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Book_lE^\A.



Gopyright^i" ^

COPXRJGHT DEPOSIT.



Vol. viii; r



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jALTIMORL

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The Mosf Seasonable Time
To Visit Ihe World's Fair



SEASON EXCURSION TICKETS w. II be sold daily dur-
ing the period of the Exposition. v,ith final return linm
of December 15. 1904.

SIXTY-DAY EXCURSION TICKETS w,:i be sold d.i.ly
during the period of the Exposition, with final return limit
of sisty ( bO) days, but no' later th.in December 15, I '^04.

FIFTEEN-DAY EXCURSION TICKETS will be sold
daily during the period of the Exposition, with final return
limit of fifteen I 15 ) days, including date of sale.

COACH EXCURSION TICKETS w,U be sold only tor
specified dates and trams. Tickets will be good in DAY
COACHES only on special or des-gnated trains going,
and on regular trains returning, limited for return passage
leaving St. Louis not later than ten (10) days, including
date of sale.

SrOP-OVERS.

STOP-OVER not exceeding ten ( 10) days .it each point will
be allowed on Season, Sixty (60) day and Fifteen (15)
day excursion tickets, in cither or both directions within
return limit, at Cincinnati, 0., Mitchell, Ind, (for visitors
to French Lick or West Baden Springs, Ind.), and at
Chicago (on tickets reading via Chicago). To secure
stop-over, passengers must notify conductor and deposit
ticket with Depot Ticket Agent immediately on arrival.

STOP-OVER not exceeding ten (10) days will be allowed at
St. Louis en all one-way and round-trip tickets (except
Colonist tickets to the Pacific Coast) reading to points
beyond St. Louis, upon deposit of ticket with Validating
Agent and payment of fee of $ 1 .00.



EXCURSION FARES.



I K



iM



t.ir



New York, N. Y. ..$34.00

Philadelphia, Pa. .. 34.00

Chester, Pa. 34.00

Wilmington. Del. 34.00

Newark. Lei 34.00

Baltimore. Md 33.60

Wa.shington. D.C.. 33.60

Hagerstown. Md 33.20

Frederick. Md. - . - 33.60

Cumberland, Md 30.40

Grafton. W.Va 27.20



'.. I».i\

$28.35
28.35
28.35
28.35
28.35
28.00
28.00
27.70
28.00
25.35
22.70



islXu
1 .tre

$23.25
23.25
23.25
23.25
23.25
23.00
23.00
22.75
23.00
2 1.00
10. 00



I-art-
$18.00
(7.00
17.00
17.00
I 7,00
17.00
17.00
lo.OO
16.00
15.00
13.00



ROtTES.

The above fares apply via Cincinnati or vja Chicago in both
directions; or going via Cincinnati and returning via
Chicago; or going via Chicago and returning via Cincin-
nati. Tickets will be accepted via Pittsburg.

Corresponding Rales irom olher Polnls.

For_addilional_ informalion concerninu rnules. r ales . Jl me o i
trains, etc.. call on ticket agents.




A








World's Fair
Service



New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore
Washington, Cincinnati and
St. Louis Line

Three vestibuled trains daily each
way comprise the excellent service be-
tween the Great Eastern Cities and the
World's Fair. The " Nation's Highway "
to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition.
Trains are modem throughout. Coaches
are marvels of comfort. Drawing-Room
Sleeping Cars are spacious. Dining Car
service unexcelled. Scenery world-re-
nowned.

(See time tables herein.'



Pittsburg, Columbus, Cincinnati
and St. Louis Line

Three vestibuled trains daily each
»ray comprise the excellent service be-
tween Pittsburg, Wheeling and St. Louis
morning, noon and night. These trains
have entirely new equipment. Day trains
with Cafe and Dining Cars and the night
trains \vith Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars.
Coaches are of new design with spring-
raising windows and sanitary ventilation.

The World's Fair Flyer i"ves Pittsburg

at 1.30 p. m.

daily. Sohd vestibuled train with through
Coaches, Sleeping Car and Dining Car.

Lv I'lTTSBUKG 8.30 am 1.30 pin 8 50 piii

Lv WHF.tLING 10.453111 3.43 |>lli tl.35 pin

Lv COLUMBUS a.35|>iii 7.20 piii 3 50 am

Ar CINCINNATI 55opni 10 30 pni 7.303111

.\r ST. LOUIS 7.133111 7.583111 6 00 pin



THE




irnomiDiFiB

]D(



EXHIBIT AT THE



World's Fair



Is the most remarkable railway
exhibit in the world showing the
evolution of transportation on the



First American Railroad



From 1828 to 1904



With exhibitions of locomotives frori

the first attempts to use steam

as a motive power



The Baltimore & Ohio

Was the pioneer in all
railway problems



PROGRESSIVE AND AGGRESSIVE



The First Railway to Form

Connections between

Atlantic Seaboard and

Mississippi River



is

Modern

Throughout



Is

Magnificently
Equipped




LfeRAfTYif bONGRFSS
Two Conies Rewlved
OCT 12 1904

Onovrlrht Fntrv
CLASS I3 yXc. No



X Onov



Book of the Royal Blue.



PUKI.IS[1KI) MoNl HI.V.

