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k. "How to Be
man," and beautiful specimens. FREE. Your name
on card if you enclose stamp. F. W. Tamblyn,
406 Ridge Bldg., Kansas City, Mo.



"CARD WRITERS WANTED" Traveling penmen

can make extra money easily, or local penmen as

part time work. Special plan. Write PAS. c/o

THE EDUCATOR. Columbus, Ohio.



WRITING TEACHERS'

Assignment Dictionary

Ol AA carefully selected words arranged for spec!

"lv"men full page lessons. Contains many nev

schemes to create interest and attain skill

Printed in rejjioilui'cil business writing. Outline

and Dictionary postpaid for 40 one cent stamps.

Address 3S10— SE 76th Ave., Portland. Or

BURTON A. O'MEALY. Instructor

High School of Commerce



SATIN GLOSS INK



ed 25



of



perfect my Satin Gloss Ink and
Black Ink.

The Velvet Black is a dead black that is
so very black that the shades look like velvet
and the Satin Gloss is the only very glossy ink
that will not rub off in hot weather. I will
now sell the formulas for making each for 60
cts. or both for $1.00 and a beautiful specimen
of Card Carving free. Circulars for stamp.

A. W. DAKIN, North Syracuse, N. Y.



28



The Educator



Lessons in Knifemanship and Carving



By FRANK A. KRUPP

Interstate Business College, Fargo, North Dakota



No. 3

This design is similar to last
month's. You will find some new
things in it, especially the poinsettia
flower. Raise the petals and leaves
high to cast deep shadows.

In place of turning and moving the
hand and knife in cutting long, cir-
cular strokes, try turning and moving
the cardboard with the other hand,
holding the knife stationary.

If you have any trouble in making
any strokes, let us know for we are
anxious to help you. Regularity of
spacing and graceful curves help.



Your friends will appreciate Christ-
mas cards you have carved and let-
tered. Study Mr. Carter's card on
page 21.





This specimen was made by Piatt R. Spencer, Jr., of the Spencerian Commercial College in Cleveland. It was made in the eightit
intensely black and the hair lines were a beautiful brownish tint. It is one of the most delicate and graceful flourishes of its kind. I
time that W. A. Hoffman, H. B. Lehman, F. L. Dyke and E. W. Bloser were in Cleveland. This group of penmen did much to



The shades were
as made about the
jence penmanship.



The Educator



29



BOOK REVIEWS



Our


readers ar






ested i


n books of merit,


but especially in


bo


ks


of interest and value to




cial teache




inc


tiding


books of


special


educational value


ant


b


joks or


business


subjects.


All sue


h books v


■ill


be


briefly


reviewed


in these


column.




ct


be


ng to


give Midi.


ent de-


scriptlo


n of each


to




lable c


ur readers


to de-


termine


its value.













How To Be Always Well, by Robert

G. Jackson, M. D. Published by
Jackson Publishing Company, Buffalo,
N. Y. Cloth cover, 449 pages.

HOW TO BE ALWAYS WELL! That ought
to be a strange title for a book written for civilized
people to read. The very fact of being civilized
ought to imply a knowledge of how to be always
well, since it is true that the uncivilised or savage
races are almost entirely free from disease. Think
of it! People knowing nothing of science, people
without books or schools, people who know noth-
ing even of the three R's, people who can read
only the sign language of nature, people who never
heard of sanitation, or hygiene, or dietetics, or
psychology, or domestic science or physical culture.
— are able to grow to be very powerful and large
in stature, to live very lengthy lives — judged by
civilized standards— almost entirely free from dis-
ease, and die, almost invariably, from old age or
accident.

Why, to us civilised people, that almost seems
like divine intervention to protect and prolong the
lives of these simple races! But it is not. It is.
however, a divine provision that enables them to
live so nearly disease-free.

