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As A MAN THINKS



AUGUSTUS THOMAS
(From a portrait bust by Robert I. Aitken)



AS A MAN THINKS

A PLAY IN FOUR ACTS



BY

AUGUSTUS THOMAS




NEW YORK

DUFFIELD & COMPANY
1911




play is fully protected by the
copyright law, all requirements
oj which have been complied
with. In its present printed
form it is dedicated to the reading public only,
and no performance of it may be given, except
by special arrangement with the owner of the
acting rights, who may be addressed in care of
the publisher.



DUFFIELD & COMPANY



CAST

of the

First presentation at the 3Qth Street Theatre,
New York, March 1 3th, IQII.



The characters are named in
ance.

VEDAH . . .
Dr. SEELIG .
HOLLAND, Seelig s footman
BUTLER
Mrs. CLAYTON
JULIAN BURRILL .
BENJAMIN DE LOTA v
FRANK CLAYTON .
Mrs. SEELIG . .
SUTTON, Clayton s footman
Miss DOANE .
Judge HOOVER
DICK



the order of their appear-

CHARLOTTE IVES

JOHN MASON

. JAMES VINCENT

RALPH SAMONE

CHRYSTAL HERNE

VINCENT SERRANO

WALTER HALE

JOHN FLOOD

. AMELIA GARDNER

. W. B. SADLER

GAIL KANE

WILLIAM SAMPSON

RAYMOND HACKETT







ACT I.



AS A MAN THINKS



ACT ONE

\CENE: Drawing Room of the residence
of DOCTOR SEELIG. Two small sofas
set at right angles to the fireplace form
a kind of inglenook. At the outer ends
of the sofas are two marble pedestals,
each surmounted by an antique vase.

Time: An afternoon in late September. VEDAH SEELIG,
a young girl, is at the piano and playing. After a few
bars there is the sound of a door closing. VEDAH listens,
then speaks.




Papa?
Yes.
Alone ?



VEDAH.
SEELIG.
VEDAH.
SEELIG.



Alone. [He enters from the hall. VEDAH meets and
kisses him. ] Mother home?



She is lying down.



VEDAH.



10 AS A MAN THINKS

S E E L I G.

Is mother ill?

V E D A H.

Only resting.

S E E L i G.
Ah where is the tea?

V E D A H.
It isn t time.

S E E L I G.

[Regarding his watch.] Quarter of five.

V E D A H.
[Laughing."] But no company.

S E E L I G.

Company ? My dear Vedah. Tea with me is not a func
tion it s a stimulant. [He calls to a footman passing.]
Holland.

HOLLAND.

[Pausing at doorway.] Yes, sir.

S E E L I G.

Tell the butler some tea.
[HOLLAND goes.

VEDAH.
Now, Papa.

S E E L, I G.

[Affectionately imitating her.] "Now, Papa." You
want to drive me into dissipation.



AS A MAN THINKS 11

VE D A H.
But the others will think they re late.

S E E L I G.

I shan t grudge them that accuracy they are late. I
don t wonder at some of them, but I m astonished at
De Lota.

V E D A H.

[Pause.] DeLota?

S E E L I G.

Yes.

V E D A H.

Is Mr. De Lota coming?

S E E L i G.
I asked him to come.

V E D A H.

Why?

S E E L I G.

Meet your artist

V E D A H.

But, Papa

S E E L I G.
[Playfully. ] Well, scold me.

V E D A H.

But Papa.

S E E 1L I G.

First to famish for a little tea and then to be repri
manded for inviting a prospective son-in-law.



18 AS A MAN THINKS

V E D A H.

I don t want Mr. Burrill and Mr. De Lota to meet.

S E E L i G.
Not meet?

V E D A H.

Just yet.

S E E L I G.

Why not?

V E D AH.

I haven t told anybody of my engagement to Mr. De Lota.

S E E L i G.
Well?

VE D A H.
Well he carries himself so so

S E E L i G.
Proudly?

