Bangor and Aroostook Railroad Company St. Louis Southwestern Railway Company.

Annual report to the directors and stockholders online

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age of the total tonnage transported, the revenue derived from
cotton forms quite a large percentage of the total freight revenue.

The increase in the grain movement of 19,989 tons, or 32.57
per cent., does not indicate an unusual movement of this com-
modity, but is due to the exceptionally light grain tonnage of
the preceding year, against which comparison is made.

The tonnage of hay shows a good increase over the preceding
year, and the increase represents principally business which
originated on this line.

The increase in the tonnage of vegetables of 6,911 tons or
44.73 per cent., is attributable to the further development of
water melon production in southeast Missouri, and to fruit and
vegetable production in eastern Texas.

The live stock movement was substantially increased during the
current fiscal year by 6,943 tons or 13.56 per cent. , which is very
gratifying in view of the strong competition for this class of freight.

Miscellaneous freight, which includes all car-load freight not
classified under other headings, increased 11,137 tons, or 11.38
per cent.



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36



TRAFFIC.



The information shown in the table of ** Classification of Ton-
nage" on page 34, subdivided under ** Tonnage originating on
this system'* and ** Tonnage received from connecting roads/'
will be found in the following tables :

Tonnage Originating on this System.



COMMODITIBS.



Year ended
June 30, 1896.



Tons.



Per
Cent,
of com-
modity
toUl.



Year ended
June 30. 1895.



Tons.



Per
Cent,
of com-
modity
total.



Increase.



Tons.



Decrease.



Tons.



Lumber

Cotton

Cotton seed products . .

Grain

Flour

other mill products . .

Hay

Tobacco

Vegetables

Live stock

Bacon

Merchandise

Coal (inclnd'K charcoal)

Oil

Suffar

Agricultural implements

Emigrant outfit

Salt

Wine, liquors and beer .
Miscellaneous



ToUl.



689.948

90.914

66,522

53.553

8.204

9.294

23.237

13

11,791

42,364

697

30,783

21,508

768

327

376

2.560

926

447

50.025



91.04

93.13

93.25

65.82

13.98

60.74

64.98

3.25

52.73

72.86

5.60

45.19

41.31

6.24

4.66

10.79

31.52

9.50

7.55

45.89



638,027

148,520

96,825

38,168

9,731

7,182

19,019

18

8,513

35,362

394

28,387

9.650

3,293

348

612

1,976

222

257

37,145



1,104.257



74.26



1,083,649



91.38
91.10
90.95
62.19
16.88
33.48
65.61

4.83
55.10
69.06

3.70
44.01
20.43
24.91

4.54
16.93
27.77

2.60

4.52
37.95



51.921



15.385

2,112
4.218

3,278
7,002
303
2.3%
11.858



584

704

190

12.880



8.14



40.31

29.39
22.18

38.51

19.80

76.90

8.44

122.88



29.55

317.12

73.93

34.67



73.70 112.831 — 92.223 —



57.606
30.303



1.527



2.525

21

236



38.79
31.30



15.69



27.78



76.68
6.03
38.56



Tonnage Received from Connecting Roads.



COIOCODITIBS.



Year ended
June 30, 1896.



Tons.



Per
Cent,
of com-
modity
total.



Year ended
June 30, 1895.



Tons.



Per
Cent,
of com-
modity
toUl.



Increase.



Tons.



Decrease.



Tons.



Lumber

Cotton

Cotton seed products . .

Grain

Flour

Other mill products . .

