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versity of Chicago, Chicago.

Adaptation of Curriculum Making to Individual
Traits and Tendencies in College Students. Dr. Paul
Lomax, New York University.

The Social-Economic Element in Business Education.
Dr. R. J. Worley, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh.

Principles of Curriculum Making in Colleges and
Universities. Ernest A. Zelliott, University of Denver.

Principles in Curriculum Making as Applied to the
Economic and Social Aspects of Life. Ann Brewington,
University of Chicago.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON ADDRESSES
1:45 — 4:45 P.M.

Principles Involved in Business Curriculum Mak-
ing in Adult Education. Ethel Richards, Western Illinois
State Teachers College, Macomb.

A Survey of the Practices in Business Curriculum
Building. Dr. Atlee Percy, School of Business, Boston
University.

Principles of Curriculum Making in Commercial
Teacher-Training Institutions. Shepherd Young, Indiana
State Teachers College, Terre Haute.

Case Studies in Business Curriculum Making in Col-
leges and Universities. Dr. E. G. Blackstone, State Uni-
versity of Iowa, Iowa City.

The College Instructor's Participation in Course of
Study Building. Dr. A. J. Lawrence, University of
Kentucky, Lexington.

AN OPEN FORUM

Resume of Afternoon Contributions
Election of Officers

SOCIAL-ECONOMIC SUBJECTS

ROUND TABLE

FRIDAY MORNING ADDRESSES

9:30—12:00 Noon

Conflicting Theories of Consumer Education.
The Specific Contribution of Business Education in
Relationship to Consumer Knowledge.

The Individual, the Job, and Economic Training.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON ADDRESSES
1:45 — 4:15 P.M.

Resume of the Morning Contributions. Harlan J.
Randall, State Teachers College, Whitewater, Wis.

JURY PANEL

DISCUSSION LEADER: E. D. Pennell, State Teachers
College, Kalamazoo.

JURY PANEL MEMBERS: B. M. Swinford, State
Teachers College, Muncie, Ind.; G. A. Carlson,
State Teachers College, Whitewater, Wis.; P. O.
Selby, State Teachers College, Kirksville, Mo.;
Ada Flemington, New Trier Township High
School, Winnetka, 111.

Election of Officers.



SECRETARIAL ROUND TABLE

FRIDAY MORNING ADDRESSES

9:30—12:00 Noon

The Psychological Factor as a Determinant of Per-
sonnels in Shorthand Classes. Ann Brewington, Uni-
versity of Chicago.

Importance of Personality and Mental Ability in
Connection with Secretarial Training. Dr. William F.
Book, Indiana University, Greencastle.

Analysis of Secretarial Duties and Traits as a
Basis for Guidance and Training. Doris Tyrrell, Uni-
versity of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

The Discovery and Development of Power and Per-
sonality Through Secretarial Practice. Olga E.
Schlueter, Juneau High School, Milwaukee.

Specifications for a Personal Stenographer as Set
up by an Employer.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON ADDRESSES
1:45 — 4:30 P.M.

Determining the Content of a Secretarial Training
Curriculum. Dr. Etta C. Skene, Westbrook Junior Col-
lege, Portland, Maine.

The Peculiar Importance of Suitable English as a
Major Consideration in the Secretarial Curriculum.
Florence M. Stullken, University of Texas, Austin.

The Minimal Essentials Which Should be Taught in
a Course.

(a) In Secretarial Training.

(b) In Stenographic Training.

Nancy M. Lawrence and Mildred Butler, Omaha Tech-
nical High School.

Analysis of Skills as an Aid to Guidance, Training
and Placement. Jane Clem, Teachers College, White-
Water, Wis.

AN OPEN FORUM

Useful By-Products of the Teaching Activities in
Secretarial Education. Discussion Leader: Mary Alletta
Dodd, Springfield High School, Springfield, 111.

Election of Officers.

