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Bates Torrey.

Practical typewriting : by the all-finger method, which leads to operation by touch online

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better the result will be. Some operators also think that the original can be written



PRACTICAL Tl'PEWElTIXG. 91

jpon thick paper, and that carbon copies can be made on thinner sheets af paper
placed back of the same with etpially as good results as though all of the sheets
Avere thin. This is an erroneous idea, as Avill be readily understood when it is noted
that by rising a thick sheet of paper for the original the outlines of the letters are made
heavier in proportion to the thickness of the paper, and necessarily the carbon copies
will not be nearly so sharp as if the first sheet were a thin one.

(297.) To prepare a stencil for the Mimeograph or other duplicating device that
employs paraftine paper : Exceptionally beautiful results by these processes can be
obtained if the operator will carefully follow the directions as follows,— Eemove the ink
ribbon (or slip to the front of the type-wheel guard), rubber impression strip, and ribbon
shield from the typewriter. Put the stencil sheet into the typewriter with the perforat-
ing silk only back of it, Avithout the paper " backing."' Use the hammer at its greatest
tension, and in doing this it may be necessary to give the main spring one more turn, as
in manifolding. Clean the type-wheel before commencing to write. Parties having
machines numbered below 0,000 should have them fitted with large main and hammer
springs. All machines above that number contain the necessary appliances for execut-
ing stencil' Avoi'k. It is important, however, for all parties desiring to execute i:)erfect
stencil work to use the Mimeograph wheels, which can be obtained from the Hammond
Company, or its agents, for the usual price of the ordinary wheels. Such wheels should
be used for stencil Avork exclusiA'ely, as those for ordinary Avriting seldom produce a per-
fect stencil. It is also adA-isable to use paraffine paper Avhich is knoxvn to he adapted to
the Hammond machine.

(29S.) When using paper that is very Avide, say double the width of the carriage,
roll before insertion, and if it is tabular Avork, make the columns of figures at the left ;
then roll again, and insert in the carriage so that the right of the paper can be printed,
and proceed as before, being very careful to adjust so that the continuation of the lines
shall be uniform with the first portion Avritten.

(299.) When the capital-shift is depressed, and perhaps fixed by the catch, the
figure-shift may be depressed in addition without releasing the other shift.

(300. ) Observe that the period of the Universal machine adapts itself to either the
shifts or the normal condition of the manual ; also note the variety of characters for
mathematical work and the reference marks.

(301.) Erasures may be made upon the nickeled surface just back of the paper, mov-
ing the line of Avriting to that point. AVh en restoring to printing position be careful to
follow the line-guide.



92 ^PRACTICAL TYPEWRITING.

GENERAL FORM OF AGREEMENT.

THIS AGREEMENT, made the first day of August, 1890, between
Isaac E. Hill, of Tarkio,, County of Atchisonj, State of Mi^-GOLiri, of
the first part, and John Smith, of Fairfax, Mo ., of the Gejond part:

WITNESSETH, that the said Isaac E.. Hill, in consideration of
the agreement on the part of the second part, herei'naf ter contained,
contracts and agrees to and with the said John Smith, th:it he will
deliver, in good and marketable condition, at the village of Corn-
ing, Mo., during the month of Septertiber, of this year, one hundred
tons of prairie hay, in the following lots, and on the following
specified terms; namely, twenty- five tons by the 7th of September.
twenty- five tons additional by the 14th of the month, twenty- five
tons more by the 21st, and the .entire one hundred tons to be all
delivered by the 30th of September.

The said John Smith, in consideration cf the prompt fulfilment
of this contract, on the part of the party of the first part, con-
tracts to and agrees with the said Isaac E. Hill, to pay for said
,hay Six Dollars per ton, for .each ton as soon as deliverea.

In case of failure by either of the parties hereto, it is here-
by stipulated and agreed that the party so failing shall pay to the
other One Hundred Dollars as fixed and settled damages.

.In witness whereof,^ we, have hereto set our hands, the day and

year first above written.. -r-.^.^ r^ - rrr

• ISAAC E. hILL»

JOHN SMITH.;



PRACTICAL TYPEWRITING. 93

SPECIMEN OF COURT TESTIMONY..

Mr. Lovely. Q. Dr.. Andrews,^ what is your profession? A. —

Physician and surgeon.

Q. Of how many years practice? j^A? Will be fourteen next

February.

