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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA.



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ETCHED BY H. TOUSSAINT, PARIS, FROM THE BRONZE PANEL IN THE

LIBRARY. MODELLED BY J. C. CHAPLAIN, MEMBER OF THE

INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. THE MEDALLION PORTRAIT

FROM A BUST BY CHARLES CALVERLEY, NEW YORK.



CATALOGUE OF



THE AVERY

ARCHITECTURAL

LIBRARY



A MEMORIAL LIBRARY OF

ARCHITECTURE, ARCHEOLOGY, AND

DECORATIVE ART




LIBRARY OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE
NEW YORK: MDCCCXCV







THE DE VINNE PRESS CERTIFIES

THAT THIS COPY IS ONE OF AN

EDITION OF ONE THOUSAND COPIES

PRINTED FROM TYPE, 1894-95.





WINDOW IN THE LIBRARY MADE AND PRESENTED
BY THE LATE DANIEL COTTIER



INTRODUCTION

U j HE Avery Memorial Library was founded in 1890 by Mr.

J. Samuel P. Avery, of New York, and Mrs. Mary O. Avery,
his wife, as a memorial to their son Henry Ogden Avery, who died
April jo, 1890. No better statement of the object and conditions of
this foundation can be made than the letter of Mr. and Mrs. Avery
to President Low, which is as follows :

4. East j8th Street, New York, June 23, 1890.

Mr. Seth Low, President Columbia College.

Dear Sir: With your consent and that of the Trustees of Columbia College
we propose to establish the Avery Architectural Library in memory of our son
Henry Ogden Avery.



vi INTRODUCTION

We propose (i) to give to Columbia College, for the purpose mentioned, the
library, comprising all volumes relating to architecture and the decorative arts,
and other professional books, owned by the late Henry O. Avery, including one
or more folios of original architectural drawings by the late Henry 0. Avery ;
and in addition thereto (2) to give to the Treasurer of the Corporation such
sums as may be required to pay for books purchased, as provided below, on
notice of their purchase, previous to the ist day of January, 1891, not exceeding
fifteen thousand dollars, and also (j) to give to the Treasurer of the Corpora
tion on the ist day of July of this year the sum of fifteen thousand dollars* to
be invested and to form a permanent fund, the interest of which is to be em
ployed, first, in binding and making the necessary repairs of the books forming
said Avery Architectural Library, and second, in the purchase of newly pub
lished books, or others, under the conditions stated below.

It is our wish that the purchases made for the Avery Architectural Library
be made exclusively by a Commission of three persons, namely, the Librarian of
Columbia College, the Professor or acting Professor of the Architectural De
partment of the School of Mines, and Mr. Russell Sturgis of New York,
whose successor, in case of his declination at any time, is to be selected by the
other two members of the Commission as above, to be always an architect and
not immediately connected with Cohimbia College.

It is our wish also that the books so purchased, including those coming from
the late Henry 0. Avery, shall be kept together in one room, alcove, or the like,
to be set apart and designated for the purpose and approved by the Commission
of purchase, but without impairing in any way the constitutional control of the
college property vested in the Trustees by the charter, and that they be kept as a
library of reference only, and not allowed to leave the library building except on
special occasions, as for binding, repairs, etc., or for the ptirpose of having pho
tographic or other copies made of plates and the like, but always on the express
approval of the Commission of purchase, or a majority of it.

It is also our wish that a tablet, or some other form of record, which we will
furnish, be put in a prominent position, and always retained, in the room or
alcove devoted to the Avery Library, and that a book-plate be pasted inside
the cover of each volume of the library, the said tablet and book-plate to
state the foundation of this library by the parents of Henry Ogden Avery in
his memory.

* Since increased to twenty-five thousand dollars.



INTRODUCTION vii

It is also our zvish that, at the discretion of the Trustees, a separate cata
logue of this library from time to time be printed in pamphlet form, at the
expense of the college, and that copies of it in sufficient number be furnished the
Commission of purchase for free distribution to architects, students of art, and
other persons or institutions to whom the Avery Architectural Library may be

useful.

