODUCTION TO NORFOLK AND PORTSMOUTH 7

The Elizabeth River, along which these cities extend their
wharves and docks for several miles, forms the inner harbor, and
offers sufficient depth of waterway for the entrance of the largest
ships. Hampton Roads, the converging point of the Elizabeth,
the James, and the Nansemond rivers, forms the outer harbor.
Its great area, ample depth, and sheltered position render it a
haven of perfect safety for mariners seeking protection from out-
side storms. Here its waters intermingle with those of Chesa-
peake Bay, a vast body of water almost entirely landlocked by
Cape Charles and Cape Henry, a natural ocean gateway, through
which the exports of the central East, Southeast, and South
make their exit, and the imports of products from all the other
great nations may make their entrance into this country.

Located midway between the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the
Gulf of Mexico, this harbor is the most magnificent along the
Atlantic Seaboard, and in size and importance is second to none
in the world. "Greater Norfolk" is located in latitude 36 50'
north, and in longitude 7 6° 19' west. The climate is mild and
healthful, and it is very rare that the temperature reaches
extremes during winter or summer. Statistics show that for a
period of fifteen years past the average maximum temperature
has been 97.47 ; the average minimum temperature 13.13 ;
and the average mean temperature 59.27 for the entire
period. The average precipitation has been 46.27 inches.
This is the best evidence of uniformity of temperature and
abundant rainfall.

""-The territory immediately surrounding "Greater Norfolk" is
peculiarly adapted to truck farming, which is one of the principal
industries of tide -water Virginia. The fertile soil, regular rain-
fall, low freight rates, unequaled transportation facilities, and
the nearness to the large northern markets combine to make
this section the greatest trucking and shipping point in the South.

Eight great railroads and numerous steamship lines have,
their terminals here.

For the information of strangers visiting Norfolk, who desire
to find their way about the city without difficulty, it may be
well to state that Church Street, extending in a northerly direc-
tion from Nivison, is the principal thoroughfare from which all
cross streets of importance lead to the eastern and central parts




Boardjoj Trade Building — Plume ami Atlantic Streets



INTRODUCTION TO NORFOLK AND PORTSMOUTH 9

of the city ; and Granby Street, extending in a _ northerly direc-
tion from Main, is the principal thoroughfare from which all
cross streets of importance lead to the western and central parts
of the city. These two streets practically divide .the old part
of the city into three sections. Main Street, which extends
entirely across the city, east and west, is the principal retail
thoroughfare in the downtown business district. All streets,
extending from Main in a southerly direction, lead to Water
Street, where the wholesale business district is located, and to
the various steamer piers along the water front. Beginning at
Main, the most important streets between Church and Granby
are Bank and Atlantic, the second of which leads into Brewer
Street These two thoroughfares extend as far north as Queen
Street . The retail stores line Main Street from Granby to Church ,
and as far north on Church as Queen, along Bank to City Hall
Avenue, and along Granby as far as Charlotte Street. The princi-
pal cross streets running from Church to Granby are Plume,
City Hall Avenue, and Cove, Washington, Freemason, Charlotte»
Bute, and Queen streets. The most convenient routes for pedes-
trians to reach Brambleton (5th ward) are east through Holt
Street, or Queen Street and Brambleton Avenue. Park Place
(7th ward) is reached quickest, north through Granby Street-
Ghent and Atlantic City (6th ward) are reached conveniently s
west through Freemason, Bute, or York to Botetourt Street.
York Street continues west to Atlantic City Bridge, and Botetourt
north to Ghent Bridge.




View of Norfolk Navy Yard



10 RAILROADS

Railroads

The Norfolk & Western Railway passenger and freight
depots and extensive yards are located at the foot of East Main
Street. This company also owns and operates the largest coal
piers in this country, which are located at Lambert's Point, and
millions of tons of coal are annually loaded into vessels by them
for shipment to all parts of the world.

Passenger trains leave Norfolk daily, 7.40 a. m. : Chicago
Express, parlor car to Roanoke; sleepers Roanoke to Columbus,
Cincinnati, and Knoxville ; dining car.

9.25 a. m. for Richmond. Connects at Petersburg for Roan-
oke, and at Richmond, except Sundays, for Washington, D. C.

4.30 p. m. for Richmond. Connects for Washington, D. C.

8 .00 p. m. for the South and West: Pullman sleepers; dining
car.

