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Augustus Thomas.

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to cast the first stone?"



AS A MAN THINKS 119

CLAYTON.

I m no hypocrite I never subscribed to his code and
111 not begin the living hell of life with a dishonored
woman.

ELINOR.

[Rising defiantly.] I m not dishonored. I only claim
the right you exercise for yourself to go where life interests
me. If it s honorable and moral for you it s equally hon
orable and equally moral for me.

CLAYTON.

Every right you may possibly claim you have fully earned
by your visit to Ben De Lota s room. I m going to make
your equality complete. From now on, you ll protect your
self and you ll earn the substance your vanity squanders.

ELINOR.

Ah!

S E E L I G.

[Interrupting ELINOR S outburst.] One moment don t
speak, my child. [Pause. Calms ELINOR to her chair.]
Your difference must wait. Just now Mrs. Clayton must
be composed.

CLAYTON.

[Explosively.] We re past the consideration of her
nerves. Just now Mrs. Clayton must take what she needs
for the night and leave her trunks will follow her. [Goes
to the push button and rings.

S E E L i G.
[In masterful calm.] No Frank she shall not leave.

CLAYTON.
She ll not



120 AS A MAN THINKS

S E E L I G.

She shall not.

CLAYTON.
[Angrily. ] What have you got to do with it?

S E E L i G.

Every thing ! There s a little boy upstairs no one shall
move him until I give permission,, and his life for the next:
few days will depend on the mother that gave it him.

[Enter SUTTON.

CLAYTON.

[Pause.] SUTTON [Pause SEELIG looks sharply and
steadily at CLAYTON.] pack my valise and send it to the
Club.

SUTTON.
Yes, sir.

[Goes out.

CLAYTON.

[Leaving the room.] Good night, Doctor Seelig.

SEELIG.
[Quietly.] Good night.

[ELINOR still seated turns weeping to SEELIG who
embraces her paternally*

CUKTAIN.



ACT III.




ACT THREE

CENE: Library in house of DOCTOR
SEELIG. Door at back lets into Drawing
Room which formed the first act. An
other door to left lets into the hallway.
Large diamond paned and leaded win
dow with seat at right. Mantel and fire
place are at back. Over mantel is picture of Judith. Other
pictures are heavily framed on wall. Book-cases height of
mantel are at all walls. The ceiling is carved and heavily
beamed. Near window is library table with lamp. In front
of table and masking it is heavy sofa. Pig easy chairs fiank
and half face the fire. A second table has a telephone. On
mantel are DE LOTA S two vases. Other ornaments com
plete shelf furniture. General tone of scene and carpet is
red and gold.

At Rise of Curtain BURRILL is discovered waiting.
[HOLLAND enters.

HOLLAND.
Miss Seelig will be down immediately.

B U R B I L L.

Thank you.

[Exit HOLLAND.

[ BURRILL scans the book shelves.

[VEDAH enters.

123






AS A MAN THINKS

V E D A H.

Julian! [Extends both hands.

B TJ R R I L L.

My sweetheart! [Jfo*gs her.

VE D A H.
Together after all the talk and tears and family councils.

B u R R i L L.
Have there been tears?

V E D A H.
[Nodding.] Some.

B U R R I L L,.

You poor dear.

V E D A H.

I ve tried so hard not to care for you.

B u R R i L i>.
Have you? [They sit together on the sofa.

V E D A H.

Yes. Read the persecutions of my ancestry and blamed it
all on yours and then said, with Mercutio, "A plague on both
your houses."

B u R R i L :L.

I hope you are as incurably smitten as Mercutio was
when he said that.



AS A MAN THINKS 125

V E D A H.

I think I must be. Wasn t there something about a church
door?

B u R R i L :L.

You angel!

V E D A H.

Our critics write that the vice of our race is display.

B u R R i L L.
Well?

V E D A H.

And I fear it s true. I have a great envie to have the
noted American sculptor in our box and all the opera glass
es saying,, "Vedah Seelig! She s caught him at last."

