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is to fill out the coupon below, write your
name and address plainly, tell us how
many seU you will require, enclosing
check or money order to pay for the
Zaner-Bloser Finger-Fitting Pencils at
15c each and we'll include free as our
share in your gift to your pupils one
Zaner-Bloser Penholder to match, packed
with each pencil in attractive colorful
box.

For a delightful surprise — at Christmas
time to get unmatched value for your
gift money — this year — fill out and mail
this coupon today.



ZANER-BLOSER COMPANY



DEPT. E



COLUMBUS, OHIO




SPECIAL "SHARE YOUR GIFT" COUPON
Zaner-Bloser Company, Dept. E, Columbus, Ohio

Gentlemen : I accept your special "Gift-Sharing" offer
to enable me to give the complete set of matched Finger-
Fitting Penholder and Pencil to my pupils. Enclosed find

in payment for Pencils

at the regular retail price of 15c each and you are to
include Free one Finger-Fitting Penholder to match each
Pencil ordered as per your offer. Penholder and Pencil
are to be packed together in attractive colorful box and
to be mailed to me postpaid.

Teacher's Name



Address

Town State..



SPECIAL NOTE: These sets are available in the following colors: red, block, blue,
yellow, green, pink, silver, orchid, and variegated.



OL. 46



DECEMBER, 1940



No. 5







Published monthly except July and August at 612 N. Park St., Columbus. O.. by the Zaner-Bloser Company. Entered as second-
class matter November 21, 1931, at the post office at Columbus, Ohio, under Act of March 3, 1879. Subscription $1.50 a year.



The Educator



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The Educator



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The Educator




K






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The Educator



Provides for Variation
in Student* s Abilities



New Standard Typewriting



bundant Material

Correct Forms Only

est Current Usage

Hear, Concise Direc-
tions

•iteresting Topical
Arrangement

• istinct Type

•urable Binding

'ood Illustrations



by



Nathaniel Altholz

Director of Commercial Education,
Board of Education,
City of New York



Charles E. Smith

Specialist in Typewriting Instruction,

Trainer of Every World's Professional

Typewriting Champion



We might elaborate one feature after another — the topical arrangement of applied
problem material ; the interesting, instructive, carefully selected exercise and project
material; the constant attention to the interest and convenience of pupil and teacher;
the method by which the entire class, with no slighting of individual aptitude, mas-
ters the keyboard together.

But it all comes down to just this: Here is the typewriting text 'which 'will serve
you best. New Standard Typewriting is now in wide use, in every case with the
most satisfactory results. Embodying ideas gathered from exceptional experience
and thorough understanding of actual classroom problems, it stands approved by
every test of expert opinion and practical demonstration.



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The Educator




Handwriting Christmas Cards

These cards have a strong penmanship appeal. They are admired by everyone who sees them because of the/
beauty and dash.

USE THESE CARDS THIS CHRISTMAS

Twenty-five designs to select from. They are different and distinctive. Postal card size, printed in black ink o
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EDUCATOR



1EVOTED TO PENMANSIIIE ENGROSSING AND
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America's Only Handwriting Magazine



COLUMBUS, OHIO, DECEMBER, 1940



National Handwriting Council



ie National Handwriting Council
meet jointly with the Department
lupervisors and Directors of In-
dian of the National Education
iciation in Atlantic City, New
zy, at the meeting of the Ameri-
A.ssociation of School Administra-

February, 1941.
ie Council will meet as a separate
on Wednesday morning, February
L941.



The members of the Executive Board
have endeavored at all times, to bring
before the Council speakers well-
known to the field of education. At
this meeting we are to have the
privilege of hearing Dr. Frank N.
Freeman, Dean of the School of Edu-
cation, Berkeley, California. Dr. Free-
man, well-known to all educators, will
bring to his audience a message of
vital importance under the title, "The



Function of Handwriting in the
Scheme of Education."

The meeting is open to all inter-
ested in the field of education. The
National Handwriting Council does
not lean toward any one particular
method but is interested in all.

Plan to make this a MUST AT-
TEND meeting. Your effort will be
rewarded.

