Copyright
Augustus Thomas.

As a man thinks; a play in four acts online

. (page 3 of 6)
Online LibraryAugustus ThomasAs a man thinks; a play in four acts → online text (page 3 of 6)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Does any woman?

* B u R R i L. L,.

[With quick look about. ] You know, if there weren t so
many doors here [Approaches her.

V E D A H.
[Retreating.] No

[CLAYTON re-appears on stairs.



AS A MAN THINKS 85

B tr R R i L L.

[Changing the subject.] And all originals. [Indicates
the framed sketches.

VE D A H.

So wonderful to have them, isn t it?
[Enter CLAYTON.

CLAYTON.
Boy s certainly not himself.

V E D A H.

Poor child.

[SUTTON enters.

S tr T T o N.
[Announcing. ] Dr. Seelig.

[Enter SEELIG. He is in evening dress and wears
a cloak.

SEELIG.

Good evening Frank. [Shakes hands with CLAYTON.]
Mr. Burrill.

BuRRILL. j\

Doctor.

SEELIG.
[To VEDAH.] Sorry to be late. Where s Mama?

CLAYTON.

With Dick complains of his throat. Have you time to
look at him?



86 &S A MAN THINKS

V E D AH.

Certainly.

S E E L i G.
What is more important? Go up?

CLAYTON.

[Nodding. ] The nursery. [SUTTON takes SEELIG S
cloak and hat.

S E E L i G.

Get ready, my dear. [Goes into hall and upstairs with
CLAYTON.

V E D A H.

[Resuming the interrupted talk with BURRILL.] But
write to that girl.

BURRILL.
[Smiling.] I did say I loved you.

VE D AH.
A month ago.

BURRILL.

Yes.

V E D A H.

And now?

BURRILL.
There isn t any stronger word or I d use it.

V E D A H.

[Seriously."] It isn t a thing a man says to a girl be
trothed to another man is it?



AS A MAN THINKS 87

B U R R I L L.

Not generally.

V E D A H.

That is another proof that you recognize Mr. De Lota
as that man of the court room. You must do something.

B u R R i L, L.
[Easily."] Does it really matter?

V E D A H.
Matter ? Why we re engaged aren t we he and I ?

B u R R 1 1, L.
I ve said I love you.

V E D A H.

Yes.

B U R R I L L.

And you ve listened to it because you love me.

V E D A H.

[Pause.] Well?

B U R R I I, L.

[Shaking head.] Not Mr. De Lota. I shall marry you
so what difference does it make what he did in Paris?

V E D A H.

I know my father. Mr. De Lota is of our faith, there
would have to be good reason for breaking with him now.

[CLAYTON comes downstairs with MRS. SEELIG.



88 [AS A MAN THINKS

B u B, R i L L.

Breaking the engagement would mean no distress to
you?

V E D A H.

[In half coquetry.] Why have I listened to you?
[Enter MRS. SEELIG and CLAYTON.

MRS. SEELIG.
[Getting her wrap.] Not ready?

V E D A H.
Where s Papa?

MRS. SEELIG.

We are to send the car back to him. He wants to wait
a while with Dick.

V E D A H.
Excuse me. [Goes to hall.

CLAYTON.
[To MRS. SEELIG.] Can I help you?

MRS. SEELIG.
It s very easy, this cloak.

[CLAYTON assists VEDAH with her wrap.

B u R R i L L.
Allow me. [Holds cloak for MRS. SEELIG.



AS A MAN THINKS 89

MRS. S E E L, I G.

[To CLAYTON as she goes.] I won t say anything to
Elinor until Doctor comes.

VE D A H.

Good night. [Gives hand to BURRILL and goes out with
MRS. SEELIG.

[CLAYTON and BURRILL come down to the fire
place.

CLAYTON.
Wonderful man with children, this Seelig.

BURRILL.
I thought principally surgical cases?

CLAYTON.

He s at the head of the hospital for crippled children
but great in diagnosis medicine anything.

BURRILL.
Heidelberg, Miss Vedah tells me.