VE D AH.

So much like a proprietor that it s hard to explain to
others strangers especially.

S E E L I G.
By "strangers especially" you mean Mr. Burrill?

V E D A H.
Yes.

S E E L I G.

Is Mr. Burrill s opinion important?



AS A MAN THINKS 13

V E D A H.

His refinement is important.

S E E L i G.
Refinement ?

V E D A H.

Yes the quality that you admire in men the quality
that Mr. De Lota sometimes lacks.

S E E L I G.
When for example?

V E D A H.

I ve just told you.

S E E L I G.

Well, tell me again.

V E D A H.
When he gives the impression of of owning me.

S E E L i G.
[Pause.] But after all, isn t there a compliment in that?

V E D A H.
There s considerable annoyance in it.

S E E L i G.

Oh [A butler enters, gets tea table, which he places
center and goes out.] If you and De Lota announced your
engagement his manner might seem more natural to
strangers especially.



14 AS A MAN THINKS

V E D A H.

I don t wish it announced.

S E E L I G.
It was to have been announced in September, wasn t it?

V E D A H.
I know but I m waiting.

HOLLAND.
[Appearing in doorway and announcing. ] Mrs. Clayton.

[MRS. ELINOR CLAYTON, a blonde and blue-eyed
woman of delicate charm and distinction enters.

VE D A H.

Elinor! [Kisses her.~\ How good of you to come so
early.

ELINOR.
Doctor.

S E E L I G.

[Shaking hands with MRS. CLAYTON.] Elinor.

ELINOR.
[Seeing the empty tea table.] Am I the first?

V E D A H.

The very first.

S E E L i G.
If I m not counted.



AS A MAN THINKS 15

ELINOR.

You re first in every situation, Doctor. [To VEDAH.] I
hope to have a moment with your father before the others
call.

VEDAH.
Professionally ?

ELINOR.

Don t I look the invalid? How s your mother?

VEDAH.
Fine, thank you.

ELINOR.

And to see her on a matter about as unimportant as my
medical errand.

VEDAH.
I ll leave you together while I tell Mama.

[She goes out.

ELINOR.

[Sitting. ] When I came to see you last time ?

S E E L i G.

Yes?

ELINOR.
You told me the truth about myself?

S E E L i G.
My dear Mrs. Clayton.



16 AS A MAN THINKS

ELINOR.

Of course you did as far as you told me anything, but I
thought you might be withholding something.

S E E L i G.

I don t know a woman in better physical condition. [He
takes a chair beside her.

ELINOR.
Well, I want you to give me something to make me sleep.

S E E L i G.
Sleep!

ELINOR.
I wake about four in the morning and stay awake.

S E E L I G.
How often has this happened?

ELINOR.

Ever since I came to see you and a week before that.

S E E L i G.
M [Pause.] Anything troubling you?

ELINOR.
No.

S E E L I G.

Do you stay wide awake or only partly so?



AS A MAN THINKS 17

E L I N O E.

Awake.

S E E L I G.
Thinking?

E L I N O E.

Yes.

S E E L I G.

Of what?

V

E L I N O E.

Oh everything.

S E E L i G.
But principally ?

E L I N O E.

Principally [Pause.] That old trouble at Atlantic City.

S E E L i G.
Anything in Frank s conduct to revive that?

E L I N O E.

No but

S E E L I G.

What?

E L I N O E.

I think sometimes that I felt that trouble more than
any of us even I thought I felt it.

S E E L i G.
You forgave Frank, didn t you?

E L I N O E.

Yes but it was a good deal for a wife to overlook.



18 AS A MAN THINKS

3 E E L I G.

You mean you didn t forgive him?

E L i N o E.

I mean the hurt was deeper than I knew deeper than I
could know except as time taught me its depth.

S E E L I G.



Your thoughts on that are what wake you in the early

E L I N O E.



morning ?



And keep me awake.

S E E L I G.
Well, let s talk about it.