B u R R i L L.
Have you manoeuvred greatly?

V E D A H.
Shamelessly not even introduced to you.

B u R R i L, L,.

I know it but we ve met, haven t we? [Kisses her.

V E D A H.

[Resisting tardily. ] That isn t being done, you know,
until the engagement is announced.

B U R R I L. L.

How does one tell ?



126 AS A MAN THINKS

VE D A H.
I suppose one doesn t tell?

B u R R i L, ~L.
What have you been doing since I saw you?

V E D A H.
Home mostly. You know Mrs. Clayton is visiting us?

B u B it i L, L.
Mrs. Clayton?

V E D A H.

And little Dick. He has the room that was my nursery.
I ve spent a lot of time with Dick.

B u R R i L, ~L.
And what operas what parties?

V E D A H.
Twice to the opera.

B u R R i i, L,.
With?

V E D A H.

Mama. Then once to the theatre.

B u R R i L L,.
With?

V ED AH.

Mama and papa.



AS A MAN THINKS

BURRILL.

No suitors? [VEDAH shakes her head.] Not even one?

V E D A H.
You mean have I seen Mr. De Lota ?

BURRILL.

Well?

VEDAH.
He is out of the city.

BURRILL.
Oh.

[MRS. SEEHG enters.

MRS. SEELIG.
Vedah !

[BURRILL and VEDAH rise.

VEDAH.
Mama.

MRS. SEELIG.
Mr. Burrill. [Gives hand.

BURRILL.
Mrs. Seelig.

MRS. SEELIG.
You didn t tell me Mr. Burrill had called.

VEDAH.
Did you wish to know?



128 AS A MAN THINKS

Mas. S E E i, i G.

Of course. [She goes to the telephone. ] Give me 2500
Plaza, please. [Pause.] I want to speak to Doctor Seelig
if he s there. [Pause.] Mrs. Seelig.

V E D A H.

Why do you want him, Mama?

MRS. SEELIG.
You ll see in good time.

V E D A H.

[To BURRILL.] A girl never grows up in her mother s
mind.

MRS. SEELIG.

Yes. That you, Samuel? [Pause.] Will you be home
soon? [Pause.] Well, nothing important except
[Pause.] Mr. Burrill is here and I thought I d ask him
to wait for you [Pause.] No [Pause.] No well I
think it much better for you to do it yourself [BURRILL
and VEDAH quickly exchange glances and BURRILL comically
interests himself in the books]. Perhaps but are you com
ing? [Pause.] Thank you. [Hangs up phone,

VEDAH.
What is it?

MRS. S E E L I G.

You know [To BURRILL.] Sit down, Mr. Burrill
[MRS. SEELIG and VEDAH sit together.] Vedah s father and
I have had a good many talks about about you and Vedah.






AS A MAN THINKS 129

B U R R I L L.

Yes?

MRS. S E E L i G.
We haven t *always agreed.

B u R R i -L L.
I m sorry to be the cause of any difference.

MRS. S E E L i G.

It s Doctor s fault. I ve always said to him, don t invite
any men to your house in whom you wouldn t be willing to
see your daughter interested.

V E D A H.
But Mama, Papa didn t invite Mr. Burrill.

MRS. S E E L i G.

I know, but Papa was with you. That was the time for
him to have been firm. And not go locking the stable
after

V E D A H.

Oh, Mama, don t make me into a stolen horse.

B u R R 1 1, L.
No see what I d be.

MRS. S E E L i G.
[To VEDAH.] You d better listen.

BURRILL.
Pardon.



130 AS A MAN THINKS

MRS. S E E L i G.

Vedah s our only child, Mr. Burrill, and my first wish is
to see her happy but

V E D A H.

Mama means that any unhappiness of mine wouldn t
matter if she had another daughter.

MRS. S E E L i G.
Mr. Burrill understands me, I m sure.

BURRILL.
I do, Mrs. Seelig.