(Signed] Samuel P. Avery,

Mary 0. Avery.

The conditions of this endowment were accepted by the Board of
Trustees on the 6th day of October, 1890.

Mr. Henry Ogden Avery, to whose memory this noble foundation
was made, was born in the city of Brooklyn, N. Y., January j/, 1852.
The influences surrounding him in his home life, the house and asso
ciations of his father, naturally turned his mind to matters of art.
Mr. Samuel P. Avery has long been identified with art and its
various interests, and for many years has been widely known as a
collector in different fields of art, whose treasures have always been
freely available to the citizens of New York and the lovers of art
objects generally.

Commencing with the Cooper Union Schools, the young Henry
went in 1870 into the office of Mr. Russell Sturgis as a student of
architecture, and in 1872 on his advice went to Paris and entered the
Ecole des Beaux Arts under the late able and honored Prof. Jules
Andre. The young mans course of study and practice in Paris was
long and delightful. From 1872 to 1879 he devoted himself uninter
ruptedly to the study of architecture and art, and during these years
formed the acquaintance and enjoyed the counsel of many celebrated
artists and art critics in Paris. After his return to New York he
was for a time in the office of Mr. Richard M. Hunt, and from 1883
on, as an independent architect, devoted himself to the quiet and in
dustrious prosecution of his profession.

During his brief career as a practising architect he was active, and
either built or made designs for a number of buildings and monu-



Vlll



INTRODUCTION



ments. He was also earnestly engaged in the Architectural League
of New York and in the Archaeological Institute of America, and was
a frequent writer on art topics. His untimely and lamented death at
the beginning of the fullness of his career called forth numerous ex
pressions of regret from the persons and from the organizations to
whom he was best known.

In his memory, and in the interest of the arts he loved and of the
work to which he had devoted himself , his parents determined to found
in Columbia College a library of architecture and the allied arts.
The letter of Mr. and Mrs. A very, given above, states clearly the
conditions of this foundation and the method of its administration and
development. After the expenditure of the sum mentioned in this
letter, Mr. A very very greatly extended the credit in the hands of the
Commission, and made possible the creation of a collection much broader
and richer than the Commission had, at the outset, dared to hope for.
The scope of the library was gradually extended until its conception
was changed from a selection of a limited number of standard and
important works to a reasonably full representation of the literatures
of the building and decorative arts.

The collection as it noiv stands numbers about thirteen thousand
volumes, the majority of which are richly illustrated, and in great
proportion large and costly works. It was the purpose in gathering
the Avery Library to collect the material out of which, Jirst, any his
torical question concerning the development of any form of architecture
or the architecture of any land or period could be successfully studied,
together with the architectural development of any important building
or locality ; and in the second place, to establish a storehouse in which
architects and art-workers might find almost infinite resources of
suggestion and inspiration for their work. Hence, historical architec
ture, rather than an accumulation of treatises on mere construction,
characterizes the library. From this position it was but a step to
archeology, and the collection is very rich in all those departments of
archeology which deal with architecture, sculpture, and the other



INTRODUCTION ix

decorative arts. Supplemented in some degree by the general library,
it contains sets of nearly all the architectural periodicals and many
of those devoted to art and archtzology, as well as the transactions
of societies in these fields. Most of the large and extensive works
devoted to the description and study of the monuments of architecture
in all lands and periods will be found here. The general treatises on
architecture from Vitruvius, Alberti, and Serlio down to the present
time are fully represented. Many of the older works are interesting
and valuable for the engravings they contain, which are often from
famous hands and of artistic workmanship, or depict objects long
since destroyed.

Nor has less attention been paid to special works on the different
classes of architecture. The oriental, classic, the modern European,
Gothic, Romanesque, and Renaissance, in all their various subdivisions
and classes, have been considered, and, in like manner, care has been
taken to include all the various forms of architectural work as defined
by the uses to which buildings are destined. Ecclesiastical architec
ture, domestic architecture, and the architecture of theaters, schools,
public buildings of all kinds, and of monumental structures, together
with military architecture, are largely represented. Persistent efforts
have been made to include all works which could throw light on the
history of architecture, while the bibliography of the subject and the
lives of architects have also been gathered.