Hay

Tobacco

Vegetables

Live stock'

Bacon

Merchandise

Coal (includ'g charcoal)

Oil

Sugar

Asrricultural implements

Emigrant outfit

Salt

Wine, liquors and beer .
Miscellaneous

ToUl



67,925

6,707

4,814

27,814

50.469

6,008

12,522

387

10,569

15,783

11,751

37,342

30.558

11,539

6,688

3,108

5,562

8,820

5,470

58,985



8.96
6.87
6.75
34.18
86.02
39.26
35.02
96.75
47.27
27.14
94.40
54.81
58.69
93.76
95.34
89.21
68.48
90.50
92.45
54.11



382,821



25.74



60,152

14,502

9,631

23,210

47,922

14,272

9,970

355

6,936

15,842

10.253

36,117

37.5%

9,927

7.309

3,003

5,140

8,308

5,435

60,728



8.62
8.90
9.05
37.81
83.12
66.52
34.39
95.17
44.90
30.94
96.30
55.99
79.57
75.09
95.46
83.07
72.23
97.40
95.48
62.05



386,608



26.30



7,773



4,604
2,547

2,552

32

3,633

1,498
1,225

1,612

105

422
512
35



12.92



19.84
5.32

25.60

9.01

52.38

14.61
3.39

16.24

3.50

8.21

6.16

.64



7,795 53.75
4,817,50.02



8.264157.90



59



.37



7,038 18.72
621 8.50



1,743; 2.87



26,550 —



30,337



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TRAFFIC. 37

The first of these tables is especially interesting as reflecting
the resources of the country traversed, and^the fact^that 74.26
per cent, of the total tonnage transported originated on this
System must be taken as a healthy indication of the productive-
ness of the contiguous country.

New industries located along this line during the year ended
June 30th, 1896, and extensions of old industries during the
same period are as follows :

St. Louis Southwestern Railway.

Dale, Mo. (M. P. 4)— Saw mill erected.

Jonesboro, Ark. — Large heading factory erected. Flour mill
erected.

Pine Bluff, Ark. — Stave factory erected.

Fordyce, Ark. — Capacity of the Fordyce Lumber Company's
saw mill increased from 60,000 to 100,000 feet per day.

Thornton, Ark. — ^The Yellow Pine Lumber Manufacturing
Company has put in a new mill increasing its daily capacity
from 40,000 to 150,000 feet per day.

Best's Switch, Ark. (M. P. 320)— A new mill has been built
doubling the capacity at this point.

Onalaska, Ark. (M. P. 328)— The Cotton Belt Lumber Com-
pany has erected a laige mill with a daily capacity of 100,000
feet. They are at present operating a mill at M. P. 370, where
the lumber is about cut out, and which will be abandoned during
the fall of 1896.

Lumber, Ark. (M. P. 376) — New saw mill is in process of
erection.

St. Louis Southwestern Rah^way op Texas.

Texarkana, Tex. — The Texarkana Oil & Delinting Company
has built a plant for the purpose of delinting cotton.

Redwater, Tex. — A 60-saw gin, capacity 10 bales per day,
has been erected.

Naples, Tex. — A large shingle mill has been erected.



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38 TRAFFIC.



Mt. Pleasant, Tex. — A saw mill to cut oak and pine lumber,
capacity 15,000 feet per day, has been erected. A paint factory
has been erected at Material yard, about one-l^alf mile west of
station. The material for making this paint is clay, which is
found abundant in this vicinity. All colors of paint will be
manufactured except white. The Dallas Brewing Company has
put in an ice and beer house a short distance from the depot.

Mt. Vernon, Tex. — A large brick yard has been erected.

Greenville, Tex. — An oil mill of 80 tons capacity has been
erected.

Carrollton, Tex. — A 60-saw cotton gin, capacity 10 bales per
day, has been erected.

Wolfe City, Tex. — A foundry and machine shop has been
erected.

Smith's Mill, Tex. (M. P. 500.8) — A new saw mill with a daily
capacity of 15,000 feet has been erected.

Pritchett, Tex. (M. P. 516.1) — A new saw mill with a daily
capacity of 20,000 feet has been erected.

Lignite, Tex. (M. P. 586) — A lignite bed of coal has been
opened up with vein of about seven feet in thickness.

Corsicana, Tex. — In boring an artesian well an oil vein was
discovered about 1,000 feet below the surface. Wells are being
sunk to tap this oil vein, which promise well, both as to quality
and quantity.

Waco and East Waco, Tex. — Plants have been established for
compressing cotton under the Bessonnette system (cylindrical
bales).

Hubbard City, Tex. — A plant has been established for com-
pressing cotton under the Bessonnette system (cylindrical bales).