MRS. SEELIG.
But Doctor and I agree that Vedah should think calmly.

V E D A H.
That s expecting a good deal.

MRS. SEELIG.

The Doctor is going to well, not let you see so much
of each other, and I want to prepare you, Mr. Burrill, for his
talk with you.

[Enter HOLLAND.

HOLLAND.
Mr. De Lota and Judge Hoover.

MRS. SEELIG.
Judge Hoover ! Excuse me. [Follows HOLLAND out.



AS A MAN THINKS 131

B U R R I L L.

Mr. De Lota?

VE D A H.

Yes. And now with Papa going to talk you haven t
informed yourself about that Paris affair.

B u R R i L L.
I wouldn t talk that no matter what I knew.

V E D A H.

It s on my mind all the time.
[Enter MRS. SEELIG.

MRS. SEELIG.

You go to the living room [VEDAH and BURRILL start
out.] I ll join you. [VEDAH and BURRILL go to drawing
room.] Come in, gentlemen.

[Enter HOOVER and DE LOTA from the hall.

HOOVER.
Some years since we met, Mrs. Seelig.

MRS. SEELIG.
Yes [To DE LOTA.] You ve been away, Benjamin?

D E LOTA.
[Nods.] How is Mrs. Clayton s son?

MRS. SEELIG.
Doctor says he may go out in a day or two.



AS A MAN THINKS

D E LOTA.
[To HOOVER in tone of congratulation. ] Ah!

HOOVER.

It s been very good of you^ Airs. Seelig, to have him and
his mother here.

MRS. S E E L i G.

A change of surroundings and Dick s always called me
Auntie. [ELINOR enters by the door from hall.

ELINOR.
Father !

HOOVER.
My dear. [Kisses her.

MRS. S E E L i G.
We shall see you later, Mr. De Lota?

D E LOTA.
Oh yes yes.

[MRS. SEELIG goes into the drawing room closing
the door after her.

ELINOR.
You two come here together.

HOOVER.
I brought Mr. De Lota yes.

ELINOR.

Why?



AS A MAN THINKS 133

HOOVER.

Sit down, my dear. It s going to take more than a min
ute. [ELINOR sits. ] And you [Ds LOTA sits. ] When
have you heard from Frank?

ELINOR.

[Anxiously rising.] Don t they know where he is?

HOOVER.

Good Heavens, Elinor don t answer my question by ask
ing another.

ELINOR.
But don t they?

HOOVER.
Don t who know where he is?

ELINOR.
Anybody.

HOOVER.
Hundreds I suppose but have you heard from him?

ELINOR.

No.

HOOVER.
Doesn t he ask after little Dick?

ELINOR.
He phones Doctor Seelig every day.

HOOVER.
But you?



AS A MAN THINKS

ELINOR.
No. [Pause.

HOOVER.

Frank has instructed Colonel Emory to begin suit.

ELINOR.

You mean?

HOOVER.
Divorce.

ELINOR.
Oh!

HOOVER.
You expected it, didn t you?

ELINOR.

Not after his conduct with this second woman this sculp
tor model in Paris.

HOOVER.
That wasn t condoned, eh?

ELINOR.
Not after I discovered it.

HOOVER.
What what proof have you of that affair?

ELINOR.
He admitted it.

HOOVER.
[Quickly.] He did?



AS A MAN THINKS 135

ELINOR.

Almost.

HOOVER.
I fear "almost" won t go in court.

E L, i N o R.
And Mr. De Lota knows it. He told me so.

D E LOTA.
[As HOOVER turns to him.~\ My opinion.

HOOVER.
You told Mrs. Clayton that, did you.

D E LOTA.
My opinion yes.

HOOVER.

Have you and she met since Clayton and I came to
your hotel?

D E LOTA.

No.

HOOVER.

Communicated? [De LOTA shakes head.] Oh then you
told her this opinion of yours with an idea of its influence
upon her?

D E LOTA.

I answered her questions.

HOOVER.
And a damn fine mess you ve made of it.



