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Thurber, especially because he never
dots his "i." Furthermore, his ini-
tials P. G. look like R. T., and I'm
certain yours were closer to Q. X.
than anything else.

Then there is Ralph Gregory. But
Ralph always runs his signature to-
gether so it looks like: Salsrslsrr
with a little hook at the end that
stands for "y." I played handball
with Ralph yesterday. He claims he
didn't send it. So that means you
aren't Gregory.

I'm equally sure you are not Bill
Williams. His signature looks like
one of those writing exercises we did
in the grade schools:



4Wftm<«*~



except for the two dots he puts in
at random. You couldn't be Bill.



I can't close without bringing in
L. L. Lewis. His signature starts
with two or three tall "l's" anil ends
with smaller ones that have tinned
to "e's," like this:



Jlltjv^



But you aren't Les. because he has
an advertising agency and wouldn't
be seen in an investment office. Still,
I'm very happy you remembered me.
"Q. X." In fact, I am so impressed
that I think we ought to have dinner
together Thursday. Meet me at my
office at fiv?.

Yours truly.



(Reproduced by special permission
of The Saturday Evening Post. Copy-
righted, 1942, by The Curtis Publish-
ing Company. Cuts were loaned to
us by The Wolf Envelope Company.
Cleveland).




A simple lesson in flourishing made by M. B. Moore. Practice the neck, body and wing stroke until
you can get the shape, proportion and location of shades. We suggest that you draw the head in pencil to
aid you in getting the proper shape. A flourish is not ve.ry attractive unless the head, eye and bill are well
drawn. Get plenty of snap into the shades.



24




ntehn



Pmutient
^ %trnuittnmd BiiitinriW lllarhinrs Curpnnitiun

V (TiuttimuT ^rntiiT llvpnrtxixmt

of the Chicago i9Hicc_ want to ^tnccreh

thank vou an5> the other tvccattvo<r

oi fl)c o'ntcrnational KmsineSiOllaehincs

Corporation for the manv i?picnoio policies

aooptc^ to insure our welfare ano security

•^ as well as the welfare ai^ security) oi our ram t lies.

Iiljl* increase in ohr salaries ai^ o'iu<uraucc ^oli-
H eies make us all verv proufc to he part of this
^reat oi;aa nidation.

jr plcbac our sincere tovaltv to you anfc to this
lousiness whieh Ave helieve is

3Ui jUnstttuttim that mill mi mi Thitiut

9Itorcli«,l9.'t -•




From the M. L. Harris Studio, Chicago, Illinois — it is a masterpiece.

abedtfghijk

Imnopqrstuv




SPEEDBALL LETTERING

In this alphabet Maxwell Heller shows the order m which the strokes should be made. Draw head and base
lines. Watch alignment, spacing and proportion.

The space inside of the letters c, o, p, q, etc., should be perfect ch'cles.
Use black heavy ink and watch your dipping of ink. Too little ink will make gray lines while too much ink
makes blots.



The Educator



25











Mr. Henning has been with the Cedar Rapids Business College for many years
the Zanerian College of Penmanship. Columbus, Ohio.



He originally took work at



EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT

Learn from the experience of oth-
ers and build lasting friendships by
joining the exchange club. The fol-
lowing members agree to send speci-
mens and exchange letters with any
other penmen:

George G. Borum
600 E. Reeves St.
Marion, Illinois

E. H. Van Patton
Avoca, New York

C. E. Heffelfinger

General Delivery
Jeannette, Pa.



ENGROSSING SPECIMENS
C. A. Romont, 83 Montgomery St.,
Boston 16, Mass., is greatly improv-
ing his engrossing work. Specimens
have just been received containing
some well made lettering and scroll
work in colors.




