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naker, Charlestown, W. Va.; Paul
Fernandez Bas, Havana, Cuba; Edna
Virginia Prusha, Virginia, Minn.

The 1940 Convention will be held
in Atlantic City, March 21, 22, 23.
Although the E. C. T. A. is conven-
ing at this time in the Hotel Am-
bassador we feel that Atlantic City
is large enough to accommodate both
conventions and each may benefit by
meeting at the same time. Both
conventions are independent of each
other. Miss Olive Mellon, supervisor
of handwriting, of Atlantic City has
been appointed General Chairman of
Local Affairs.

The theme of the 1940 Convention
is to be "Penmanship Contributions
in a Foursquare Democracy."

The sides of the square are the
home, church and society, business,
and the school.

Won't you start planning your ex-
hibit now, working your ideas ai'ound
the central theme. You might merely
consider the home, or you may con-
sider the contributions to church and
society. Again you might like to use
the entire square.

Certificates of merit; primary, sec-
ondary, and business, will be awarded
all schools entering exhibits. Exhib-
its may consist of cardboard mounts,
freezes, booklets, posters, etc.

Let us strive to make this year's
exhibit outstanding.

Plan to spend your Easter with us
on the Boardwalk at Atlantic City.

Hotel arrangements will be an-
nounced later.

DORIS E. ALMY,

President.



73 this month wanting to HELP while
yet young. All that send $1.00 for
PRACTICAL PAYING PENWORK, Fifth
Edition, I'll send CHRISTMAS PRESENT

of other books worth much more.

D. L. Stoddard



Route 4, Box 174



Indianapolis, Ind.



^jQl^prttftratna



Booklet or Sheet Form — Artistic Designs-
Attractive Covers— Leather and Imitation.
Diploma Filling a Specialty. Send for Sam-
ples and Quotations.

Best Quality — Lowest Cost

HOWARD & BROWN

ROCKLAND MAINE




This is the time of the year when
our friends try to give us "spring
fever" by sending us photographs of
their catches. What irks the editor
is that none of these famous fisher-
men at any time volunteer to divulge
their secrets and as a result we in
the office of the Educator when we
go fishing have to content ourselves
with catches which we would not
care to photograph. At any rate,
we appreciate seeing these photo-
graphs and to know that our good
friends have the foresight to take a
little time off to get out close to
nature.

The above photograph is of our
genial friend, John R. Eye, vice-
president and secretary of the Duns-
more Business College, Staunton,
Virginia. Mr. Eye never loses an
opportunity to go fishing. He does
both fresh-water and salt-water fish-
ing. The snapshot above is of a salt-
water fish caught by Mr. Eye about
a month ago and he states that this
is not the largest he has ever caught.
We congratulate Mr. Eye on his
success as a fisherman as well as
upon his success as a commercial
school man.



THE COVER

The covers this month and also for
November were prepared by W. Le-
roy Newark of the Zaner-Bloser en-
grossing studio. Mr. Newark not
only does all types of engrossing and
illuminating, but also does pen and
ink work and oil i)aintings.



The Educator








''^ jcranton .

oiuci m fTumflc ai'nTrnJiQri \o the
GtcnLKitlE.pticsi, vplic Diuinc
Sficpficrii dE dot Souls.'^Uc proiso

- ,__^ IfTc name oFDcsus CfiiigHfurSniiior.

tmo fitter \o iDur (SlcrnariotKcr i]tn}cfu[ hfianEs For tRc hcnchiccncc ot
Pi^Diuinc'llIirr.-ujfiicR Has or6ciitiCLS For us asKiqlTpricst nn6 Sficpncril)
oTtfc t)ioccsc of Scranton.lDur iP'clouci nn6 t£^ruTy /Ipostofic Bishop,

!* he #05t |.eueren6 #illiQin f oscph ^dQi^

iiTilB ?Sirn"^Uc loin in profoimi!! qmliluoc for Inc^manir UrncCs
lufiicft^FTaiTc Bfc5sc6 1^15 Tifc oi iPonscciabiV-ScTin^c, ov\6 for
tRc Gifts of iT)_in6 Qn6""SoT.ir vuriicn ficiuc mnicTjis^Qctificcs-
QCCcptaBf: \o do6 an6 Tiis faETors Fruiffuf For uS His' £'Rifiircn.

