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Mysore: a gazetteer compiled for government (Volume 1) online

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namely,



II with population of over 4,000
15 ,, ,, ,, 3,000



26 with population of over 2,000
22 ,, ,, ,, 1,200



The town population may thus be reckoned as 626,558, forming
127 per cent, of the total.

To estimate the growth of towns during the present century the
following statistics are available : —



Town


1852


1858


1871


1881


1891


Bangalore


134,628


175,630


142,513


155,857


180,366


Mysore


54,729


55,761


57,815


60,292


74,048


Seringapatam


12,744


14,928


10,594


11,734


12,551


Kolar








9,924


11,172


12,148


Shimoga





14,186


11,034


12,040


11,340


Tumkur





9,339


II , 1 70


9,909


11,088


Chik Ballapur







9,882


9,183


10,623



Except in Bangalore and Mysore these figures do not disclose any
firmly established tendency to a decided increase in the urban popula-
tion in the case of the principal towns.

Other particulars regarding the occupations, »S:c. of the people, are
given under each District in Vol. II.



CHARACTER. DRESS, &c.

The people of Mysore are a hardy and well-formed race, fairer as a
rule than those of the low country, and with regular features. " I have
never," says Buchanan, " seen finer forms than even the labouring



DWELLINGS 263

women of that country frequently possess. Their necks and arms are
in particular remarkably well-shaped."

In public character and disposition they may be described as the
most conservative of the South Indian races. In practice, perhaps they
exhibit a greater aptitude for the labours of the field and the tending of
cattle than for other occupations. With the bucolic turn of mind there
was no doubt much stolidity to be found among the agrestic hinds, and
till lately predial slaves, but accompanied with blind devotion and
simple fidelity to their masters. The better specimens of headmen, on
the other hand, are dignified and self-reliant, commanding and gaining
respect, proud of hospitality, sagacious observers, shrewd in conversa-
tion and with a vein of homely good sense and humour. The
industrial classes and field- labourers are very hard-working, especially
the women.

The dwellings of the people are generally built of mud, one-storeyed
and low, with few, if any, openings outwards e.xcept the door, but
possessed of courtyards within, surrounded with verandahs, and open
to the sky. In the better houses these are well-paved and drained,
while the wooden pillars are elaborately carved or painted. The huts
of the outcaste and poorer classes are thatched, but the houses of the
higher orders are covered with either terraced or tiled roofs, the latter,
uiore especially in the west, where the rainfall is heavy.

The villages are pretty generally surrounded with a thick hedge of
thorn, a protection in former days against the attacks of the Mahratta
cavalry. For the same reason the entrance is often a flat-arched stone
gateway, so constructed as to present an obstacle to a horseman. In
the districts lying north-east from the Baba Budans, villages commonly
have the remains of a round tower in the middle, a somewhat
picturesque feature, erected in former days as a place of retreat for the
women and children in case of attack. Most important villages and
towns have a considerable fort of mud or stone, also the erection of
former troublous times, when every gauda aimed at being a palegar, and
every palegar at becoming independent. The fort is the quarter
generally affected by the Brahmans, and contains the principal temple.
The pete or market, which invariably adjoins the fort at a greater or
less distance beyond the walls, is the residence of the other orders.

There is seldom any system in the arrangement of streets, which are
often very roughly paved, and nearly always abounding in filth. The
only motive for the formation of wide and regular streets in some of the
towns is to provide for the temple-car being drawn round at the annual
festival. All other lines of way are irregular beyond description. But
improvements, both in laying out the streets and in their sanitation, are



264 ETIINOGRAPJIY

now to be seen in many places which have been brought under
municipal regulations.