Trains arrive at Norfolk daily 8.45 a. m., 11.20 a. m., 5.20
p. m., and 10.00 p. m. Ticket office, 171 Main St., foot of
Granby.

The Norfolk & Southern Railroad passenger depot is located
at the corner of Park and Claiborne avenues, and may be reached
by the Norfolk & Portsmouth Traction Company's trolley cars
marked "Brambleton," eastbound on Granby or Main Street,
or northbound from the corner of Main and Bank streets.
Passenger trains leave Norfolk daily, except Sunday, 8.35 a. m-
and 4.45 p. m. for Elizabeth City, Hertford, Edenton, and inter-
mediate points. Express train leaves at 11.55 A - M - f° r Eliza-
beth City, Hertford, Edenton, Plymouth, Washington, and
Belhaven, N. C. Leave at 9.40 a. m. and 4.10 p. m. for Munden
Point daily, except Sunday. Excursion trains leave every
Sunday at 8.45 a. m. for Elizabeth City and Edenton, N. C.
Trains connect daily, except Sunday, at Elizabeth City with
steamers leaving Elizabeth City at 1.45 p. m. for Roanoke
Island (a point of great historical interest) . Trains arrive 10.45
a. m., 2 .00 p. m., and 5.10 p. m. daily, except Sunday.

The New York, Philadelphia & Norfolk Railroad (Cape
Charles Route) Company's passenger and freight depots are
located at the foot of Brooke Avenue. Trains for Wilmington,
Philadelphia, and New York. Steamers leave Portsmouth 7 . 2 5



RAILROADS 11

a. Rf. and 5 .30 p. m. ; leave Norfolk at 7 .45 a. m. and 6.15 p. m. ;
leave Old Point 8.40 a. m. and 7.20 p. m., connecting with
trains at Cape Charles, Va. Trains arrive Norfolk 7.30 p. m.
and 8.45 a. m.; arrive Portsmouth 7.45 p. m. and 9.05 a. m.
Trains connect with all rail and water lines to and from Boston,
Providence, and all New England points. Ticket office, corner
Granby Street and City Hall Avenue.

The Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Company's passenger and
freight depots are located at the foot of Brooke Avenue. It
also has extensive yards, coal piers, and grain elevators located
at Newport News, Va. Steamer leaves Norfolk daily at 6.45
a. m., 9.15 a. m., and 4.30 p. m. Connect at Newport News with
trains for Richmond and western points. Ticket office, 69
Granby Street.

The Seaboard Air Line Railway Company's passenger depot
is located at the foot of High Street, Portsmouth, within half a
block of the Norfolk and Portsmouth ferries. Its extensive
freight yards and warehouses occupy a large portion of Ports-
mouth's water front. Trains leave Norfolk (via ferry) 8 . 48 a. m.
and 8.12 p. m. Leave Portsmouth 9.15 a. m. and 8.30 p. m.
Trains arrive daily Portsmouth, 7.45 a. m. and 5. 20 p. m.
Ticket office, corner Main and Granby streets.

The Atlantic Coast Line R. R. Company's passenger and
freight depots are located at the corner of Water and Matthews
streets. Its freight yards and terminals are located at Port.
Norfolk, adjoining Pinners Point. Trains leave Norfolk daily
at 8.40 a. m. and 4.00 p. m. Trains arrive daily 1.00 p. m.
(except Sunday) and 5.55 p. m. Ticket office, 171 Main Street.

The Tidewater Railway passenger depot is located at the foot
of East Main Street, and its immense freight terminals and coal
piers are located at Sewells Point. This is a new railway com-
pany which has just entered Norfolk, and has not yet completed
the work of laying its rails, that will extend from the coal fields
of West Virginia, where it connects with the Deepwater Railway
for western points. Passenger service has not yet been inaugu-
rated, consequently no schedule is published. The principal
business of this road at present is the transportation of large
quantities of coal from the mines in West Virginia direct to
Sewells Point, where itis loaded into vessels.



12 STEAMSHIP AND RIVER LINES

Steamship and River Lines

Baltimore Steam Packet Co. (Old Bay Line) for Old Point
and Baltimore. Passenger and freight piers are located at west
end of Main Street. Steamers leave Portsmouth 5.30 p. m.,
Norfolk 6.20 p. m., and Old Point 7.30 p. m., daily, except
Sunday. Connect at Baltimore for Philadelphia and New York
with Pennsylvania R. R. and Baltimore & Ohio R. R. Steamers
arrive Norfolk 7.00 a. m. and Portsmouth 8.30 a. m. Ticket
office, corner Main and Granby streets.