It is the intent of nature, or God, that all men
shall be disease-free. And in nature are to be
found principles of living, obedience to which —
laws, the living in harmony with which — will
ensure mankind freedom from all disease. The
simple races, living what we call natural lives, do
live in harmony with these laws. That is what

Although it is not divine intervention that keeps
the savage diseascfree, it must be intervention of
some kind that so constantly prostrates great masses
of civilized mankind with sicknesses and loath-
some and horrible diseases. That must be self-
evidently true. For if nature intended mankind
to be always well, and natural provisions obtain
for ensuring that they may be well, yet we find
vast hordes of men terribly afflicted with disease,

fluence, has intervened to prevent the carrying
out of the benevolent intent of nature. What-
thing or influence is, it is responsible



for the

ulcers °6
and dist



appendic



tube



nd the thousand and



typhoid



ulosi



*flu.



'ilized.



ffered by
and intellectual mankind. That same thing or in
fluence is responsible also for the calling away fron
productive employment of the army of physicians
hospital attendants, druggists, nurses, manufactur
ing chemists, etc., employed to care for and brinf
some measure of relief to those afflicted civilizec



:ings.



this






S.lV.l^lS



Think of it!
> live disease-free, while
in civilization some ot our greatest public institu-
tions — hospitals — are for the taking care of the
sick and diseased. And ever and ever these hospi-
tals grow larger and more numerous.



the



till



ill b



gge



hospitals, sanatoria and nursing homes. Wha
be the reason?

Is it likely God planned that the very apex of
His creative achievements, civilized mankind, should
be the only part of His creation that would mani-
fest this imperfection of disease? Why it seems
almost a blasphemy even to ask the question.

If all wild things, including wild men, are prac-
tically disease-free, and only civilized mankind are

zation itself and not by God has caused the dis-
eases of civilization. Neither is it necessary to
assume an intervention by God to save savage
mankind and the lower animals from disease. It
is only necessary to assume that they live as God
intended them to live, or according to the laws
of nature. And if it is civilization that has thus
intervened to induce disease where none was in-
tended by God, then it must be in the institutions,
the habits, of civilization, or some of them, that
we must seek for the cause or causes of civili-




Xiotect JLh



em



V/HILDREN are the joy of parents, the hope of the
nation, and the concern of all. One of the perils that
beset them on the road of life is tuberculosis. Nine
million children under fifteen years of age in the
United States today are infected with the germs of the
disease. These children may be protected, however, by
safeguards such as are provided by Christmas Seal
funds — tuberculin tests. X-rays, clinics, preventoria
and nursing service. Your purchase of Christmas
Seals to decorate your holiday letters and packages
will help protect children from tuberculosis.



^. ........

SEASONS GREETINGS
1934



fc^£



■ ■ ■ ■ r ■ • ,

The National, State and Local Tuberculosis Associations
of the United States

Buy Christmas Seals



reasoning leads to the foregoing
: most abstract and profound can



only



of civilized people
indubitably true.

We an
reader — ar
interested
through —
diseased, be guilty
phemy:— "It is Go
done." Rather shai
such despite to Goc

In the follow,
reader may at ti
not strictly conf
concepts, but thi
that generally w
concepts and not



of the living habits
soon proves the conclusion is

:ed that the more intelligent
the intelligent reader can be
:o read a book on this subject
r again, when he is sick or
of uttering the hideous blas-
t's will " or "God's will be
11 be his that he has done

ig presentation the professional

nes discover contentions that do

irm to present-day physiological

author thinks it will be noted



forced to adopt these concepts
factorily, results obtained in 1
similar results obtained in many oth

In other places the author has felt forced to
adopt a phraseology that will convey to the lay
mind a certain concrete idea that the proper tech'
nical phraseology would fail to convey, yet the
non-technical phraseology may, upon its surface.
seem to the professional
that the author reallv do
known how to avoid thi;
thing but good can resul
mate good of our profe
taught the great importan



xplain satis-



e it is for the ulti
that the people be

rorrcct living habits.