White or coloured cotton stuffs of stout texture supply the principal
dress of the people, with a woollen kamhii as an outer covering for the
night or a protection against cold and damp. Brahmans are bare-
headed, the head l)eing shaved all except the tuft at the crown {juttte),
and most of the Hindus observe the same practice. The moustache is
the only hair permanently worn on the face. The dhotra, a thin sheet,
covers the lower limbs, one end being gathered into folds in front and
the other passed between the legs and tucked in at the waist behind.
A similar garment is thrown over the shoulders. To protect the head,
a bright magenta worsted cap is often donned, such as a brewer's dray-
man wears, but not in the same jaunty manner, for it is pulled well
down over the ears and back of the neck. This and a scarlet, green,
or blue blanket are favourite articles of attire for the early morning or
on a journey. In attending offices Brahmans wear a turban {rwndl)
and a long coat {aiigi), either woollen or cotton. This also is more or
less the costume of the merchant class. A fashion has sprung up
among college students of wearing a sort of smoking-cap instead of a
turban. The ryots are generally content with a turban and a kambli,
with most frequently a short pair of drawers {challand). When not at
work they often wear a blouse or short smock-frock.

The dress of the women is generally very becoming and modest. A
tight-fitting short bodice {kiipsd) is universally worn, leaving the arms,
neck, throat, and middle bare, the two ends being tied in a knot in
front. It is generally of a gay colour, or variegated with borders and
gussets of contrasting colours, which set off the figure to advantage.
In the colder parts, to the west, a somewhat loose jacket, covering all
the upper part of the body and the arms, is worn instead. The shire
or sari, a long sheet, the ordinary colours worn being indigo or a dull
red with yellow borders, is wrapped round the lower part of the body,
coming down to the ankle. One end is gathered into a large bunch of
folds in front, while the other, passed across the bosom and over the
head, hangs freely over the right shoulder. In the west it is tied there
in a knot. The Brahmani women pass the lower end of the cloth
between the legs and tuck it in at the waist behind, which leaves the
limbs more free. Their heads too are not covered, the hair being
gathered into one large plait, which hangs straight down the back, very
effectively decorated at the crown and at different points with richly-
chased circular golden cauls and bosses.

The Vaisya women are similarly dressed, but often with less good
taste. As the fair golden-olive complexion natural to most Brahmani



DRESS 265

girls is much admired, those of the sex who are not so fair smear them-
selves with saffron to produce a yellow tint, and not only on their cheeks
but over their arms and legs. This practice, which seems very common
with the trading class, is by no means attractive. Neither is the habit
of blackening the teeth, adopted by married women. Many fair women
are elaborately tattooed on the arms from the wrist to the elbow. The
Sudra women generally gather the hair into a chignon or bunch behind,
stuffed out with a fleece of wool, and run a large pin through, with an
ornamental silver head to it, which is rather becoming. In the Malnad
the women often do up the back hair in a very picturesque manner,
with a plaited arrangement of the cream white ketaki blossom {patidanus
odoraiissimus), or even with orchid blossoms or pink cluster roses.

Ornaments are commonly worn in the ears and nose, and on the
arms, with rings on the fingers and toes, and as many and costly
necklets and chains round the neck as means will allow. Chains
frequently connect the upper rim of the ear with the ornamental pin in
the back hair, and have a pretty effect. The richer Brahmani and other
girls wear silver anklets, often of a very ponderous make, which are by
no means elegant. A silver zone clasped in front is a common article
of attire among all but the poorer women, and gives a pleasing finish to
the graceful costume.

It would be useless to attempt to go through a description of the
varieties of Hindu dress in different parts. The only marked differ-
ences are in the Malnad, as described under Manjarabad, and the dress
of the Lambani women.

The Muhammadan dress for men differs chiefly in cut and colour,
and in the wearing of long loose drawers. But for undress a piece of
dark plaided stuff is worn like the dhotra. Muhammadans shave the
head completely, but retain all the hair of the face. A skull-cap is worn,
over which the turban is tied in full dress. The women wear a coloured
petticoat and bodice, with a large white sheet enveloping the head and
the whole person, and pulled also over the face.

The higher Hindus wear leather slippers, curled up at the toe and
turned down at the heel, but the labouring classes wear heavy sandals,
with wooden or leather soles and leather straps. The Muhammadans
also wear the slipper, but smaller, and frequently a very substantial big
shoe, covering the whole foot. Women are never shod, except occa-
sionally on a journey, or in very stony places, when they sometimes
wear sandals.