Alma E. Dorst, President
National Handwriting Council




average American as he ap-
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mentality sweep over him.
ther it is real or temporarily as-
id we take an added interest in
! around us. We get a sincere
ure in bringing a mite of cheer
ur friends and neighbors. A
y "Merry Christmas and Happy
Year" greeting is welcomed by

i have enjoyed publishing this
izine for you during the past
and hope that its monthly visits
bring help and good cheer to
throughout the coming year.



THE LIFE WORTH LIVING

There is a life that is worth living
now as it was worth living in the
former days and that is the honest
life, the useful life, the unselfish life,
cleansed by devotion to an ideal.
There is a battle that is worth fight-
ing now as it was worth fighting
then, and that is the battle for jus-
tice and equality; to make our city
and our State free in fact as well as
in name; to break the rings that
strangle real liberty and to keep
them broken; to cleanse, so far as in
our power lies, the fountains of our
national life from political, commer-
cial, and social corruption; to teach



our sons and daughters by precept
and example, the honor of serving
such a country as America — that is
work worthy of the finest manhood
and womanhood. The well-born are
those who are born to do that work;
the wellbred are those who are bred
to be proud of that work; the well-
educated are those who see deepest
into the meaning and the necessity
of that work. Nor shall their labor
be for naught, nor the reward of
their sacrifice fail them; for high in
the firmament of human destiny are
set the stars of faith in mankind,
and unselfish courage and loyalty to
the ideal. — Henry Van Dyke.



THE EDUCATOR

;hed monthly (except July and August)
By The ZANER-BLOSER CO.,
612 N. Park St. Columbus, O.
LUPFER Editor

[ER ZANER BLOSER Business Mgr.



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, SI. 50 A YEAR

(To Canada, 10c more ; foreign 30c more)

Single copy, 25c.

Change of address should be requested
promptly in advance, if possible, giving the
old as well as the new address.

Advertising rates furnished upon request.



THE EDUCATOR is the best medium
through which to reach business college pro-
prietors and managers, commercial teachers
and students, and lovers of penmanship. Copy
must reach our office by the 10th of the month
for the issue of the following month.



Lessons in Handwriting



By E. A. LUPFER

Zanerian College, Columbus, 0.




e^z?S-^&u



Usually you must make application for a position in your own handwriting. You cannot afford to write poorly «
that first application. Get busy now and improve your handwriting.



'J%



Practice on each capital letter given in the Dictation Exercise. Write various difficult combinations of letters an
words.



See how freely you can swing into this sentence. The hand should rest on the little fingers.



9^^9t^^T^^%^ ^T^1^9£









fO






Kinky lines indicate a slow movement. Speed up to get a smoother line. Go freely but not carelessly.



The Educator




s copy gives practice on a free lateral movement. You will be surprised at the strength this kind of practice
I put into your work.




ictice on words, letters and combinations. Take each one separately and make line after line of it. Do not
tter your effort too much.



&&



petition is the secret of improvement. You may have to make many attempts at this letter before you get a
)d one. Don't give up.




!eep the down stroke of e straight. Get light in the loop.



10



The Educator



-^^^^ [email protected]&-ie-e -&n^is
-p^e^ ~p^3-& -^is^ -?-&-&

Check your position. Does the holder point toward the shoulder? Are your feet flat on the floor? Are yoi
shoulders even? How about your paper? Keep it directly in front of you. Re-read the instruction about pos
tion in previous issues.



Don't overlook the value of working on general exercises like the above. It will make your writing freer at
easier. Arm movement enables you to write longer and with less fatigue.



'7



'?77^ /



<?).



<n



s^yTSL/



/



Get a rolling over motion on M, N, m and n. Get turns where turns belong and angles where angles belong — thf
is essential for legibility. Pull all down strokes toward the center of the body.

Don't become discouraged if your first attempts are not satisfactory. Find out what is wrong, then keep on prac
ticing.



Frequently review the letters you studied in previous lessons. Watch movement, quality of line and slant.




Try a two space exercise occasionally. You need a surplus of movement and scope.