BUY WAR BONDS



Write (or our new Free Book,
' ' How to Become a Good
Penman." Enclose 10c for
a Professional Pen Point and
your name beautifully writ-
ten. Write today.
THE TAMBLYN SCHOOL
438 Ridge Building
Kansas City, Mo.



bemoniaiBibutftf
Resolutions
tf> Testimonial^ j
^Certificated of



~ JJJJJJ IT l UllUUI I

illuminated on porrhmrnt

KB enu champ

ifngrossrr Illuminator

35 5South6roabmau,

A V?os An$rt*<-(?aliforiuQ A




26



The Educator



C^y^^>^.^



2^Z%2-. - *^^A










&



<>^



'^<^-r1 — &



The top specimen was written by Muriel Greer. The second one was written by Hazel Buchholtz. Both are
students in the Minneapolis Business College and are taking penmanship work from J. A. Buell, the efficient pen-
manship teacher of that institution.










t?£-t



_'^> ,<tit-cir S £ - r •/









' J

iV////^>^ Edward Hic^kson



This specimen was written by Meredith Yeago, Dunsmore Business College, Staunton, Virginia. John R.
Eye is the penmanship teacher. Mr. Yeago is an unusually skillful, coming young penman.







The Educator



27



THE WOULD NEEDS MEN

There comes t<> me in visions of the

night
The schemes of men who compromise

with right:
For common usage mow proclaims as

pood
The evils which breed wealth in

plentitude.
The wrongs which are intrenched in

sordid greed
Behind the mask of profit, who will

heed ?
For practice makes acceptable the

laws,
And conscience seared by gold counts

not the flaws.

The world needs men; upright stal-
wart men

Who dare defend the right with voice
and pen:

The kind of men that money cannot
buy

Or promised fame: who will refute
the lie

That all men have a price; that if
the lure

Is big- enough, the best will not en-
dure.

There are true men who will not
count the cost

There are brave men or else the
world is lost.

The ethics of the present will not do:

Each age must write its business
laws anew.

The past has said that money was
success.

The future will be built on righteous-
ness.

And service to mankind will have re-
ward,

Esteem of men and "Well done"
from the Lord.

Then ring you forth the clarion call
again:

To build the better day: The world
needs men.

— Robert Holmes.



MUCH TIME IS LOST

We fee] that handwriting is a very

important subject and it doesn't re-
ceive the attention it deserves in our
public schools. Hardly a day goes by
in this office that we do not have dif-
ficulty in trying to decipher some
man's name due to poor writing. Fre-
quently we have the problem of try-
ing to decipher manuscript in long-
hand.

We recall very well the d»vs wb»"
we were in grade school the great
attention that was given to penman-
ship. We may be wrong but we
doubt very much if the students
in our schools today are given the
training in penmanship that was pro-
vided in past years. This is most un-
fortunate, states E. L. Newcomb, Ex-
ecutive President, National Whole-
sale Druggists' Association, New
York City.

Every boy and girl should be
trained to write legibly and quickly.
President Roosevelt once commented
on the large percentage of illiteracy
among the drafted men and said that
it was much too great. In a recent
newspaper, we notice where the Gov-
ernment has taken steps to reduce
illiteracy. Much valuable work is be-
ing done in adult educational classes.
Every man and woman should at least
be able to write his own signature
legibly. It is quite an inconvenience
in a busy office to receive a letter and
be unable to read the signature. On
many letters it is fortunate that the
signature is printed which helps o'
in guessing the identity of the writer.

. We would welcome the day when
the writer of illegible or scrawiy
signatures receives a severe criticism
and treatment much the same as he
receives when he commits a serious
breach of etiquette. After all, it's a
breach of etiquette when you incon-
venience others with illegible writing.



OUR REDBIRD FRIENDS

The- Redbird sings with all his heart

From high up in a tree,
Anil tho' he sings for all the world,

It seems it's but for me.

All through the bright sunshine of
.lay,
Or when the clouds ;n e gray.
He sends, "What Cheer! What
Cheer!" to all
To drive gloom away.

Most times, he and his dusky mate.

Sing love notes to each other;
Some times, the message that he
gives

Is a warning to another.

He and his bride select a home
In which to live, and then

He drives away to other grounds
All those who are his kin.