136 AS A MAN THINKS

D E LOTA.

Perhaps Judge Hoover, we d better get to the purpose
of our call.

HOOVER.

Perhaps. [To ELINOR.] I don t need to tell you,
Elinor, that this thing s awkward for me.

E L I N O R.

I know.

HOOVER.

The other side can subpoena me and my testimony can t
help you [Pause.] If we go about it rightly, however,
Colonel Emory thinks Frank can be persuaded to let you get
the decree.

ELINOR.
No.

HOOVER.

No?

ELINOR.

The reason for not getting a divorce two years ago is
much greater now.

HOOVER.

You mean ?

ELINOR.
I mean Dick.

HOOVER.

It s better for Dick to have the blame fixed on his father
than upon you.

ELINOR.
I m not guilty.



AS A MAN THINKS 137

HOOVER.

My dear Elinor, I m your father and and I believe
you but [Pause. ] I m an attorney and I have been a
Judge. The case is against you.

ELINOR.
[To DE LOTA.] You know I m not a guilty woman.

D E LOTA.

I do but your father is right. We must face the situa
tion as it is. I love you, Elinor. [Comes to her.

ELINOR.
[Recoiling.] Don t say that to me.

HOOVER.

My dear, I ve brought Mr. De Lota here that, unpleas^
ant as it is, he might say it in my hearing.

ELINOR.
You?

HOOVER.

Yes. If we can t arrange it as Colonel Emory proposes
[Pause.~\ Mr. De Lota s willing to marry you.

ELINOR.

Oh! [Covers her face in revulsion.
HOOVER.

[Soothing her.~\ Don t don t do that. It isn t what any
of us hoped for some years ago but it s a devilish sight
better, my dear, than it all looked last month.



138 AS A MAN THINKS

ELINOR.

There can t be such injustice in the world that he may
go unscathed and little Dick and I no no I can t live
and have it come to that. I won t consent to any such
arrangement of it all.

HOOVER.
It s little Dick I m asking you to think of.

ELINOR.

He s all I am thinking of. He s like his father it s his
father s name he ll carry through his life and I m riot going
even to propose to blacken it.

HOOVER.
What are you going to do?

ELINOR.
Defend myself defend my boy s mother.

HOOVER.

Against the boy s father?

ELINOR.

Yes.

HOOVER.
And if the court gives Clayton a decree of divorce?

ELINOR.

Then I shall live live so that he ll see some day he was
mistaken.



AS A MAN THINKS 139

H O O V E E.

There s one point we musn t overlook. Dick s hew old?

ELINOR.
He s seven.

HOOVER.
The court may award his custody to Clayton.

ELINOR.

^Greatly agitated.] Oh no! Father! They won t they
can t do that.

HOOVER.
I don t know.

ELINOR.
You can think arrange some way to avoid that.

HOOVER.

I have thought of one way you won t listen. If we can
persuade Clayton to be the defendant, that settles it. If
we fight him as you propose,, his anger may lead him to taktf
the boy.

ELINOR.
Divorce !

D E LOTA.
And no certainty it can be kept quiet.

ELINOR.
You mean the papers?



140 AS A MAN THINKS

D E LOTA.

Yes. If Mr. Clayton lets you get the decree only the
Chardenet girl will be named.

[ELINOR rings push button by fireplace.

HOOVER.
What are you doing?

ELINOR.
Tell Mrs. Seelig

D E LOTA.

No no

HOOVER.

Why?

ELINOR.

Because Doctor Seelig has told her nothing.
[Enter HOLLAND.

HOOVER.
One minute.

HOLLAND.

[Going.] Yes, sir.

ELINOR.

Holland ask Mrs. Seelig to come here.
[HOLLAND goes.

HOOVER.
Wait till Frank decides.



AS A MAN THINKS 141

ELINOR.

I ve decided.

HOOVER.
But you may reconsider.

D E LOTA.
Yes why tell her now?

ELINOR.