CorvRic.ii 1, i()o4. I'Y THE Passenger Departmem'. Hamimoke Ot Oiiio Raiikhah.

resti-lii-\i- tliat an\ inij man hejjged

Notwitlistandini; these pleasant relations pite(>iisl\ hut to no purpose, for the I'enn-
tiie lieretot'ore happy liomeot' Mr. Swindley syKani.in uas steadfast, and tile last hreatll
is anythino- but |)leasant and eonit'ortable ot' tlie f'aitlit'ul ('atholi in;; out just so soon as
members of the family h.ive so far eseaped. they were li;;hted. I'he nlus.d ot the
riie heretofore eontented and happ> family eandles to furnish hixUt was the tirst siyns
now live in fear of having- their house en- of anythinn' unusual, but this was accounted
tirely destroyed, for every effort has been for by a suppositiiui that salt had t in the
made to detect the source of annoyance tallow before the t:dlow dips were run"
and danger, but without avail. The neish- (molded). Next d.n the stransei" was
bors and friends of Mr. Swindley have bm-ied in the country chnrchy.ird, and that
joined in the wati'h both da> and night, niiiht there were all kiiuK of (|ueer doings
but the stones continue to come at intervals in the Livingston homt'. ( rockery and glass-
in perfect showers. The mystery is added ware fell from the cupbo.ird .ind sm.ished
to by the fact that the house is in the open on the Hoor : the old wooden churTi danced
and there is no place where the stone the X'irginia Reel over the floor; the bed
throwers coulil conceal themselves. There clothes were torn andcut tofnizzles : bridles,
being no mountains or hills within miles, it s.iddles and harness were i-ut and rii>ped :
is certain that the stones cannot come from plow lines twisted and tied in a hundred
them. .\nother i)eculiar fact is that many knots: and many other just such things.
of the stones which have been thrown on 'I'he following night great stones rolled
;ind in the house are not of the same Hinty down the massive stone I'hinnn-y .nul c.i\-
eharacter as those in this section. orted .around the room. 'I'hese in.inifest.i-

Many of the best i)eople of the valle> tions continued, and Mr. I.i\irigston had .1
have visited the home of Mr. Swindle\ to "vision," in which he was told th.it he
witness the shower of stones and to aid must see a man in robes and that this robed
him if possible in detecting from whence man would sto|) the str.ange proceedings.
they come. If the annoyance continues it Without del.i\ Mr. Livingston pidled out
is safe to assert that a splendid country for Winchester and sought Rev. Alex
home will he offered for sale. Old people Malm.iine, .m I'.piseopal nnnister. Rev.
here say that they ha\e never known of H.ilni.iine convinced the thoroughly tright-
anything so bad as this, but they tell that ened man th.it he was not the robed
"mother and father went through wiirse indi\iiiu.il he h.id si-eii in his vision and
than this," when it was not safe for anyone that he u. is not in the businiss ot removing
to go to Smithfield, now known by this " spells," ghosts, and things ot like nature.
name as well as Clip.ind Middleway, letters Then Mr. Livingston hurried to Shepherds-
coming to the ottice addressed to .ill three town ,iiul s.iw F.itlier ( '.ihill, the Catholic
names. It is claimed that man.\ ye.irs ,igo priest who w.is in th.it missionary field.
a man ii.iined Adam Livingston, a native Father t'ahill. so the stor\ goes, went to
of I'ennsylvania, settled at Smithfield, bu.\- tin- home of Mr. Livingston .md stojiped
ing a tract of L2.) acres, and proceeded to tin- gliostl.\ programme tor a\\ hile. When
make himself a comfort.ablc home. One day i'\er\lhiiig w.is moving .ilong in a (luiet
a stranger appeared at the Li\ ingston home m.inncr Nh'. Livingston l)elie\ed he w.is on
and w.is taken in as a boarder until he could safe ground and beg;in a tirade against the
regain his iiealth. The boarder, so the {'.itholics, .ibusing the dead and the living.
natives sa> . became \ery ill and asked that Tlun his troubli-s returned tenfold in e\cn
a i)riest be sent for, Mr. Livingston, who worse form than In-fore In- had sci n the
was strong in the Protestant faith, told the priest, .ind he was lin.ill> eoinpellcd to
sick man th.it no Catholic priest could enter vacate the housi-. Tin farm is now known
his house; that if it reipiired the services .is " I'riestfield. "



CAVES OF REFUGE.



SOME UNIQUE REMINDERS OF WAR TIMES IN MISSISSIPPI.



AF'I'KH a canipainn of six nioiitlis diir-
ation and iit-arl> tun iiKintlls vifror-
ous sicjff, till' (■(iiitV'dfi'atc hattcrii's
' ' lit' \ ickshiii-i;. Miss., wliicli had

attfiiiptt-d to ml) a nation of the most
majestic ri\cr on tllc kU'I'^'- feW, .ind tin-
Mississippi was thi"()\vn open tortlu' unre-
stricted eoinnier their knittinjr for six lonu'
months, .and if we had'nt run so devilish
shy on jirul) we mi{;ht have been fiirhtin;;
yet. Hut, .as I say, they wiped us out, .and
.about .ill that we had left w.is tiiese cellars
and eaves around here, where the timid
fellows, old men. women .and children took
refuije during: the siejie. I'he boys left



these with us as mementoes of the scrap,
but, by jinyii, after all these years, I'ncle
Sam — and I'm on jfood terms with him
now — has come alon;; and swi|)e(l up the
List remainiiif; cave and it is included in
the National Park. Rifjht



Online LibraryBaltimore and Ohio railroad company.om old catBook of the Royal blue (Volume 3) → online text (page 1 of 44)