He dresses up in flaming red
From beak to near his toes.

And does not have to camouflage
For safety from his foes.

The female, too, can sing as well
As her bright-colored mate;

'Tis quite unique, her warbling, for
It's not a common trait.

All (iraise to these, our little friends.

Whose song of joy and cheer,
Ring out in crystal, bell-like, tones
Each day throughout the year.
— C. E. Chamberlin
San Marcas, Texas

Mr. Chamberlin is the teacher of
penmanship in Southwest Texas State
Teachers College, where hundreds of
teachers have come under his guid-
ance, and believe us, large numbers
of them have developed into excel-
lent penmanship teachers.

Mr. Chamberlin, a Pennsylvanian.
learned his penmanship here in Co-
lumbus, Ohio, but Texas gave him
his inspiration for poetry. — Editor.



ABCDEFGHIJ






KLMNOPQRS
TUVWXYZ

An alphabet by J. A. LaRoche, New England Mutual Life Insurance Company, Boston. Mass. This is a well
executed alphabet and one which deserves your careful study.

We suggest that you draw the alphabet very carefully making it twice as huge as shown. After you have
carefully penciled the alphabet, ink it in with India Ink.



28



The Educator



Merry Christmas to you all,

Each and every one;

Rapturous joy without alloy,

Radiant with fun.

Yuletide blessings to you all.

Children, young and old;

Holly wreaths and mistletoe

Reveries unfold.

Ivied festoons o'er the door;

Strands of fairy light;

Tinkling bells a-wishing all

Merry Christmas bright,

All the world, it seems to me,

Stirs with Yuletide memory.

D. B. Henry.




Advertising- cut by the Editor. Work for this cut was done with blacV
ink on white cardboard and the engraver reversed the center part of the
plate giving it the unusual black and white effect.







T*i-i '■ ..'■-.. ' ' ■ 1


.-


IN MEMORIAM







This beautiful piece of work was made by H. W. Strickland.




This greeting was sent to the Old Penman's Art Journal many years ago. It deserves a place in your scrap-
book. Most of you will recognize it as the work of C. P. Zaner.



The Educator



29







^^^c^L-^e^^^^x-^-^^c-^^i - -<e<!^^^^-^




Some individual letter forms which were made by C. P. Zaner. In doing penwork for the public, the penman
is frequently called upon to execute something- a little different. You will do well to try different styles.



30



The Educator



From A To Z in Ornamental Penmanship

Bv




Strayers Business College, Washington, D. C.




The Educator



31



'




s £ M






.c j* t3

& oj i



J3 0) OJ
IB A! >»

« 5 i






3g



ujsi £



-at! S~



■S a




25 Cards for 25c, postpaid.

Distinctly Individual - Handwriting Christmas Cards 1

These cards have a strong penmanship appeal. They are admired by everyone who sees them because of
their beautv and dash.

USE THESE CARDS THIS CHRISTMAS

Twenty-five designs to select from. They are different and distinctive. Postal card size, printed in black ink on
good heavy cardboard. Price on blank Christmas cards. 25c per set of 25, postpaid; 100 cards, $1.00; 500 cards,
$5.00; 1,000 cards, $10.00. A penman's Christmas Card for lc.

THE ZANER-BLOSER COMPANY

612 NORTH PARK STREET COLUMBUS, OHIO



VOL. 49 No. 5



Jibe Educator



JANUARY, 1944




Published monthly except July and August at 612 N. Park St.. Columbus. O.. by the Zaner-Bloser Company. Entered as second
class matter November 21. 1931, at the post office at Columbus. Ohio, under Act of March 3. 1879. Subscription SI. 50 a year.



The Educator



VISUAL SELF-HELPS



Showing Healthful Posture and Efficient Position:

1. For manuscript and cursive writing.

2. At the blackboard and the desk.

3. For both right- and left-handed children.




By Dr. Frank N. Freeman, Dean of the School of
Education, University of California

One set $1.50

Three sets $1.25 per set

All Postpaid.



