Benjamin Chase.

History of old Chester [N. H.] from 1719 to 1869 online

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be recorded in the book of the town clerk."
April 2, 1864,

" Voted, to pay all volunteers that have enlisted, or
may enlist, to fill the quota of the town under the call of
the President for two hundred thousand men, three hun-
dred dollars.

" Voted, to hire four thousand dollars on the credit of
the town to carry out the foregoing Yote."

Aug. 8, 1864,

" Voted, that the town raise and appropriate a sum not
exceeding six thousand dollars to encourage voluntary en-
listments in said town, and that the selectmen be author-
ized to hire the same on the credit of the town, and that
the town treasurer be instructed to pay to each volunteer
for one year, or his substitute, or to the order of his substi-
tute, the sum of one hundred dollars ; and to each volun-
teer for two years, or his substitute, or to the order of his
substitute, the sum of two hundred dollars ; and to each
volunteer for three years, or his substitute, or to the order
of his substitute, the sum of three hundred dollars. Said
sums to be paid when such volunteer, or his substitute, shall
be mustered into the service of the United States.

"Voted, that the town assume and cash the state bounty,
and take an assignment back from the state.

" Voted, to instruct the selectmen to hire the sum not
exceeding six thousand dollars, to pay drafted men or their
substitutes.

" Voted, that any person putting in a substitute can take
an assifrnment of the state bounty from their substitute,
and have the same cashed by the town."

August 16th, 1861,

" Voted, to pay two hundred dollars in gold, or its
equivalent, to each man, to pay expenses in procuring sub-
stitutes.

"Voted, to instruct the selectmen to hire a sum not
exceeding eight thousand dollars to cash the state bounty.

"Voted, that the selectmen be instructed to hire a sum
not exceeding eight thousand dollars, to pay for procuring
substitutes.



400 HISTORY OP CHESTER.

" Voted, that the selectmen be authorized to pay three
per cent, bonus on money, if it cannot be procured for less.

" Voted, that tlie town appoint one agent to act in uni-
son with the selectmen in procuring substitutes."

Andrew F. Fox was chosen agent.
September 2d, 1864,

" Voted, to instruct the selectmen to pay the sum of
four hundred dollars in addition to the one hundred dollars
which was voted at the meeting of August 8th, to citizen
volunteers under the last call of the President.

" Voted, an agent to see to the roll of the militia of this
town."

Kcndrick Emery was chosen agent.

" Voted, that the agent be paid the sum of three dollars
per day, and his expenses.

" Voted, to authorize the selectmen to hire on the credit
of the town, a sum not exceeding eight thousand dollars,
to pay their own citizens that have enlisted, or may enlist,
to jiU the quota of the town, under the call of the Presi-
dent."

January 9th, 1865,

" Resolved, that the town raise a sum of money not ex-
ceeding eight thousand dollars, and appropriate the same
as bounties to such persons as may voluntarily enlist, as
volunteers or as substitutes 'for enrolled or drafted men,
to fill the quota of the town under the last call of the Pres-
ident of the United States for three hundred thousand men
to serve in the army and navy.

" Resolved, that the town pay each man voluntarily en-
listing or volunteering as a suljstitute for an enrolled or
drafted man of this town, the sum of one hundred dollars for
one year, two hundred for two years, three hundred for
three years ; and to each man who has .been an inhabitant
of tliis town for three months preceding this meeting, en-
listing in the quota of this town, the sum of six hundred
dollars for one year, seven hundred dollars for two years,
and eight hundred dollars for three years ; and that per-
sons so enlisting by this vote to receive them or their order
as soon as they are mustered into the service of the United
States.

*' Voted, that the selectmen be instructed to raise a sum
of money not exceeding eight thousand dollars, to carry
out the foregoing vote."



MILITARY HISTORY.