■^Uc.thc infflCCrS On§ iDcmbcrS oF tfic rammmsm,^



o



Scrnnton DiorctiQiiTOpf f oli|Mmc SacfeKcg,

extern*! to UXir ?Bclouc_6.SFcpncr4 ^mccn;c'lt'onmQtu[Qhons"
on the occasion oFtnc -'^rirjcx ^'ubu.-'c of I^is ipricsHu
oriSination, Qn6 ujitQ_GTofcfuf TTcoTts unite in one oceoro
in presenting trixs iSgsfiinopu oTtfieTcattu. Rcuercncc
ono iZouc oF Inc SDcTnbcrs of tnis -Society^.

0ia' |nirnc5t|^rQucr is tfTot Ga6 mtw qiant b
IJis ilifc illanunappu 1^015, nni*! to BisJolTors
isitcrnal Bfcsshrijs throiiohi|csus Hhiisi Ulur iZoriii.




This piece of engrossing: was done by Joseph W. Costello of Scranton, Pa., son of the late P. W. Costello. Joseph
has taken up the engrossing where his father left off and is certainly carrying on the Costello style in excellent
shape. At first we thought it was the work of P. W., being so close in character and execution. We congratulate
Mr. Costello upon his most excellent skill.



The Educator



31




Hairy S. Blanchard. 218 South Broadway,
Los Angeles, California.




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Christmas Ctvin^
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You Give fhe Pencif for
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holder to F D C C
Match it r K t t



linlh Piicked Together in
Colorful Hox



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An

Ideal

Lasting

Gift



This Matched Finger-
fitting- Pen and Pencil
set in beautiful onyx-
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the heart of every child.
This Special Zaner-Bloser
"Share-with-You" Gift Offer
brings you both Matched Pen-
holder and Pencil postpaid for
only 15c.



FINGER-FITTING



and PENS



RESTFUL — EASY TO USE — IMPROVE PUPILS' HANDWRITING



Here is a happy solution of the gift problem for
your pupils. You want something first of all that
will please — something that will last — something
at a price you can afford to pay — something that
will express your personal intei'est in the welfare
of your pupils. How can you do this better than
by showing your interest in the improvement of
the child's handwriting?

A Matched Set for Every Child

To make it possible for you to make a really
worthwhile gift to your pupils this Christmas, we
are making a special "Share-with-you" Gift Offer.
You give the Pencil — we'll give the Penholder.
In this way you are able to remember every child
with a lasting, useful, valuable gift — and all at
a cost to you of only 15c each.



Order Promptly — Use the Coupon

We make no restrictions on this "Share-with-
You" Gift Offer. Whether you wish 10 sets or
a hundred, all you need to do is to fill out the
coupon below, write your name and address
plainly, tell us how many sets you will require,
enclosing check or money order to pay for the
Zaner-Bloser Finger-Fitting Pencils at 15c each
and we'll include free as our share in your gift
to your pupils one Zaner-Blosei- Penholder to
match, packed vsath each pencil in atti'active
Colorful Box.

For a delightful surprise — at Christmas time — to
get unmatched value for your gift money — this
year — fill out and mail this coupon today.



The Zaner-Bloser Company



612 North Park Street



Dept. E



Columbus. Ohio




SPECIAL "SHARE YOUR GIFT" COUPON

Zaner-Bloser Company, Dept. E, Columbus, Ohio

Gentlemen: I accept your special "Gift-Sharing" offer to
enable me to give the complete set of matched Finger-Fitting

Penholder and Pencil to my pupils. Enclosed find

in payment for Pencils at the regular retail price of

15c each and you are to include Free one Finger-Fitting Pen-
holder to match each Pencil ordered as per your offer in The
Educator. Penholder and Pencil are to be packed together in
attractive colorful box and to be mailed to me postpaid.