CLAYTON.

[Getting a cigar.] Postgraduate yes but New York
family. Father left him ten millions.

BURRILL.
Might have struggled through with that.



90 AS A MAN THINKS

CLAYTON.

His heart makes him a doctor. If ever I go to Heaven
and that old Jew isn t there I ll ask for a rain check.

B u E E I L L.
[Lights cigarette.] I understand they receive Jews.

CLAYTON.

Heaven? [BURRILL nods.] Yes very carelessly man
aged. Sit down. Judge Hoover will be here presently
he tells me you re acquainted. [He sits as BURRILL takes
a chair.

B u R E I L L.

[Nodding. ] We meet at the Club.

CLAYTON.
Mrs. Clayton s father.

BURRILL.
I know.

CLAYTON.

I d have had Judge to dinner but [Pause.] How long
you been in the Club?

B U R E I L L.

Two years only.

CLAYTON.
Perhaps you know?

BURRILL.
What?



AS A MAN THINKS 91

CLAYTON.

The way Hoover s resisted the admission of Jews? He
hates em.

B u R R i L L.
No.

CLAYTON.
Blackballed Seelig. What rot, eh?

B U R R I L L.

Foolish antipathy.

CLAYTON.

I love em not the cheap ones. I hate cheap Yankees
and cheap cattle of all kinds but a classy Jew with edu
cation and culture

B U R R I L L.

I agree with you.

CLAYTON.

While we think in vulgar integers they think in com
pound fractions.

B U R R I L L.

True.

CLAYTON.

Damn it [Looks about in playful caution.] I m so
wrong that I like their noses.

B u R R i L L.
[Laughing.] Not all of them.



92 AS A MAN THINKS

CLAYTON.

Yes, all of them. Dismiss your Jprej ufo^e ~f or a while.
See how insignificant our average Scandinavian and North
Europe noses become. [BURRILL nods.] But don t tell
father-in-law Hoover you like em.

BURRILL.

[Laughs.] I won t. [Seeing SEELIG who re-appears on
the stairs.] The Doctor.

[CLAYTON and BURRILL rise. SEELIG enters.

SEELIG.
Don t disturb yourselves, gentlemen.

CLAYTON.
How do you find him?

SEELIG.

[Pause.] I ll look at him again when he s quiet. I
hope some of the trouble may be only excitement.

CLAYTON.

Cigar?

SEELIG.
[Shakes head.] Thank you.

CLAYTON.

[Standing by the fire.] His mother tells me a singular
thing. She was holding Dick s hand as he napped on her
bed this afternoon babies him a good deal. She was
reading to herself an old book of Stockton s some
treasure-trove men carrying sacks of gold from cave to



AS A MAN THINKS 93

ship. Dick suddenly waked sat up and said: "Where
where s all that money?" Elinor said., "What money?"
Dick said "that gold those those men had!" Reading to
Tier self!

SEELIG.

[Easily. ] Yes. [Pause.] The connection between
mother and child is more subtle, more enduring than our
physiologies even suggest.

[SEELIG and BURRILL sit.

CLAYTON.

Elinor invited the Underwoods to the opera or I don t
think she would have gone herself.

SEELIG.
Courtlandt Underwoods?

CLAYTON.
Yes.

SEELIG.

Mrs. Underwood s suddenly ill. That s where I was de
layed this evening.

CLAYTON.
Too ill to go out?

SEELIG.
Oh yes.

CLAYTON.
[Thoughtfully.] M m.



94 AS A MAN THINKS

SEELIG.

[To BURRILL.] Doesn t the opera attract you?

B u R R i L L.
Yes, but more important business here.

CLAYTON.
Those architects have sued us.

S E E L I G.

Sued you?

CLAYTON.

[Nodding. ] Libel. My editor insinuated graft in the
sculpture awards and they jumped us.

S E E L i G.

[Laughing.] Well. [Looks to BURRILL.] You insur
gent artists are getting prompt action.

BURRILL.
Yes I feel a little guilty at involving Mr. Clayton.