BUSINESS METHODS ROUND
TABLE

FRIDAY MORNING ADDRESSES

9:30—12:00 Noon

What Individual Differences as to Capacity, Traits
and Tendencies are Considered by The Private Business
School in Curriculum Making? Dr. E. G. Blackstone,
State University of Iowa, Iowa City.

The Importance of Getting the Right Kind of Teach-
ers to Teach the Right Kind of Subjects to the Right
Kind of Pupils Having in Mind the Demands of Business.
Rodney P. Wing, Lincoln School of Commerce, Lincoln,
Neb.

PANEL DISCUSSION

THEME OF PANEL: What are the New Developments
in Business Education and what are the Problems
Involved in Adopting These New Developments
in the Schools of Today?

(Just what is the Future of Such Sub-
jects as Bookkeeping, Commercial
Arithmetic, Business Law, Junior Busi-
ness Training, Salesmanship, etc., in
Each of the Agencies of Business Edu-
cation.)



The Educator



21



Carl Holmstad, High School, Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin,
and Miss Pauline Van Eman, High School, Gallatin, Mo.
Discussion Leader: Dr. W. R. Odell, Columbia Univer-
sity, Teachers Training Institutions. C. C. Crawford,
Vocational School, Regina Groves.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON ADDRESSES
1:45 — 4:30 P. M.

A Plan for the Teaching of Bookkeeping and Ac-
counting. Louis D. Huddleston, John Adams High
School, Cleveland.

A Plan for the Teaching of Business Law. E. R.
Dillavou, University of Illinois, Urbana.

A Plan for the Teaching of Junior Business Training.
S. E. Cranfill, Bowling Green Business Univ., Bowling
Green, Ky.

A Plan for Teaching Salesmanship. Harry M.
Bowser, Westfield Senior High School, Westfield, N. J.

OPEN FORUM

A Discussion of the Morning and Afternoon Con-
tributions.

Election of Officers.

OFFICE MACHINE PRACTICE
ROUND TABLE

FRIDAY MORNING ADDRESSES
9:30 — 12:00 Noon

Are Office Machine Courses

(a) Pedagogically Sound?

(b) Vocationally Sound?

(c) Meeting a Real Need?

L. Gilbert Dake, The Hadley Vocational School, St. Louis.

Materials and Teaching Methods Employed in Office
Machine Practice. F. Cleo Frazier, Emerich Manual
Training High School, Indianapolis.

An Analysis of Occupational Activities as a Basis
for an Office Machine Clerical Curriculum. Ray Abrams,
Samuel J. Peters High School, New Orleans, La.

Is There a Demand for the Product of the Machine
Clerical Course? H. M. Winkel, Division of Guidance
and Employment, Milwaukee Vocational School.

The Place of Office Machine Practice in a Business
Education Curriculum.



FRIDAY AFTERNOON ADDRESSES
1:45 — 4:30 P.M.

An Integrated Course Comprising Essential Correla-
tion and Coordination of Important Subjects. R. M.
Utterback, Utterback Business College, Danville, HI.

Equipment of an Office Practice Department and Its
Effective Placement.

AN OPEN FORUM

Demonstrations and Discussions.
Election of Officers.



MACHINE SHORTHAND ROUND
TABLE

FRIDAY MORNING ADDRESSES

9:30 — 12:00 Noon

In Personal Qualities. Mrs. Erma M. Gould, Daven-
port -McLachlan Institute, Grand Rapids, Mich.

In Professional Skills. C. M. Smith, Terre Haute
Commercial College, Terre Haute, Ind.

In All-Round Accomplishments. Paul Moser, Moser
School, Chicago.

OPEN FORUM

Discussion of the Morning Contributions.



FRIDAY AFTERNOON ADDRESSES



1:45 — 4:15 P.M.



D.



Our Stenotype-Secretarial Course. Homer
Brammer, Bryant and Stratton College, Chicago.

Interpreting and Applying the Stenotype Course of
Study. Virginia Logan, Lockyear Business College,
Evansville, Ind.

Transcription — The Stumbling Block in the Steno-
graphic Path. Clifford I. Lamoreaux, Spencerian Col-
lege, Cleveland.