E L i N o E.

I don t wish to talk about it, Doctor.

[She moves to a seat near the window.

S E E L I G.

In surgery we sometimes find a condition where a wound
has healed too quickly and on the surface only. The treat
ment is to re-open it entirely. A mental trouble has its
analogy. Better talk of it. [He goes to a seat beside her."]
Frank was foolish. Under the law you might have aban
doned him to his folly. In that case, with his temperament
[Pause.] Two years? He d have been well "a fail*
ure" is too gentle a description. As it is, consider his ad
vancement in the two years his development power. All
due to your wisdom, my dear Elinor to your wisdom and
forbearance to your love for him [Pause.] That sums
it up you do love him.



AS A MAN THINKS 19

E L I N O E.

[Earnestly. ] Yes.

S E E L I G.

Frank is important he influences public opinion with his
magazines and papers. He addresses an audience of two
millions, let us say. In the great scheme of the world Frank
is a factor a big factor isn t he?

E L I N O E.

Yes I suppose he is.

S E E L I G.

[Cheeringly.] Well, there you are. Your abiding love
for him made all the difference between success and failure.
All the forces radiating from Frank really do so because of
your loyalty at a supreme moment. That s a large com
mission, isn t it? The fates made you their chosen instru
ment their deputy. If Frank hadn t needed help you
couldn t have given it, could you?

E LI N O E

Of course not.

S E E L I G.

[Rising energetically.] Well, don t regret having been
useful be proud of it.

ELINOR.

But a man who has once committed such a fault may do
go again.

S E E L i G.

[Pleasantly.] You re assuming that we learn nothing
from our mistakes we men.



20 &S A MAN THINKS

ELINOR.
Well, do you?

SEELIG.

[Smiling. ] As a physician I d hate to tell you how
much.

ELINOR.

I couldn t go through it again.

SEELIG.

You won t have to.

ELINOR.

[Going to SEELIG.] And you won t give me anything for
my insomnia?

SEELIG.
Isn t a point of view something?

ELINOR.
Yes, if I can take it.

SEELIG.

You did take it. I saw the care go out of those eyes
and the peace come into them.

ELINOR.

[Pause.] You re a dear. [She gratefully and impulsive
ly takes SEELIG S hand.

V E D A H.
May I come in?

SEELIG.
Fes.

[VEDAH enters.



AS A MAN THINKS 31

V E D A H.

Mama wants you to come up, Elinor.

ELINOR.
Yes [As VEDAH starts with her.] Oh, I ll go alone.

V E D A H.

But don t desert me entirely.
[ELINOR goes out.

S E E L i G.
Mama not coming down?

VEDAH.
No.

[The BUTLER enters with tea service lighted
lamp, etc., which he puts on the table and goes
out.

S E E L I G.

When did you first meet Mr. Burrill?

VEDAH.
With you at his exhibition.

S E E L i G.
That was in September.

VEDAH.
Yes.

S E E L I G.

[Pause.] Vedah, I want to help Mr. Burrill



22 AS A MAN THINKS

V E D A H.

He has a lot of talent.

S E E L I G.

I m going to take down my beautiful vases De Lota gave
us. [He caresses a vase on one of the pedestals.

V E D A H.
They re deadly

S E E L i G.

And put up Mr. Burrill s statuettes

V E D A H.

That s helping ourselves.

S E E L I G.

I m going to enlist Clayton in Mr. Burrill s fight with
the architects.

V E D A H.

That s "copy" for Clayton s.

S E E L I G.

But Mr. Burrill is [Pause.] not a Jew.

VE D A H.

[Pouring tea.] There s no race nor religion to art, is
there?

S E E L I G.

There frequently is to the artist. [Tenderly.] Careful,
my pet. Remember your happiness will be with your
own race.

[VEDAH gives SEELIG his tea.



AS A MAN THINKS 23

HOLLAND.

[Appears and announces. ] Mr. Burrill.