401



The following list of soldiers furnished by the town of
Candia, and the bounties paid them, has been given by
Abraham Emerson, Esq. I prepared a list from the Adju-
tant-General's Report, showing the companies and regi-
ments in which they served, but the names of many were
not found there credited to Candia, owing probably to the
large number classed under " unknown," and some others
who enlisted into Massachusetts regiments. The following
list is certified by the selectmen as having enlisted from
Candia into the service of the United States in 1861, or
previous to any bounty being paid by the town :



J. Lane Fitts,

Stephen Dearborn, killed at
James Island,

George Emerson, killed at
Fredericksburg,

."Wells C. Haines, wounded
at Bull Eun, taken pris-
oner, and died at Kich-
mond,

John G. Burbeck,

David Bedee,

William Bedee,

Richard B. BroAvn,

John Brennard,

Fi'ancis Fifield,

Edmund J. Langley,

Lewis B. Carr,

Edwin J. Godfrey,

George W. Clay,

Rufus Ward,

Henry Buzzell,

Lorenzo Fifleld,

William Norton,

Richai'd Norton,

Lucieu CaiT,

Charles Turner,



Horace Dearborn,

Albert Harlow,

Chester C. Smith,

J. Henry AVorthen,

John Sullivan,

Stephen Fifleld,

William Robinson,

James Gannon,

George Robinson,

"William Daniels,

George A. Turner,

Guilford Batchelder,

E. Morrill,

David R. Daniels, died in

army,
David Dudley, died in Maiy-

laud,
John Hall,
William Roberts,
Charles B. Carr,
E. MattheAvs,
Charles Robinson,
David Xorton, Jr.,
Henry Norton,
Reuben Batchelder.



On the 17th of October, 1861, we find the following vote
passed by the town of Candia in aid of volunteers :

" That the selectmen be authorized and instructed to
raise by loan, or otherwise, a sum of money not exceeding



26



402 HISTORY OP CHESTER.

five hundred dollars, and expend so mucli of the same as
they may think proijer in aiding the families of such per-
sons as have enlisted and been mustered into the service of
the United States from this town ; the same to be expended
agreeably to the law of New Hampshire, passed June,

1861. Also, that the same provision be granted to all who
may hereafter enlist."

At the annual meeting in March, 1862, the following vote

was passed :

" Voted, that the selectmen abate the poll-tax of all sol-
diers that have enlisted into service from this town."

At a legal town-meeting, held on the 14th day of August,

1862, the following votes were passed in the affirmative :

" Voted, that one thousand dollars be raised to aid the
families of volunteers.

" Voted, that the selectmen hire, at the lowest possil)le
rate of interest, a sufficient sum of money to pay each vol-
unteer who has enlisted, or may enlist into tlie service of
the United States for three years, and who has been mus-
tered into said service to make up the quota of Candia,
agreeable to the last call of the President for three hun-
dred thousand men, two hundred dollars."

At the same meeting it was

" Voted, to add one hundred dollars, making three hun-
dred to each volunteer."

On the 13th of the same month it was
" Voted, to pay the nine-months men one hundred and
fifty dollars each."

The following is a list of names of those who received a
bounty of three hundred dollars each, at the time Captain
W. R. Patten enlisted his company. Here is the receipt :

" We severally acknowledge to have received from the
town of Candia the sums set to our names, agreeable to the
vote of the town passed August 14th, 1682, to encourage
volunteer enlistments into the service of the United States
for the term of three years."

"William E. Fatten, Captain; R. Baxter Brown, 1st Lieut.
William Clark, sickened in Henry W. Rowe,
the ai'iny, retui'ued to Con- Lewellyn Wallace, died in
cord and died, army,

Robert Clark, Charles R. Rowe,

Ansell Emerson,- George W. Hartford,



MILITARY HISTORY.



403



Edwin Haines,

Frank Sovaine,

Edward B. Robinson,

Thomas C. Eunnells,

Oliver Haynes,

George Mead, died,

Dexter Read,

Woodbury Hartford,

Joel P, Beau, returned, died,

Jesse D. Beau,

N. F. Brown,

Daniel Brown, Jr., died,

E. W. Foss,

C. R. Stacy,

Charles E. Wason,

Manson M, Bricket,

Levi Barker, Jr.,

Frederick F. Emei'son,

Charles M. Lane,

Nathl. Hardy, died,

Charles C. Page,

Leonard F. Dearborn,

George AY. Griffin,



Hem an O. Mathews,
Charles C. Brown,
E. F. Brown, died,
N. J. Dearborn,
Rufus Ward,
Ezekiel L. Shurtleff,
John H. Harrison,
Thomas J. Morrill,
Joseph L. Gleasou,
Albert M. Morrill,
Augustus B. Gile,
James H. Mori'ill,
Charles A. Jones,
Hiram G. Gleasou,
George C. Fifleld,
Asa E. Buswell,
John A. Gile,
Daniel C. Davis,
Woodbury D. Dearborn,
Reuben H. Dunn,
George W. Brown, Jr.,
William Collins.