Teacher's Name

Address

Town State



Vol. 45



JANUARY, 1940



No. 5




Published mnnthly except July and August at 612 N. Park St.. Columbus. O.. by the Zaner-Bloser Company. Entered as second-
class matter NoveXr 21 iwl at the post office at Columbus. Ohio, under Act of March 3. 1879. Subscription $1.50 a year.



The Educator




PENMANSHIP SUPPLIES



Suggested for use ivith the various penmanship lines of work



BUSINESS WRITING

1 Z-B Penholder $ .05

1 qt. pkg. Ink Powder 80

M gr. Standard Pens 40

1 pkg. No. 9 Paper, 250 sheets 75



ORNAMENTAL PENMANSHIP

1 Rosewood Oblique Holder, 8 in.. $ .65

Vi gr. Fine Writer Pens 50

1 bot. Arnold's Japan Ink (4 oz.) 50

1 pkg. 5-lb. Paper, 240 sheets 1.80



ADVANCED ENGROSSING

1 bot. India Ink $ .40

1 Expert Holder 20

1 Doz. Gillott's No. 303 Pens 25

1 Doz. Fine Writer Pens



20

1 Z-B Pencil with Hard Lead .15

1 Ruby Eraser No. 112

12 Thumb Tacks

6 Sheets Cardboard



.05
.10
.90



ENGROSSERS SCRIPT

1 Excelsior Holder $ .15

V* gr. Fine Writer Pens 50

1 bot. Arnold's Japan Ink (4 oz.) 50

1 pkg. 5-lb. Paper, 240 sheets 1.80



TEXT LETTERING

Set Lettering Pens ? .35

1 Ink Feeder 10

1 Lettering Holder 20

1 pkg. 5-lb. Paper 1.80

1 bot. India Ink 40



(The Above prices are all postpaid)
Write for a complete catalog of supplies to 612 N. Park St., Columbus, Ohio



m



^SBB



m



^SSBek



f^A



The Educator



The POPULAR

PLACE TO STAY
IN

TOLEDO




People traveling or living in Toledo quite
naturally turn to the Fort Meigs. Not only
is it the focal point of activities, but it is
a convenient, comfortable and pleasant
hotel. Its unusual Purple Cow Coffee Shop
and Maritime Buffet are the reasons it is
preferred as an entertainment center.

250 ROOMS$0

WITH BATH^MfH L

JOSEPH HERLICY, Monager

FORT MEIGS

HOTEL

ST. CLAIR BETWEEN MADISON AND

JEFFERSON
ONE OF THE ALBERT PICK HOTELS



Extraordinary Methods

Courses For
Commercial Teachers

The Gregg Summer Session has been the pathway
to better teaching for thousands of men and women
during the past quarter of a century. Going to the
Gregg Summer Session is more than merely attending
a "Summer School." It is a way that will enlarge
your vision, broaden your experience, refresh the
tired imagination, give you "new ways to do old
things better," and enable you to recapture the am-
bition to be a leader in your profession.

Courses are arranged to meet the requirements
of experienced teachers, as well as those about to
enter this profession. Graduates from all parts of the
United States and Canada enthiusiastically recommend
the practical courses of study.

The 1940 Session begins July 1 and closes
August 9. Write today for special bulletin.

THE GREGG COLLEGE



6 North Michigan Avenue



Chicago, Illinois



THE "HOME" OF

and

HOTEL

FORT HAYES



# A battar plac* to Hoy in Ohio's Capital - better
accommodations, food and service. .CoHee Shop and
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COLUMBUS

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The Educator



^ Courteous Service
)f Genuine Hospitality
if Luxurious Surroundings
In




* You'll appreciate the com-
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first choice of experienced
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HOTEL

MIAMI

V. C. MURPHY, Monoger

SECOND AND LUDLOW STREETS

ONE OF THE ALBERT PICK HOTELS



SUCCESS DRILLS IN
TOUCH TYPEWRITING

By CHARLES E. BATEN, Principal

The Lewis and Clark Public Night School
Spokane, Washington

A complete course especially designed

for business schools and

evening classes.

