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WE HAVE JUST PUBLISHED

SPELLING STUDIES

By HARRIET EWENS BECK, A. B., and
MARIE J. HENNINGER, A. B.

A Radical Innovation in Spelling



Our announcement of this book in the September issue brought a larger
number of calls for sample copies in a shorter time than any book we have ever
published, because of the remarkably favorable impression it has created. The
number of adoptions for the time it has been published has been phenomenal.

NO DESCRIPTION WILL EQUAL A PERSONAL EXAMINA-
TION OF THE BOOK ITSELF.

ROWE SHORTHAND is still winning in all parts of the country. There
are fifty-five teachers enrolled in our Correspondence Course in Rowe Shorthand
from one section of the country alone. When the proper time comes, which is not
far ahead, we will announce large numbers of adoptions coming from all sections
of the country.

We have already printed the names and addresses of a larger number of
Court Reporters using Rowe Shorthand for the length of time and the number
of students studying it than any other shorthand system. These are not "cultivated"
reporters for exhibition purposes, they simply went to school where Rowe Short-
hand was taught and then went out and secured appointments in this most difficult
of all reporting work, and among them there have been no failures.

ROWE SHORTHAND IS THE ONLY MASTERPIECE IN AB-
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BOOKKEEPING

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Metropolitan

Business

Speller



New Edition
By U. G. Potter

McKtnley High Scha
Chicago



Over 6000 words. New lessons containing words pertaining
to Aeroplanes, Radio, Automobiles, etc. Complete Index, 244
pages, attractive binding, 50 cents.

A Superior Speller

Twofold Design. In the preparation of the Metropolitan
Business Speller we had constantly in mind two objects: first,
to teach the pupil to spell, and second to enlarge his vocabulary,
especially of words in general use.

Classification of Words. As an aid to the memory we have
classified words, as regards sounds, syllabication, accents and
meaning. We have grouped the words relating to each par-
ticular kind of business into lessons, by which the student is
enabled to familiarize himself with the vocabulary of that busi-
ness. We have interspersed miscellaneous exercises in the
nature of reviews. We have grouped words that can best be
learned by comparison, such as Stationery and Stationary.

is, railways and commercial
form, and grouped alphabeti-



Abbreviations of states,
terms are given in regular 1



cally. We regard abb
with spelling.

Syllabicate
sion of word
are printed i
as to bring
spelling.



rviating of almost equal importance

and pronunciation arc shown by the proper divi-
and the use of the diacritical marks. The words
bold type, and the definitions in lighter face, so
it the appearance of the word, — an aid in sight



Metropolitan *• Edition
System of w A au^&r

Bookkeeping

You Will Like It. The text emphasizes the thought side of
the subject. It stimulates and encourages the reasoning power
of the pupil. Pupils acquire a knowledge of the subect as well
as facility in the making of entries. It is a thoroughly seasoned,
therefore accurate, text supported by complete Teachers' Refer-
ence Books, and Teachers' Manual.

Parts I and II fext is an elementary course suitable for any
school in which the subject is taught. Two semesters are
required in High Schools and a correspondingly shorter time
in more intensified



Parts III and IV text is suitable for an advanced course
following any modern elementary text. We make the statement
without hesitation, that this is the most teachable, most up-to-
date, and strongest text published for advanced bookkeeping and
elementary accounting use.

Corporation-Mfg. -Voucher unit is bound in heavy paper covers
and contains all of Part TV. It is a complete course in Cor-
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exercises, problems, etc. It is without doubt the best text for
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pages, 40 cents. Supplies, including Blank Books and Papers,
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Text* for Commercial Subjects
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RANDOLPH 2920
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Cleveland. Ohio

October 8, 1923

Mr. J. S. Knox,

Care Knox School of Salesmanship,

71st-Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio.

Dear Mr. Knox: Last winter Mr. M. V. Hanson, who, as you
know, has been in my employ for nearly seven years as a sales-
man, and who is now my assistant Sales Manager, took a course
with you in your School for Salesmanship.

