Copyright
Bailey Tyler Bryan.

Stenotypy, the machine way in shorthand online

. (page 1 of 5)
Online LibraryBailey Tyler BryanStenotypy, the machine way in shorthand → online text (page 1 of 5)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


wiSi-^-.:i#^SpilSiSfii^





THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

0¥ CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES






B. 0, BAXEE
UWYER

Dallas -'■



;[email protected]



The Machine Way in Shorthand



Revised by

B. T. BRYAN, Instruction Manager

The Stenotype Company





PEVTSED EDITION



Published by

THE STENOTYPE PRESS

INDIANAPOLIS, U. S. A.



COI'TRIGHT, 1915

THE STENOTYPE COMPANY



Copyright in Great Britain and Canada
Entered at Stationers' Hall



s ^ ^



PREFACE

The StenotAT^e's success diinng the three years it has been
taught in pubHc, private and parochial schools is sufficient evidence
that Stenotypy has improved the recording of speech in the
four most important essentials — ease, speed, accuracy and legi-
bility. By conserving energy it has become an expression of this
age of progress when better and faster methods, applied to a

f2 machine, are constantly supplementing and supplanting the cruder

ti hand methods in every line of endeavor.

>.

^ This manual, the outgrowth of valuable experience, presents

ti a simpler Stenotypy, more easily learned, written, read and taught.
"* In this edition everything unnecessary has been eliminated, but
nothing has been omitted that would help the beginning student
^ or the most expert operator. The system is complete and com-
v> prehensive, adequate to meet the severest test to which it may be
I put.

In presenting this edition to the public grateful acknowledg-
ment is made of the suggestions of teachers, students and writers,
c and especially of the service rendered by Misses Mary McEvoy
^ and Laura H. Smock in compiling it.

B. T. BRYAN
Indianapolis, U. S. A.
August, 1915.



TO THE TEACHER

Accuracy and speed on the Stenotype come with the ability to operate the
naachine easily and evenly with a light stroke and without hesitation between
strokes. This ability is acquired by intelligent and consistent practice and by
continued application of the Stenotypic principles.

FINGER EXERCISES. The results of touch operation with the Stenotype
are so superior to sight writing that the touch method should be used from the
beginning of the course and no other method of operation should be allowed.
To assist students to write by the touch method each of the first ten lessons in
this manual contains a group of Finger Exercises. The purpose of these exercises
is (1) to teach the keyboard and the relation of the letters one to another, (2) to
train the fingers and to make them supple, (3) to review the letters and combi-
nations covered in previous lessons, and (4) to develop the student's power of
concentration and ability to think quickly and accurately.

RHYTHMIC OPERATION, To accomplish their purpose the Finger
Exercises must also become rhythm drills. In other words, they must be dictated
and written in even time to a steady beat. Speed in Stenotypy comes from an
even stroke which can be developed only when the principles are thoroughly
learned and applied to the operation of the machine without mental effort. The
ability to apply the principles of Stenotypy unconsciously is best developed by
rhythmic practice of the Finger Exercises.

WRITING EACH COMBINATION THREE TIMES. In writing the
Finger Exercises students may write each letter or word three times before pro-
ceeding to the next. Then the whole exercise should be practiced again, writing
each letter or word four times. The exercise should hf, written to an even beat
timed by a metronome, care being taken that there is the same lapse of time be-
tween strokes when changing from combination to combination as when writing
the same combination. Practicing rhythm drills occasionally in time to music
gives excellent results. For this purpose a phonograph and dance records can be
used.

ARBITRARY COMBINATIONS. Arbitrary combinations in Stenotypy
should be referred to by the letters they represent rather than by the letters which
compose the combinations. For instance, H R represents /, instead of h-r; and
it should be spoken of only as I. In like manner, l-e instead of h-r-e is the correct
outline for the phrase will-he and n-i instead of t-p-h-e-u is the abbreviation for
any.



TO THE TEACHER



WORD EXERCISES. The Word Exercises should be practiced in much
the same manner as tlie Finger Exercises. Their main purpose is to develop a
light and even stroke and to thoroughly apply the princii)les introduced in the
lesson. The words should be written first by columns and then by lines. The aim
should be a rhythmic operation which will jjroperly coordinate the work of brain
and hands. Speed will come readily wiien an even stroke has been developed.