Despite the extent of the collections in the above-mentioned fields, it
is probable that where this library compares most favorably with any
other is in its richness in treatises on local architecture, by which is
meant the monographs and descriptive works concerning the architec
ture of individual towns, districts, and regions, and important single
buildings. These collections relating to local architecture may vary
from a single monograph of a few pages about some ancient fragments
built into a later building, to the whole body of memoirs of a local
society, and also to the scores of volumes, including many hundreds of
plates, which describe the architecture of Paris or Rome.



x INTRODUCTION

The practical and mechanical phases of architecture have naturally
received much less attention. The newer standard works on con
struction in all its details, including ventilation, heating, and light
ing have been gathered, and, incidentally, the older works, which have
largely historical value only. To go farther into the field of scientific
construction would be to make rather a library of engineering, than
one of architectural fine art. In like manner it has been thought un
necessary to make the collection at all complete in treatises on archi
tectural drawing, perspective, and the like, but some important works
have been provided.

Apart from historical architecture, the library is most rich in the
large subject of decorative art not purely architectural. Sculpture
of all kinds and of all epochs, it has been thought necessary to in
clude. Mosaic, mural painting, and stained and painted glass are
of course closely connected with building, but in addition to these
arts, those subsidiary arts which are applied to portable objects have
received attention. There are hundreds of important works on tapes
try, textile fabrics, furniture, pottery, glass vessels, costume, arms and
armor, and similar topics. A mong the general art works are numerous
illustrated catalogues of art collections existing in museums, or of
famous collections made or dispersed during past generations down
to recent times. The most of these have been the direct gift of Mr.
A very, whose intimate connection and wide acquaintance with the com
merce of art have made him conversant with this form of literature.
Indeed Mr. Avery s personal purchases of wisely selected volumes have
been constant from the beginning. Not a few of these volumes are
interesting from their former ownership, or from their rarity, fine
binding, or because they have been extra illustrated, or contain orig
inal drawings and manuscript annotations by their former owners.

The printing of the catalogue, which Mr. Avery with character
istic generosity has made his own charge, has occupied nearly two
years, during which time large additions have been made to the library.
These additions have been incorporated in the catalogue in such por-



INTRODUCTION xi

tions of the alphabet as were not yet printed, so that the later letters in
the alphabet represent more fully than the earlier the collection as it
stands to-day. It is intended at a later time to include the omissions
and future additions to the library in a supplementary volume.

The printing has been done by the well-known press of Theodore
L. DeVinne & Co., who have from the beginning shown great interest
in the undertaking, and whose excellent work speaks for itself. From
the fact that the printing has gone on simultaneously with the gather
ing of the books, a few titles may appear in the latter part of the
alphabet without the proper author or other collateral entries, which
belonged in the letters already printed. Much care has been taken in
the titles of the numerous illustrated works here given, to state the
number of plates and other bibliographical information not always
found in similar catalogues. It is believed that these data, together
with the fact that this catalogue is one of the most extensive in print
on this subject, will render the work of great and lasting value to pro
fessional men, librarians, collectors, and the public at large.

It should also be noted that the catalogue as here printed contains
only the works in the A very Library, and does not include books on
similar topics contained in the general library of Columbia College.
Books already in the general library have not, in most cases, been
duplicated, and this fact may explain the absence of certain well-
known and standard works which might naturally be looked for in a
collection of this extent.