V E D A H.
Show Mr. Burrill in.

[HOLLAND goes.

S E E L i G.
Second call this week, isn t it?

V E D A H.

Yes.

S E E L I G.

You know, he has some rights.

VE D AH.
You mean ?

S E E L I G.

His heart

[Enter BURRILL, a young man of twenty-eight
years.

V E D A H.
Good afternoon.

BURRILL.
How do you do? [They shake hands*

S E E L i G.
How are you ?

BURRILL.
Fine, thank you.



24 !AS A MAN THINKS

S E E L I G.

Any more news of the court house decoration?

B u B B i L L.
Nothing different.

V E D A H.
How will you take your tea, Mr. Burrill?

B u E B i L L.

Submissively. I take it only because I admire its prep
aration.

S E E L, i G.

We still struggle along with our vases. [He indicates
the vases on the pedestals.

B U B E I L L.

I understand your reluctance to move them.

S E E L i G.
Only waiting for your statuettes.

B u B B i L L.
They haven t come?

S E E L i G.

No.

V E D A H.

I think they did, Papa. Something dreadfully heavy
came this morning.



AS A MAN THINKS 25

S E E L I G.

Well!

V E D A H.

I was afraid to unpack them.

B u R R i L L.
[Laughing.] They re bronze.

[VEDAH gives BURRILL his tea. She then goes to
the door and pushes the electric button.

S E E I, i G.

Do you know Clayton the publisher Clayton s maga
zine ?

B U R R I L L.

Reputation.

S E E L i G.
He s a live wire Clayton.

B u E R i L L.
Yes.

[The BUTLER enters.

VEDAH.
The expressman brought a package this morning?

BUTLER.
Yes, M m two statues.



VEDAH.
How do you know?



26 AS A MAN THINKS

B TJ T L E E.

I opened it.

V E D A H.

You opened it!

BUTLER.
[Looking to SEELIG.] Mrs. Seelig told me to open it.

V E D A H.
Mama told him to open it. Would you have thought it?

SEELIG.
[To BURRILL.] How was the box addressed?

B U R R I L L.

To you.

SEELIG.
[Dryly."] I "would have thought it yes

V E D A H.

Bring the statuettes here.

BUTLER.
They are in Mrs. Seelig s room.

V E D A H.

I ll go with you and get them Excuse me
[VEDAH and the BUTLER go out.

SEELIG.
I ve asked Clayton to drop in on his way uptown.



AS A MAN THINKS 27

B U R R I L L.

I shall be glad to meet him.

S E E L I G.
Mr*. Clayton is here. Have you met her?

B U R R I L L.

No.

S E E L I G.

She was a Miss Hoover. Judge Hoover s daughter.

B u R R I L L.

[Nodding.] The newspapers keep one pretty well in
formed.

S E E :L i G.
Unfortunate, that notoriety.

B U R R I L L.

Can t be agreeable.

S E E L i G.
Prosperity tries a man more than poverty does

B u R R i L L.
So I ve read

S E E L, i G.
Clayton makes two millions a year from his publications

B u R R i L L.
Think of it !



28 AS A MAN THINKS

S E E L I G.

His temptations were proportionate to his sudden success
and well, she is a most sensible woman.

B u u u I L L,
Forgave everything I believe.

S E E L i G.

Not too meekly I assure you but they have a little
boy and as I say she is a most sensible woman. As for
Clayton well I guess Clayton is sufficiently contrite.

VEDAH and the BUTLER re-enter, the BUTLER
carries two bronze figurines.

VEDAH.

[Indicating a pedestal.] I think the girl on that pillar
And the man on that one

S E E L I G.
I d put the girl here

VEDAH.
Why?

S E E I, I G.

See it first. [He takes the female figure from the BUT
LER who places the male figure on the floor and goes out.

VEDAH.
She s too darling for anything.

S E E -L i G.

[Placing the statuette on the ted table. ] Your figures are
even handsomer here, than at the exhibition.