/it Ccutf

"Picture Query"

PLAN of TEACHING
WRITING POSITION

Teachers of Handwriting

will find mat it

Simplifies Teaching — Keeps Pupils

Interested — Gets Excellent Results

It's VISUAL Teaching • It's POSITIVE Teaching



Published by



THE ZANER-BLOSER COMPANY



612 North Park Street



Columbus 8, Ohio




Stop at the

SEELBACH

we'll take care of
the REST

You needn't worry about a
thing.. .check in at the Seelbach

and you're sure of a good bed
attentive service, fine food and
a friendly atmosphere. Youll a-
waken in the morning refreshed
and ready for a successful day.
500 ROOMS WITH BATH
horn #0 50



WALNUT AT
FOURTH ST.



LOUISVILLE, KY.




HIGGinS

ETERNAL BLACK

WRITING INK

is proof against age, sun-
shine, fire and flood —
PERFECT for penmanship



Xr*^-




Higgins Eternal Black Writing Ink is a pure
carbon ink. It will last as long as the paper
on which you write with it. Its clarity and
jet -black writing make it ideal for instruc-
tions and use in penmanship. No line too
fine, no stroke too broad for its free flow
and opacity. It helps develop dignity and
character in writing.

In 2-oz. cubes, half pints, pints, quarts
and gallons. Ask your dealer, today.



HI G GUIS H



HIGGINS INK CO.. INC.



271 NINTH STREET, BROOKLYN N Y.



"nmad una



Mr. Webb is one of Mississippi's finest penmen. He hails from Meri-
il.m. This alphabet was dashed off quickly and is the type of work Mr.
Webb turns out in large quantities.



Booklet or Sheet Form — Artistic Designs —
Attractive Covers — Leather and Imitation.
Diploma Filling a Specialty S-nd for
Samples and Quotations.

Best Quality — Lowest Cost

HOWARD & BROWN

ROCKLAND MAINE



The Educator



LETTERING

its

HISTORY. PRINCIPLES & PRACTICE

by MATLACK PRICE

The Romance of Lettering giving the analysis
of letters of the alphabet, letter anatomy,
serifs and principles of letter spacing.
Roman, Mediaeval and 20th Century styles of
lettering in upper and lower case.

22 page booklet — per copy $ .50

Additional mailing charge .10



SUCCESS DRILLS IN
TOUCH TYPEWRITING

by CHARLES E. BATEN, Spokane, Wash.

Bold type, easy to read and follow.
Exercises developed to produce high
speed and superior skill in the min-
imum length of time.
Price 50c

The book offers a complete course covering machine
mastery, speed development, letter writing and difficult
exercises. 64 pp.

THE PALMER COMPANY 370 Atlantic Av.
Boston, Massachusetts



HOTEL

CLARIDGE

IS PREFERRED

The Clandge is the only hotel in St Louis with
tub, shower and circulating ice water in every
room. A superior hotel offering splendid ac-
commodations at ordinary hotel rates. . .Two
and one-hall blocks from Union Station, con-
venient to all points of interest. . .The Marine
Dininq Room — finort in town.

350 ROOMS FROM $2.25 parking

TUB, SHOWER AND RUNNING ICE WATER



LOCUST AT EIGHTEENTH



ST. LOUIS

MISSOURI



Fits any hand and any
pen or pencil.

Adapts itself t o any
system of writing.




FITS ANY PEN

Quickly and Easily Attached
to Pen or Pencil.



The Zaner^Bloser
Writing Frame

For Right and Left-Handed Persons



Ic makes writing interesting and the teaching
simple. Insures correct hand and wrist position,
arm movement and slant of penholder. By alter-
nating writing with the Frame, then without it,
pupils automatically acquire the correct hand po-
sition and arm movement necessary to good writ-
ing.

Every pupil in the room is interested in trying
it, to see how it works and feels, thus every pupil
becomes position conscious and a marked improve-
ment in handwriting is noted where students have
access to a Writing Frame. It is highly recom-
mended for students having extra trouble with po-
sition and for discouraging excessive finger move-
ment. It encourages good position and freedom of
movement.