vith demonstrated physiological
epts differ. But he has been



WONDERFUL DESIGN

and eyes



Fnur large birds, scroll, 1
limli. Sent for a dime. \
amount. New circular free
C. W. JONES. 224 Main



St., Brockton. Ma



30



The Educator



'//,



A



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?



f> mem f'r/'J <



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c/etl f/f cd rvrrff reJ (,<??? </ /r
/fte&l //rr ///r/n rr/'J ry {/if J

. />rrf /'{/ /'po/frrf/fff/t/ pj/p//</
t/iecr f t'rsJ Yffff //r/ dwm/iafnt/.

,Jc f/!f//(/fr//-/u/{/e/J rr?u/

3'it^itruitiT (Simttpmm.

tee rr // /u rr //r p //'f f/t /t/v/pffjw/



, v^



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The fourth page of an album prepared in the Zaner-BIoser Studio.



The Educator



31



Now A Genuine Finger-Fitting Pencil To Match
Your Zaner-Bloser Penholder



A Practical

Inexpensive

Christmas

Gift



1. It is provided with a means of
knowing at all times the
length of lead in the pencil.

2. It is always the right length
to write with — never too
short.

3. It will outlast a dozen ordi-
nary pencils.

4. It is well balanced, light in
weight, pleasing in
appearance.

5. Your fingers do not annoy-
ingly slip down to the point
when writing.




JfTe Ideal

Q)riting

loools




Excellent
P rize. Stim-
ulates good
writing



6. It is made in a variety of
colors.

7. It is made to fit the hand
which means comfort in
writing.

Its shape is an aid to correct
pencil holding with fingers
the correct distance away
from the point.

Standard leads purchased
from any stationery store can
be used for refills.

10. Additional erasers may be
secured from any stationery
store.



Here's the Approved Pencil
for School Use — Designed by
Experts.



The Zaner-Bloser Co.
612 N. Park St.
Columbus, Ohio.

Please send postpaid Zabco Pencils at $21.60 a gross.

Quantity

Prepaid Prices: One Pencil, 25c; Twelve, $2.40; One Gross, $21.60.
Please send postpaid ZANER-BLOSER PENHOLDERS at $4.80 a gross.

Quantity

Prepaid Prices: One Penholder, 10c; Twelve, 60c; One Gross, $4.80.

Pencils and Penholders furnished in orchid pearl, pink pearl, silver, dark blue, and Chinese

red.

Color Name -



Cash enclosed
Send C. O. D.



Address

Position.



THE ZANER-BLOSER COMPANY



61 2 North Park St.



COLUMBUS, OHIO




25 Cards for 50c, postpaid

Distinctly Individual - Handwriting Christmas Cards

These cards have a strong penmanship appeal. They are admired by everyone who sees them because of
their beauty and dash.

USE THESE CARDS THIS CHRISTMAS

Twenty-five designs to select from. They are different and distinctive. Postal card size, printed in black ink on
good heavy cardboard. Price, on blank Christmas cards, 50c per set of 25, postpaid; 100 cards, $1.80; 500 cards,
$8.50; 1000 cards, $15.00. A penman's Christmas Card for l!/ 2 c.



THE ZANER-BLOSER COMPANY



612 NORTH PARK STREET



COLUMBUS, OHIO



Vol. 40



JANUARY, 1935



No. 5




Published monthly except July and August at 612 N. Park St., Columbus, O., by the Zaner-Bloser Company. Entered as second-cla
matter November 21, 1931, at the post office at Columbus. O., under Act of March 3, 1879. Subscription $1.25 a year.



The Educator



School Activities

The National Extra Curricular Magazine

Our Best Testimonial and proof
of unusual Reader Interest —

.... the number of School
Activities readers has in-
creased 400% during the
depression !



Many of our readers tell us that their copies of School
Activities are in constant demand not only in their
schools but at church and other community functions.