The Educator



11




actice Sales, Saturday, Sunday and similar words. If you have trouble with any letters in the words, practice
;m separately. You may have to make many pages of a letter before you master it.




practice the above paragraph observe what it says. Legibility is the most important quality of writing.




that your position is right. Have your teacher help you. Study illustrations of good handwriting positions.

Counf a.5 uol/ wr/'te .



V



l-J /-2-J



■2-3-*S /-i\^J_ /-2-J



ere we have a review of capital letters. Swing them along with a nice free movement. Use mostly arm move-
ent.

7,

ry the entire alphabet and compare it with what you did at the beginning of this course.



12



The Functional Learning of Spelling
and Writing



Is spelling being taught in the
schools today? Is handwriting as
important as was once thought ?
These are questions which have come
up in connection with discussions
concerning the newer trends in educa-
tion.

Let us consider briefly, the back-
ground of traditional practices and
the types of instructional practices
which are emerging in the immediate
present. The older education con-
sisted of the study-recite-test stereo-
type kind of work. The teacher took
care of the organization, did most of
the thinking, and alone judged the
success of the children. The children
were expected to follow directions
dictated by the teacher. A set cur-
riculum determined what should be
studied. The teaching was largely
mass teaching. Uniform methods



If every teacher is expected
to correct a pupil in his Eng-
lish whenever the opportunity
presents itself, why not work
out a plan whereby every
teacher of every subject will
show a similar interest in hand-
writing?



were used for all. There were few
experiences other than with books;
and question and answer recitations
followed their use. Spelling and
writing were taught in separate pe-
riods and were unrelated to the rest
of the work of the day.

In many schools all this has been
changed. The child is the center
about which everything is planned
and the whole child is considered.
The social, emotional, physical and
intellectual development are given
equal emphasis. Subject matter is
learned as children have need for it
— but it is not given first place.
Children's interests in the life about
them are considered and under the
guidance of the teacher these inter-
ests expand and are lifted to higher
and broader levels. There is much
flexibility in the curriculum and in
the methods used and these are
adapted to the needs of the partic-
ular group and individuals who make
up that particular group. In the
functional learning of spelling and
writing the needs for these skills
grow out of real experience based
upon the activities of the group.
Some of the enterprises in which
learners of various ages might be-
come engaged, are:

I. Studying the flowers, trees, or
birds native to the locality.



By Helen C. Howland,
Schenectady, N. Y.



II. Going' on excursions for defi-
nite purposes.

III. Caring for pets, giving atten-
tion to suitable diets and liv-
ing conditions.

IV. Observing and making records
of bird activities and their
nesting; recording the time of
arrival and of departure of
migrating birds as well as
keeping lists of different birds
observed in the locality during
a season.

V. Canning and preserving foods.

VI. Constructing a door bell.

VII. Building a telephone.

VIII. Exploring history to find
stories of men who have done
much to build up their country
or to find the beginnings of
situations which are significant
in life now.




Helen C. Howland



Mrs. Howland has enjoyed an
enviable reputation as a pen-
manship specialist. She has
gone about her work quietly
and efficiently.

A few years ago she came to
the Zanerian where she was an
honor student, and executed her
own certificate of graduation.
Mrs. Howland majored in Meth-
ods of Teaching Handwriting
and Supervision.



Many other activities which h
been developed might be listed
all such situations children will ;
that they need to make use of sp
ing and writing in order to carry
the activity.

When a child is stimulated by
environment and is challenged
what he is doing, he has many i
purposes for discussing, investif
ing and searching. If his exp
ences in and out of school are V'
to him, he will want to share
contributions with his group,
will want to express himself throi
the various avenues that he
learned to use.

In such living are opportunities
the child to learn to cooperate \*
others, to choose, to judge the wo
of his activities, to solve proble:
to make decisions and to set up



Get your pupils to see that £
paper poorly written is never as
good as it would have been, hac
it been well and neatly written
Show them the effect it ha9
upon the reader. Ask there
whether or not these impres
sions count.



ues, all of which are so necessary
full self development. It is in s
a setting that a functional use
spelling and writing develops.