AN OPEN FORI M

Discussion of the Afternoon Contributions.



President, N. C. T. F.





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A TALK TO FRESHMAN CLASSES
ON HANDWRITING

Massachusetts State Teachers Colleges
By C. E. Doner

The first essential is to practice.
Nothing will take the place of con-
scientious practice. There is no royal
road to success in learning to write.
Success must be earned through one's
own earnest efforts.

In the second place there must be
a definite motive, a desire, a willing-
ness to learn and improve one's hand-
writing. One of the best motives is
a keen desire to write well. No teach-
er can work against the will of a
pupil and accomplish anything. The
pupil himself must be interested in
the thing he is doing. In large meas-
ure he must furnish his own "Drive."
A teacher explains, interprets, he aims
to lead, he opens up the way, so to
speak, for the pupil, making condi-
tions favorable for learning. Good
teaching is nothing more or less than
making conditions favorable for learn-
ing.

Through much practice the es-
sentials of position, good pen or pencil
holding, and fluent movement must be
learned. Right motive performance
must come first, which means correct
methods of writing easily, smoothly



and rapidly. The right performance
at the beginning, until correct habits
of posture, holding the pen and paper,
establishing the fluent flow of hand
and pen, must become reflexes as soon
as possible. But when you write do
not have the wrist level on top, — the
natural, easy way for the wrist is to
tip it a trifle to the right. The under
part of the wrist should be raised a
little from the paper so as to give an
easy glide of the hand on the last
two fingers. Use a combination of
arm, hand and fingers in writing. The
arm furnishes the flow, the force and
character, and the fingers steady the
shaping-up and forming of the letters,
resulting in a style of writing that
has rhythm, beauty of curve, and at
the same time is reasonably good in
letter formation.

To improve the quality of handwrit-
ing one must analyze the letters. The
letters should be the approved stand-
ard forms. A study must also be made
of the curves, angles, loops, retrac-
ings, beginnings and endings and the
relative height of all the letters. To
misplace curves, angles, loops and re-
tracings is what makes illegible writ-
ing. When sufficient formal practice
is given to these essentials, some
character or individuality usually de-



velops in one's handwriting. The prob-
lem at this point is, "How can one
learn to write fluently, easily and
rapidly and yet retain some individ-
uality in the writing?" I believe this
can be done without sacrificing too
much in the form, spacing and slant.
It is the teacher and his methods
which will accomplish this desirable
end. Ease and speed in writing must
be developed and at the same time
the quality must be such that the
writing can be easily read.

Finally, face your problems o f
learning and teaching handwriting
with a wholesome mental attitude.
You must tackle your school work
with this attitude of faith that you
are going to succeed just like
Columbus in discovering America and
Lindberg in flying to Paris. Faith
in yourself, faith in your job, enthus-
iasm, a positive confidence in the
thing that you are doing, — these are
the qualities that make for achieve-
ment and success. I frequently say
to my classes, "We may not always
be right, but we are just so many hu-
man beings trying to do the best we
know how. Therefore, we dedicate
ourselves anew to our tasks, giving
everything of which we are capable
and serving to our utmost.



A MONTH LATER



GOOD FOft YOU, JOHNNY f A 100%
CLEAN HANDS SCORE AND YOU HAVEN'T
MI'.SED A SINGLE DAY THIS MONTH.





/






If you wish to emphasize health rules or any other important truth with your pupils have them find a
picture that illustrates this truth or, better still, have them draw or paint such a picture and then see who can
write the sentence the best, using large free letter forms with a good swing across the page. We are indebted to
Sister M. Alice, St Mary's School, Urbana, O. for this splendid Correlation of Handwriting and cleanliness in the
first grade.



23




G^JJ^v^Jdted^T}



C/.'MfJ&/4klety<5fet?y. ^/^/^-ji^p/tne^J^^fgJ.








/ A ,. , _X



/.



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il.