The following is a list of volunteers for nine months, who
were paid a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars each ;



Levi Barker,
Andrew J. Mead,
Daniel B. Langley,
Edward P. Lane, died at

New Orleans,
Henry T. Eaton,
Walter W. Bean,
Franklin Clay,
John H. Bean,



Samuel C. Xay,

P. Gerrish Robinson,

Daniel Hall, died at

Orleans,
Frederic Clay,
Joseph Avery,
George W. Taylor,
Charies W. Hoit,
John A. Haines.



New



At a legal meeting held on the 10th of January, 1863,
the following vote passed affirmatively:

" That the selectmen be instructed to appropriate six
hundred dollars to aid the families of volunteers."

At the annual meeting, 1863, it was

" Voted, to raise one thousand dollars to aid the families
of volunteers."



404 HISTORY OF CHESTER.

July 14th, 1863, it was

" Voted, to appropriate two thousand dollars to aid the
families of volunteers."

At a legal meeting, held on the 2d day of September,

1863, tiie following vote was passed afifirmatively :

" To pay each drafted man three hundred dollars,
whether he serves himself, or procures a substitute."

At a meeting of the town, held on the 30th day of No-
vember, 1863, to see what measures the town would take to
fill its quota, the selectmen were instructed to procure a
sufficient number of men at as low a rate as may be, and
that the town raise a sum of money not exceeding eight
thousand dollars, and appropriate as much as may be
necessary in procuring said men.

List of Volunteers under the call of October nth, 18G3.

Patrick Donnelly, Carl Neagle,

Augustus Archer, George Smith,

Cliarles Smith, George C Brow' n,

Edward Black, John Nelson,

John Wilson, Martin Rapee,

John Brown, Frederick IMcPherson,

Horace Colburn, James AVebber,

Nelson Hurd, Charles Fifield.

At the annual meeting, 1864, it was voted to raise one
thousand dollars to aid families of volimteers.

At a meeting of the town, April 28, 1864, it was voted
to pay veteran soldiers three hundred dollars bounty.

At the same meeting it was voted to raise two thousand
five hundred dollars, to be paid as bounties to raw re-
cruits ; also to raise five thousand dollars to be expended in
filling our future quotas, if any calls be made prior to
March next.

At a legal meeting of the town held Aug. 30, 1864, it
was voted to raise fifteen hundred dollars to aid families of
volunteers.

At the same meeting it was voted to raise five thousand
dollars in addition to what had already been raised ; and to
pay to drafted men, or substitutes for drafted or enrolled
men, the highest bounties allowed by law.



MILITARY HISTORY. 405

At a meeting held Dec. 28, 1864, it was voted to pay
volunteers, residents of Candia, six hundred dollars for one
year.

" Voted, to raise a sum not to exceed twelve thousand
dollars, to pay volunteers or substitutes."

Substitutes for Drafted Men.

James O'Donnel, Thomas Marks,

Carlz Fitzrun, John Stevens,

James Sullivan, James Han.

The above were paid three hundred dollars each, by the
town.

The following is a list of those enlisted in 1864, who
were paid a bounty of four hundred dollars :

James Thomas, Thomas Hai-vey,

James Wright, Edward Bailor,

George Bower, Malcom McKinna,

Charles Dearborn, George A. Turner,

William Rohinson, Richard Howard,

Alexander Wliite, Robert Field,

Nicholas Johnson, Cyrus W. Truel,

AVillie F. Eaton, John H. Brown,

A. Frank Patten, Orlando Brown,

Reuben H. Fitts, Sam' C. Nay.