Q., Where did you graduate, Doct'or? A. — At Bush Medical Col-
lege,- Chicago.-

Q; U'hat preparation did you make for the profession besides

ycur actendance at college? A. - Well, after graduating at Rush I
practiced two or three years and went to New York and^took a ful}
course in Bellevue Hospital Medical College, and graduated there
again; and after practicing a few years :iiore - two years mor-e - l
went off to Chicago again and. was-there tliree months, in the dif-
ferent hospitals and taking private courses,, not in any particular
college .;

Qi Well, Doctor^, you have been to Europe? A. Yes>;, I prac-
ticed tlien again three or four years, and went to Europe and took
a course of n; ediclne in Berlin and Vienna.

q; Attended the lectures and clinical course-s there in the

hospitals? A... Yes;' my course there was entirely clinical.: I

did not enter the colleges at all^ but took private clinical
courses.,

Q. State whether or not you have seen Mr^g Harrold; the plain-
tiff in this case? A Yes;- I first saw him this niorning.



94:



PRACTICAL TYPEWRITING.



State of Ohio,
Cuyahoga County,



EDWARO PLACE

vs.
ROBERT GRIiVES.



In the Court of Cowwon Pleas of Cleve-
land,- of November Term, A. D., 1882.
No. 232..



GEORGE PHILLIPS, of Cleveland,, in said County, the lawyer and
attorney of Edward Place, of said city, county and state, butcher,?
on oath declares that the said Edward Place has-a demand against

THE within WAMED ROBERT GRIMES, U?0M THE CAUSE OF ACTION STATED IN
THE WITHIN WRIT, WHICH THIS DEPONENT BELIEVES TO BE JUSTLY DUE, AND
U=ON WHICH HE EXPECTS THAT THE SAID EDWARD PlACE WILL RECOVER

Twelve Dollars and fifty-thre'e cents, or upwarus; a,\'d that this de-
ponent HAS reasonable CAUSE TO BELIEVE THAT THE SAID ROBERT GRIMES
is ABOUT TO DE.^ART BEYOND THE JURISDICTION OF THE COURT TO WHICH
SAID WRIT IS RETUF.NA3LE, THAT IS TO SAY, INTO THE PROVINCE OF ONTA-
RIO, Canada, and not to return TitL after judgment may probably be

RECOVERED IN SAID SUIT, SO THAT HS CANNOT BE ARRESTED ON THE FIRST
execution [if any! which may be' issued in SAID SUIT.

GEORGE PHILLIPS.
SDBSCRIBED and sworn to this twenty-third day of November, A.)
£)., 1882, before me^,

.QUARTUS K. RICE,

Notary Public. -■



PFs, ACTIO AL TYPEWRITING.



Palace Hotel, San Francisco,
Feb . 6th, 1??90.



lESSaS-.. SICHAEDS & DE JONES,
Kew York City.



.'Gentlemen:-

I arrived in San franci3Co yesterday, after a somewliat
3'. cajrreeable trip, tlie roads having been much obstructed by land-
slides, and bridges carried away by tlie swollen streams. I have
called- upon so;;ie of the trade, and judging from the low stocks of
goods on hand, I shall take some large orders. There is a better
ieeling an-. or.g the leading houses than I expected. I called upon
Messrs. J. M. H. & Sons, as instr'ucted by you, but was not favor-
ably impressed with them, their store and stock having a very slack
appearance, and showing a loose way of doing business. I could not
learn of their doing the amount of business represented, nor could
I obtain satisfactory, information as to their standing. I. should
hesitare about filling their orders without a guarantee. Our new
go.ods are appreciated, and orders exceeding my anticipations have
alread.v been taken.

Will leave for Chicago on the 9th inst.,and in the meap-
time shall keep you informed of what is done here.

Very respectfully yours.



<>6 PRACTICAL TYPEWRITING.

547 Fifth Ave., Albany, N. Y.
January 5, 1873.

Messrs. A. T. Stewart & Co.,
New Yonk City.

Gentlemen:

Enclosed find Post Office Order for Twenty-five Dollars

[$25.00] for which, please send by A-nerican Express, the following

goods:

2 Lancaster Table Spreads, [$3.50], $7.00

4 Prs. Alexandre Kid Gloves, [$2.50] No.6i,

Brown, Green, Yellow, Black, 10.00

8 Yds. Calico, Brown, with small figure, [25(?] 2.00

12 " " White, " " pink dot

figure, [25(?] , .- 3.00

2 Linen Handkerchiefs, [50<2'] , 1.00

4 Prs. Lady's Cotton Hose, [50<f ] , No. 9, . . . 2.00

$25755

Your earliest attention will greatly oblige.