CLAYTON.

[Reassuringly.] We ll take care of that. [To SEELIG.]
The Judge is coming to confer with us Judge Hoover.
[SEELIG nods. HOOVER appears in hall.] Ah here he is.

HOOVER.
[Removing his overcoat.] Hello, Frank.



AS A MAN THINKS 95

CLAYTON.

Waiting for you. [Meets Hoover who comes into room.
SEELIG rises. ] Dr. Seelig, you know.

H O O V EE.

Good evening.

SEELIG.
Judge.

H o o v E E.
How are you, Burrill?

B u E E i L L.

Good evening [Shake hands.
[Enter SUTTON.

S u T T o N.
Automobile for Dr. Seelig.

SEELIG.

Tell him to wait, please.
[SUTTON goes.

C L A T T O N.

[Answering HOOVER S look.] Doctor s been good
enough to stay and see Dick.

H O O V E E.

[Anxiously.] Boy sick?

SEELIG.
These sudden fevers; can t tell immediately.



96 AS A MAN THINKS

HOOVER.

[To BURRILL.] Poor little Dick when he s ill it gets
me right in the stomach. Man s an idiot to have grand
children.

S E E L i G.
Still a pardonable weakness.

HOOVER.

[To BURRILL.] I did a stupid thing. Left the copies
of those letters you sent me the photographs all at my
office.

BlJRRILL.

Originals are at my studio only two blocks. [Starts
out.

CLAYTON.
[To HOOVER.] Do we need them?

HOOVER.

Better have them.

BURRILL.

Won t be five minutes.
[Goes out.

HOOVER.
Doctor, may Dick see his grandfather?

[Miss DOANE appears down the stairs.

S E E L I G.

I m waiting for him to get quiet, but
[Miss DOANE enters.



AS A MAN THINKS 97

HOOVER.
No, you re the boss.

MlSS DOANE.

Doctor.

S E E ]L I G.

Ready?

[Miss DOANE nods. SEELIG goes with her and
upstairs.

HOOVER.

[Alcne with CLAYTON.] Nearly scared me out of a
year s growth.

CLAYTON.
Dick?

HOOVER.

Seelig. I feared you d asked him to sit in this confer
ence.

CLAYTON.

[Shaking head.] I know your prejudice too well for
that.

HOOVER.

Not him expressly but the whole breed and it isn t
prejudice. Observation and experience.

CLAYTON.
I ll chance em.

HOOVER.

Chance is the word. This libel suit s a proof of it.

[Gets a cigarette.



98 AS A MAN THINKS

CLAYTON.
An Irishman wrote the editorial.

HOOVER.

[Nods.~\ On information furnished by a Jew. Wasn t
it?

CLAYTON.
De Lota! Yes but De Lota s pretty cautious.

HOOVER.

[Shaking head in disapproval.] Bad lot I know him.
Hell get in some nasty scandal before he finishes and it ll
react on your business.

CLAYTON.

Why do you say that?

HOOVER.
A rounder stamping ground the Great White Way.

CLAYTON.

His contract s the Great White Way he does art and
music for us.

HOOVER.

I passed his side street hotel on my way here. De Lota
sneaking in with a girl.

CLAYTON.
[Easily.] Guess you re mistaken. >



V

AS A MAN THINKS 99

HOOVER.
I called him.

CLAYTON.

His hotel? [HOOVER nods. ] De Lota stops at the Du
cal Apartments.

HOOVER.

[Nods. ] Ducal Apartments?

CLAYTON.
That s a bachelor place women not admitted.

HOOVER.
Not admitted nor permitted after eleven o clock.

CLAYTON.
I d hate to know as much about this town as you do

HOOVER.

Wait till you re my age.

CLAYTON.

[After a disarming pause. ] What kind of a girl?

HOOVER.

Didn t get her number she scooted ahead.

CLAYTON.

You spoke to him?

HOOVER.
Called to him.



100 AS A MAN THINKS

CLAYTON.
Called?