Lime City, Tex. — The capacity of the lime plant at this point
has been increased by the erection of three modem lime kilns.

McGregor, Tex. — A cotton compress has been erected. An
oil mill has been erected.

Gates ville, Tex. — A cotton compress has been erected.



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TRAFFIC.



39



Tyi,er Southeastern Railway.

Durham, Tex. (M. P. E613.6) — A saw mill and planer has
been erected.

Spinks, Tex. CM. P. E615.5) — A saw mill has been erected,
capacity 15,000 feet per day.

Passenger Traffic.
Passengers Carried and REvgNUE— Entire System.



ITBM.



Year

ended

June 30,

1896.



Year

ended

June 30,

1895.



In-
crease.



De-



Number of passencrers carried . .

Number of passengers carried one
mile

Averasre distance one passenger
carried (miles)

•Total passenger revenue ....

♦Avcrag:e revenue per passenger

♦Average revenue per passeni^cr
per mile



935,555

40,159,897

42.93

1944,146.62

$1.0092

$0.0235



838.984

36,744,040

43.80

$889,304.61

$1.0600

$0.0242



96,571
3,415,857

$54,842.01



11.51 —

9.30 1 —
I

6.17 .—



— ] — $0.0508
1

— j — $0.0007



1.99

4.79
2.89



*Actual revenue derived from hauling passensrers, not including mail and express,
nor any portion of miscellaneous revenue.

The foregoing table shows very gratifying results from pas-
senger traffic for the fiscal year ended June 30th, 1896, the total
annual passenger revenue closely approaching the one million
dollar mark. The number of passengers carried increased
96,571, or 11.51 per cent., the number of passengers carried one
mile 3,415,857, or 9.30 per cent., and the total passenger reve-
nue $54,842.01, or 6.17 per cent. The average distance one
passenger carried decreased .87 of one mile, or 1.99 per cent. ;
the average revenue per passenger decreased $0.0508, or 4.79 per
cent. , and the average revenue per passenger per mile decreased
$0.0007, or 2.89 per cent.

Following this will be found an analytical table showing the
general passenger movement properly classified for the fiscal year
ended June 30th, 1896, compared with the preceding fiscal year:



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40



TRAFFIC.



Classification of Passenger and Passenger Revenue —
Entire System.



ITBM.


Year

ended

June 30,

1896.


Year

ended

June 30,

1895.


In-
crease.


£


De-
crease.




PA88BNOBR8 CARRIED—

Local ticket*

Cash fares

Home coupon tickets . .
Foreign coupon tickets .

Total


727.112
128,978
37,776
41,689


654,262
117,606
30.209
36.907


72.850
11.372
7.567
4.782


11.13
9.67
25.05
12.96


-


-


935,555


838,984


96.571


11.51


-





MILB —

Local tickets

Cash fares

Home coupon tickets . .
Foreign coupon tickets .

Total


21,228,234
1,758,885
7,294,308
9,878,470


19,345,161
1,675,547
6,040,350
9,682,982


1,883,073

83,338

1,253,958

195,488


9.73
4.97
20.76
2.02


-


-


40,159,897


36.744,040


3,415,857


9.30


■"




$564,577 59
53,445 59
132,227 65
193,895 79


$528,807 28
52,306 07
116.619 50
191.569 76


1


-


-


Local tickets

Cash fares

Home coupon tickets . .
Foreign coupon tickets .

Total


$35,770 31

1,137 52

15,608 15

2,326 03


6.76

2.17
13.38
1.21


1944,146 62


$889,304 61


$54,842 01


6.17


- —


Rbvxnub pbr passbnobr—

Local tickets

Home coupon tickets . .
Foreign coupon tickets .

Total


$0.7765
0.4144
3.5003
4.6510


$0.8082
0.4448
3.8604
5.1906


-


-


$0.0317
0.0304
0.3601
0.5396


3.92
6.83
9.33
10.40


$1.0092


$1.0600


-


-


$0.0506


4.79.