When I learned that he was going to take this Course, I doubted
very much if you could be of very much service to him, on account
of the fact that he has been in the selling game for many years
and was, in my opinion, a finished salesman.

I might say that I regarded him as one of the greatest salesmen
it has been my privilege to employ during the past fifteen years,
since I first became an automobile distributor. If he had been a
new inexperienced man. I would have certainly urged him to have
taken your course, but I honestly felt that in his case, your
School could not possibly render him any great service.

I am pleased to report that I was mistaken in this respect. I
do not believe I am over-stating it when I say that he has in-
creased his value to himself and to me by at least 25%. I believe
that his earnings this year will be increased from two to three
thousand dollars, as a result of the training and inspiration which
vhile attending your School.

to state that I am a big booster for the
manship, and I am urging not only my
employees to take a course with you.

ery sincerely yours,

WARNER M. BATEMAN.



It is needless for m
Knox School for Sale
salesmen but my other




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PENMANSHIP
STORIES

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Recognizing that the average age of shorthand students has
lowered materially in the past half dozen years, Isaac Pitman &
Sons have published the "New Era" edition of "Course in Isaac
Pitman Shorthand," an attractive and simple exposition, embody-
ing the completeness and thoroughness of previous Pitman texts.

Students are encouraged by their rapid progress. The new
grouping of principles in the first half dozen lessons enables the
student to write real business sentences from the first. The pro-
gress is genuine and continues throughout the course, being greatly
accelerated in the last few lessons because of the minimum use of
arbitrary abbreviating principles.

All Pitmanic shorthand is based on the Isaac Pitman
alphabet. A course in the principles of Isaac Pitman shorthand
will broaden the viewpoint of a shorthand teacher and greatly en-
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ence, free of charge, through Isaac Pitman & Sons.

Let us, if you are a teacher, enroll you for this
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ISAAC PITMAN & SONS

2 West 45th Street, New York



VOLUME XXIX



COLUMBUS, OHIO. FEBRUARY, 1924



NUMBER 6



NATIONAL COMMERCIAL
TEACHERS' FEDERATION

The N. C. T. F. is the one big
national association that meets each
year right after Christmas to further
the interests of commercial education.
The 26th annual meeting was held in
the Hotel Sherman, Chicago, December
26-29, and the number who attended
and registered was exactly 444. Many
more no doubt attended some of the
meetings but did not register.

These persons who attend from one
end of the country to the other are the
leaders in every phase of commercial
education. They are the persons who
have raised the standards of this com-
paratively new division of educational
work in this country to a plane equally
as high as that of other educational
standards. In fact, educators and the
public generally now look upon com-
mercial education in a similar way that
they view educational training in the
professional fields. The demand for
commercial training is far greater than
the demand for legal or medical educa-
tion, and these commercial training
specialists have worked out courses of
study that are none the less scientific
or of truly educational value than are
those that prepare for law or medicine.

The N. C. T. F. is doing a great work
that needs to be done, and all inter-
ested should give it hearty support by
attending and by assisting in the work,
and profit thereby.

The next annual meeting w-ill be held
in Louisville, Ky., a city long famous
for its typical southern hospitality, and
it is now none too soon to begin to
think and plan to attend.

Persons wishing further information
should address the Secretary, Mr. John
Alfred White, Emerson High School,
Gary, Ind.

The following resolutions were unanimously
passed at the close of the N. C. T. F. in
Chicago last December, and we invite our read-
ers to give them a careful reading. They set
forth in brief form the spirit and purpose of
this progressive organization.

Who is there who can read these resolutions
and not feel that it would be greatly to his in-
terests to belong to that body?

Resolutions
BE IT RESOLVED by the National
Federation of Commercial Teachers in
convention in Chicago, December 29,
1923.