HOOVER.
Yes I was forty feet away.

CLAYTON.
Had your nerve with you.

HOOVER.
The girl dropped something I thought it was a fan.

CLAYTON.
Well?

HOOVER.
Twasn t but that s why I called De Lota.

CLAYTON.
How do you know it wasn t?

HOOVER.
I picked it up.

CLAYTON.
What was it?

HOOVER.
A libretto.

CLAYTON.
What libretto?

HOOVER.

Don t know but grand opera I remember that and
libretto.



AS A MAN THINKS 101

CLAYTON.
You threw it away?

HOOVER.
No kept it.

CLAYTON.
Where is it?

HOOVER.
Overcoat pocket.

CLAYTON.

[Pause.] I d like to see it. Think I could have some
fun with De Lota.

HOOVER.

[Going up to hallway.] My idea too fun and word of
caution. [Gets coat and returns feeling in pocket for
libretto.

CLAYTON.
C aution naturally,

HOOVER.
Here it is. [Reads] Aida.

CLAYTON.
[Taking libretto savagely] Aida let me see it.

HOOVER.
What s the matter? [Puts coat on a chair.



AS A MAN THINKS



CLAYTON.

[In sudden anger, throws book.] The dog! Damn him
damn both of them!



H O O V E E.

What is it? See here Who s with Dick?

CLAYTON.

Not his mother no! [Points to libretto on the floor.]
Marked. I did that myself, not an hour ago, and gave it
to her.

HOOVER.
To Elinor?

CLAYTON.

[Catting as he rushes to the hall.] Sutton! Sutton!

HOOVER.
Hold on, Frank there s some mistake.

CLAYTON.

[Gets overcoat and hat.] Get me a cab never mind
I ll take Seelig s machine. [Disappears.] Here! Doctor
Seelig says to take me to [He goes out. Door bangs.

[SUTTON enters from dining room.

SUTTON.
Is master Dick in danger, sir?

HOOVER.
[Nervously.] I don t know, Sutton. Where s his mother?



AS A MAN THINKS 103

S U T T O N.

Opera, sir.

HOOVER.
With whom?

S u T T o N.
Mr. De Lota.

[Enter SEELIG from upstairs.

HOOVER.

That ll do.

[SUTTON goes.

HOOVER.
Doctor Seelig.

SEELIG.
Judge Hoover.

HOOVER.

Mr. Clayton was summoned hurriedly he took your
automobile.

SEELIG.
I m glad it could be of service.

HOOVER.
I ll get you a cab. [Goes to telephone.

SEELIG.

I m not going, thank you simply sending a prescription.
[Starts toward push button.

HOOVER.
Perhaps you d better go Doctor Seelig.



104 AS A MAN THINKS

S E E L I G.

[Stopping.] Why so, Judge? I ve a very sick little
patient upstairs.

HOOVER.

Your pardon! But [Pause. ] Mr. Clayton s just had
some disturbing news . The I think the family would
rather be left to themselves this evening.

S E E i, I G.

I shan t intrude past professional requirement believe
me. [Rings.

HOOVER.

I do believe you! Doctor. [Nervously getting his coat
from the chair.] You and I are not especially intimate
but in your own sphere of usefulness I respect you.

S E E L I G.

Thank you.

HOOVER.

A physician is not unlike a lawyer in his relations to his
client. [SEELIG nods.] I ask you to treat sacredly and with
discretion any matter that comes to your knowledge here
tonight.

SEELIG.

My obligation to do that, Judge Hoover has a firmer
anchorage than even your request.

HOOVER.

I know it excuse me. Clayton s news bears on me,
too, a little.

[Enter SUTTON in response to SEELIG S ring.



AS A MAN THINKS 105

HOOVER.

Sutton Mr. Burrill will return. Say that important busi
ness has called me away.

SUTTON.
Yes, sir.

HOOVER.

And we ll make another appointment.
[Quickly goes out.

S E E :L I G.
Sutton

SUTTON.
Yes, sir [Returns.

S E E L i G.