A card catalogue in duplicate of the entire collection has been pre
pared both by authors and subjects, one copy of each entry being placed
in the general catalogue of the library, while the other copy forms a
special catalogue for the A very Library. It was deemed wise to issue
now only the author catalogue, both from the extent of the work and
because it was desirable that the subject catalogue be complete before
beginning to print. This catalogue contains, therefore, only author
and title entries. It is hoped later to print a subject catalogue, either
as a whole or in special sections by topic.



xii INTRODUCTION

The library has been catalogued almost entirely by Miss Harriet
B. Prescott, a member of the library staff, assisted in the preparation
of the cards principally by Miss Annie I. Mann and Miss Rae
Foster. The work of cataloguing has been carried on under the
special supervision of the librarian who, with the cooperation of the
other members of the Commission and of Mr. A very, has chiefly
gathered the books. The work of immediate preparation for the press
and of proof-reading in all its stages has been done by Mr. C. Alex.
Nelson of the library staff, whose experience as the editor of the Astor
Library Catalogue rendered him peculiarly well Jitted for the task.

The collection of books has been classified in a simple and readily
intelligible manner by subjects, on the shelves, so far as this was
possible with volumes varying so greatly in size. The classification
is printed after this Introduction.

That this rich collection of books may be more widely known, and
may more fully serve architects and investigators of every class, the
donors have caused this catalogue to be printed.

The Commission desires to express its thanks to Mr. and Mrs.
Avery for their great generosity and kindness ; also to various
friends at home and abroad who have presented books, and to Presi
dent Low and the Trustees of Columbia College for constant and
hearty cooperation in the gathering and care of this collection.

GEORGE H. BAKER,

Librarian of Columbia College.

WM. R. WARE,

Professor, Department of Architecture, Columbia College.

RUSSELL STURGIS.

Commission of purchase.



IN MEMORY OF OVR BELOVED ASSOCIATE

HENRY OGDEN AVERY
AND IN RECOGNITION OF THE GENEROVS
PROVISION MADE IN HIS NAME HERE AND
ELSEWHERE FOR THE MORE THOROVGH STVDY
OF THE ART WHICH HE LOVED AND SERVED

WETHEMEMBERS OF

THE ARCHITECTVRAL LEAGVE OF NEW YORK

HAVE SET VP THIS TABLET ON THE FIRST

ANNIVERSARY OF HIS DEATH XXX APRIL

M DCCC LXXXX 1



BRONZE TABLET IN THE LIBRARY



COLUMBIA COLLEGE







1Y ARCHITECT



BORN THIRTY- FIRST
JANUARY MDCCC L li
DIED THIRTIETH APRIL
M DCCC LXXXXXEX^>-
^2XXc>-HIS PARENTS
SAMUEL P AVERY AND
MARY OGDEN AVERY
HAVE FOUNDED THIS
REFERENCE LIBRARY
OF ARCHITECTURE AND
DECORATIVE





FROM THE ORIGINAL DRAWING FOR BOOK-PLATE,

DESIGNED AND DRAWN BY D. N. B. STURGIS,

FROM A SKETCH BY RUSSELL STURGIS.



CLASSIFICATION



D2



GENERAL ARCHITECTURE .... A

PERIODICALS B

SOCIETIES C

DIFFERENT SCHOOLS D

ORIENTAL Di

GREEK )
ROMAN )

BYZANTINE 03

ARABIAN D4

ROMANESQUE 05

GOTHIC D6

RENAISSANCE Dy

NORMAN D8

CHURCH E

DOMESTIC 2

FACTORIES, &c 3

THEATER 4

BRIDGES 5

PUBLIC BUILDINGS E6

FORTIFICATION 7

MONUMENTAL E8

HISTORY F

BIBLIOGRAPHY 5

LOCAL (arranged by countries) . . H

CONSTRUCTION I

BUILDERS HARDWARE & MA
CHINERY CATALOGUES . . . . I 2
MERCANTILE ARCHITECTURE . . 14

NAVAL ARCHITECTURE 15

VENTILATION AND HEATING,
ACOUSTICS, LIGHTING AND

PLUMBING J

PUBLIC HEALTH, &c Ji

TILE AND BRICK WORK . . . . J2

DECORATION AND ORNAMENT . K

DESIGN L



ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING AND

PERSPECTIVE L2

NUMISMATICS Mi

WROUGHT-! RON AND METAL

WORK Ma

BRONZE WORK M3

GOLDSMITHS WORK M4

WOOD-CARVING M.$

FRESCO-PAINTING M6

GLASS, PAINTED My

TAPESTRY M8

TEXTILE FABRICS N

FURNITURE Ni

CERAMICS N2

GLASS VESSELS N3

COSTUME N4

ARMS AND ARMOR N$

INDUSTRIAL ARTS N6

LANDSCAPE GARDENING .... N8

ART O

ART COLLECTIONS O2

ART EXHIBITIONS 04

ETCHING 05

PAINTING O6

DRAWING 062

ENGRAVING O;