First: That our gratitude be ex-
pressed to those who labored the past
year for the success of this convention,
and that special thanks be given to the
Local Committee on Arrangements
with particular mention of Mr. H. J.
Holm.

Second: That we are under special
obligations to Col. W. H. Whigam and
his helpers for the extraordinary pro-
gram rendered at our annual banquet
on Friday evening. From the menu to
the cap piece, which was the address




of Mr. Douglas Malloch, this was a
charming and refreshing evening. Mr.
E. E. Gaylor of Massachusetts, the
toastmaster, enriched the brilliant pro-
gram by his grace, humor and pathos,
and a number of ex-Presidents of the
Federation seated at the speakers' table,
added a touch of yesterday, today and
tomorrow to the occasion. The music,
the general setting and the joyous spirit
made the evening the high event of the
meeting.

Third: That we value the good
neighborliness of our annual assem-
blages, even above the interesting and
professional work done in and through
our several sections.

Fourth: (a) That we are pleased
with the co-operation of the
many sections of the Federation;

(b) With the harmony existing be-
tween the private and public
school interests of this organiza-
tion;

(c) With the generous spirit of help-
fulness of a number of organiza-



tions and associations which
meet and participate with us an-
nually.

Fifth: That we renew our loyalty
to the type of educational work in
which we are engaged and give to it the
coming year and all future years our
best intelligence, industry and ideals,
to the end that we may keep up with
the marvelous march of business and
education in this still more marvelous
country, and with the yet higher hope
that at times we may lead the march.

Sixth: We express our appreciation
of the work of the Committee on
School Relations, appointed and sup-
ported by the Nationall Association of
Accredited Commercial Schools, as it
appears that the work of this Commit-
tee will very shortly result in the fixing
of standards for teachers of commercial
subjects of both private and public busi-
ness education, and will so correlate
the work of business education with
that of our general educational system
as to give to privately owned business
schools new recognition, new dignity,
and added prestige. We pledge to the
National Association of Accredited
Commercial Schools our support in
what it may attempt in getting a higher
value set upon the work done by com-
mercial students.

Seventh: That we congratulate any
school or system of schools that may be
able in any honorable way to advance
in courses, resognition. or anything
that adds strength and dignity to com-
mercial education.

Eighth: That we condemn the school
which purposely induces or tries to in-
duce any student to leave the grades,
high school, or any other school which
he may be attending.

Ninth: That we think it wise for the
officers of this Federation to spend
each year a liberal amount from the
general treasury for the purchase of the
best available talent for our annual
meeting, the amount so expended, of
course, being determined by the good
judgment of those in authority and the
condition of the treasury. The enrich-
ment of our programs will justify the
expenditure suggested.

Tenth : That we encourage cities in-
viting this convention to meet with
(Continued on page IS)



THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR

Published monthly (except July and August)
By THE ZANER-BLOSER CO.,

612 N Park St., Columbus, O.

E. W. Bloser - - - - Editor

Horace G. Healey - - Contributing Editor
E. A. Lufper Managing Editor



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, $1.25 A YEAR

Single copy, 15c. (To Canada, 10c more:
foreign, 20c more.)

Change of address should be requested
promptly in advance, if possible, giving the old
as well as the new address.

Advertising rates furnished upon request.



The Business Educator is the best medium
through which to reach business college pro-
prietors and managers, commercial teachers
and students, and lovers of penmanship. Copy
must reach our office by the 10th of the month
for the issue of the following month.



^T c^&ud/n^(£uu&fir &



Business Penmanship

By OLIVE A. MELLON

Supervisor of Handwriting, McKeesport, Pa.



"CHEER UP!"

Just a word of cheer to the discouraged folks. It seems to me I hear some of you say: "The more I practice
the worse it gets." Just so; we have all passed through that stage, and that period usually comes when finger move-
ment or old habits are being broken down and new ones and better ones are forming. Just remember the cloud with
the silver lining and work on. . .