Subscription Rate — $2.00 per year
($1.50 Cash With Order)



The School Activities Pub. Go.

1013 WEST SIXTH STREET
TOPEKA, KANSAS



YOUR PROFESSIONAL
ADVANCEMENT

This year of 1935 will not be the year to seek a
position that pays a larger salary, but it may be the
year for you to secure a position that offers greater
opportunities.



Enroll in our Reliable Placement Bureau

and

Let us Help You



THE OHIO TEACHERS BUREAU

H. Ray Wagner, Director
1952 N. High Street Columbus, Ohio



NEW STANDARD

Typewriting



NATHANIEL ALTHOLZ

Director of Commercial Education

Board of Education

City of New York

AND

CHARLES E. SMITH

Specialist in
Typewriting Instruction



Trainer of

every World's Professional

Typewriting Champion.



Meets the common problems of the type-
writing classroom.

Permits a simple and progressive method
of teaching.

Is meeting with the widespread approval
of typewriting teachers everywhere.

An important contribution to typewriting
instruction.



Pitman Publishing Cnrporation



2 West 45th Street



New York



The Educator



a a




ON THE OCEAN FRONT

Atlantic City, New Jersey
SITUATED DIRECTLY ON THE BOARDWALK and
CONVENIENT TO ALL PIERS and AMUSEMENTS.



Per day,
per person



European
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With Meals
Private Bath



Private
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HOT AND COLD SEA WATER
IN ALL BATHS

Excellent Food French Cuisine

Garage
Emanuel E. Katz, Man. Director



HEEB3B&B3ES83SE83E



W3&*



%



Printing



our SERVICE

• ^-^ Catalogs

I C^ Price Lists

^^ Color Work

' ^"^ Publications

House Organs
Mailing Pieces
Stationery

Loose Leaf Record Sheets
Factory and Office Forms
Special Blank Book Manufacturing
Pen Ruled Forms — They save the eyes

May We Serve You?






BpJtemms <$<■ tiE^oAN, 9nc



&K

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PRINTERS

AxnJJllank Reel <)>K,mJnduu
240NorlkFburt!iSl. Columbus.Oh








POINTS

FOR IMPROVING
CLASS WORK



Hundreds of educational institutions use
Esterbrook Pens in their class rooms. Esterbrook
Pens are made in a variety of styles to suit all
class requirements. Test them yourself and dis-
cover why so many teachers demand that their
classes be supplied with Esterbrook steel pen
points exclusively. The real test of any pen point
is the way it writes. A sample assortment of
Esterbrook school pens will be sent to you upon
request so that you may test their writing qualities.

Esterbrook Points in
the Re-Xeu'-Point Fountain Pen



Through the use of Solid Duracrome
Metal, Esterbrook has combined
fountain pen convenience with
steel pen efficiency. The Re-New-
Point fountain pen gives you
the same uniformity, versatility
and writing accuracy that has
made Esterbrook steel pen
points the standard in pen-
manship classes. Leading
educators recommend
Esterbrook Re-New-
Point Fountain Pens.



ESTERBROOK
STEEL PEN MFG. CO.

62 Cooper Street, Camden, N. J.
or Brown Bros., Ltd.,Toronto,Can.



(Diiejithvtik




and up

A choice of

Re-New-Points

and a new one

when you need it.

Points



RE-NEW-POINT FOUNTAIN PENS AND STEEL PENS



The Educator



Are You Abreast of the
Newest Developments

In the Teaching of
Commercial Subjects?

Advancements, new perspectives, better ways to ac-
complish more, have taken place in the teaching of
shorthand, typewriting, and other commercial sub-
jects, just as they have in other fields of education.

Teachers of commercial subjects, and those prepar-
ing to enter this profession, will find the Gregg
Normal Session a source of inspiration, and an in-
valuable aid to efficient teaching.