Important' Features ....

Bold type, well spaced, easy to read and
follow even in poorly lighted classrooms.

Exercises carefully developed to produce
high speed and superior skill in the mini-
mum time.

Each exercise has a specific purpose, and
instructions are reduced to simplest and
briefest form.

Price 50 cents

Discount on quantity

THE PALMER COMPANY



370 Arlontic Avenue



Boston, Mass.




Trovclcri acclaim the fine food in
the two modern restaurants - tl>e
Steamboat Cabin Coffee Shop and
the Old English Tap Room -they
praise the friendly atmosphere and
fine service - and they never forget
the modern rooms and the IDEAL
LOCATION of the Mark Twain



300 ROOMS

pom.



'2



O. E. TRONNES, MGR.

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ONE OF THE ALBERT PICK HOTELS



The Educator



Provides for Variation
in Students' Abilities



New Standard Typewriting



Abundant Material

Correct Forms Only

Best Current Usage

Clear, Concise Direc-
tions

Interesting Topical
Arrangement

Distinct Type
Durable Binding
Good Illustrations



Nathaniel Altholz

Director of Commercial Education,
Board of Education,
City of Seiu York



Charles E. Smith

Specialist in Typeii-riting Instruction,

Trainer of Every World's Professional

Typeivriting Champion



We might elaborate one feature after another — the topical arrangement of applied
problem material; the interesting, instructive, carefully selected exercise and project
material; the constant attention to the interest and convenience of pupil and teacher;
the method by which the entire class, vfith no slighting of individual aptitude, mas-
ters the keyboard together.

But it all comes down to just this: Here is the typeixriting text ivhich <u-ill serve
you best. New Standard Typewriting is now in wide use, in every case with the
most satisfactory results. Embodying ideas gathered from exceptional experience
and thorough understanding of actual classroom problems, it stands approved by
every test of experi opinion and practical demonstration.



The Most I SABLE Text Ever Devised



PITMAN PUBLISHING CORPORATION

New York Chicago



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Used constantly by College and School officials, by Guidance Committees and by Lead-
ing Libraries.

Covers 652 Colleges and Universities. 563 Junior and 119 Negro Colleges.
Also 2613 Professional Schools of Aeronautics, Agriculture, Architecture, Commerce,
Dentistry, Education, Engineering, Forestry, Journalism, Law, Library Science, Medi-
cine, Nursing, Osteopathy, Optometry, Pharmacy, Social Work, Theology, and Schools
of Technology.

567 Universities around the World. Full page color State Maps in Educational Atlas.

^ _ __ Address the Editor— Dr. H. W. Hurt

Price SA f S 4^"^ Riverside Drive

"^" ■ ^ New York Citv



The Educator



5 V OUR /
i- BUSINESS/



Junior Business

Plus

Functional

Arithmetic

OUR

BUSINESS

LIFE

By Lloyd L. Jones



A Junior Business Text

1. That includes correlated functional arithmetic, handwriting, and
vocabulary training.

2. That explores the field of business, offers guidance, and develops
all the social values of this rich subject.

3. That makes the student aware of the business forces and business
practices that affect his life from early youth to old age.

4. That is on the eighth and ninth grade vocabulary level, and holds the
student's interest.

5. That makes future commercial studies more meaningful, more
effective, more valuable.

6. That is supplemented by a teacher's methods book, an optional
workbook program, and modern tests that are impressive.



THE GREGG PUBLISHING COMPANY



New York Chicago San Francisco

Toronto London Sydney



Boston






America's Only Handwriting Magazine



Volume 45



COLUMBUS, OHIO, JANUARY, 1940



No. 5



CONVENTION ANNOUNCEMENTS



N. A. P. T. S.



A MESSAGE TO ALL WHO ARE
INTERESTED:

The National Association of Pen-
manship Teachers and Supervisors
have selected the Ritz-Carlton Hotel,
Atlantic City, N. J., for their 1940
convention.