PER MILE—

Local tickets

Cash fares ./

Home coupon tickets . .
Foreign coupon tickets .

Total


$0.0266
0.0304
0.0181
0.0196


$0.0273
0.0312
0.0193
0.0198


-


-


$0.0007
0.0006
0.0012
0.0002


2.56
2.56
6.22
1.01


$0.0235


$0.0242








$0.0007


2.89



Note.- The foregoing results are based on actual revenue derived from hauling
passengers, not including mail and express, nor any portion of miscellaneous revenue.



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TRAFFIC. 41



Mail Traffic.



Mail revenue fiscal year ended June 30tli, 1896 |143,208 89

Mail revenue fiscal year ended June 30th, 1895 119,327 98

Increase I 23,880 91

Per cent, of increase 20.01

The increase in mail revenue is due to the following causes :
In the spring of 1895, the mails on the routes extending through
the States of Missouri and Arkansas were weighed, and the
mcreased compensation from such weighing was effective from
July 1st, 1895. On that date a line of vestibuled railway post
office cars was put into service between Cairo and Texarkana,
and on January 1st, 1896, six months after the establishment of
the line, according to the United States Post OflBce Department
regulations, the compensation for transporting mails on the route
extending between Cairo and Texarkana was increased $10,600.00
per annum on account of such vestibuled post oflSce cars, one-
half of which, or $5,300.00 was included in the mail revenue
for the year ended June 30th, 1896. The compensation for
carrying the United States mails on the entire System now
amounts to nearly $150,000.00 per annum.



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CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION.



Train and Car Mileage Statistics — Entire System.



Comparative for Years ended June 30th, 1896-95.





Year


Year




i




^


PRBXOHT.


ended
June 30,


ended
June 30,


In-
crease.


a


De-
crease.


u




1896.


1895.




&




£


No of trainB run


23,814
401,318


22,202
393,158


1,612
8,160


7 26






No. of loaded cars moved ....


2!08


.


_


No. of empty cars moved


185,168


173,753


11.415


6.57





— .


Total No. of cars moved


586,486


566,911


19.575


3.45


— )





No. of miles run by all freight














trains (includes mixed trains)


1.987,431


1.940,257*


47.174


2.43








No. of miles run by loaded cars . .


28,720,774


28,913.339






192.565


.67


No. of miles run by empty cars . .


10,461,446


10.071,485


389,961


3.87








No. of miles run by all cars ....


39,182,220


38,984.824


197,396


.51








No. of miles run by home cars . .


18,982,235


20,221,920







1.239,685


6.13


No. of miles run by foreiarn cars .


20,199,985


18.762.904


1,437,081


7.66






No. of miles run by home cars














on foreisrn lines


11,541,435


9,930,917


1,610,518


16.22








Percentasre of empty car mileage














to total car mileage


26.70


25.83


.87


3.37








Averasre No. of trains run daily .


65


61


4


6.56





— .


Average No. of loaded cars moved
dally














1,096


1,077


19


1.76






Averasre No. of empty cars moved












506


476


30


6.30








Averasre No. of all cars moved
daily


1,602


1,553


49


3.16





— >


Averasre No. of loaded cars in each














train


14.46
10.90


14.90
10.70


.20


1.87


.44


2.95


Averagre load per loaded car (tons)


Average load per train (tons) . .


157.49


159.38







1.89


1.18


Average No. of empty cars in each














train


5.26


5.19


.07


1.35


""■


"~




train


19.72


20.09


~-


^


.37


1.84


Average No. of miles run by trains
daily


5.430


5,316


114


2.14





^


Average No. of miles run by each














train


83


87


^


*~"


4


4.60


Average No. of miles run by


loaded cars in each train . . .


1.206


1,302








96


7.37


Average No. of miles run by














empty cars in each train . . .


439


454








15


3.30


Average No. of miles run by all














cars in each train


1,645


1,756








111


6.32


Average No. of miles run per car














per day— home cars


24


24














Average No. of miles run per car














per day— foreign cars


25


22


3


13.64





^


Average No. of miles run per














car per day— this Company's














cars on foreign lines


19


18


1


5.56








Average No. of cars on line— home


2,171


2.345








174


7.42


Average No. of cars on line-foreign


2,185


2,322








137


5.90


Average No. of this Company's














cars on foreign lines


1,655


1,537


118


7.68







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CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION.