The following enlisted under the vote to pay six hundred
dollars bounty :

John C. Fifield, Orestes J. Bean,

Lewis H. Cate, William G, Fitts,

George L. Merrifield, John L. Quimby,

Lewis D. Moore, Samuel L. Carr,

John H. Mears, Frank G. Bursiel.

At the annual meeting, 1865, it was voted to raise twelve
hundred dollars to aid families of volunteers.

Here follows a list of substitutes furnished by enrolled
men, to each of which the town paid a bounty of three
hundred dollars:

Joseph B. Quimby, Charles Fuller,

Thomas Smith, John Curdines,



406



HISTOEY OF CHESTER.



John Logan,
Frank Eogers,
James Cheney,
James Green,
Edmund Boyle,



Frank Stanton,
James Webb,
Wm. H. Williams,
John Haynes,
Jacob Shenau.



The following list of the soldiers furnished by the town
of Raymond has been given by the Rev. Joseph FuUonton,
who is preparing a history of Raymond ; as with the town
of Candia, there are discrepancies between that and the
Adjutant-General's Report :



Sewel J. Tiltou, Capt.,
John A. Cram, Lieut.,
George B. Cram,
George II. Tilton,
John Brown,
Orren T. Dodge,
Samuel G. Bartlet,
Warren True,
Augustus A. True,
Elias True, Jr.,
Elbridge G. Moore,
William B. Green,
Hazen Currier,
George P. Sargent,
George S. Fullonton,
J. Francis FuUonton,
Henry Robinson,
David T. Osgood,
George S. Gove,
Geoi'ge D. Howe,
George B. Robinson,
Daniel R. Bean,
Andrew C. No well,
Gilford F. Gilman,
Charles H. Edgerly,
John H. Dearborn,
David W. Towle,
Nathan II. Magoon,
Thomas R. Tuttle,
Isaiah G. Young,
Chase O. Wallace,
AYm. A. Wallace,
Geo. W. Gilman,



Elisha Towle,
Nathaniel Emery,
Ricliard Abbot,
Rufus A. Tilton,
Daniel W. Osgood,
Nathan Norton,
Jonathan P. Ilolman,
Abraham S. Healey,
John Gilc,
William II. Fcrren,
Charles H. Abbot,
William H. Kenniston,
Alvah Fogg,
James Pecker,
John H. Hill,
Franklin P. MoiTison,
Horatio H. C. Morrison,
Daniel AY. Norton,
Laomi G. Warren,
George C. Johnson,
James Card,
Charles Dow,
Jona. F. Brown,
Timothy Gleason,
George W. Healey,
Samuel II. Robinson,
James H. P. Morrison,
Jesse F. Morrill,
Josiah W. Lane,
George M. Brown,
Samuel C. Nay,

(claimed by Candia) ,
Frank S. Heath,



MILITARY HISTORY.



407



Wm. Y. Griffin,
Leonard G. Tilton,
Cyrus W. Dwight,
James O. Scribner,
Charles E. Dodge,
Joseph Gleason,
Hiram Gleasou,
Edward Gleasou,
Charles H. Perkins,
John D. Folsom,
Daniel Robinson,
John D. Brant,
Robert P. Kennard,
Joseph A. Littlefleld,
Samuel M. Heath,



James L. Stevens,
Samuel Spaulding,
Abner Lowell,
Charles L. Randlet,
Cyrus E. Poor,
Wm. H. Thurston,
Charles Jones,
David S. Healey,
George Tripp,
Joshua Smith,
Orren B. Cram,
Samuel G. Healey,
,John M. Smith,
Daniel Bachelder,
George S. Gove.



Those who furnished substitutes for Raymond



Charles W. Lane,
T. M. Gould, M. D.,
William B. Blake,
Saml. I. Locke,
Charles A. Bachelder,



Elisha T. Gile,
Thomas B. Bachelder,
John F. Lane,
Horace G. Whittier,
Irving Folsom.



The following votes were passed bj the town of Ray-
mond, respecting raising men, paying bounties, &c.

Sept. 28, 1861, voted to adopt an act authorizing cities
and towns to aid the families of volunteers, and authorized
the selectmen to pay the families of volunteers.