Send 25c for this helpful Z-B Writing Frame, or
$2.40 for a dozen, net.



THE ZANER-BLOSER COMPANY



612 North Park St.



COLUMBUS, OHIO



The Educator



IMPROVE YOUR
HANDWRITING



Never before has there been a greater demand for good handwriting than today
and never before has the opportunity for improving your handwriting been better.
The Zanerian College of Penmanship offers you scientific, wellplanned courses
which can be taken by correspondence in

Tuition Supplies

Business Handwriting Course $10.00 $1.55

Roundhand or Engrossers' Script 12.00 2.60

Text Lettering and Engrossing 12.00 2.85

Advanced Engrossing 12.00 2.05

Ornamental Penmanship 12.00 3.10

The instructions are clear and to the point. They are the results of years of
study and actual experience in the classroom. The Zanerian has had an unequalled
experience in training professional penmen, engrossing artists and teachers of pen-
manship. A large percentage of America's expert penmen have received their
start in the Zanerian. You also can receive the benefit of their experience and skill
by getting under their instruction now.

A combination of fresh-from-the-pen, handmade and printed copies and instruc-
tions is used to good advantage. Enough of the handmade copies are given to sup-
ply inspiration and enough of the photoen graved copies are given and enable us to
give the course at an extremely low cost.

Send vour enrollment and remittance today to




Co/umbus, Oh/o

(512 NORTH PARK ST.



The Educator



_OUR GLOBAL WORLD

A Brief Geography for the Air Age

By

Grace Croyle Hankins

Dr. John W. Studebaker, U. S. Commissioner of Education, and other eminent edu-
cators are urging that American citizens become better acquainted with the realities of the
world through intensive courses in world geography. "Our Global World" was written
for such a course.

This text recognizes that the air age is rushing towards us with the speed of the
fastest plane. Already aviation has shrunk world distances almost unbelievably and has
reduced tremendously the transportation difficulties of mountains, oceans, and deserts —
in all parts of the world. It has become necessary for America to know global geography
in order to understand better the problems of the other nations of the world in war or
in peace.

The eight sections of Our Global World cover these topics: This Global World —
Maps and How to Read Them — The Topography of Our Global World — The Natural
Regions of Our Global World — The Climate and Weather of Our Global World — The
Natural Resources of Our Global World — The Population of Our Global World — The
Economic Development of Our Global World.

In addition, there are important appendices — -tables of global world statistics (land
areas, water areas, etc.), mountain peaks, mountain passes, islands, rivers, areas of bod-
ies of water — questions for each chapter — reading list by chapters — general- reference
reading list.

More than half the page space of this truly global text consists of fine maps and
striking pictures of areas and world products that are studied because of their world-wide
importance. From original concept, this book was designed to present the global view-
point.

The book should be used as a text for a brief course or for supplementary study
as a factual and inspirational aid in any social-science course. Ninety-six pages, nine by
twelve, beautifully bound in color, this is an attractive text for advancing world under-
standing by today's youth — tomorrow's citizens. See it at once.

Examination copy. $1 postpaid; regular list price. Si. 32

THE GREGG PUBLISHING COMPANY

New York Chicago San Francisco Boston Toronto London



America's Only Handwriting Magazine



Vol. 49



COLUMBUS, OHIO, JANUARY, 1944



\.. 5





* * * w

* * *




*







*


THE FOUR FREEDOMS





Message To The 77th Congress*




In the future days, which we seek to make secure, we






look forward to a world founded upon four essential






human freedoms.




*


THE FIRST: is freedom of speech and expression —
everywhere in the world.

THE SECOND: is freedom of every person to wor-
ship God in his own way — everywhere in the world.


*




THE THIRD: is freedom from want — -which translated


*





into world terms, means economic understanding


which will secure to every nation a healthy peace-






time life for its inhabitants — everywhere in the world.