ELLUMINATED INITIAL

card 7x11 inches $1.00

nd Carved Greeting Cards, 1 doz 1.00

nple Creeling Carved Card 15

J. D. Carter

Deerfield, III.



A GOOD YEAR

A letter from Frank H. Rickett,
who does engrossing in Philadelphia,
states that so far this has been the
best year he has had since 1930.



Thirty Years of Distinctive Service to Teacher and Employer
Our specialty is placing commercial teachers. Our candidates have
been sent to every state and several foreign countries. Let us help you.
Continental Teachers 1 Agency, Bowling Green, Ky.



IOO YEARS AGO




*hey« e , re



CILLOTT STEEL PENS



and today the name "Gillott" stands for the
highest in quality.

School— Nos. 1066, 1096, 41, 51, 61, 71,
81, 91.

Flourishing, Ornamental and Fine Commer-
cial Writing— Nos. 1, 601EF, 601F, 603EF,
603F, 604EF, 604F.

Send 10c for samples of either of the above
groups.

JOSEPH GILLOTT & SONS. LTD.
93 Chambers St. New York City



24



The Educator








DESIGNING AND
ENGROSSING

By E. L. BROWN
Rockland, Maine



Greeting cards have become a most
popular way of remembering friends
on all occasions. The pen-sketch given
in this connection was made from an
old house near Rockland, a type of
the old New England home which is
fast disappearing. Believe it or not,
the sketch was made this Fall, when
grasses and shrubbery had turned in-
to brilliant hues, but it was an easy
matter to change to a scene of snow
and ice, and make the design more
in keeping with the winter season.

First make a pencil sketch, suggest-
ing tone values. Place house at left
of centre. The house and spruce tree



balance the left of design and the let-
tering and snow-covered pines the
right side. The figure in foreground
gives the design added interest. Use
a fine pen on building and foreground,
giving special attention to the pen-
technique. Zanerian ink is best for pen
drawing and lettering. Values are
most important. Use a broad pen or a
brush for the solid black surface. Add
Chinese white in a clean pen to repre-
sent the effect of snow and ice.







Catalog and Samples on Request
Ask about our Booklet Diplomas-
Original specimens of Brush and Penwork
for sale — Engrossing

HOWARD & BROWN

ROCKLAND, MAINE



Penhold



book, "How to Become an Expert
Penman." FREE! Your name will be elegantly
written on a card if you enclose stamp to pay
postage. Write today!

T. M. TEVIS Box 25-C, Chillicothe, Mo.



EDWARD


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The Ed u cat oi-



ls



PENMANSHIP BUILT THIS
BEAUTIFUL HOME




■ w



E. E. Gaylord's Residence,
Beverly, Mass.

The name Gaylord has been famil-
iar to commercial educators, penmen
and readers of The Educator for many
years. Over forty years ago he be-
came interested in penmanship and
in 1890 came to Columbus, Ohio,
where he became a student of pen-
manship and, even if he will not ad-
mit it, became a very skillful pen-
man. In addition to being an accom-
plished penman, Mr. Gaylord is an
authority on commercial education
and correct English. Who does not
delight in receiving one of his well
worded letters and admire his elo-
quent style? For many years he has
conducted the National Teachers'
Agency which has rendered a con-
scientious, worth while service to
teachers and employers.

Mr. Gaylord purchased a choice
piece of ground in Beverly up on a
high spot overlooking the bay and be-
gan building the beautiful home pic-
tured above. I have heard it said
that the hill was rather rocky but
Gaylord with determination, a crow-
bar and well chosen words cleared the
place and moved the rocks around in-
to walks, walls and flower gardens.

This cut of Mr. Gaylord's home was
loaned to us by D. L. Stoddard, R. R.
4, Box 141, Indianapolis, Indiana, who
publishes a book on Beautiful Homes
and How To Build Them. Of the
above house Mr. Stoddard writes:
"While I have planned, arranged and
helped to create many far more ex-
pensive homes for millionaires and
others, I have never seen it surpas-
sed. When you take into considera-
tion everything that makes it so beau-
tiful — the surroundings, the view of
the land and water and everything —
it is a wonderful accomplishment,
especially for a penman."