ABBREVIATIONS. Oral recitation should precede all machine work on
Abbreviations. To assist in learning the abbreviations the new ones are italicized
in the lesson in which they are introduced. It is not enough, however, for stu-
dents to be able to recite perfectly on abbreviations — they must be known so
well that they can be written instantly.

PHRASING SUGGESTIONS. In order to develop the habit of forming
easy and natural phrases, each of the first ten lessons contains Phrasing Sugges-
tiojis. These exercises do not by any means contain all the phrases capable of
being written in Stenotypy, nor is it necessary that these phrases always be written
Their puri)ose is to cultivate the phrasing habit and to enable students to operate
the Stenotype more rapidly and to read their notes more readily. Phrases that
occur in the Setitence Exercises are hyphenated and students should follow these
suggestions in preparing their lessons. Many phrases not found in the Phrasing
Suggestions are to be found in the Practice Phrase List on page 60. This list should
be used for practice purposes when the lessons have been completed. Phrases
should be practiced rhythmically.

SENTENCE EXERCISES. In the Sentence Exercises of each lesson,
practical api)lication is made of every new principle, combination and abbrevia-
tion introduced in the lesson. The j)urpose of these sentences is to develop the
proficiency of students and to impress upon their minds the new lesson, at the
same time giving them further drill in the application of what has already been
learned. The sentences should be practiced many times with a view to devel-
oping the same even, steady stroke that should be the aim of all Stenotype stu-
dents from the first day's work to the last. Therefore, it is better to require the
development of an even stroke than to assign a certain number of copies of a
les.son. Students who are simply writing a certain number of copies will find it
a physical rather than a mental exercise after they have made their first few copies.
On the other hand, when an even stroke is required, with hci^itation eliminated
between strokes, every time the students write the exercise they will find it nec-
essary to concentrate ujion the work, putting forth their best efforts to meet the
requirements.

SUPPLEMENTARY LETTERS. The Supplementary Letters found in the
back of the book j)rovide a thorough aj)])lication and review of everything covered
in the lessons. These should be j)racliced by the students until their maximum



TO THE TEACHER



speed, consistent with a steady, even stroke, has been developed. The 6rst set of
letters should be practiced when Part One has been completed.

STANDARD ABBREVIATIONS AND DERIVATIVES. Thorough
drills should be given on the Standard Abbreviations on page 66, and the Derivatives
on page 64.

SUPPLEMENTARY STENOTYPE READER. After the first lesson in
the manual has been explained and well mastered, machine work on all other les-
sons should be preceded by home study of the exercises in the Supplementary
Stenotype Reader. These exercises will help greatly in familiarizing the student
with the lesson, thus making the machine practice easier and more interesting.
A reading speed of at least one hundred words a minute should be required on the
exercises in the Supplementary Stenotype Reader before any machine work is
allowed.

A PRACTICAL TRAINING. Throughout the entire course it must be
borne in mind that the students are in school to prepare for a useful business
service and that the more practical their training the better able they will be
to serve business as it demands to be served. The best foundation for practical
efiBciency is a thorough knowledge of the principles and theory of Stenotypy
and the allied subjects. Special attention must be given to such phases of the work
as proper names, figures and the method of making insertions and corrections.
Upon a broad and accurate theoretical knowledge may be built a practical effi-
ciency which will meet the highest requirements of business.



TO THE STUDENT



Stenotypy is a system of recording speech in plain English letters by means
of a machine called the STEXOTYPE.

DIVISION OF KEYBOARD. The Stenotype keyboard is divided into




INITIAL CONSONANTS

three groups of letters. The group at the left of the keyboard is composed of
initial consonants which are used to begin words.

The group in the middle of the keyboard contains the vowels, which may
be combined to form diphthongs.

The group at the right of the keyboard is composed of final consonants used
to end words. In this text the final consonants will be preceded by hyphens to
distinguish them from initial consonants. In speaking of the letters on the key-
board, therefore, -R should be called "final R" and R, "R." \

COMBINATIONS. The Stenotype keyboard is composed of twenty-one
letters. Letters not on the keyboard are formed by combination of the keyboard
letters; for example, the letter "I" does not appear on the keyboard, but is rep-
resented by EU. These Combinations are such, however, as are rarely sounded
in any English word.