43



Train and Car Mileage Statistics— Entire S^stibm— Continued,



PAS8BNOBR.



Year

ended

Jane 30,

1896.



Year

ended

June 30,

1895.



In-
crease.



De-
crease.



No. of trains mn

No. of cars moved

No. of miles mn by trains (not

including mixed trains) . . .
No. of miles run by home cars .
No. of miles run by foreign

cars

No. of miles mn by all cars . . .
Average No. of trains run daily
.Average No. of cars moved daily
Average No. of cars moved in

each train

Average No. of miles run by

trains daily

Average No. of miles run by

each temin

Average No. of miles run by

cars daily

Average No. of miles run per

car per day— home cars ....
Average No. of miles run per

car per da3r— foreign cars . . .
Average No. of cars on Une—

home .*. .

Average No. of cars on line-
foreign



9,649
40,733

1,440,748
4,840,535



1,228,375

6,068,910

26

111

3.99

3,936

149

16,582

157

177

84

19



9,317
38,711

1,358,605
4,555,758

897,278

5,453,036

26

106

3.79

3,722

146

14.940

160

129

78

19



332
2,022

82,143
284,777

331,097
615,874

5

.20

214

3

1,642



3.56
5.22

6.05
6.25

36.90
11.29

4.72

5.28

5.75

2.05

10.99

37.21
7.69



Freight.

No material change took place in the number of freight cars
owned and leased during the year ended June 30th, 1896, the
aggregate number remaining practically the same as during the
preceding fiscal year, as may be seen by an examination of the
statement of equipment on page 64.

The shortage in the cotton crop had an unfavorable influence
on the record of the car service department. The transporta-
tion of cotton usually involves a long haul of a large portion of
the crop to Northern connections ; the large decrease in cotton
shipments, therefore, caused a reduction in these long and
profitable hauls, which prevented as good a showing as might
otherwise have been made in the handling of freight cars.

The sharp competition in the matter of quick time in transit,
mentioned in the last annual report, has continued throughout
the year, and has made it necessary to run a still larger number
of foreign cars through to destination without transferring, thus
causing an empty return haul of such cars, which might have



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



44 CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION.

been avoided if the conditions would have permitted the transfer
of such cars at junction points.

While these conditions were detrimental to the economical
handling of the freight car equipment, a careful examination of
the preceding table will reveal some comparisons with the
preceding fiscal year which are very gratifying.

The increase of 1.14 per cent, in total tonnage transported was
accomplished with an increase of only 2.43 per cent, in freight
train mileage, and with a decrease of .67 of one per cent, in
loaded car mileage. While the empty car mileage increased
3.87 per cent., it will be noted that the total car mileage has
increased only .51 of one per cent., which is a cause for
congratulation, when the increase in total tonnage transported
and the unfavorable conditions that prevailed throughout the
year are taken into consideration.

The mileage of home cars on this line decreased 1,239,685
miles, or 6.13 per cent., but to offset this the mileage of home
cars on foreign lines increased 1,610,518 miles, or 16.22 per
cent. The total mileage made by home cars both on and off the
line during the fiscal year ended June 30th, 1896, compared
with the preceding year, shows an increase of 370,833 miles, or
1.23 per cent. The average number of miles run per car per
day by home cars on this line is «gain 24 miles, the mark at
which this average has now stood for four years. The average
number of miles run per car per day by foreign cars on this line
is 25 against 22 during the preceding year. The average
number of loaded and empty cars in each train remains prac-
tically the same as during the preceding year, and the average
load per loaded car has increased .20 of one ton, or 1.87 per cent.

The following table shows the amount earned by St. Louis
Southwestern System freight cars on foreign roads, and the
amount paid for mileage of foreign cars on this line during the
year ended June 30th, 1896, compared with the year ended June
30th, 1895:



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CONDUCTING TRANSPORTATION.