The next time you are in the New
England states take a look at the
beautiful Gaylord home built with a
pen.

Any young man or woman who will
thoroughly prepare himself in pen-
manship can feel assured that some
day he also can have a beautiful
home.




LOOKING AHEAD

It is easier to look ahead and visual-
ize our possibilities, when we look
backward and see what great things
have been wrought during the past
10 or 20 years.

Truly, this is a MARVELOUS age
— and yet we have probably only be-
gun to realize, in a limited way, our
vast possibilities. This is a day of
research, of invention, of discoveries,
of electricity, and of gasoline.

THINK — only a few years ago, we
had no aeroplanes, no radios, no mov-
ing pictures, nay, even no automo-
biles! And in this short time, all of
these things have become common to
all of us. With all this rapid and won-
derful progress, what may we expect
ten years HENCE?

And how will we, as INDIVID-
UALS, "Size-up" ten years from to-
day? Each of us must, of necessity,
make our own place. It is, after all,
a question of what we are willing to
contribute. We shall get out of the
future what we put into it — no more,
no less. Our growth is, therefore,
determined by the preparation we
make, and by the service we render.
In the matter of preparation we
should overlook nothing that will add
to our efficiency and worth; and in
the performance of our duty, we
should never lose sight of the im-
portance of rendering the greatest
possible service.









I


jH^**'~~*












. ^i


B



Competition gradually becomes
keener and keener, between individ-
uals as well as between different lines
of business; but opportunities for the
exceptional individual are correspond-
ingly enhanced. Opportunity's "latch
string" always hangs out to the man
or woman of initiative, of industry and
of executive ability.

The humblest boy or girl may DE-
VELOP these qualities — these es-
sentials to success. It is simply a
matter of ambition, of inspiration,
and of determination. For example,
take the lives of Abraham Lincoln,
Henry Ford, and Thomas Edison.

Yes, we are living in a progressive
age, and in a day of opportunities;
and ten years HENCE, the world will
have advanced even more than it has
during the PAST ten years. Inven-
tions will have been made, that are
unknown or unthought of by the
average layman today.

But we who seize our opportunity,
who prepare ourselves by keeping
abreast of the times, by the proper
study, and by close application, may
play an important part in such
things. It is entirely up to us, as
individuals, whether we shall be a
leader or a follower, a success or a
failure, an asset or a liability to the
community in which we live and to
the world at large.

Success, achievement, and fame
mean hard work, struggling, and per-
severing; but these are far sweeter,
more satisfying, and more enjoyable
than a life of mediocrity, of useless-
ness, or of selfishness.

Yes, there's OPPORTUNITY ahead,
and our future is entirely up to us, as
INDIVIDUALS; will we pay the
PRICE that we may enjoy the RE-
WARDS ?



C. C. Wiggins, Marquette, Mich., Chairman,
Penmanship Section. N. C. T. F.



THE AMERICAN PENMAN

America's Handwriting Magazine

Established 1884

^Subscription price, $1.25 a year; two years,
years, $3.00. Contains depart-



of bu






ornate penmanship, engrossing, the Good
Writers Club, etc. Timely articles on the
teaching of handwriting by leading authorities.
Ask about the American Penman Certificate
of Proficiency.

Send 15c for sample copy.

The American Penman

55 Fifth Avenue New York, N. Y.



26



The Educator



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dmbia ^KF Ave Branch Philadelphia

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fur Hii' raurtnuis tmitmnit ulimiiis iimn ilrit its. hir tltr iiiirmilili' n'litfinns rstiilitishcit nnit iniiiiihimrii. hir
his kmillg firmiiMS unii fur Hir iiulluiti rn iipmiliiiii rxlniiiri) us m ill! flint lins fowl &f mir iiiliiuiimiii'ilf.