OPERATION OF MACHINE. Unlike the keys of a typewriter, which
have a common center or striking point, the keys of the Stenotype have individual



TO THE STUDENT



centers and always strike in the same relative positions on the paper. This enables
the writer to strike any or all of the keys at once. In this way a word or a phrase
containing several words may be written at a stroke. When the keys are struck,
the paper automatically feeds forward for a new line.

SEQUENCE OF LETTERS. The upper letter of each pair prints just
at the left of the lower one. If all the keys are struck at the same time the follow-
ing line is written across the paper:

STKPWHRAO*EUFRPBLGTSDS

FINGERING. The correct position of the fingers is directly over the space
between the upper and lower rows of keys. Each finger controls two keys with
the exception of the little finger of the left hand, which operates only the letter
S. The little finger of the right hand operates TS and DS, only one pair being
operated at a time, however.

TOUCH. The touch method only should be used. The fingering should
always be easy and natural. The keys should be struck lightly, but firmly, and
then released quickly, leaving the hands free for the next stroke. In releasing
the keys, the fingers should be raised only enough to clear them. The hands
should be kept directly over the keyboard ready for instant operation. A hori-
zontal line from elbow to knuckle is the correct position, and the wrist stroke
should be used rather than the hand pressure. The muscles of the hand and
arm should be relaxed at all times.

SPACE KEY. The lower key in the center of the keyboard is the Space
Key. This key when struck feeds the paper forward without printing and may
be oi)crated with the forefinger of cither hand. The use of this key is necessary
only in very special instances, however.

ERRORS. The upper key in the center of the keyboard writes a star.
This key is operated by the forefinger of either hand. Should an error occur in
writing, strike the star and then write the word correctly.

ABBREVIATIONS. Many common words are abbreviated instead of
being written in (ull. They should not be followed by a period.

OUTLINED WORDS. The Stcnotypic outline when given for a word in
this text is the i)ropcr one to use and shoukl n(jt be deviated from in any particular.

SPEED. Si)eed on the STENOTVPF^ is proportionate to the development
of a light, even stroke. The student who eliminates waste time and motion be-
tween strokes will attain speed easily.



PART ONE



I



LESSON ONE



IIQBIIIIII
IIOiQIill




lMK9\




COMBINATIONS

HRfor/ STPH for ? (interrogation)

EU t and vowel ^ -FPLT . (period)

- F -/ and -v

1. FORMATION OF WORDS. Omit all silent letters. Hay,
HA.

(a) "Write consonants according to sound. Laugh, HRAF.

(b) Write vowels according to spelling, omitting those not
sounded. Rare, RAR; oar, OR; our, OUR.

FINGER EXERCISES

Note: These exercises should be practiced until they can be written easily
and lightly, with an even stroke.

1. h, r, 1, a, o, e, u, i, -f, -r, -fr.

2. hay, hoe, hue, high, ray, row, rue, rye.

3. lay, low, lea, Lou, lie.
4- oar, ear, ire, off, eve.

5. hay, row, lea, hire, half.

6. I hear a rough roar.

7. I love a rare laugh.



STENOTYPY



WORD EXERCISE

Note: The following words should be written first by columns, then by
lines, until they can be written easily, lightly, and without hesitation between
strokes.

half hive rough leave hear lore

hove rave rive live hire leer

heave rove laugh hare rare lure

huff reef love hoar roar lyre (24)

ABBREVIATIONS

Note: Oral recitation should precede machine work on abbreviations. They
should be practiced until thoroughly mastered.

had h will (verb) 1 your ur

are r or -r you u of, have -f

PHRASING SUGGESTIONS

Note: Time enough should be given to the reading and writing of these simple
phrases to secure ready recognition. Oral recitation should precede
machine work.



had-a


lia


had-ijou


hu


had-I


hi


are -you


ru


will-a


la



will-have


1-f


will-you-have


luf


you-havc


uf


I -ha re


if


you- are


ur



SENTENCE EXERCISE

Note: Practice these sentences until oacli can be written smoothly and con-
tinuously, without conscious effort. Speed w'ill come in proportion as the
waste time between strokes is eliminated.