Chesapeake Steamship Co. (New Bay Line) for Old Point
and Baltimore. Passenger and freight pier is located at foot
of Jackson Street. Steamers leave Norfolk 6 .00 p. m., Old Point
7 .00 p. m. Connect at Baltimore with Pennsylvania R. R. and




Epwor'-h M. E Church — Freemason and Boush Streets



STEAMSHIP AND RIVER LINES 13

Baltimore & Ohio for Philadelphia and New York. Ticket
office, 95 Granby Street. .

Clyde Steamship Co. for Philadelphia and Richmond.
Passenger and freight piers, Water Street, foot of Madison
Street. Sailings for Philadelphia Monday, Wednesday, and
Saturday. Ticket office at company's pier.

Merchants & Miners Transportation Co. for Boston and
Providence. Passenger and freight piers are located at west end
of Main Street. Steamers sail for Boston, Sunday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Friday at 6 .00 p. m. For Providence, Monday,
Thursday, and Saturday at 6.00 p. m. Ticket office at com-
pany's pier.

Norfolk & Washington, D. C, Steamboat Co. for Old Point,
Alexandria, and Washington. Passenger and freight pier is
located at west end of Water Street. Steamers leave Norfolk
daily 6.00 p. M.-, Old Point 7.00 p. m. Arrive Alexandria 6.30
a. m., Washington 7.00 a. m. Connecting with Pennsylvania
R. R. and Baltimore & Ohio for Philadelphia and New York.
Ticket office, corner Granby and Plume streets.

The Old Dominion Steamship Co. Daily sailings for New
York. Passenger and freight piers are located at the corner
Water and Church streets. Steamers leave Norfolk at 7 . 00 p. m.

Night James River Line, for Newport News and Richmond.
Leave Norfolk at 7.00 p. m., touching at Newport News at
8 .00 p.

Day River Lines. Leave daily for Old Point, 6.30 and 1 1 . 1 5
a. m. and 4.15 p. m. ; for Hampton, n . 15 a. m. and 4.15 p. m.;
for Newport News and Smithfield, 6.40 a. m. and 3.00 p. m.;
for East, North, and Severn rivers, Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday, 6.30 a. m.; for East and Ware rivers, Tuesday, Thurs-
day, and Saturday. 6.30 a. m.; for Nansemond River and
Suffolk, 3 .00 p. m.

Virginia Navigation Co., for Old Point, Newport News, and
Richmond. Passenger and freight pier is located on Water
Street, foot of Madison Street. Steamer leaves Norfolk Tuesday,
Thursday, and Saturday at 7 .00 a. m., Old Point at 8.00 a. m.,
and Newport News at 9.00 a. m. Steamer touches at all of the
principal historical James River landings.




14



TROLLEY DINES 15

Trolley Lines

Bay Shore Terminal Co. Cars leave corner Church and
Plume streets every few minutes west and north bound for Park
Place, Lafayette Park, and Ocean View. Portsmouth Traction
Co., Sewells Point division.

Norfolk and Portsmouth Traction Co. express trains leave
passenger station, corner City Hall Avenue and Atlantic
Street, for Pine Beach and Newport News 7 .30 a. m. and every
one and one-half hours until 9.00 p. m. Regular trains leave
passenger station every few minutes for Pine Beach and the
Jamestown Exposition Grounds.

Ocean View Division, for Ocean View, Jamestown Exposition
Grounds, Willoughby Beach, and Old Point. Express trains
leave Norfolk west end of Main Street every hour for Old
Point from 7.00 a. m. until 9.00 p. m. Regular Ocean View
trains leave every fifteen minutes from 6. 30 a. m. to 11. 00 p. m.,
connecting at Ocean View for Jamestown Exposition Grounds.
City Division— main line cars run to and from Lafayette Park
and Ghent, via Church, Main, and Granby streets.

Brambleton via Queen Street. Cars leave corner Main and
Bank streets, northbound, passing through Queen Street, and
Brambleton Avenue to North Brambleton, there making a loop
and returning to starting point.