AS A MAN THINKS 29

B TJ R R I L L.

The room helps them.

S E E L I G.

[With the statuette which he displays."] Look, Vedah!
Isn t she graceful in every view?

VEDAH.
She is.

S E E X, I G.

Do you know your nymph reminds me of those stunning
little things by Theodore Riviere?

B u B, R i L L.

That s very interesting. The girl that posed for this
was a model for Riviere.

S E E L, i G.

[Playfully.] Well, there you are I shall set up as a
connoisseur.

VEDAH.
You promised to bring her photograph.

B u R B i L L.
I have brought it.

S E E L i G.
[Half anxiously. ,] But posing?

BTTRBILL. \

Oh, no street costume.



30 AS A MAN THINKS

S E E L I G.

Oh

B TJ B, R I L L.

There [He takes a photograph from his pocket and
hands it to VEDAH.

S E E L, i G.

[Sitting comfortably. ] I don t know why sculpture is so
much more modest than photography but it is.

B u R R I L L.
The artist is a mediator.

S E E L i G.
Does that explain it?

B u E m L L.
Doesn t it?

S E E L I G.

I don t know I ve never been an artist.

VEDAH.
Nor a photographer.

S E E L i G.
Nor, for that matter, a beautiful female model.

VEDAH.

[Carrying the photograph to SEELIG.] See, Papa isn t
that face angelic?



AS A MAN THINKS 31

S E E L I G.

It is It is [To BURRILL.] And I dare say the lady
herself was [Indicates abandon.

BURRILL.
No she wasn t a bad sort. She has a right to the face.

V E D A H.

[With girlish enthusiasm.] Those eyes, Fapa! And
that beautiful nose and mouth. Why, anybody could love
her.

BURRILL.
Well a good many did.

V E D A H.
Of whom does she make you think?

S E E L i G.
Some player.

I

V E D A H.

Duse.

[SEELIG nods.

B u E R i L L.
The resemblance is often remarked.

4
V E D A H.

She should have been an actress.

BURRILL.
[Shaking his head.] She tried acting and failed.



AS A MAN THINKS

V E D A H.



Did you see her?



B u E R i L L.



Before my time. Antoine gave her a very good chance in
his theatre, but she was only a model.

.S E E L I G.
Yes, if Antoine couldn t make her act.

[VEDAH returns the photograph to BURRILL.

B u R R i L L.

But a fine girl for all that warm hearted most grate
ful to the man who had got her the chance.

VEDAH.

Well, if anybody got me a place in Antoine s theatre I d
be grateful. [She returns to the statuette examining it
closely.] I m sorry we can t see her mouth.

S E E L I G.

You can t? [Also examines the statuette.

BURRILL.

No our early Greeks played with those pipes tied to the
face.

VEDAH.
I m going to put her on her pedestal.

BURRILL.
Let me. [He takes the statuette from the table.



AS A MAN THINKS 33

V E D A H.

Take your old vases, Papa.

B u B, R i L L.

Old vases !

S E E i, i G.

[Taking the vases from the pedestals.] The finest speci
mens in America, Mr. Burrill.

B u R R I L, L.

Exquisite where did you find them.

S E E L I G.

Benjamin De Lota brought them from Genoa. De Lota
does art and music for Clayton !

B u E R i L L.
Charming.

S E E L i G.

I shall promote them to my library. [He goes toward
the door.] I I regard them somewhat as a bribe.

BURRILL.
A bribe?

V E D A H.

[Expostulating.] Papa !

S E E L I G.

De Lota gave them to me and in the same interview
asked me to to become his father-in-law an intimate and
antique relation a time-honored method. [Regards vases.]
Ah, well. [SEELIG goes out through the library door.



34 AS A MAN THINKS

B TJ R R I L L.

[Dashed with the news] His father-in-law.

V E D A H.

You hadn t heard? [BURRILL shakes head, avoiding her
gaze.] Why, yes. [Pause] May I pour you some more
tea?