Yours truly,

MRS. JAMES. H. BROWN..



PRACTICAL TYPEWRITING.



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THE YOST MACHINE.



PRACTICAL TYPEWRITING. 99-

YOST.

FINGER METHOD.

(302.) In applying the finger method of this book to the Yost Writing Machine the
first feature of interest is the doable key board, the capital letters being produced by

another manual identical in its order with the lower
case, but lifted above the latter three rows higher.



(303.) The repetition of the letters is indicated
by a change in the color of the keys. Seventy eight
characters can be written, and the keyboard is very
compact (6^ x 9 inches), considering its range. This
latter feature is a help in its manipulation, and
assists touch writing somewhat. The duplication
of the letters does not, however, occasion complicated
fingering, but only calls for a double application of the method.

(304 ) For purposes of instruction the keyboard may be supposed to be divided
vertically into territory foi' either hand, as partially illustrated in the diagram of page
10, and the keys marking this imaginary division may be called " guides," as in para-
graph 352. In the top bank of either manual TY are the guides ; the middle bank GH ;
the lower, VB. These keys are attacked by the index fingers, and the remaining letters
are operated by the four fingers as described in the said diagram.

(305.) Particular attention should be given to the duty of the little fingers. It will
be noted that the accompanying diagram sets forth ^^

the "Universal" keyboard. Essentially, Fig. 1. is a fpN^ >^?^ ^ ^9^ >n >s, >^
distinct character, and the letter 1 will not need to ^4i^® ^^® ® ® ^®
be utilized. In other important respects the kej^- .^.m.^^.^^^^^^
board is umfoi'm with those ot the other machines .-».-»..«». .^ .^^^^^^^.

®©0O®®®®O9

treated m tins work. /-x/-n/-a/-n^-n^-n/-^^-^ .-s T^

®®©©©®®®(o)®

©®©®®®®®®®
(30G.) The touch of the Yost should be quick @@®(c)(v)®®@00
and shai'p, though not necessarily hard. A light ttU^iJ^

staccato blow is preferable. AVhen properly attacked digram of keyb ■ard

the type acquires a momentum which finishes the

stroke, and gives a good and sufficiently clear impression. If the finger action is
exerted as above, no collisions will occur, and very fast writing can be jjerformed.



100 PRACTICAL TYPEWRITING.

(307.) Practice at the beginning should be upon the lower manual, it being generally
more accessible. A command of the keyboard may be acquired by writing paragraphs
21 to 24 or 243 to 246, supplementing the same by twenty-five working wholly
upon the lower manual, and progi'essing by tasks of not too great length, being careful
to follow the fingering exactly as indicated. When a familiarity with the position of
letters has been gained, together with their correct fingering, and the same in words
as given, the student may pass to the upper manual; and as a help to an easy progression *
thereto we recommend the following :

2341 1123211 1313 2413 1311 123 121 2 3 1
(308.) Copy Brewery Note Mate Both New Buy Meet

112 221 1 214 4213 221 1 13 2 1312 34124 413

Burr Meyer Cup Zero Merry Veer Nettie X-traZulu

1241 1431 1242 233 1233 4231 1 32 23132 123 2114

Near Vast Beak Cell Vile Zest Bold Mould Vie Myra

2

123 22 2413 4314 2411 34243 241 23 4212 1223

Bessie Carl Zora Maud X-mas Man Mix Zuni Nice

1

2341 122 1 112243 241312231 1221231 24143 1

Milan Vichy Burial Cavendish British Catalog.
1 a 2

Eemember to not repeat the letter when passing from capitals to lower case,

(309.) The same finger procedure applies to the ujDper manual as the lower, and if a
capital or other character be written, it should be attacked by the finger distinctly speci-
fied as belonging to the particular situation.

(310.) The uniformity of this method makes it a simple one to acquire, and when
cultivated from the beginning the skill of hand keeps pace with the understanding. The
only exceptions are those covered by paragraph 41, also H and N fingered 2 when oc-
curring before Y, and C by 1 when sometimes preceded by E. Words illustrating these
variations, as also a few exceedingly rare ones, will be found in paragraphs 41 and 42.