Lamberts Point Division. Cars run to and from Lafayette

Park and Lamberts Point via Church, Main, and Granby streets,

and through Ghent, Brambleton, and Atlantic City Division.

Cars run to and from Brambleton and Atlantic City ward via

Park Avenue, Main, Granby, York, and Front streets, returning

through Ghent and Bute Street. Riverview cars leave corner

of Main and Granby streets, northbound, every thirty minutes

via Granby, 18th, and Church streets, returning over same

route, passing Lafayette Park in both directions. Transfers are

interchangeable on all the city and Ocean View cars of this

company.

Berkley Division. Cars leave City Hall and Monticello

avenues every thirty minutes for Berkley Ward, Money Point,

and Lakeside Park.
2



A UTOMOBILE LINES 17

Portsmouth Division. Cars for navy yard, Pinners Point,
Port Norfolk, Battery Park, Park View and cemeteries, Piedmont
Heights, Gilmerton, and other suburban points, leave corner
High and Water streets every ten minutes, traversing all the
principal streets of Portsmouth.



Automobile Lines

The Virginia Automobile Company.

K. R. Harmon.

C. O. Morse.

A. A. O'Neill & Bro.

Cars for private parties may be obtained by applying at
almost all the leading hotel offices.

Seeing Norfolk car leaves corner of Main and Granby streets
at regular intervals for special tours of the city. Tickets on sale
at Atlantic Hotel office. Cars may be hired by the hour or day
from the above mentioned concerns by private parties desiring
to make special trips.



Cabs, Hansoms, and Carriages

Vehicles of all kinds may be hired by the hour or day from
the following concerns:

Norfolk

W. P. Boyce, 1 08 Union Street.
Chas. E. Crull, 233-237 Charlotte Street.
W. J. Davis, 61-65 Cove Street.
W. T. Gilchrist & Co., 355-357 Church Street.
H ann an & Kelly, 56-60 Union Street.
A. C. Ives, 76-78 Church Street.

Monticello Avenue Stables, Monticello Avenue near
Washington Street.

Norfolk Cab & Carriage Co., 110-112 Church Street.
Virginia Boarding & Livery Stables, 119-121 Church St.
M. C. Newton, 87-89 Union Street.
Willis, Williamson & Co., 88-94 Union Street.




18



CABS, HANSOMS, AND CARRIAGES 19

Portsmouth

John C. Curling, 916 South Street.

P. C. Codd, 319-331 King Street.

Wm. J. Davis, 216 King Street.

Model Livery & Boarding Stables, 215 County Street.

Palace Livery & Boarding Stables, 607-609 Middle St.

Westbrook & Dunn, 203 South Water Street.



Baggage Transfer Companies

Norfolk

J. G. Bray & Co., 40 Smith Street.

City Express Co., Water Street, foot of Nebraska.

H. Crockin Corporation, 466 Church Street.

Harrison Transfer Co., 245 Main Street.

Hulchers Express, 88 Roanoke Avenue.

Irwins Express Co., 87 Plume Street.

Norfolk & Portsmouth Transfer Co., 2 Granby Street.

Trice Transfer Co., nth & Granby streets.

Union Express Co., 108 Commercial Place.

Virginia Baggage Transfer Co., 82 Granby Street.

Withys Norfolk & Portsmouth Co., 221 Main Street.

Portsmouth

Wm. T. Dewberry, 434 Lincoln Street.

Chas. H. Eckert, 401 Effingham Street.

John T. Judkins, 714 County Street.

Frank H. Piedmont, 818 Cook Street.

Walsh Bros., corner High and Water streets.

Nearly all of the above mentioned transfer companies have
wagons which meet every incoming train and steamer, and
visitors arriving may have their baggage delivered to any part
of the city for a small charge. Travelers departing from Norfolk
or Portsmouth may, by calling any of these transfer companies
by telephone, have a wagon come for and deliver their baggage
to any railway station or steamer wharf in the cities, at a nominal
cost.




National Bank of Commerce Building— Main and Atlantic Streets



20



HOTELS— AMERICAN PLAN 21

Hotels

The most important hotels are centrally located within the
business district, and convenient to all the railways and steam-
ers, and as in most other large cities, they are run on three
plans: American, European, and Combination.