BURRILL.
No, thank you. [He walks away.

E D A H.

Do you know Mr. De Lota?

BURRILL.

No.

V E D A H.

He wrote that beautiful notice in Clayton s about your
work.

BURRILL.
[Moodily at window] I know his articles, of course.

V E D A H.
Shan t we put up the dancing man too?

BURRILL.

[Rousing himself] Let me. [He puts the male figtirine
on the second pedestal.

V E D A H.

They go well there, don t they?



AS A MAN THINKS 35

B U R R I L L.

Very well.

V E D A H.

Attendant spirits of my fireside.

B u R R i L L.
They are honored.

V E D A H.
Do -ou know why I like them?

B u R R i L L.
Why?

V E D A H.

[Impressively. ] They are just a girl and a man noth
ing more with their pan pipes their freedom the joy of
existence

B u R R i L L.
[Forcing a gayety.} That sounds like paganism.

V E D A H.
I am a pagan.

B U R R I L L.

And the gentleman?

V E D A H.

Mr. De Lota?

B U R R I L L.

Yes.

V E D A H.

Mr. De Lota is a Jew.



36 AS A MAN THINKS

B U R R I L L.

[Pause. ] Well, I m a pagan myself a Walter Pater
pagan.

VE D A H.

Oh, yes. I, too, must have the sunshine, the poetry, the
festivals.

B u R R I L :L.

And you saw somewhat of that in my little figures?

V E D A H.



Yes



B IT B- R I 1.



You hinted as much that day at the exhibition thou
sands had walked by and looked at their catalogues but
y OU on iy y OU interpreted them. I can t tell you how
much that meant to me.

V E D A H.
I wonder if you know that we [Pause.

B U R R I L L.

We what?

V E D A H.

Were never introduced to each other.

B u R R i "L L.

I hug that to my memory.



AS A MAN THINKS 37

V E D A H.

A friend offered but I fibbed. I said I knew you al
ready. An introduction would have been well [Rises
impatiently.

B U R R I L L.

What?

VE D A H.

A straight- jacket on your dancer. [She pauses and
comes near him.] But it has been wrong to make you call
here, hasn t it?

B U R R I L L.

Has it?

VE D A H.
Tell me.

B U R R I L L.

[With renewed fervor. ] Not if they are really to be the
attendant spirits.

VE D A H.

[Evading his manner and going to the first statuette.]
Why did you get her a place in Antoine s theatre?

B u R R i L L,.
I didn t.

VED AH.
Then how do you know she was grateful?

B U R R I L L.

The man who got her the place afterwards committed
committed a crime and was on trial in Paris. Mimi had



38 AS A MAN THINKS

then become a model and was posing for Riviere and me
and other artists. She dragged us Antoine Riviere me
everybody to the court house in a frenzied effort to
free him.

VE D AH.

Maybe she loved him.

B u R R i L L.

I think not simply gratitude for his interest. But that s
a rare virtue.

[MRS. ELINOR CLAYTON returns to the room.

V E D A H.

Mrs. Clayton, may I present Mr. Julian Burrill, the
sculptor.

ELINOR.
Mr. Burrill. [She gives BURRILL her hand.

V E D A H.
Mrs. Clayton is the Mrs. Clayton.

ELINOR.

You must look as though you knew.

BURRILL.
My struggle is to conceal,, my knowledge

ELINOR.

[To VEDAH.] All that you ve told me of him seems to
be true.



AS A MAN THINKS 39

B U R E I L L.

So quickly?

VEDAH.

One or two lumps? And look at my Greek playmates.

E L i N o E.

[Seeing the statuettes. ,] Charming. [To VEDAH.] Two
please. [She turns to the dancing nymph.] Think of want
ing to vote when one may do that.

B U E E I L L.

Exactly.

VEDAH.
And cream?

E LI N o E.
Lemon please. [To BURRILL.] You re a dangerous man.