Members of the various Hindu orders are known by the sectarian
marks painted on their foreheads. Married women commonly wear a
wafer-spot or patch of vermilion, or sometimes of sandal-powder, on the



266



EllfNOGRAJ'J/V



forehead. Tiiu Lingayits arc known by the pecuh'ar-shaped silver box,
the shrine of a small black stone emblematic of the linga, which is
worn suspended by a string from the neck and hanging on the chest.
'J'he working-classes of that order often tie the linga in a piece of hand-
kerchief round the arm above the elbow. The commoner religious
mendicants dress in a variety of grotesque and harlequin costumes.
But garments dyed with red ochre or saffron are the commonest indica-
tion of a sacred calling.



Alphabetical List of Castes mentioned in this chapter.



A'chari 248

Ach]iiljc 228

A'di (iianajiga) 246

,, S'aiva 237

,, (Wokkaliga) 229

Agamudi 247

Agani 253

Agarvdla 247

Agasa 223,

226, 247, 250

Agasale 248

Aggada (Banajiga)

246

,, Koracha233

Agni (Tigala) 231

,, Wokkaliga 229

Agramudi 229

Agra Vanniar 231

Aiyangar 236

Akkasale

222, 226, 248
A'kuleti 246

A'ladakapu 229

Aleman 253

AUa 251

Aniaravatiyavaru

254

Ambiga 252

Anche Reddi 229

A'ndhra 234

A'ne Kurulia 213

Angalika 229

A'radhya 241

Arale 246

Aramudi 229

Arasu 227

Arava Beda 256

,, Goila 251

,, Madiga 254

,, I'anchala 248

,, Reddi 229

,, Tigala 231

Aravattokkalu

237-8

A ruvelu 237-8

,, Niyogi 237-8

Asaga 250

Ashtasahasra 237



Attan-kutatar 240 1
Avadhuta 243 {

Ayodhyanagara 247
Ayya 242

I

Babbur Kamme

^ 237, 238
Bachanige 229

Bada Arasu 227

Badagalava 246

Badaganad 237

Badagar 229

Badagi 222, 226, 248
Bailu Akkasale 248 \

, , Kammara

233> 249 I

,, Wodda 255 I
Bairagi 227, 242-3
Bais 237 j

Bajantri 249

Bakkal 247

Balagai 215, 253
Balaji 249

Balajogi 256

Bale 246

Banajiga222-3, 245-6
Bane 251

Banige 251 I

Baniya 227, 245, 247
Banjari 231 [

Bannadava 246 '

Bannagara 245

Banni 251

Banta 246

Barika 256

Baruva 228

Basale 246

Basavi 245

Bavaji 242

Bavane 246

Beda 223, 226, 255
Belagude 229

Belakuvadi 229

Bellala 228

Beiiaia Reddi 229
Belli (Agasa) 250

,, (Besla) 252

,, (Kuruba) 251



Bellikula


253


Chalavadi


253


Bengali


249


Cham


227


Beralukoduva




Chambula


253


228,


230


Chammadi


252


Besta




Chanimdr


254


223, 226, 247,


252


Chandra Bans


227


Bettadpura


239


Chandra Thakiir 227


Betta Kuruba


213


Chapprada


251


Bettale


233


Charanti


241


Bevina Kuruba


213


Chattri


227


Bhagavata 2


36-7


Chavan


227


Bhaniya


228


Chavana


253


Bhat Raju 226,


244


Chillaravar


253


Bhattarachdrya


240


Chippiga


249


Bheri 223,


247


Chitapavan


237


Bheris'etti


246


Chitari


245


Bhogar


229


Chitragara 223


245


Bhoja (Besta)


252


Chittala


229


,, (Wodda)