THE FOURTH: is freedom from fear— which translated


+




into world terms, means a world-wide reduction of




armaments to such a point and in such a thorough




fashion that no nation will be in a position to com-




*


mit an act of physical aggression against any neigh-




bor — anvwhere.






FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT.




¥■




*






*






* *

* *






USE THIS IN YOUR HANDWRITING CLASSES.— (Editor.)





THE EDUCATOR

Published monthly te:;cept July and August)
By The ZANER-BLOSER CO..
612 N. Park St.. Columbus, O.

E. A. LUPFER Editor

PARKER ZANER BLOSER Business Mgr.



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE. 31.50 A YEAR

i To Canada, 10c more; foreign 30c more*

Single copy, 25c.

Change of address should be requested
promptly in advance, if possible, giving the
old as well as the new address.

Advertising rates furnished upon request.



THE EDUCATOR is the best medium
:hrough which to reach basiness college pro-
prietors and managers, commercial teachers
and students, and lovers of penmanship. Copy
must reach our office by the 10th of the
month for the issue of the following month.



The Educator





tmi/Ui



Handwriting For All Grades



By E. A. Lupfer, Columbus, Ohio.




The F is like T with a cross stroke. Get the cap directly over the stem. It should fit as though it were part of
the letter. Special attention should be given the compound curves. Stop on the sharp retrace.




The top and bottom loop of f should be the same size and slant. Keep the loops open. Stop at the joining on the
base line. Get a good i in your f.



C^~



tTT^ ^i&^l^^t^^y^- ^2L^^>i



'^U^.



Watch the slant, spacing and height. Draw slant lines down the back of each letter. All lines should be uniform.




Keep the back of I straight. Stop on the retrace. The I has two sections in which the spaces are equal. Backs
should be straight. Keep the top and bottom nearly the same in size. Avoid extremely large loops. The J should not

interfere with the letters on the next line.



^^\ /?,






fiJIQf ^W



I he Educator



//// //// ////////



1ZZ^7



1^4^





Learn to write your name and the names of the months neatly. Note i dots and punctuation marks.




T/tS



. . ^w^ 7/????79^7^ */79???^n^ 77797?^^^

, : ^79v7?iy7?v??v^7?v9?v 7^^9?v



Use an over rolling movement in making M. The first exercise encourages freedom. Run them along without
stopping. Swing freely and easily. The M runs gradually down hill at the top. Keep the letter on the base line.
Finish up like in i. See how many letters in the words rest on the base line.



The I is a tall loop. Keep it tall to be different from e. Back should be straight. Loop is full and clear.



^l^lMllll^l .J>



10



The Educator



^£^^^^^^^ ^M^




Practice words in groups and separately. Repeating easy words over and over enables you to center your atten-
tion on a few details at a time. Repeating words after you learn to write them well, serves to make permanent the
correct habit of writing.



f



P7T7 .



^^C^L^C>-t>LAy - ^77-24^



Lower loops are important. They should not interfere with the line below. Avoid closed loops. Watch the size
of j. Test the size with a ruler.



? oc°) ^°j #r? %v %;*> KV *)c

The K begins like H. The second part is joined to the first by a loop in the center. Study the spaces inside the
letters. You should get from 12 to 14 letters on a line if they are properly proportioned.



10%, 16 W?C -TO W)0 10 10 10 70

Z,*C*)C "10 96^6 16-7070 10 10 10 96

Mixing exercises and letters will help to develop freedom and form. Make both with the same speed. Pick out
the parts you can't do well and practice and study them.




The second part of k requires special attention. Study the little loop. Be sure your k is distinct from h.



The Educator



1 I




TIils is .1 review copy. It pays to review frequently the letters previously studied.




u]) all letters but one. If thai letter standing alone is not perfectly clear you need to improve it.
Find out what makes it hard to read. While each letter has semi- similarity to other letters, it also has some-



Online LibraryAuguste LutaudThe Educator (Volume 49) → online text (page 12 of 32)