She has a right to know.

HOOVER.
What right?

ELINOR.

A wife s right a mother s right. The right of a woman
who has taken an outcast into her home.

HOOVER.

You were not an outcast, Elinor you could have come
to me.

ELINOR.
In your club?

HOOVER.
I d have gone to a hotel.

D E LOTA.

I beg of you, Elinor wait or at least don t tell every
thing. My position in this house is peculiar.

HOOVER.
Your position?



AS A MAN THINKS

D E LOTA.
Yes a tacit engagement to Vedah.

ELINOR.
Oh! How vile it all makes me.

D E LOTA.

The more reason to be careful.
[Enter MRS. SEELIG.

MRS. SEELIG.
My dear?

HOOVER.
[Cautioning.] Elinor!

MRS. SEELIG.
What is it? [Starts to ELINOR.

ELINOR.

Wait [Pause.] until I tell you [Pause.] doctor told
you only that it would be good for Dick to come here?
Nothing more?

MRS. SEELIG.
Nothing.

ELINOR.

Not my trouble with Frank?



AS A MAN THINKS 143

MRS. SEELIG.

No and don t you tell it, my dear, if it agitates you.
Besides, Frank has lots to worry him. We mustn t judge
too quickly.

ELINOR.
He wants a divorce.

MRS. SEELIG.
He does?

ELINOR.

[Nodding.] He s already gone to a lawyer about it-
father has just told me.

MRS. SEELIG.

Because [Looks at HOOVER who nods toward DE LOTA.]
Frank s jealous of Benjamin? [To ELINOR.

ELINOR.

I had no idea Vedah was engaged to him. Oh, it s to*
too horrible.

MRS. SEELIG.
What ideas men can get in their heads.

ELINOR.

No, I m to blame, Mrs. Seelig. I deserve it all I di(\
go to his rooms the Doctor knows.

MRS. SEELIG.
Your rooms [DE LOTA nods.] Together?



144 AS A MAN THINKS

D E LOTA.
Yes.

MRS. SEELIG.
But, my dear Elinor

ELINOR.

The Doctor believes me I was crazy rebellious venge
ful striking back bitterly resentful of deceit Frank had
been newly guilty of. I went as much in the name of all
women despitefully treated as I did in assertion of my own
freedom. And then I came to my senses. I m not guilty
or I wouldn t be in your home

MRS. SEELIG.

My dear! [Takes ELINOR in her arms.
[Enter SEELIG.]

MRS. SEELIG.
[Quietly.] She s just told me.

SEELIG.

[To HOOVER.] Col. Emery called on me this after
noon.

HOOVER.
Then you know?

SEELIG.
Yes.

HOOVER.
Naturally somewhat of a shock. [Indicates ELINOR.



AS A MAN THINKS 145

S E E L I G.

Yes.

HOOVER.

We haven t any right to expect less from Clayton.

ELINOR.

No right? Did I divorce him two years ago when he
was guilty really guilty. Did I ?

HOOVER.

No! You made a scene with the woman and got a
rotten lot of newspaper notoriety but the offense you con
doned.

MRS. SEEL.IG.

And a man that s been forgiven all that shouldn t talk
about divorce if his poor wife loses her head for a minute.
It s unbearable the privileges these men claim and the
double standard of morality they set up,

S E E L i G.
These men?

MRS. SEELIG.

All of them. And that woman dramatist with her play
was right. It is "a man s world."

S E E L i G.
It s a pretty wise world, my dear.

ELINOR.
You think I should be made to suffer?



146 AS A MAN THINKS

S E E L I G.

I think you do suffer.

ELINOR.

That my offense is less forgivable than Frank s was?

S E E L i G.

[Pause. ] You have my pity, Elinor, and shall have my
help but I can t lie to you.

ELINOR.
That I m more guilty than he?

MRS. S E E L i G.

[Pause. ,] Don t ask that of a Jew, my dear however
liberal in his religion he pretends to be. My father was
an orthodox Rabbi I know.