45



Description.


Year

ended

June 30,

1896.


Year

ended

June 30,

1895.


Increase.


Decrease.


Amount earned by foreign freisrht cars
on St. h, S. W. Ry. Entire System .

Amount earned by St. L. S. W. Ry.
System freight cars on foreign roads.

Net balance due foreign roads .


$129,290 18
74,574 47


$115,455 80
60.050 08


$13.834 38
14,524 39


-


$54,715 71


$55,405 72


-


$690 01



The figures contained in the foregoing table show an increase
of $13,834.38 in the mileage of foreign freight cars on this line,
which is caused principally by the increase in the mileage of
foreign cars belonging to other railroads, and of refrigerator
cars, the mileage of patent stable cars remaining about the same
as during the year ended June 30th, 1895.

In order to offset the increase in the mileage of foreign cars on
this line, the policy of loading the cars belonging to your Com-
pany to points off the line was practiced freely, and not only for
this purpose, but also, by avoiding transfer at junction points, to
reduce claims for damage incident to such transfers. Under this
policy it will be noted that the increase in the mileage of your
Company's cars on foreign lines has more than offset the increase
in mileage of foreign freight cars on this line, thus effecting
a decrease of $690.01 in the net balance due foreign roads.

The rates of mileage charged were the same during both years
compared.

Passenger.

In the statement covering the performance ot passenger
equipment, it will be noticed that increases have occurred in
nearly all the items included therein, the natural result of the
increase of 11.51 per cent, in number of passengers carried, and
the increase of 6.17 per cent, of passenger revenue. The
increase in the mileage of foreign cars on this line is due mainly
to the establishment of a through sleeping car service between
St. Louis and Shreveport, which was commenced in July, 1895.



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



MAINTENANCE OF WAY.



Road Department.
Character of Rah, in Main Track, June 30, 1896.



Location.


75-lb.
Steel.
Track
miles.


56-lb.
Steel.
Track
miles.


35-lb.
Steel.
Track
miles.


Total
Track
miles.


St. Louis Southwestern Ry. Co.
Main Line


13.31


404.69

51.40

41.20

.02

59.50


5.70

.50
6.38


418.00

5.70

51.40

41.70

6.40

59.50


New Madrid Branch

Delta Branch

Little Rock Branch

Magnolia Branch

Shreveport Branch

Total

St. Louis Southwestern Ry. Co.
OF Texas—

Main Line


13.31


556.81

259.74

109.90

97.20

40.00


12.58
44.86


582.70

304.60

109.90

97.20

40.00


Sherman Branch

Ft. Worth Branch

Hillsboro Branch

Total

Tyi,er Southeastern Ry. Co.—

Main Line




506.84
.14


44.86


551.70
88.60


Entire System, June 30, 1896. .
Entire System, June 30, 1895. .

Increase, this year

Decrease, this year




13.31
4.07


1,063.79 1 145.90
1,071.44 147.49


1,223.00
1,223.00


9.24 ! — 1 —
— 1 7.65 j 1.59






The following is a summary of the new steel rail weighing
75 pounds to the yard (the standard heretofore adopted) pur-
chased, and placed in main track, and leads to side tracks to



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



MAINTENANCE OF WAY. 47



June 30th, 1896, and the amount remaining on hand at that

date:

NBw 75-POUND srrnHh kaii, purchased and placed in track.



Track

No. of Tons. Miles.

Pnrchased during fiscal year ended June 30tli,

1895 1010 iii« 8.577

Purchased daring fiscal year ended June 30th,

1896 2120 yJfS 17.990

Total purchased 3131 jUi 26.567



Placed in track year ended June 30th, 1895 . . 522 HU 4.435

Placed in track year ended June 30th, 1896 . . 1069 ifH 9.077

Total placed in track 1592 Hfi 13.512



Balance on hand June 30th, 1896 1538 iM 13.055



Online LibraryBangor and Aroostook Railroad Company St. Louis Southwestern Railway CompanyAnnual report to the directors and stockholders → online text (page 9 of 41)