Attractive courses of study, an unusually strong
teaching staff, and other exclusive features are of-
fered. Decide now to take this important step to
self-advancement. Write today for Bulletin about

The 1935 Normal Session Beginning
July 1 and Closing A ngust 9

The Gregg College

6 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois




Maximum Beauty, Per-
manence and Visibility

ONLY jet black ink, such as HIGGINS' ETERNAL
BLACK WRITING INK will give your writing
these outstanding advantages.

The sharp contrast, the crisp, uniform lines
of HIGGINS' BLACK WRITING INK on white
paper have an attraction — as well as a practical value,
that is daily converting many penmen. Forever black
and permanent, the superiority of decorative penman-
ship and all other types of writing in HIGGINS'
ETERNAL INK is immediately apparent.

TRY HIGGINS' ETERNAL BLACK WRITING
INK and see for yourself. 10c the standard 2-oz.
bottle. At most good stationers', druggists and
Woolworth stores.

Chas. M. Higgins & Co., Inc., 271 Ninth St., Brooklyn, N. Y.

HIGGINS'

Eternal BLACK Writing Ink



Prepare for a Position

Or Business of Your Own

By preparing to do pen work you can establish a penmanship or
engrossing business of your own in any good sized city. The opportunities
are unlimited. There is a large volume of penmanship business and the
possibilities for increasing it are very promising. The future is really very
bright. We urge you to investigate this interesting line of work.

Now is the time to prepare to teach penmanship if you desire a good
teaching position.

The Zanerian has trained thousands of the leading penmen and
teachers and can help you to thoroughly prepare yourself. Gome to the
Zanerian, or if that is not possible, enroll for the correspondence courses.



z&rw.





612 N. Park St.



Columbus, Ohio



The Educator



I0KLWAL101

where old-fashioned hospitality meets every mod-
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EDUCATION

A Monthly Magazine Devoted to the Art,

Science, Philosophy, and Literature of

Education

Herbert Blair, Editor-in-Chief

Professor of Education, School of Education,
Boston University

Some Special Feature Numbers

GEOGRAPHY

Edited by Douglas C. Ridgley

ART

Edited by Royal Bailey Farnum

SECONDARY EDUCATION
Edited by Frederick E. Bolton

VISUAL EDUCATION
Edited by F. Dean McClusky

INDUSTRIAL ARTS
Edited by Arthur B. Mays

By popular request EDUCATION is indexed in the "Readers
Guide to Periodical Literature" and in "The Education Index." See
that your library has it. Subscription Price: $4.00 per year. Forty
cents per copy.

Mention this advertisement and ask for a Free Sample Copy.

The Palmer Company, Publishers
120 Boylston St., Boston, Mass.




SINCE 1858 THE BEST PEN NAME



Executed by 11. If'. Flickinger and L. P. Spencer in 188+ with
a famous Spencerian No. 1 College double elastic point.

Win a prize for writing a letter!

SOCIAL LETTER CONTEST

6 Prizes each month

for the best examples of social correspondence covering in-
vitations, acceptances, regrets, congratulations, condol-
ences, etc. Letters to be judged on penmanship, general
appearance and expression. For each of the three best
letters a beautiful photographic reproduction of the above
Flickinger-Spencer Eagle — one of the most remarkable
examples of flourishing in existence — approximately 11" x
14", printed on heavy sepia paper, mounted for framing.
For the three next best letters a copy of Emily Post's
"Letters That Must Be Penned," covering all forms of
social correspondence — by the leading authority. All let-
ters bearing January postmark will be considered as in
the January contest; letters postmarked February in the
February contest, etc.

Names of winners in January contest will be published in
the March issue of "The Educator"; winners of February
contest in the April issue, etc. Mail your letters to
address below.



PEN DRAWING
PORTFOLIO



^Jify



ra



NEW!

PEN DRAWING

PORTFOLIO

by A. L. GUPTILL



A complete course in pen
drawing. Shows various
techniques, gives clear in-
structions. Large size, 11
x 14 in. At leading art-
ists' materials stores, $1.
If your dealer hasn't this
book, order direct from us,
mentioning his name.