1. Are-^ou here? O)

2. I had-a loaf. (4)

3. I hear your laugh. (4)

4. l-have a low laugh, (s)
6. Ilad-you had-a. hoe? (5)

6. Will-you-hare half of a loaf? (7)



STENOTYPY



LESSON TWO

COMBINATIONS

A U for aw U for ow

AO 00 U ew (except in sew, which is

written SO)

FINGER EXERCISES (Follow directions in Lesson One)

1. h, -f, r, -r, a, u, o, e, i, a, u, au, o, u, ou, a, o, oo.

2. hay, ray, lay, half, rave, laugh.

3. haw, how, hew, raw, row (ROU), rue.
4- hoe, row (RO), low, hove, rove, loaf.

5. hoof, roof, law, lure.

6. high, rye, lye, hive, rife, life.

WORD EXERCISE (Follow directions in Lesson One)

hay high ray rye hew hoof

hoe haw row (RO) raw Lou roof (i7)

hue how rue row (ROU) lure

ABBREVIATIONS (Follow directions in Lesson One)
already 1-r ever, every -fr he e

little li on o help he

2. COMPOUND WORDS AND DERIVATIVES. If an

abbreviation forms part of a compound word or a derivative,
the abbreviation should be used for the part of the word
it represents. Whoever, HOFR; however, HOUFR.

PHRASING SUGGESTIONS (Follow directions in Lesson
One)
had-he he had-you-ever hufr will-you-ever lufr

had-he-ever hefr will-he le are-^ou-ever rufr

had-I-cver hifr will-he-ever lefr are-a ra



STENOTYPV



SENTENCE EXERCISE (Follow directions in Lesson One)

1. \\\\[-he leave here? (4)

2. Will-Ae-have your help? (5)

3. Are-you on-every high reef? (6)
Jf. Will-you help her a little? (6)

5. I-have already had-a row (ROU). (6)

6. Yshoever I hear will-have a rye loaf. (8)



STENOTYPY



LESSON THREE



IBBBillll
IQQBBIill




COMBINATIONS

PW for b PH for m

FINGER EXERCISES

1. p, w, b, p, h, m, h, r, I, a, o, oo, a, u, au, o, u, ou.

2. b, 1, m, oo, i, au, ou, -fr.

3. pay, way, bay, pave, wave, brave.

4. pay, hay, may, pare, hare, mare.

5. bay, lay, may, bow, low, mow.

6. bare, more, beef, muff, buy, mire.

3. EI AND EY WORDS. Write A for ei and ey when they
have the sound of a, as in weigh, WA ; prey, PR A.



ORD


EXERCISE










pea


buff


my


brew


blue


wife


pew


bear


mere


brief


bluff


war


pie


bore


prey


proof


weigh


wore


pour


beer


prue


plea


woe


wire


peer


burr


pry


play


woo


whey


pure


me


prow


plow


we


whiff


bee


mew


bray


blow


wove


whir(42)



STENOTYPY



ABBREVIATIONS



about

after

before

look

make



b
af
b-f
loo



party
reply

were, with
what
ichen



par

pli

w

wa

we



where

whether

which

would

write



wr

wh

wi

wo

ri



PHRASING SUGGESTIONS



about-a

about-^ou

aboui-^our

were-a

were-I



ba

bu

bur

wa

wi



irith-yoii
when-have
when-are
tvhen-yoii



wu whcre-you wru

wcf where-are wr-r

wer irhether-he whe

weu n'hether-you wliii



when-yoii-have weuf which-of wif



were-you-cvcr wufr we-are wcr

with-a wa we-have wcf



would-you wou



SENTENCE EXERCISE

/. When ivcre-you tvith-her? (5)

2. What would-you write about? (5)

3. Which plow would-you buy ? (5)

4. Where will-you leave her muff? (6)

5. Look about-you before you make reply. (7)

6. I may hear whether-he would pay her. (8)

7. I-have about-a half hour after our party. (O)



STENOTYPY



LESSON FOUR



IBBBBBIII




COMBINATIONS

'fPior-ch,-dg -PB for -n

-RB -sh, -zh

FINGER EXERCISES

1. -f, -p, -ch, -f, -p, -dg, -r, -b, -sh, -r, -b, -zh, -p, -b, -n, p, w, b,
p, h, m.