255


Choli


240


Bhoyi


252


Choliya


251


Bhumda


233


Chunchu


256


Bhumi


253






Bhusa


228


Dabbe


233


Bhutya


231


Daire


258


Bidara


246


Dandasetti


249


Bigamudre


251


Dandi


243


Bilimagga 249-50


Darji 226, 247


249


Biiloru


254


Dasakuta


236


Bilva 212,


253


Dasa Banajiga


246


Binlakur


227


,, (Wokkaliga)229


Birappana Wokkalu


Dasari 226, 234


242




251


,, (Holeya)


253


Bodhdyana


237


Dasavantige


229


Bogavaru


245


Dekal Thakiir


227


Bokkasada


251


Desast'ha 2


37-S


Bondili


227


Des'ayi


246


Boyi"


255


Devaddsi


245


Brahman 226,


233


De\adiga


246


Brahmarishi


231


Devalaka


237


Brihachcharana




Devanga 223,


249


'237-8


Devar


253


Brinjari


231


Devara makkalu 212


Budabudike226


,256


Dhalya


233


Busare


256


Dhanapala


223


Bydlada


251


Dharma Dasari


242






Dharmaraju


246


Chakkili


254


Dharmarajukap


u


Chakra


253




231



LIST OF CASTES



267



Dhatii


227


Clovar 227


I)h(')l)i


250


(judama Dasari 242


1 )humavatpa(!a


231


thidtjangaliga 251


Digambara 242


244


Gudikara 249


Dodava


247


Chijjari 256


Dodd'i


251


Ciundikula 252


Domba 226,


255


(".urust'hala 228,241


Dravida 234, 2


37-«


C'lujarat ^Iochi 254
Gujarali 222, 227,


Edaiyar


251


245, 247


Enibar


240


(iiirjara Brahman


luiiieri


231


234



Oadakanti 229

Clada Lingayit 246
Gaddigeyava 246
Gaharvariya Thakur

221

Gajulabalji 246

Gampa 254

Gampasale 254

Ganadhis'vara 242
Gandhudil^alji 246
Ganga 246

Gangadikara 217,
228-9, 253
Gangemakkalu 252
Ganiga 222, 226,
247, 252
Gaiitijogi 256

Ganiu 233

Garadiga 227, 255,

257
Gaiidamane 228
GaiuUi Brahman 234
, , Tigala 23 1
Gaudakula 252

Gaudu 246

Gaulljans 251

Gauli 251

Gaiiiiga 228

Gaundar 249

Gaurija 255 1

Ciausanige 229

Gayaka 245

Gayakavadi 251
Gaya Thakur 227
Gazula 233

Gejjegara 249

Gerhaiji 246

Ghaniya 229

Golla 223, 226, 247,

251
Gollatc 253

Gondaliga 227, 256
Gongadi 233

Goniga 226, 247,
249-50
Gopdla 25 1

Goppasale 254

Gorava 256

Gosangi 229 i

Gosdyi 227, 242-3



Haiga 216, 237, 239
Hajam 249

Haje Kannatliga

' 237-8

,, Karnatka 237-8

,, Kuril ba 252

Ilajemakkaju 250

Haiepaika 212,

228-30,253

Hajepaiki 212

Hale Tigala 231

Haie Wodda 255

Haili Beda 256

,, Kuruba 251

,, Tigala 231

Hallikara 229-30

Haiu Beda 256



Jadi




252


Jahala \'eljala


229


Jaina 223,


233.


242,




245


247


Jalagara


227


248


Jaman




247


Jambava


251


254


Jamkhanvala


250


Janapa




250


Jangtiliga




256


Jangalpatt


iburusu






255


Jangama




241


Jarupa




255


Jat


227


245


Jattedevara


252


Jatii




257


Jenu Kuru


ba


213,
233


Jetti


255


257


Jhadmali




253


Jinagara




245


Jintra




253


Jogda




232



J6gi226, 232, 255-6
Joti 253

Jotibanajiga 246
Julinagara 252

Jotipana 252



„ Goila


251


Kabbaliga


252


,, Kuruba


2!;2


Kachche Gauli


251


,, Wokkaliga

228-9


Kadambiyar
Kridu Golla


240
251


Hande 2


51-2


, , Kuruba


213.