First grade children have m;
experiences with composition 1
before they are able to write. W
a child's experience causes him
burst forth with enthusiastic cc
ment, the teacher seizes the opj
tunity to write his vivid sense
pression or colorful story on a paj
chart or blackboard. This may
read later to the child and to
group. Sometimes the author lea
to read his expression. Notes, lett
and other writing needs of the g:
are also recorded by the teacl
Oral language, discussion and pi
ning precede this recording. In t
way the young child builds an
cellent attitude toward writing,
understanding of purposeful writ
and a satisfaction in using words
express his ideas and emotions 1(
before he attempts to write.

It is the responsibility of the sch
to build this readiness for express)
When the child has no purpose
need for writing the teacher must
aware of situations that will stir
late the child to want to write. !
must watch for leads from the cl
and choose from among these lea
These may be starting points for r



The Educator



13



periences. When the teacher is
irt to introduce new points of view
d new experiences, the activity will
enriched as it develops. With
her living will develop real pur-
ses and needs for writing.
There is nearly always a wide
ige in abilities. For this reason
; first grade children ai-e not all
idy to begin to write independently
the same time. As soon as the
ung child is mature enough to do
he often wants to learn to write
i name in order that he may label
; drawings or materials. He may
int to write such words as
lother" or "father" on his valen-
ie, birthday or Christmas cards; a
le for a drawing or picture book
has made, or a letter or invitation
classmates or parents. As soon
he develops a bit of skill, words



Teachers should not confine
themselves to their individual
subject, but have the foresight,
and insight of education that
will prepare the pupil for his
future economic and social life.



interest to him, phrases and short
ntences of his own creation are
ten chosen. Very often, an entire
ntence may be his first choice, be-
use of some purpose. Little by
tie the child grows in developing

feeling for writing of words,
.rases and short thoughts, skill in
.ndling materials and facility in
filling and handwriting. The manu-
ript which is used by first and sec-
d grade children in many school
stems greatly simplifies the writ-

I:

When a child has many rich and
tal experiences he must have ave-
les of expression. One of these
rms of expression is oral and writ-
n language. Purposeful writing
(en, follows vital experiences. In
e upper elementary grades we may
id individuals or groups forming
ass or group outlines or plans to be
led in their studies. Letter writing
p actual purposes and written re-
nts of information obtained by ask-
g some person or from library
,urces are frequently developed,
ptebooks in which records of ex-
iriments are kept may be an aid in
e child's school life. There is often
; recording of impressions after a
ip or excursion, or rich experience
r the purpose of sharing them with
hers. There may be writing of an-
luncements and invitations to par-
its and friends, labeling of maps,
tarts or diagrams, the preparing of
aterial for a class newspaper, as
ell as the writing of original plays,
lories or verse.

When the child experiences chal-
nging situations, various forms of
ritten expression will hold meaning



and value for him. From his written
expression some of his spelling needs
may be determined. But instruction
will not cease with the mere correc-
tion of misspelled words. It is neces-
sary to determine the techniques that
the individual employs when he stud-
ies spelling, what weaknesses, if any,
are handicaps, what methods he uses
to help him attack the spelling of
new words, as well as procedures that
he develops to use available source
material as an aid in learning to
spell. The teacher must constantly
diagnose the child's errors and his
way of woiking and plan definite
help and practice for him in order
that there may be a continuous de-
velopment of good work habits, an
increased vocabulary and growth in
power to attack the spelling of new
words.

Tn this way of working the indi-
vidual develops a spelling vocabulary
to meet his particular needs. The
most common words necessary for all
expression will sooner or later be
used by all children. Each child has
a spelling booklet in which is written
the words he has needed to use and
study. These words are written on
pages, arranged alphabetically, as
soon as the child is ready to do so.
The young child may need to refer
to his spelling notebook again and
again for some of the common words
he is constantly needing. There is,
however, a place for drill in this way
of working. The child does not ob-
ject to it when out of his experiences
he feels the need. Some children
may be ready for certain types of
drill as early as second grade.



Online LibraryAuguste LutaudThe Educator (Volume 46) → online text (page 12 of 34)