2. b, 1, ra, oo, au, ou, i, -fr, -ch, -dg, -sh, -zh, -n.

3. patch, watch, batch, hatch, match, latcli, badge, Madge.
^. mush, push, bush, rush, hush, plush.

5. ban, moan, lean, run, pin, boon.

G. botch, mash, ledge, bun, reach, wish.



ORD EXERCISE








each


bleach


Madge


heap


pup


hitch


edge


ash


rap


pipe


wretch


hedge


hash


rope


web


rich


ridge


rash


reap


bib


peach


lodge


lash


ripe


hub


pitch


ledge


wash


lap


rob


witch


pledge


plush


loop


rub


beach


wedge


blush


leap


rib


preach


budge


hope


lip


ran


breach


bridge


hoop


peep


roan



8




STEXOTYPY






lane


pen


bone may




map


lone


pun


bean mow




man


line


warp


brawn mare




moon


loin


whip


brown moor




men


pawn


one (WOPB) prune mire




mine (75)


ABBREVIATIONS








appreciate


presh


ob'ject, object' ob


public pub


be, been


-h


open op


shall


-sh


importaitt, -re por


opinion pin


than


-n


much


-eh


principal, -le \mn


usual


, -ly uzli


PHR.\SING SUGGESTIONS






I~have-bec7i


ifb


wliat-I-have-been


waifb


we-havc-bcen wefb


would-you-be




woub


he-shall


esh


icon Id-you-ever-i


be


woufrb


you-.shall


ush


loordd-yon-hare




wouf


ice-shall


wesh


woidd - yon-have-


-been


woufb


had-you-been hub


irovld-I-have-been


woifb


will-he^be


Icb


ich ich-have-been




wifb


will-you-be


lub


which-are




wir


what-he


wae


u'hcre-yoii-are




wrur


what-you


wau


u'h eth er-you-have-bcen


whufb


ichat—you-are wavir


u'h ether-you-a re




whur


irliat-l-have


waif


niay-l-have




maif



SENTENCE EXERCISE

1. Public opinion w'lW-be important. (5)

2. We usually leave our barn open. (O)

3. ^Vllat will-6e your principal object? (o

4. Of what importance will-your opinion be? o

5. You-have-6ee/i here much more-t}ian vsiial. (S)
G. I-shall appreciate your opinion of our bridge. (S)

7. 'Will-he object when we-have her here? (s)

8. We wish you would look after our i)ipc line, (o)

.9. ^Yill-you pledge me your help with-each principle? w

10. I hope one of our men will-/^c principal. (9)



B. 0. BAKER

STENOTYPY LAWYER 9



I.. -:. TLXAS
LESSON FIVE

BIBIII




86




COMBINATIONS

K for A: and hard c TP for/

IK d KYI qu

-RBGS , (comma)

FINGER EXERCISES

1. t, k, d, t, p, f, k, w, qu, -f, -p, -ch, -f, -p, -dg, -r, -b, -sh, -r,
-b, -zh, -p, -b, -n.

2. d, b, 1, f, qu, m, -ch, -dg, -sh, -zh, -n.

3. teach, catch, ditch, tan, pone, fin.

4. cash, wish, queen, quaff, queer, quire.

5. dish, fetch, c{uip, fish, ditch, fawn.

6. laugh, bore, den, mush, fetch, queer.