S E E L I G.
What do you know?

MRS. S E E L i G.

Our ancient law from which all your ideas come. A
man s past was his own. He was not forbidden as many
wives as he wanted, but if a poor girl had made a mistake
and concealed it from these lords of creation, she was
stoned to death unless she was the daughter of a priest
in which case she was to be burnt alive. It s always been
a man s world.

S E E L i G.

Elinor. [Pause.] Do you hear that rattle of the rail
road ?



AS A MAN THINKS 147

ELINOR.
Yes.

S E E L I G.

All over this great land thousands of trains run every
day starting and arriving in punctual agreement because
this is a woman s world. The great steamships, dependable
almost as the sun a million factories in civilization the
countless looms and lathes of industry the legions of labor
that weave the riches of the world all all move by the
mainspring of man s faith in woman man s faith.

ELINOR.
I want him to have faith in me.

S E E L I G.
This old world hangs together by love.

MRS. S E E L i G.
Not man s love for woman.

S E E L I G.

No nor woman s love for man, but by the love of botli
for the children.

ELINOR.
Dick!

S E E L I G.

Men work for the children because they believe the
children are their own believe. Every mother knows
she is the mother of her son or daughter. Let her
be however wicked, no power on earth can shake
that knowledge. Every father believes he is a father only



148 AS A MAN THINKS

by his faith in the woman. Let him be however virtuous,
no power on earth can strengthen in him a conviction great
er than that faith. There is a double standard of morality
because upon the golden basis of woman s virtue rests the
welfare of the world.

ELINOR.
Have I lost everything?

S E E -L I G.

Frank must be convinced of your love and your loyalty.

ELINOR.
I do love him.

S E E 1. 1 G.

Of course. [To DE LOTA.] Why are you here?

D E LOTA.

To do any thing that is in my power to assure Mrs.
Clayton that she will have my protection if it comes to
the worst.

S E E L I G.

Well that s where it would be.

D E LOTA.
And there must be some things you want to say to me?

S E E -L i G.
There are.

HOOVER.

[To SEELIG.] Clayton s always had great respect for
your opinion, Dr. Seelig.



AS A MAN THINKS 149

SEELIG.

I ll see Clayton, of course. [To MRS. SEELIG.] You
phoned me that Mr. Burrill

MRS. SEELIG.
He s there. [Indicates living room.

SEELIG.
Have you seen your grandson, Judge Hoover?

HOOVER.

No.

ELINOR.
You must Dick s asked for you [Rises.] Come.

SEELIG.

On your way out I ll see you again.
[HOOVER and ELINOR go out.

SEELIG.
[To MRS. SEELIG.] You entertain Mr. Burrill a moment.

MRS. SEELIG.
He doesn t lack entertainment.

SEELIG.
What?

MRS. SEELIG.
Vedah s with him.



150 AS A MAN THINKS

S E E L I G.

[Starting to door.] I thought we d agreed about that?

MRS. S E E L i G.
Doesn t this trouble make a difference?

S E E L i G.
It can t affect our decision concerning Burrill.

MRS. S E E L i G.
Not before Vedah. [SEELIG goes to living room.

D E LOTA.

Perhaps the trouble can be fixed, Mrs. Seelig if the
doctor talks to Clayton.

MRS. SEELIG.
It can t be "fixed" as you call it, with me.

D E LOTA.
You won t tell Vedah?

MRS. SEELIG.
I won t have to tell Vedah, she loves this artist.

D E LOTA.
But to marry a Christian!

MRS. SEELIG.
When she might have you.



AS A MAN THINKS 151

D E LOTA.

It s taught me something.

MRS. S E E i, i G.

No doubt. But, I won t sacrifice my girl to finish your
education.

[Re-enter SEELIG with BURRILL.

SEELIG.

Mr. Burrill is going. He first wishes to speak with Mr.
De Lota.

MRS. SEELIG.
Why?

SEELIG.
Sarah !

MRS. SEELIG.
Pardon.