SCULPTURE O8

ARCHAEOLOGY P

ARCHAEOLOGY, LOCAL (arranged

by countries) R

BIOGRAPHY W

HERALDRY Wi

FETES W2

BIBLIOGRAPHY (general) . . . . Y

MISCELLANEOUS X

ORIGINAL SKETCHES AND MSS . Z









!lberg jHemortal



A. A. y P., F. de. AI

Manual complete de carpinteria. Madrid, 1853-55. O. 3 v. in 2. Aai

Aarau (Switzerland) Mittel=schweizerische geo=

graphisch=kommerzielle gesellschaft, editor. AB

See Volkerschau. 1888-. V88

Abbeville (France) Societe royale d emulation.

Memoires. 1833-76 in 14 v. Abbeville, 1833-76. O. ill. AC

1869-76 form 3<l ser. v. 1-2. Abl

Abbey Square sketch book. AA

See Douglas, John. 074

Abbott, Henry.

Antiquities of Rome comprising . . . views of its principal ruins . . . AH45

London, 1820. F. 6 47 p. 28 pi. R743

Abel, Lothar. AN8

Asthetik der gartenkunst. Wien, 1877. Q. 7+62 p. ill. 6 pi. Ab3

Garten-architektur ... [2. ausg.]. AN8

Wien, 1876. F. 5 8+92 p. ill. Ab3i

[Abelin, Johann Philipp. 1590 (?)-i646.]

Inventarium Sueciae, das ist, griindliche . . . beschreibung dess AH4&5

konigreichs Schweden . . . verfasset durch Job. Ludwig Gottfried, Ai
mit . . . kupfferstiicken gezieret . . . durch F. Hulsium.
Franckfurtam Mayn, 1632. F. [6] +430+ [72] p. ill. 5 por. lopl.

Joh. Ludov. Gottfridi historische chronica, oder beschreibung der AX

ftirnehmsten geschichten . . . vom anfang der welt biss . . . 1659 . . . Ab3
mit kupfferstiicken gezieret durch M. Merianum.

Franckfurt am Mayn, 1674-1745. F. 2 v. ill. 53 pi.

Aberdeen, George [Gordon], 4th earl of. 1784-1860.

Inquiry into principles of beauty in Grecian architecture, no p. A A

(In Vitruvius Pollio, Marcus. Rudimentary architecture. 1880.) V84I



2 AVERY MEMORIAL LIBRARY

Abernathey, R. James.

Practical hints on mill building. AI

Moline, 1880. O. 8+298+08] p. ill. 10 pi. Abs

Abhandlungen des Archaologisch-epigraphischen semi-
nares der Universitat Wien, hrsg. von O. Benndorf, O. Hirschfeld AP
und E. Bormann. Ab4

Wien, 1880-90. O. pt. 1-8 in 2 v. ill. 7 pi. 2 maps, I tab.

Contents: pt. i. SCHNEIDER, R. Die geburt der Athena,
pt. 2. DtiRR, J. Die reisen des kaisers Hadrian.

pt. 3. KUBITSCHEK, J. W. De Romanarum tribuum origine ac propagatione.
pt. 4. L6WY, E. Untersuchungen zur griechischen kiinstlergeschichte.
pt. 5. DOMASZEWSKI, A. VON. Die fahnen im romischen heere.
pt. 6. STUDNICZKA, F. Beitrage zur geschichte der altgriechischen tracht.
pt. 7. WEISSHXUPL, R. Die grabgedichte der griechischen anthologie.
pt. 8. REISCH, E. Griechische weihgeschenke.