Our good friend Mr. Zaner used to say he liked to hear a student say he was discouraged with his writing. He
said it was a sure sign he was ready to begin the building up process. This is quite true. You have gained just enough
knowledge in writing through observation and practice in this short period of time to become more critical about your
writing, and can detect errors more readily.

You will not remain at a standstill any length of time, but the building up process will soon begin its work. There-
fore,

Press on, there's no such word as fail.

Press nobly on, the goal is near;

Ascend the mountain, breast the gale,

Look upward, onward, never fear.

HOW TO PRACTICE

Study carefully the form to be practiced. . Notice- the turns, angles, and loops it contains; also the spacing and
slant. It is a good plan to retrace with a dry pen the letter to be practiced.

Practice the form with arm movement until improvement is shown, then go on to the next letters. Criticise your
practice work very carefully, taking time to locate principal errors and to decide upon a remedy. Devote a certain
amount of time to your writing and do it with as much care as possible.



PLATE 4



Use either the compact direct oval exercise or the



This is what we term the O o lesson. A, direct oval letter,
single direct oval exercise to develop this lesson.

Drill 1. The capital O exercise begins with leftward curve, and on the count of eight, finish with upward curve.

Drill 2. This letter requires much movement. Start the motion before touching pen to paper. Begin and finish
the O with pen in motion. Finish the letter with a narrow loop curving upward. Instead of stopping when the letter is
completed, continue the motion from letter to letter. Count 1-2.

Drill 3. When practicing these words keep the capit il letters and the small letters on the same slant. Keep
uniform size, slant and spacing in word writing.

Drill 4. Practice the compact direct oval one-half space high to develop small o.

Drill 5. Begin the small o exercise with a light over, stroke, retracing the oval part to the count of 2-3-4-5 and
swing off on 6.

Drill 6. Form the round top of the letter o with the first over stroke, otherwise the letter will appear too narrow
Curve the down stroke. Keep the finish high so as not to resemble a. Finish with outward swing. Count



at the top.

1-2-3.

Drill 7
Drill 8



Aim for steady motion and even spacing. Count 1-2-1-2-1-2-1-2-1-2.

Give attention to length of beginning and ending strokes. Rest every letter on base line



down strokes on main slant.



Keep all




PLATE 5

Drill 1. Start the A exercise leftward and downward. Shift to the push and pull stroke and finish below base
ine. Count 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8.

Drill 2. In the A tracer, count six each tor the oval and straight line, finishing tin curve below the base line.
Watch angle of paper.

Drill 3. Do not start capital A downward from the beginning. Curve the first downward stroke. Make narrow
turn at bottom. Finish with light stroke below base line, curving to right.

Drill 4. Drill upon these words carefully. Study the copy. Observe the height of letters and the spacing between
them.

Drill 5. Be sun; to use arm motion when practicing this sentence. Pause at times between words to criticise your
work.

Drill 6. The small a tracer is similar to the first capital A tracer. Write to count of 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8.

Drill 7. Small a begins the same as o but ends by coming to base line with a slanting straight line before finishing
with an upward stroke. Keep it pointed but closed at top.

Drill 8. Rest the letter a on the base line and surround it with a circular line, keeping the letter in the center
of circle.

Drill 9. Write five or six words to the line. Make a careful study of each word. Do your very best.




g)/ @y @y (a)y (Q, @y (g/ @/ (a)/ @y




PLATE 6

Drill 1. Make the oval to the count of 8. Finish with outward and upward curve about onehalf space high.
Begin each new oval at end of the preceding finish stroke. Aim for uniform spacing between ovals.

Drill 2. Capital C exercise is made by beginning the loop of capital C in the space, (not at top line), and sur-
rounding it with the oval to the count of 8.

Drill 3. Aim for a high, broad top. The curve in the down stroke cannot be over done. Curve the finish stroke
upward. Write to the count 1-2.



Online LibraryAuguste LutaudThe Business Educator (Volume 29) → online text (page 32 of 62)