Mrs. Maude E. Meyers, chairman
of the Executive Board and her com-
mittee are already hard at woi-k pre-
paring the program. We hope to
give you an interesting and worth-
while three days.

Miss Olive Mellon, supervisor of
handwriting in Atlantic City, is
General Chairman of Local Affairs
and is endeavoring to plan enter-
tainment which will be unique yet
in keeping with the Easter season.

Atlantic City has extended a most
cordial invitation and the teachers
in New Jersey are giving us their
wholehearted support.

The doors of the House of Friend-
ship will be opened at nine o'clock
We hope that you will meet us there
as we open the "friendly conven-
tion."

OFFICERS

President

DORIS E. ALMY

Henry Lord Junior High

Fall River. Mass.

1st Vice President
H. M. GARVEY
Tuckahoe. N. Y.

2nd Vice President

MARGARET MARBLE

Cincinnati. Ohio

Chairman of Executive Board

MAUD E. MEYERS

Newark, N. J.

Secretary
OTTIE CRADDOCK



Far



■ille.



Treasurer

MARY POORE

2050 South 21st Avenue

Birmingham, Alabama



E. C. T. A. BULLETIN

Peter L. Agnew, President of the
Eastern Commercial Teacher's As-
sociation, has announced the ap-
pointment of a Commission in Busi-
ness Education to confer on the out-
standing problems of Business Edu-
cation at the present time, partic-
ularly those that have to do with
the Youth Adjustment problem.

The Commission is under the di-
rection of Mr. Clinton A. Reed, a
member of the executive board of
the E. C. T. A., and will consist of
the following people:

Chairman :

Mr. John G. Kirk

Director of Commercial Education

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Mr. Nathaniel Altholz

Director of Commercial Education

New York, New York

Mr. Clyde B. Edgeworth
Supervisor of Commercial Educa-
tion
Baltimore, Maryland

Dr. Haniden L. Forkner
Associate Professor of Education
Teachers College, Columbia Uni-
versity
New York, New York

Mr. Raymond C. Goodfellow
Director of Commercial Education
Newark, New Jersey

Mr. Charles W. Hamilton
Assistant in Secondary Education
State of New Jersey
Trenton, New Jersey.

Dr. B. Frank Kyker

Acting Chief, Business Education

Service
U. S. Office of Education
Washington, D. C.



Dr. Paul S. Lomax

F*i'ofessor of Education

School of Education, New York

University
New York

Professor F. G. Nichols
Associate Professor of Education
Graduate School of Education
Harvard University
Cambridge, Massachusetts

Mr. Clinton A. Reed
Chief, Bureau of Business Edu-
cation
State Department of Education
Albany, New, York

Mr. Louis A. Rice
Principal, Packard School
New York, New York

Mr. Edward J. Rowse
Supervisor of Merchandising In-
struction
Boston Public Schools
Boston, Massachusetts

Miss Frances Bowers
Director, Department of Commer-
cial Education
Temple University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The Commission held its first meet-
ing in New York City on December
9. A complete report will be made
at the annual convention which will
be held at Atlantic City on March
21, 22, 23, 1940. At the conven-
tion, members of the Commission
will also act as a panel, discussing
the issues presented in their report.
They will also endeavor to answer
questions from the floor. A copy of
the report will appear in the 1940
yearbook.

The theme of the 1940 convention
is to be,. "'The Contributions of
Business Education to the Youth
Adjustment Act."



THE EDUCATOR

Published monthly (except July and August)
By THE ZANER-BLOSER CO..
612 N. Park St.. Columbus, O.

E. A. LUPFER Editor

PARKER ZANER BLOSER Business Mgr.



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE. $1.50 A YEAR

iTo Canada. 10c more; foreiem 30c more)

Single copy, 25c.

Change of address should be requested
promptly in advance, if possible, giving the old
as well as the new address.

Advertising rates furnished upon request.