Is there someone who can take this prescription to the
druggist and wait for it?

SUTTON.
Yes, sir.

S E E L i G.
And go quickly?

SUTTON.
Yes, sir.

S E E L I G.

Frazer s.

[SUTTON nods and leaves.



106 AS A MAN THINKS

S E E L I G.

[At phone.] Bryant 6151. [Pause regards watch.]
Hello Frazer s? [Pause.] Doctor Seelig. I m send
ing a prescription by messenger from Mr. Frank Clay
ton s. Will you please fill it as promptly as possible?
[Pause.] Thank you. [Hangs up phone.

[BURRILL and SUTTON appear in hall. BURRILL
carries a package of papers.

SUTTON.

Mr. Clayton and Judge Hoover have been called away.
Judge Hoover said he d make another appointment.

[SUTTON and BURRILL enter.

BURRILL.

Oh [Pause.] Well I ll leave this envelope for them
they may care to see it when they come in. [Seeing SEE
LIG.] How s the boy,, Doctor?

SEELIG.
Quite ill poor baby.

BURRILL.

Too bad [To SUTTON.] I ll speak with the Doctor a
moment. [SUTTON bows and goes out.

BURRILL.
You have a minute or two?

SEELIG.

[Still seated at phone table.] I ve sent for some medi
cine and am free until it comes.



AS A MAN THINKS 107

B U E R I L L.

[Approaching.] I want to thank you, Doctor, for your
interest in my work.

S E E L I G.

It s been a pleasure, Mr. Burrill.

B u R R i L L.
It s been a lesson to me.

S E E L i G.
Lesson ?

B U R B I L L.

[Nodding. ] I m reprehensively ignorant on most sub
jects, especially religion and well your interest in
sculpture your toleration of it surprised me.

S E E L, i G.
Why?

BURRILL.

I d always thought there was something in your tenets
that forbade any graven image.

S E E L, i G.

Only as objects of idolatry I think. The words are:
"Nor bow down and worship them." As works of art I
don t know any prohibition. My dear old father was a very
orthodox believer closed his office on Saturday and all
that but he was a liberal patron of the arts. In fact, I
don t know a Jew among a fairly extensive circle that
feels as you as you feared, Mr. Burrill.



108 AS A MAN THINKS

B u R E i :L L

You are not so orthodox as your father then?

S E E L i Gk
Not orthodox at all.

B u R R i L L,
I got a contrary impression.

S E E L i G*
From Judge Hoover?

B U R R I L !,

From Miss Vedah.

S E E L I G

Vedah?

B U R R I L L,

Yes. It is of her I wish to speak.

S E E L I G.

Ah!

B U R R I I, I,.

I wouldn t speak of her if if I didn t think a mistake
was being made^ Dr. Seelig.

S E E L i G*
A mistake!

B U R R I L IA

Yes I mean that my own feelings are not my sole guide.
I think that Miss Vedah likes me.



AS A MAN THINKS 109

S E E I, I G.

I m glad you see it. I have cautioned her myself and
now perhaps you will aid me.

B u R R i L L.

I speak to you about it as a matter of honor. You

you ve been so ready to invite me to your house and all
that and

S E E L I G.

And to tell you early of Vedah s engagement?

B u R R I L L.

Yes so my duty is to be a trifle old fashioned^ if you
will and to tell you that I mean to increase her regard
for me all I can.

S E E L i G.
Her regard? Only that?

B U R R I I, L.

I ve no right to speak for her so

S E E L I G.
Has Vedah said more?

B u R R i L, L,.
I ve said more. She knows that I love her.

S E E L I G.

You told her so?

B U R R I L L.

Yes.



110 AS A MAN THINKS

S E E L I G.

Then this caution to me is somewhat late, isn t it?

B u R R I L L.

But unavoidably. If I didn t think she cared more for
me than for the man to whom she s engaged, I don t think
I d have spoken.

S E E L, i G.
You mean to me ?

B U R R I L L.

To either of you.

S E E L, I G.

Why not first to me?