Hanifi


258


231, 233


251


Hasular


214


Kaikoja 2


45-6


Havika 216,23;


>239


Kaikota


237


Hebbar
Iledigebuva
Heggade
Hegganiga 223
Helava


240

254
252
252
256


Kalayi
Kalkutaka
Kajjar

Kaiiu Wodda
Kalu


246
248
249
255
253


Hema Reddi


228


Kamati


223


Hemniigeyar


240


Kama-wokkalu


229


Hindustani


227


Kanibali


252


Hirihasube


246


Kambaliir 2


37-8


Holeya 215,


223,


Kammadi Kedc


1229


226, 246-7


253


Kammara 222,


226,


Honne Reddi


228


2


48-9


Hosadevara


229


Kammc 2


v-^


Hosa Kuruba
Hoysaniga 2


252
37-8


,, Banajga246
,, Reddi 228


lluvvadiga


246


Kamsi
Kanaka 227


227
256


I'diga 226, 247, 252
llijiatnalkaravaru


Kanakaiyanajat
Kanakkan


1252
244


237
I'raganti MadivaH


Kanchala
Kanchugara


254
222,




250


227,


248


Iruliga 214,


226,


Kandadc


240


231.

Jada


233
249


Kandappajji
Kanda Raju


231
237



Kandavara 237, 239

Kanes'alu 229

Kankar 251

Kannada Agasa 250

,, Banajiga 246

,, Becla 255

, , Devanga 249

,, Ganiga 252

,, Gojja 251

,, Holeya 253

,, Kamnie 237-8

, , K6mati 246

,, Koracha 233

,, Korama 233

,, Kumbara 252

,, Kuruba 252

,, Madiga 254

,, Mochi 251

,, Raju 227

,, Tigala 231

,, Uppara 252

,, Wokkaliga 229

Kannadiga 246

Kannaiyana Jali 256

Kant'ha Pavade 246

Kanva 237

Kanyakubja 224

Kapali 246

Kapu 253

Kapu Reddi 229

Kapus'akalavadu

'250
Karade 237, 239
Karadi 251

Karaje 229

Karhade 239

Kariga 229

Karma 227, 251, 256
Karman 249

Karnata 249

Karnataka (Brah-
man) 234, 237
,, Holeya 253
Karne 251

Karnikar 244

Karu 229

Karukal 229

Kasalnad 237

Katyayana 237

Kavadiga 251

Kavare 246

Kavarga 237, 239
Kausika 239

Kayasla 227, 244
Kelasi 249

Kempala 254

Kempt i 246

Kempu Banajiga 246
,, Golla 251
Kenchala 252

Kliadri \'aishnava

241
Khanulal 232



268



ETIJNOGRAJ'JIY



Khatii 249


Kuruiiattc


253


Khctaval 23 1


Kurus'ivalli


237


Kihiri 251


Ivuruvina


249


Kiliiad 237


Kus'ast haja


237


Kilnatar 240






Kine 22S


Labl;e 257,


259


Kira (laniga 252


Lc-ida 222, 226


245


Kiralaka 256


Lalagonda 229


231


Kodaga 227


Lambadi


231


Kodati Reddi 228


Lambani 226,


231


Kolalii 251


Lankekara


228


Kolania 229


Lingabalji


246


Knlla 246


Linga Banajiga 223,


KdlH Kuruha 213




245


Ki)luva 229


Lingakatti Veljala


Komarapatta 227




229


Komati 223, 226,


Lingayit 226,


228,


245-6


233, 241-2


245


Konar 251


Lokabalike


245


Konda 249


Lokottaraparey


^253


Konclakatte 229






Kondamangala 249


Machi


256


Kondi Reddi 229


Madhva


235


Konga(IIoleya) 253


,, Pennattui


237


Konga Wokkaliga


,, Vaishnav:


1237


229


Madhyanjana


239


Konkanast'ha


Madiga 223,


226,


237, 239


247, 2


53-4


Konkaniga 229


Madivali


250


Koracha 214, 226,


Madya


252


231, 233


Madyandina


239


Korama 214, 231,


^laggada


253


233


Maharashtra


234


Korava 214


Mahdvi


258


Koratakapu 229


Mahratta


228


Kos'ava 252


Mdji


252


Kota 237, 239


Majjana


252


Kotari 227


Majjige


252


Kotegara 229


Mala


253


Kotisvara 237, 239


Malava


228


Kotta Banajiga 246


Malavaru


229


,, Kuruha 252


Maleya


214


Kottadevarakapu


Malla


253


229


Malloru


254


KshatrabMnu 228


Mande


251


Kshatriya 226, 229


Mandyattar


240


Kudike Wokkalu


Manga


228


229


Mangala


249


Kuduchappara 251


Mannu Wodda


255


Kulala 252


Manu


248


Kulibedaga 229


Mapile 257


, 259


Kumari 228


Marabuvva


254


Kumbara 223, 226,


Maradurar


240


, 247, 252


Marasi


246


Kumbi Marvacli 247


]Marata 226


, 228


,, Wokkaliga 229


,, Mochi


254


Kunchatiga 228-9


Marvadi 227,


245,


Kundali 249




247


Kunte 229


Masalu


253


Kuri Golla 251


Matanga


254


,, Kurul)a 252


Matangi


254


Kuruba,2i3, 223-6,


Mattige


253


247, 251


Maval


233



Maya 248

Meda 226, 255

Melpavade 246

Melusakkare 252
Menian 258-9

Metukunteyar 240
Mirasikat 232

Mochi 227, 247, 254
Modayavaru 255
Modihidiyuva 257
Monda 227, 256
Mopi'ir Raju 227
Morabuvvadavaru

254

Morasunad 240

Morasu( Holeya) 253

,, (Madiga) 254

,, Wokkaliga

228, 230
Muchchalamire 256
Mudali 226,245,247
Mudali Wokkaliga

229
Mudusarebalji 246
Mughal 258

Mugla 256

Mulikinadu 237-8
Multani 227, 245,

247
Muncholi 240

Munigalu 254

Murik'inati 250

Murusire 246

Musaku 229

Mushtiga 257

Mutta 246

Muttaraju 246

Muttu 229

Myada 246

Myasa 256

Nagarta 223, 226,
245
Nagaru 246

Nagi 256

Nallanchakravarti

240
Nalla 257

Nallar 253

Namadakula 251
Namadhari 247

Xamburi 237

Namdev 249

1 Nandavaidika 237,

239

Nata 249

Natacharasurti 241

Natamangala 249

Xatuva 226, 245

I Nava Thakur 227

' Navige 252

i Nayadu 246

, Nayaka 255-6



Nayakasani 245
Nayar 227-8

Nayi 251

Nayinda 223, 226,
247, 249
Neita Reddi 229
Nerati ,, 228

Neyigara 226, 247,

249
Nihang^ 243

Nirumelinava 246
Niyogi 237

Nonaba 217, 228-30



Oja
Oswal



248
247



Padala 250

Paclayachinayakan

229
Padmamurikinati

'249
Padma.sale223, 249-

50
Pagadala 246

Pakanati 256

Pakanati Reddi 228
Palaki 252

Palayar 229

Palchankoti 233
Pale 253

Palli 223, 231, 253
Pallegar 256

Palya 229

Paly agar Gauda 239
Palyakar 229

Palyapat 252

Pamar 229

Panan 228

Panasakapu 229
Panchachara Gauda
228, 249
Pancha Gauda 234
Panchagrama 237,
240, 248
Panchaia 222-3,
247-8
Panchamasale 246
Pancharatral 241
Pandaram 227, 256
Pandya Tigala 231
,, Veljala 229
Panne 253