SEND 15c
for Sample Card of our
Art Series pens and pen
holder. Sold by artists'
material stores.

STEEL PENS — School and commercial models. Write for free
samples and prices — mentioning name of your dealer.

SPENCERIAN PEN COMPANY

347 Broadway, New York



The Educator



Announcing
OFFICE APPLIANCE EXERCISES

A Minimum Course for Business Students
by

John T. A. Ely and A. C. Beaver
Washington School for Secretaries, Washington, D. C.

The purpose of this brief course is to familiarize the student with the most
commonly used office machines which, from the teaching standpoint, may be divided
into four groups:

1. Accounting and record-keeping machines

2. Duplicating machines

3. Name- and data-writing machines

4. Miscellaneous labor saving machines

The teaching plan is simple and is based on the apprenticeship system of
instruction. One pupil at a time receives instruction on each type of office machine. He,
in turn, "breaks in" the next pupil before passing on to another machine. This plan
of instruction follows the customary procedure in the business office — the expert
operator "breaking in" the new operator.

Although designed for typing classes, "Office Appliance Exercises" may be used
in bookkeeping classes or office appliance laboratories.

By actual test it has been found that all the assignments in the text can be
worked out in 36 periods of 45 minutes each.

All necessary equipment for the complete course may be obtained for not to
exceed $700. Full information will be sent on request.

List Price $1.60
Special Sample Copy Price: $1.00 net, postpaid



THE GREGG PUBLISHING COMPANY

New York Chicago Boston San Francisco Toronto London Sydney

Gregg Books Are Authoritative.




Volume 40



COLUMBUS, OHIO, JANUARY, 1935



No. 5



Philadelphia!! Killed
by Auto

MICHAEL J. RYAN

At Thanksgiving M. J. Ryan, in-
structor of penmanship in the Peirce
School of Business Administration,
Philadelphia, was run down by an
automobile and killed. Mr. Ryan had
been in the penmanship business for
many years and was recognized as
one of the leading penmanship teach-
ers.

Peirce School has been famous for
fine penmanship and has employed
some of the most prominent penmen
in the United States. The pioneer
penman, A. P. Root, was one of their
penmanship teachers who did much
for the profession. R. S. Collins, the
beloved and well-known penman,
taught in this school for years. Mr.
Ryan succeeded Mr. Collins in 1920
and has held up the high reputation
of their penmanship classes.

For some years previous to his con-
nection with Peirce School he was em-
ployed in the advertising department
of the Record.

Mr. Ryan was a familiar figure at
the penmanship conventions, and put
on many exhibitions of his students'
work. He was at all times deeply
interested in penmanship. He ac-
quired many fine specimens of the
masters of his time and also had a
fine library of books on the subject
of Lettering and Illumination. Any-
thing in the art line that was fine
and beautiful interested him. He had
traveled some in foreign lands and
this country and was a most enter-
taining conversationalist on these
subjects. He enjoyed some forms of
outdoor life and exercise. He was
particularly good in taking photo-
graphs and in bowling. At one time
he spent his vacation in Columbus
studying penmanship and viewing the
fine collection of penmanship in Co-
lumbus.

He is survived by a sister.
H. W. Patten has assumed Mr.
Ryan's duties as head of the penman-
ship classes in Peirce School.



(Smttngs tn All



ruining from a year full of heartaches, disappointments
and uncertainties, we face a new year with new hope and re-
in wed determination.

In facing the daivn of a brighter and more prosperous era
we wish you, one and all, the happiness for which you hope and
the success which you deserve.

II c also wish you an abundance of good health and good
penmanship for 1935.



KEEPING OUT OF THE RED

When a business does not make a
profit the loss is shown on its books



Online LibraryAuguste LutaudThe Educator (Volume 40) → online text (page 15 of 35)