B U R R I L L.

Until I was sure there was no need to distress you, as I
felt you would be, as I feel you are. [Walks away as hav
ing said all that is possible.

S E E L I G.

[Pause, slowly rises and approaches BURRILL.] In
asking your patient understanding, Mr. Burrill I am
fortunate that you are a sculptor.

BURRILL.
How so, Doctor?

S E E L i G.

Most sculptors think in large symbols. The little span
of human life takes its true proportion.



AS A MAN THINKS 111

B U R R I -L L.

This life is all I m sure of. I fear its rather important
to me.

S E E -L I G.

It s all any of us is sure of. [Pause."] I m not a re
ligionist, Mr. Burrill but [Pause. ,] It has been wisely
written, "Of all factors that make races and individuals
what they are the most potent is religion." It would be a
very sorry world without it.

BURRILL.
There can be more than one religion, however, can t there?

S E E L I G.

There should be. Even to grind corn there must be two
millstones. And for the world to grow in religion there
must be more than one idea. [Pause. ] The belief in one
God is the trust given to the Jew the precious idea of
which every Jewish woman is custodian and which to trans
mit the Jew suffers and persists. You see, Mr. Burrill,
that there is something here to think of.

BURRILL.
Yes.

S E E L I G.

The Christain faith itself needs our testimony. It is
built upon our foundation arid .^whenever a jaughter quits
us the religious welfare of the whole world is the loser.

BURRILL.
I don t see that.



AS A MAN THINKS



S E E L I G.

Pardon the pride, which our proverb says "Goes often
before a fall" and let me call your recollection to the nobil
ity of this trust which a Jewish girl abandons if she mar
ries elsewhere] [BURRILL nods.] [A pause.] When Egypt
worshipped Isis and Osiris and Thoth, Israel proclaimed
the one God. When India knelt to Vishnu and Siva and
Kali, Israel prayed only to Jehovah and down past Greece
and Rome, with their numerous divinities from Jove to
Saturn, Judah looked up to one God. What a legacy what
a birthright ! How small our personal desires grow in com
parison. As a sculptor, who writes in bronze that all time
may read, what message can you leave if one so grand as
this fails of your respect?

BURRILL.
It has my respect sir.

S E E L i G.

I was sure of it. Is it too much to ask that a girl
shall have time to think of this?



No, sir ! I shall say nothing to her more than I have said,
which is I love her and I know she loves me.

[SEELIG bows slowly, BURRILL respectfully ac
knowledges the bow.

[ELINOR enters excitedly, sees BURRILL and SEE-
LIG and quickly passes to the music room.
HOOVER comes in.

HOOVER.

[Nervously.] Mr. Burrill you will have to excuse Mr.
and Mrs. Clayton tonight?



AS A MAN THINKS 113

B U R R I L L.

I know good night. [Goes quickly out.

[HOOVER turns helplessly toward SEELIG, who
with a gesture of comprehension, goes upstairs.
As SEELIG goes, ELINOR enters by the other
arch.

ELINOR.
Don t leave me, father. [She walks excitedly.

HOOVER.

I won t. But I m not only your father I m an attorney
a counsellor. Let me have the truth, Elinor. The door
was locked?

ELINOR.

[Sitting. ] De Lota locked it in sheer playfulness. I
was begging him to open it when Frank came.

HOOVER.
But why there at all? Why in De Lota s rooms?

ELINOR.

Just plain madness. Twice at dinner the conversation
got onto Mr. Burrill s sculpture. Frank has had an affair
with Burrill s model. [Rises and walks; throws her cloak
onto the table.

HOOVER.

When ? Not since the trouble of Atlantic City ?

ELINOR.

This year in Paris I ve made him almost admit it. De
Lota introduced them. Tonight when we found the Under-



114 AS A MAN THINKS

woods couldn t go and we were alone for the evening,
De Lota and I he proposed seeing some Japanese carv
ings he has in his rooms.

HOOVER.

But, Elinor you re not an infant. A proposal of that
kind is only a mask for lawlessness.