THE AMERICAN PLAN. At these hotels, rooms, meals
at stated hours, and attendants are furnished at rates varying
from $2 .00 per day up. When guests register under this plan,
the charge begins with the meal supposed to be spread at the
time, unless when the name is placed on the book, the clerk is
instructed to note (if guests arrive after supper) lodging instead.
The same rule holds good for guests who are departing; if they
do not intend to remain until supper, the clerk must be notified
so as to close accounts immediately after dinner. The principal
hotels in Norfolk and Portsmouth operating on the American
plan, with rates charged, are as follows:

Norfolk

Algonquin Hotel, Granby Street and College Place — $2 .50
per day and tip.

Atlantic Hotel, Main and Granby streets — $2.50 per day
and up.

Colonial Hotel, 202 Granby Street — $2 .00 per day and up.

The Burgess, Boush Street and College Place — $1.50 per
day and up.

Hotel Fairfax, City Hall Avenue and Randolph Street.

St. Denis Hotel, corner Main Street and Roanoke Avenue.

Gladstone Hotel, Main and Nebraska streets — $2.00 per
day and up.

Hotel Neddo, Plume Street, near Granby — $2.50 per day
and up.

Lynnhaven Hotel, Freemason and Granby streets.

Portsmouth

Hotel Monroe, Court and High streets — $2 . 50 per day and
up.

Hotel Lafayette, Crawford and High streets — $t.oo per
day and up.



HOTELS— EUROPEAN PLAN 23

EUROPEAN PLAN. Hotels operating on this plan provide
rooms ranging from $1.00 to $3 .00 or more per day, according
to the location, and the manner in which they are fitted up, and
guests desiring meals at these hotels are served same, at moderate
prices, in the regular European dining room. The most promi-
nent hotels operating on this plan, with rates charged, are as
follows :

Norfolk

Algonquin Hotel, Granby Street and College Place — $1 .00,
per day and up.

Atlantic Hotel, Main and Granby streets — $1.00 per day
and up .

Colonial Hotel, 202 Granby Street — $1 .00 per day and up.

Hotel Fairfax, City Hall Avenue and Randolph Street.

Hotel Lorraine, Granby and Tazewell streets — $1.50 per
day and up .

The Monticello, City Hall Avenue and Granby Street —
$1 . 50 per day and up.

Gladstone Hotel, Main and Nebraska streets — $1.00 per
day and up .

Hotel Neddo, Plume Street near Granby — $1.00 per day
and up.

Haddington Hotel, Granby Street and City Hall Avenue.

Hotel Savoy, Granby Street and City Hall Avenue.

Carolina Hotel, Atlantic and Plume streets.

St. Denis Hotel, Main Street and Roanoke Avenue.

Terminal Hotel, Plume and Atlantic streets — $1.00 per
day and up.

Henry Seelinger, 39-41 City Hall Avenue.

Lynnhaven Hotel, Freemason and Granby streets.

Union Hotel, 35 Brewer Street— 50 cents per day and up.

Portsmouth

Hotel Monroe, Court and High streets — $1 .00 per day and
up.

Hotel Lafayette, Crawford and High streets — $1.00 per
day and up.

Pearson's Hotel, High and Water streets — $1.25 per day
and tip.




Y. M. C. A.— Main Street
24



PROMINENT HOTELS 25

Stag Hotels

The Lee Stag Hotel, 97 Bank Street.
McDonalds, Main Street and Commercial Place.
Victoria, 359-361 Main Street.
Henry Seelinger, 39-41 City Hall Avenue.

Colored Hotels

The Philadelphia House, 322 Church Street. European
only — 50 cents per day and up.

Tanners Hotel, 663-665 Church Street, American — $1.50
per day and up; European, $1 .00 per day and up.

These colored hotels cater to the best class of colored trade.



Some of the Prominent Hotels

For the benefit of visitors, the following information is given
concerning the most prominent hotels:

The Atlantic Hotel is the oldest in name in the city. The
present handsome 7-story building, at the corner of Main and
Granby streets, has replaced the structure which was burned
several years ago, during Norfolk's great fire. This is a modern
hotel, and one of the features is a rathskeller for ladies and
gentlemen.

The Monticello is on City Hall Avenue, and occupys the
entire block between Granby Street and Monticello Avenue.


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Online LibraryAssociation for the preservation of Virginia antiqIllustrated standard guide to Norfolk and Portsmouth and historical events of Virginia 1607 to 1907 → online text (page 1 of 7)