B u E E i L L.
I?

E L I N O E.

With that degree of flattery.

B u E E i L L.
That s a servile portrait.

E L I N O E.

Really?

VEDAH.
Show Mrs. Clayton the photograph.



40 AS A MAN THINKS

B U R R I L L.

[Pflm ngr the photo to ELINOR.] Model.

ELINOR.
I know this woman.

V E D A H.
Resembles Duse.

ELINOR.
In Paris.

B U R R I L L.

Yes.

ELINOR.
She writes for the papers.

B IT R R I L L.

I hardly think writes for the papers.

ELINOR.

French papers yes. And she represents Mr. Clayton s
publications.

B u R R I L L.
I shouldn t have thought it.

VE D A H.
You ve met her?

ELINOR.

A moment yes in this same hat and gown. [She hands
the photograph to VEDAH.] Mr. Clayton said she spoke
no English though she understood it fairly. Frank intro
duced her as a writer she smiled assent



AS A MAN THINKS 41

B u E a i L L.

[Reclaiming the photograph.] Possible.

HOLLAND.
[Entering and announcing.] Mr. De Lota.

[BENJAMIN DE LOTA enters. He is a tall ag
gressive and intellectual Spanish Jew of thirty-
five years or so.

[HOLLAND goes out.

V E D A H.

Good afternoon.

D E LOTA.
[Taking her hand with much manner.] Vedah.

V E D A H.
Mrs. Clayton you know?

D E LOTA.
Yes how are you.

[ELINOR nods to him.

VEDAH.
And let me introduce Mr. Burrill.

D E LOTA.

Mr. Burrill. [The men shake hands.
B u E n i L L.

[Seriously.] I ve an impression of having met you in
Paris.



AS A MAN THINKS

D E LOTA.

I m often there.

V E D A H.



Some tea?



D E LOTA.



Not any, thank you. [To ELINOR.] I thought Frank
was to be here?

ELINOR.
He is.

D E LOTA.

Good. [To BURRILL.] Doctor Seelig has told Frank
Mrs. Clayton s husband about your row with the archi
tects.

B u E R i L L.
I hardly call it a row.

D E LOTA.

Better call it a row and make it a row or you ll never get
a chance at the big sculpture. Once let a ring do all the
work and you young fellows can starve or be journeymen.
Thank God, Clayton s a Westerner, believes in the open
shop.

B u R R 1 1. L.
We want his influence, but not to involve him.

D E LOTA.

Magazines must print something. [He goes to ELINOR.]
Frank will clasp him and his row to our bosom with hooks
of steel, won t he?



AS A MAN THINKS

E LIN OP

How do you spell steel?

D E LOTA.

I follow the market. [To VEDAH.] Where s Papa?

V E D A H.
Finding the post of honor in his library for your vases.

D E LOTA.
[Noting the pedestals.] Oh yours?

B u R R I L L.
Yes.

D E LOTA.
[Regarding the dancing girl.] Charming.

ELINOR.
Does she impress you as a co-worker?

D E LOTA.
Co-worker no co-respondent yes.

ELINOR.
I mean as a fellow member of the profession?

D E LOTA.
Which profession?

ELINOR.

Journalism.



44 AS A MAN THINKS

D E LOTA.

By nothing except the willingness to increase her circu
lation.

V E D A H.

Mrs. Clayton says the lady represents your magazine in
Paris.

D E LOTA.
I dare say I m dull but ?

B u R R i L L.
Not the statuette the model Mimi Chardenet.

D E LOTA.
Mimi Chardenet Europa?

B U R R I L L. .

Yes.

D E LOTA.

Was Mimi your model? [BURRILL nods.] I might have
known it. [He turns admiringly to the bronze.

ELINOR.
Why do you say "Europa?"

D E LOTA.
Mimi was "Europa" at the Quat z Arts ball this year.

ELINOR.
Europa mythological, isn t it?



AS A MAN THINKS 45


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