ELINOR.

I am lawless. He claims the right to follow his fancy,
and does follow it my right is equal. He introduced me to
this very woman on the Boulevard but I didn t strike her,
did I?

HOOVER.

Did Frank strike De Lota?

ELINOR.

Like a cheap bully. [The front door is slammed violently.
[CLAYTON enters, pale with excitement.

CLAYTON.

You came here, did you?

ELINOR.

Why shouldn t I? You haven t made it such a sanctified
temple that I m unworthy to enter it.

CLAYTON.
[To HOOVER.] She can t stay.

HOOVER.

[Going to CLAYTON.] See here, Frank. You re in no
state of mind to make any important decision.



AS A MAN THINKS 115

CLAYTON.
The facts make the decision

HOOVER.
You haven t got the facts?

CLAYTON.

I ve got all I can stand and we won t vulgarly discuss
them. I decline to live with an adulteress.

E L I N o 11.

I m not that but I am an indignant and cruelly neglect
ed woman.

CLAYTON.

She s your daughter. Now take her from my house or
I ll have the servants do it!

[Strides into the music room.

E L I N O E.

[Impetuously.] Coward! His house

HOOVER.

Elinor that s not the way.

/
ELINOR.

I haven t worked in his office but every step in his suc
cess we consulted and agreed upon . His house! You know
that every investment

HOOVER.

He doesn t mean it. He s excited beyond control any
husband would be.



116 AS A MAN THINKS

ELINOR.
In every tight place it was your legal advice that

HOOVER.

We can t go into that now, my dear. Humor him avoid
i scene before the servants. I ll take you to a hotel arid

ELINOR.

Hotel! The cruelty of it turned like a common woman
onto the street. [Sinks overwhelmed into a chair.

HOOVER.

Only a day or two. If things were only as you say at
De Lota s we can get Frank to believe us

ELINOR.
After what I ve forgiven him! Oh, dad

HOOVER.

Don t don t! Change your gown and we ll go. To
morrow will put another color on everything. [Helps her
up and leads her protesting toward the hall.

ELINOR.

[Resentfully. ] The injustice of it ! The cruelty !
The

[SEELIG comes downstairs and meets HOOVER and
ELINOR in the doorway.

SEELIG.
Pardon



AS A MAN THINKS 117

HOOVER.

[Trying to pass.] Mrs. Clayton isn t well.
[SEELIG enters.

SEELIG.

[Taking ELINOR S hand.] I see but come from the hall.
Dick will hear you.

ELINOR.
Dick?

SEELIG.

Yes.

ELINOR.

Dick s ill? I ll go to him.

SEELIG.

[Restraining ELINOR.] One moment [To HOOVER.]
You go to him.

HOOVER.
The situation here, Doctor

SEELIG.

I think Judge Hoover, I comprehend the situation here,
please go.

[HOOVER goes upstairs,

ELINOR.

[As SEELIG brings her further into the room.] I can t
leave without seeing my boy.

SEELIG.

Leave ! [Slowly.] No no but you must be calm when
you go to him. There must be no excitement whatever.



118 AS A MAN THINKS

ELINOR.

[Hysterically.] I can t be calm and go away from him
if he s ill. You know the boy,, Doctor. How much we are
to each other all his life I ve never neglected him.

S E E L i G.
I know.

ELINOR.

It s too much to bear [Falls weeping into the chair at
fireplace.

[CLAYTON enters.

CLAYTON.

[With suppression.] If there s any man, Doctor, your
people should have run straight with I m the man.

S E E L i G.
My people?

CLAYTON.
[Pointing to ELINOR.] Locked in Ben De Lota s rooms.

S E E L I G.

My people! [Pause.] A Jew!

CLAYTON.
[Vehemently.] A Jew.

S E E L i G.

[Pause.] There was another Jew if one of His people
may quote Him [Puts hand on ELINOR S head.] "Are you


1 3 5 6

Online LibraryAugustus ThomasAs a man thinks; a play in four acts → online text (page 3 of 6)