THE EDUCATOR is the best medium through
which to reach business college proprietors and
managers, commercial teachers and students,
and lovers of penmanship. Copy must reach
our office by the 10th of the month for the
issue of the following month.



Business Writing



By E. A. Lupfer
No. 4




This shows the proper way to hold the chaik.
There )s really very little difference between the
holdmg of the chalk and the holding of the
pen except that the chalk points toward the
palm of the hand. Curve the fingers the same
a.s in pen and ink writing.




This illustration shows how the thumb and
fingers surround the pen. The first finger is on
top of the pen. The second finger is under-
neath and the thumb is on the side.



Take an inventory of your writing before going on. Is it satisfactory? If not, wherein can you improve it? Check
size, slant, spacing and quality of line. Do all letters rest on the base line? Is your motion free or are your lines
full of awkward kinks? Critical observation and careful practice is necessary to produce good results.

Sit healthfully and hold the pen lightly. The paper should be tipped to the left with the base lines almost at right
angles to the arm. Is your pen in good condition? Change it when necessary. It is expensive to use a worn out
pen.

Avoid ink blots and finger marks. A clean paper is nicer than a sloppy one. Ijcarn to be neat in writing as well
as in other things. Your success depends upon it.




/ 2 3 a^ C y S^f



^ r




^T



This alphabet is used in thousands of schools throughout the U S., and is therefore a standard alphabet. Study it j
carefully and refer to it frequently. Compare your letters with it. !



The Educator 9

'The H and K have the same beginning stroke. Begin with a small loop nie-third of the size of the letter and
swing wide to the left before coming down straight on the stem. Curve the second part at the top. Both strokes
coming down to the base line should be straight and parallel. The finishing swing is similar to the finish of O. The
loop on the second part should join the two parts in the center.
Count: 1-2, 3-4.



^ ^ ^ O) ^ O) ^




The P begins with a graceful curve at half the height of the letter. The beginning stroke is part of a horizontal oval.
The down stroke is straight. Stop at the bottom before making the return stroke and the oval swing. The oval
should be one-half of the letter. Close the P in the center. Keep the eye of the pen pointing toward the ceiling.
A common fault is to make the oval too large. Look at the size of the oval on a Roman type letter. Script letters
are patterned after type or Roman letters.
Count: 1-2.




'^'^^^^^



The V, Y and U begin with a loop as in N, but come down to the base line with a compound curve. The finish of V
is as the second part of U and Y, about three-fourths of the height of the letter. Get the two compound curves
evenly balanced. End with a free graceful oval motion. The turn at the base line is the same as the turns in U.
The V should be no wider than the H. Use a continuous fiee motion. Begin and end with the pen in motion.
Count: 1,-2,-3.



^ ^ ^ ^ ^ U'U. ^^ ^ ^ ^.



10



The Educator



The t is an extended i with a straight cross stroke. Begin and end the same as i. Avoid a loop. Retrace about
half way. The important thing is the location and length of the cross stroke. Make it with care, and never dis-
connect it from the letter. Very little skill is required to dot an i or cross a t but how many persons take the time
to do it correctly?
Count: 1-2, cross.




M:U.tl.tXt^^jmia:^t^£'aLy\




JZi JjZ i^^



The d is an a and an uncrossed t combined. The d should contain a perfect a. Close the a part of the d. The a *

part should be the same height as an n. The bottom of the oval and the turn should rest on the base line and be ii

the same in roundness. :

Be sure to use enough arm movement to make the execution easy and unrestricted. Sufficient finger action may be I

employed to insure a perfect retrace. A slight co-operation of the fingers is not objectionable, providing you do i!
not use enough of it to make the work labored or broken.

Count: 1-2. \




c::::!^ ^y^ t:::^ <i?Z^ <i^^ d^L^
c:t^ dPt^ C^ ^;?t^



The k begins like h. The bottom part appears as wide as the h, but in actual measurements is slightly narrower. |

Give special study to the little loop. Notice its size and direction. Stop after making the little loop, then drop |

straight down to the base line. The loop should appear to be three times as tall as the h. Get down strokes i



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