4. AI WORDS. ^Mien ai occurs in a word write AEU, though
the i is silent. Fair, TPAEUR; fain, TPAEUPB; rain, RAEUPB.

WORD EXERCISE

to tear (TAR) tape tone cow

tea tore top ten coy

tie tour tip town calf

toy tire tan tin cough



10




STENOTYPY




care


drain


fresh


clay


fair


core


drone


flash


clew


fain


cap


drove


flesh


clap


hair


cup


drear


flush


clip


pair


cab


drip


quaff


club


lair


cub


droop


quash


clutch


tray


cane


far


queer


clan


tree


cone


fear


quire


clown


true


keen


fun


quip


clean


try


dare


free


queen


clash


train


door


flay


crow


clear


though


deaf


flow


crew


throw


thee


dray


flew


cry


three


thigh


dry


fly


crutch


through


then


drive


flare


crash


lain


thin (99)


drew


floor


crave


rain





ABBREVIATIONS



can k


jrom


fr


think thi


currespcmd kor


if


f


take ta


could, company ko


include


klu


thank, that tha


did d


inform, -aiion


for


their, there thr


enclose, inclose klo


inquire, -y


quir


they the
this th


HIL\SING SUGGESTIONS






could-you


to-have




can-I


could-you-ever


to-have-been


can-he


could-you-be


if-I




can-he-ever


could-you-have


if-he




can-you-have


could-you-have-been


if-you




can-you-ever


could-you-ever -be


if-we




can-you-be


could-hc-have


they-have




froni-you


could-I


they-have-been


froni-your


could-I-have-been


thank-you






to-be


that-you







STENOTYPY 11



SENTENCE EXERCISE

1. Can-you keep that queer dish? (6)

2. We-shall correspond with-her for information. (7)

3. They may enclose-yowv fob with-her inquiry. (8)
4-1 think I-shall take her with me. (8)

5. There-Sixe few who care to inquire about her. (9)

6. D id-yon inquire whether they-eyer hear from her.'* o)

7. When-you were with-our company, did-you catch fresh
fish? (11)

S. If-yon could inform her about this train, we would thank-
yon. (12)

9. They-are too poor to pay for much information about
their boy. (i2)

10. If-yon could inquire for me, I would include you with-our
party. (i3)



12



STENOTYPY



LESSON SIX



COMBINATIONS

TPH for 71

KWR y and consonant i



TKPW for g



FINGER EXERCISES

1. t, p, h, n, k, w, r, y, t, k, p, w, g, t, k, d, t, p, f, k, w, qu.
£. d, b, g, 1, ni, f, n, qu, y, -ch, -dg, -sh, -zli, -n.
3. gnash, gash, yawn, noun, gown, yore.
4' grip, nap, year, glean, noon, yarn.
5. grief, notch, glove, niche, gun, near.

WORD EXERCISE



nay


none


gore


groin


glen


no


known


gear


green


yore


knee


nun


gap


grape


yon


new


nine


gain


grope


yawn


nigh


niche


gush


grab


yearn


gnaw


nudge


gray


grub


chafT (KHAF)


now


grudge


grow


glove


chair


knave


gay


grew


glare


chop


kjiife


gave


groove


glib


chin (47)


near


give









ABBREVIATIONS



again


gan


furnish


fur


question


que


any


ni


in


n


today


da


enthusiasm, -


I, -tic tliu


number


no


why


y


file


fi


per'fed, perfect'


l)er


yes


ye


F. 0. B.


fob


pres'ent, present'


pre







STENOTYPY 13



PHRASING SUGGESTIONS

in-a if-we-ever did-lie

in-our if-we-have-been did-I

why-you-have if-you-have did-you

why-you-are if-you-are did-we

why-you-ever if-you-ever did-he-ever

if-I-have if-you-have-been did-I-ever

if-I-ever from-our did-you-have

if-we-have from-a who-are

if-we-are from-every

SENTENCE EXERCISE

1. Today we-shall give you a 'perfect gear. (8)

2. He will-be an enthusiast about this war. (8)

3. We may help-you to 'perfect your plan, (s)

4. Our fair will-be m-your town this year. (9j

5. Are-you enthusiastic about-our new present for her? cg)

6. We-shall /wrnzs/i a, file F. 0. B. with-each gun. (ii)

7. There-are amj numher-oi men who may -present our ques-
tion. (11)

8. Why are-you again enthusiastic about-your present numher-
of men? (ii)

9. Yes, our enthusiasm will help to furnish more-than we-have
today. (12)

We-have your inquiry today about new bridge company.
We think this present company will pay cash for what-you fur-


1 3 4 5

Online LibraryBailey Tyler BryanStenotypy, the machine way in shorthand → online text (page 1 of 5)