Abingdon, Thomas. 1560-1647.

See Habington, Thomas. 1560-1647.

Abington, Thomas. 1560-1647.

See Habington, Thomas. 1560-1647.

About, [Edmond Francois Valentin]. 1828-85.

Memoire sur File d Egine. (In Archives des missions scienti- AB
fiques. 1854. v. 3, p. 481-567. I pi.) Ar2i

See Baudry, P. J. A. 1828-86. Peintures decoratives, executees
pour le foyer public de 1 Opera; notice par E. About. 1874.

Academic d archeologie de Belgique.

Annales. Anvers, 1843-. O. v. 1-46. ill. AC

Vols. 1-4 have title Bulletin et annales. Aci

Tables des matieres. v. 1-20. Anvers, 1867. O. AC

Bound with v. 20. A.C I

Bulletin et annales. See, above, Annales. 1843-47. v. 1-4. AC

Aci

Academic de France a Rome.

See Rome (Italy) Academic de France pour les beaux arts.

Academy architecture and annual architectural review. AB

London, 1889-93. Q- ill- v. 1-5. Aci

Edited by A. Koch.

Academy of the fine arts.

See Philadelphia (Pa.) Academy of the fine arts.

Accademia Clementina.

See Bologna (Italy) Accademia Clementina.

Accademia romana di archeologia.

See Rome (Italy) Accademia romana di archeologia.



AVERY MEMORIAL LIBRARY 3

Account of a tour in Normandy. AH44

See [Turner, Dawson. 1775-1858]. N782

Account of the remains of a Roman villa. AR42

See [Lysons, Samuel. 1763-1813]. 648

Account of the Roman villa discovered at Northleigh, Ox
fordshire, in 1813-16. AH42
See H[akewill], H[enry]. 1771-1830. N8ii

Account of the Rosetta stone, in three languages, which

was brought to England in 1802. (In Archaeologia, v. 1 6, p. 208- AB

263. I pi.) Ar2

Ackermann, R[udolph], 1764-1834, publisher.

History of the abbey church of St. Peter s Westminster, its an- AH42

tiquities and monuments [by W. Combe]. L84I

London, 18 1 2. Sq. F. 2 v. I por. 82 pi.

History of the colleges of Winchester, Eton and Westminster, with AH42

the Charter-house, the schools of St. Paul s, Merchant taylors, L853I
Harrow . . . Rugby and . . . Christ s Hospital [by W. Combe].

London, 1816. Sq. F. Various paging. 48 pi.

History of the University of Cambridge, its colleges, halls and pub- AH42

lie buildings [by W. Combe]. London, 1815. Sq. F. 2 v. 80 pi. Ci4i

History of the University of Oxford, its colleges, halls and public AH42

buildings [by W. Combe]. London, 1814. Sq. F. 2 v. 115 pi. Ox2

Selection of ornaments for the use of sculptors, painters, carvers, AK

modellers . . . London, 1818-19. F. 4 2 pts. in i v. 80 pi. Ac5

Acland, Sir Henry W[entworth], 1815-, and Ruskin,

John. 1819-. AO4

Oxford museum. London, 1859. D. 3 + 111 p. ill. 2 pi. Ox2

Acqua, Carlo dell .

Dell insigne reale basilica di San Michele Maggiore in Pavia. 2<ia AH45

ed. cor. Pavia, 1875. Q. 291 p. 11 pi. P282

Adam, Johann Christian, Hanel, C. Moritz, and
Qurlitt, Cornelius, 1850-.

Sachsische herrensitze und schlosser, dargestellt in ansichten, AH43

grundrissen, situationsplanen und einem . . . text. No date. Sa92

Adam, James, -1794, and Adam, Robert, 1728-92. AA

Architecture, decoration, and furniture. 1880. Adi

Adam, Robert. 1728-92.

First issue of decorative designs by R. Adams, architect, 1783. AK

Edited ... by R. Charles. London, 1883. Obi. F. 6 pi. folded. Ad 13



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