Panneri 229

Paradi 232

Pareya 253

Parivara 252

Parsi 259

Pasali 253

Pasaluvate 246

Pata (Golla) 251
,, Kuruba 252
,, Vadavalu 251



LIST OF CASTES



269



I'alhan


258


1 'attar


248


I'attari


248


I'attasale


249-50


I'atmili


250


I'atm'ili'ikar


249


I'atvegar


249-50


l'e(lakaiitiRed(li228


Peiaguncia


229


Petemane


246


Pettigesalina 229


Pichchakunte 256


Pille


227-8


Pindare


257, 259


I'injari


257, 259


Pitaml^ara


242


Praknad


2X7


Prathamas'akhe




237. 239


Prathama 'S


aish-


iiava


241


Prativadi -


bhayan -


karattar


240


1 'uda


229


Puja


251


1 'iinagu


251


Puiiamale


229


Pari


251



Sajjana (Lingayit)

245
,, (Ganiga) 252
,, (Panchaja) 248
Sakalavadu 250

Sakunasaie 249-50 |
Salar 227

S'ale 249, 251-2
S'aliga 249 50

S'alivahana 252

Salja 251

Samaji 241

Samayogi 243

Samba 231

Saml)ara 251

Samliu
Sanieraya
Saniyar
Sangu
Sankara
Sanketi



Rachevar 226, 228,

245
Raja (Ciolla) 251

,, (Tigala) 231
Rajakula 227

Rajapinde 227

Rajput 227

, , (iauda 227
Raju 227

Raju Reddi 229

Ramavatpada 231
Rampada 253

Ranagara 228

Rangare 222, 249
Ravuta 228

Rayaravuta 252

Rayaroddugara 229
Reddi (Nayinda) 249
,, (Tigala) 231

,, Wokkaliga 22S-9
Roddiigara 229

R(')hila 227

Koppada 253

Rotvad 24S

Sabavat 231

Sada 228

,, Wokkaliga 228-

30
Sadhu 244

Sadhu-vamsastha

250
Sahavasi 237, 239



253
241
256

253

241

237, 239



227,



S'anku Dasari 242
Sannyasi 227, 242
Sara 253

Sarasvata 234

Sarige 247, 252

Satani 226, 233, 241
Sattadhava 241

Satuljeda 233

Saiirashtraka 249-50
Savanti 252

Sayyid 258

Seniga 249-50

Senve 237

S'etti (Kanajiga) 246
,, (Ganiga) 252
,, (Komati) 246
(Korama) 233



Sharif

Shatsthala

Shckh

Sidlukula

Sigroidalu

Silavanta



258
242
258
253
253
245



Sillekyala 227, 256
S'ilpi 249

S'iiiie 229

Singh 227

Singadi 254

Singundi 249

Sirdevara 229

Sirkanakkan 244
Sirkarnikar 244

S^'rnad 237, 239
S'is'uvarga 237, 239
Sishyavarga 239
Sitabhaira 229

Sivachar 247

Sivachara 246

Sivadvija 239, 241
Sivalji 237

Sivanambi 241

Sivdradhya 237



Smarta 235, 237
Sole 229

Soliga 213-4

Soliyas'etti 246

Somesa 253

Someshandal 240-1
Sonajiband 248

Sonar 248

Sonnan 251

Soshya 229

S'ravaka 245, 247
Sresht'ha 252

Srivaishnava 235,
240
Sthaladava 246

SudugacluSidda2i6,
227, 256
Suggala 252

Siikali 231

Sukhamanji 246
S'ukla Vajus s'akhe

237. 239
Sunnakallu 252

Suri 241 I

Suraj Bunsi 227
Svalpa 229

Svari 251

S'vetambara 242,
244

Talukhandiya 227
Tambuli 227

Tamil Agasa 250,

253

,, Holeya 253

,, Kiimbara 252

Tammadi 241

Tanga 253

Tangala 253

Tanigelnivva 254

Telaghanya 237

Tellapi'isala 251

Telugu Agasa 250

,, Banajiga 246

,, Beda 255-6

,, Ganiga 254

,, Goila 251

,, Holeya 253

,, Koracha 233

,, Kumljara 251



Online LibraryB. Lewis (Benjamin Lewis) RiceMysore: a gazetteer compiled for government (Volume 1) → online text (page 32 of 98)