BURRILL.

A business matter, Mrs. Seelig. If you are leaving, Mr.
De Lota, I ll walk with you if you permit.

D E LOTA.
I have some business with Dr. Seelig.

BURRILL.
Could you spare us a few minutes?

SEELIG.
Well? De Lota?



152 AS A MAN THINKS

D E LOTA.
With pleasure.

SEELIG.
[Going.] Sarah.

MRS. SEELIG.
[In undertone.] You told him?

[SEELIG nods. Goes out with MRS. SEELIG.

D E LOTA.
Well?

B U R R I L L.

I m going to give you a chance to retire from this, Mr.
De Lota, without exposure.

D E LOTA.
Good of you.

B u R R i L L,.

Miss Seelig believes that you have served time in a peni
tentiary.

D E LOTA.
You told her that?

B U B B I L L.

I hadn t met you when I told Miss Seelig that the man
who got an engagement in Antoine s Theatre for Mimi
Chardenet had been in prison. Then you came into the
room and told the rest yourself.

D E LOTA.
Miss Seelig s belief is based on those two remarks?



AS A MAN THINKS 153

B U R R I L L.

Yes.

D E LOTA.
Reinforced, I suppose by your own opinion.

B u R R i L L.
I have tried to conceal my opinion.

D E LOTA.
What is your opinion, Mr. Burrill?

B u R R i L L.

That I saw you sentenced in the Cour d Assizes to a
year s imprisonment.

D E LOTA.
And you threaten to say so?

B u R E. i L L.
I hope I m a little cleaner than that, I threaten nothing.

D E LOTA.
What is it you re doing?

BURRILL.
I foresee trouble I inform you of it.

D E LOTA.

You mean you foresee Miss Seelig asking me a question ?



154 AS A MAN THINKS

B U R R I L L.

Yes ! I foresee your answer failing to satisfy. I foresee
her doubt grow deeper I foresee her going to her father
with that doubt.

D E LOTA.

And then?

B u R R 1 1, L.
I foresee Doctor Seelig asking what I know.

D E LOTA.

Ah! Now we have it. Disguised, but still the threat.
You tell Doctor Seelig your belief.

B u R R i L L.
I shall decline to express my belief.

D E LOT A.

Same thing, isn t it? Your reluctance and your shrugs
being quite as convincing.

B U R R I L, L.

You can hardly ask me to lie for you.

D E LOTA.
Miss Vedah may believe me.

B u R R i L L.

No, she has asked me more than once to write to Paris.

D E LOTA.

It would make this bluff of fair play very convincing if
you did write to persons whose names I can furnish you.



AS A MAN THINKS 155

B U E R I L L.

You mean arrange a deception.

D E LOTA.

I mean write show Miss Seelig your letters. Wait
show her the answers.

B u R R i L L.
You make it pretty hard to keep still, believe me.

D E LOTA.
You think I m unworthy to marry this girl.

B U R E I L L.

I know you are.

D E LOTA.

[Pause.] I m going to tell you the truth about that Paris
affair.

B U E E I L L.

I don t care to hear it.

D E LOTA.

You don t want the truth?

B u R E I L L.
I don t want your confidence. I won t be bound by it.

D E LOTA.

You re a man s man, Burrill you fight in the open.
Your part in this architect s row shows that. Now, in fair
play [Telephone rings.



156 AS A MAN THINKS

B U R R I L L.

Someone will come to answer that. Our interview s at an
end.

D E LOTA.

Wait. [Goes quickly to telephone and takes receiver
from its hook.] They may not come. [Pause.] I have
served a year in a French prison. Captain Dreyfus served
even longer for the same prejudice.

B u R R i L L.
Your crime was proven.

D E LOTA.

I m as good as you, Mr. Burrill, or any bachelor that
spends his several years in Paris. That imprisonment was
a decoration.

BURRILL.

Rot!

D E LOTA.

I m not a male ingenue. Doctor Seelig knows I ve had


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