(311.) At the same time these are not exceptions in an aggravating sense, for very
little attention is required to guard against them. The hand position regulates the
matter, and in an awkward situation the next best finger serves. This permitting the
play of preference is a distinguishing feature of the method.

(312.) After the exercises above assigned have been mastered, as well as paragraphs
26 to 32 inclusive, the student may take up the Prefixes (39) and Affixes (40) ; then pro-
ceed to Miscellaneous Words (53), and afterward to sentences and general writing.



PRACTICAL JYPEWRITING. 101

(313.) * When words are builded into sentences there will be occasional lapses from
the strictness of fingering (41), but only to escape the "hoppity-skippity" style of ma-
nipulation, which latter we earnestly recommend the beginner to avoid. If the jumps
common to the one or two-finger fashion of writing are taken, a "cast-iron" system of
fingering might obtain ; but more graceful writing follows a gliding, legato action, and
we are confident this style will give more enduring satisfaction.

GENERAL INFORMATION.

(31i.) Briefly stated, the features of the Yost Writing Machine are inflexible align-
ment, detachable types and carriage, single scale, double manual, direct printing, novel
inking arrangement, portability and general simplicity.

(315.) First, remember to always keep the machine clean, inside as well as out.
Never let erasings drop into the basket. When an erasure is necessary slide the
carriage either to the left oi- right, as the case may require, so the erasings will fall out-
side of the basket.

(316.) The Yost differs materially in its inking apparatus from the other standard
typewriters. The types, printing direct, are capable of producing the finest outlines, and
no operator should be satisfied with less than this. A hard, soft or medium platen is fur-
nished, according as many, few or no manifolds are desired. Most operators prefer the
medium hard platen, so that they can manifold if desirable ; but it should be noted that
there is less ' ' give " Avhen the type strikes against a hard surface, and, therefore, the
imprint is likely to be less distinct than when a soft printing bed is employed. The
backing-sheet is appropriate for the Yost, and with the hard platen it is always neces-
sary to insert two sheets of medium weight paper at a time, or say, three sheets of thin.
If this is done the complaint cannot be made that the types " are not on their feet. "
The backing sheet also serves to preserve the platen.

(317.) If the type does not ink, it will not print ; therefore it is imperative that the
character returns to the pad freely at every stroke. If through friction a difficulty arises,
clean the point of friction ; and if the double link of a type-bar becomes pressed together,
relieve it by gently forcing apart with a screwdriver, making all the joints work freely
and easily.

♦The rarity of such deviations is illustrated by paragraph 276, pages 85-86.



102 PRACTICAL TYPEWRITING.

(3 IS.) The print should be uuiforraly clear and distinct ; if it is not, something is
the matter : either the operator taps the keys in a tardy, "weak-kneed" fashion, or the
ink-jjad does not deliver freely.

(319.) If the pad seems dry in any spot, take out the case containing it, scrape the
surface with a knife blade, and squeeze it down a little to start the flow.

(320.) Experience has shown that an ink-pad works better after it has been used a
month or two ; because then, if the surface has not been disturbed, the types imbed
themselves slightly, and extract ink over their whole surface every time.

(321.) When changing pads, to introduce a different kind or color of ink, the careful
operator will, before putting on the new pad, wipe off the surface of the types, which can
be quickly done by forcing type through center guide, and rubbing with a brush.

(322.) Ink pad in one piece. To Insert. — Lay the key plate on the keyboard, with
bent edge down over the upper row of keys, to keep it from slipping. Press evenly on
the plate to bunch the keys in the centre. Spi'ing the ends of the pad case apart ; start
one end under the front scale and around under the guide holder at the back until it
comes out from under the scale on the opposite side ; then, with the two ends together,
return the junction of the case until it is under the guide holder and opposite the wide
space between the type-bars. Snap into the rim on the clamp ring.

(323.) The inking and printing system of the Yost gives better results upon quali-
ties of paper which have not a hard, glazed surface. It should be understood that
papers suited to one form of writing machine may not be best for another. The peculiar
hard properties of the fine linen and bond papers seems to confine the tendency to spread
of the coloring pigment of the ribbon machines. The kinds of paper last mentioned are,
on the other hand, illy adapted for direct printing. What is required for the Yost is a


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