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SRtac .flatlets



W ^R.Ai-.cpp Warrav 3. jailer WifficiK &.#ranin SSA>inai&53«£cr

>?.W .^-..-.•ic <£ i? <3tdioit J. £.eK a (er A. >?Rc &n»

s'Oilk-mv $6 cXirsfmcr S5enM* (5u.ihik



Samuel D. Holt of Philadelphia



ENGROSSER WANTED

Large Engrossing Studio, wonderful opportun
ties for a willing worker. Send samples, whic
will be returned. State salary and experience

THE HARRIS STUDIO



Engrossei
grossers



and Designers, En-
ment, Vellum, Book



1403-4 Marquette Building



al,20c doj., in Kt.pt, 25c. Leather, silk-
Jtions. $5.00. including name
stamped in gold, and paper, $600
Diplomas, Resolutions, Testimonials
306 East Oakdale Avenue. Glcnaide, Pa.



SCRIPT- O-RAISE COMPOUND

Produces Raised- Printing from type.

Raised- Writing with ordinary pen.,'

Kit of Gold and Silver, 50c,- Black or any

color 30c, postpaid, with directions.
Script-O-Raise, Hudson, Ohio, U. S. A.



A SUGGESTION


Send The Educator to your


friends this year for Christmas.


Special rates in clubs.


THE EDUCATOR


Columbus, Ohio



The Educator



27




IT D

ENGRAVED OR
LITHOGRAPHED

for all kinds of schools

\£e furnish Imitation, or
Genuine Leather Covers.
silk lined and gold stamped.

T/ie

M^Ghee Studio

Arti sts -Penayen
143 East State Street
TretvtotslTN J







7.



_Si//S j/offr/f/IZy



Script is appreciated by many people. It
general advertising. Penmen should indu
script. The above cuts were loaned to us



s a very valuable style to
e advertisers to use more
by A. E. Ross, Slayton,




A simple, neat, effective card written by C. P.
years ago. Study and imitate it.



INDIANA HANDWRITING

SECTION HOLDS INTERESTING

MEET

The Handwriting Section of the In-
diana State Teachers' Association
held a very interesting meeting in the
spacious ballroom of the Columbia
Club, Indianapolis, Ind., Thursday
morning, October 18.

School No. 54, Indianapolis, opened
the program with some excellent
music. A demonstration lesson by
Junior High School pupils was then
given by Miss Genevieve Burns. Vic-
trola records were used in connection
with this demonstration. This was
followed by a very excellent address
by Don E. Warrick, Secretary, In-
diana Bankers Association, on "The
Importance of Handwriting in the
Business World."

The following officers were elected
for next year:

President, Roy Williams, Rosedale;
Secretary-Treasurer, Emmagrayce
Peed, Indianapolis.



THE GIST

The Gist is published bi-monthly
by the students of Goldey College,
Wilmington, Del. It is an interest-
ing, well prepared and well edited stu-
dent magazine and no doubt helps to
keep up the morale of the school and
to build up the enrollment.



M. B. MOORE'S MASTERPIECE

A bevy of four birds gracefully hov-
ering over a nest has been received
from C. W. Jones, Brockton, Mass.,
who had this handsome piece of work
reproduced. It is one of the most
beautiful flourishes ever produced. The
design is well balanced and carefully
planned in detail. Each individual
section was flourished with remark-
able skill and grace. It is one of those
pieces of work which one wonders
how it was done and which all lovers
of pen work should have in their
scrapbooks.



THE REVIEW

This is the title of a four page
school paper which is published by
the Lawrence Business College,
Lawrence, Kansas. The Lawrence
School states that it has an enroll-
ment increase of 60% over last year.




GEMS b3 56 p^ en 10 c

Grandest CHRISTMAS PRESENT any of - em!

PRACTICAL PAYING PENWORK $1.00

BEAUTIFUL HOMES— How to Build Them .75

ABC Pen work that earned %% for 50 years 50

Enjoy the BEAUTIFUL. All 4 only 1.75

D. L. Stoddard. R. R. 4. Box 141. Indianapolis, Ind.



Online LibraryAuguste LutaudThe Educator (Volume 40) → online text (page 14 of 35)