April 5, 1862, six hundred dollars were appropriated.

Aug. 22, 1862, voted to pay a bounty of two hundred
dollars to all those who have enlisted since the first of
August, 1862, and all that may enlist, to a number sufficient
to fill the quota of the town for the six hundred thousand ;
to be paid on their being mustered into service. The
selectmen were also instructed to pay the families of volun-
teers the full amount that the law allows.

March 10, 1863, the selectmen were authorized to hire
eight hundred dollars to pay the families of volunteers.

July 31, 1863, Josiah S. James was chosen agent to see
that the quota of the town was allowed.

August 20, 1863, voted to pay a bounty of two hundred



408 HISTORY OF CHESTER.

and ninety dollars to all those who are drafted and mus-
tered into the service, and compelled to serve in the army
of the United States, and also to all substitutes that may
be mustered in and serve.

September 24, 1863, voted to pay all men drafted from
the town of Raymond, up to the present time, mustered
into the service of the United States, or their substitutes,
three hundred dollars, agreeable to an act of June, 1863.

May 31, 1864,

" Voted, that the town pay three hundred dollars, drafted
on a call for two hundred thousand men, or their substitutes
when mustered into service.

" Voted, that the town pay two hundred dollars to all
that have, or may reenlist, to keep the quota full for the
town.

" Voted, that the selectmen be autliorizcd to hire men to
enlist, to fill the quota of the town, all lliat the town may
be called upon to furnish by the government in future, not
to exceed three hundred dollars per man, and hire a sum
not exceeding ten thousand dollars."

June 5, 1864, the selectmen were authorized to hire
substitutes for drafted men, and pay not exceeding three
hundred dollars each, and also for those called for in
future ; and to hire a sum not exceeding fifteen thousand
dollars.

December 26, 1864,

" Voted to pay citizens of the town, who may volunteer,
one hundred dollars in addition to the state bounty for one
year, and two hundred dollars for two years.

" Voted to pay substitutes for volunteers three hundred
dollars.

" Voted to pay drafted men all the law allows.

" Voted to authorize the selectmen to advance the state
bounty.

" Voted to authorize the selectmen to hire not exceeding
five thousand dollars."

March 14, 1865,

" Voted to refund to each and every person who may
have provided a substitute the one hundred dollars paid
by them, over and above the amount previously received
from the town."



CHAPTER XV.

HOW THE EiRLY SETTLERS LIVED, OR THE INDUSTRL\L HIS-
TORY OF CHESTER.

Everybody will understand that the first tenements must
have been log-huts with stone chimneys. As a specimen of
the early chimneys, Joseph Basford built a frame house on
the place where Wells C. Underbill lives, which was sold
to Moody Chase in 1769, who reared in it a large family.
His daughter Mary (wife of B. P. Chase) used to relate
that they could see to work the longest by the light which
came down chimney, of any place in the house ; and that
the child who sat the farthest back against the back-log
was the one who complained most of the cold. Cranes to
hang their kettles over the fire were not in fashion, but
two pieces of wood called "cross-bars" were put into the
chimney, some three feet above the mantel-piece (which
was of wood), and another called a " lug-pole " across them
on which to hang " trammels." The ovens were built in
beyond the back of the fireplace, so that the smoke came
into one common flue. Then came half-flue ovens, being
built about half way from the back to the jamb. Next
came ovens built out to the jambs with a separate flue for
the smoke, called whole-flue ovens. Perhaps there were
no chimneys built without cranes, or with baclv ovens,
since 1800, but a great many have been in use since
then. Some of the fireplaces were so capacious as to burn
wood four feet long. They would first put on a " back-
log," from a foot to a foot and a half in diameter, and a
" back-stick," smaller, on the top, then a " fore-stick," and
small wood in front laid on andirons, if they were able to
have them, if not, on stones. Where such a fire of good



410 HISTORY OP CHESTER.

hard wood was in operation, it gave out a great amount of
heat, and the cooking had to be done over such a fire.

The ancient windows were of what was called " diamond
glass." The sides of the panes were about five inches and
the angles oblique. The longest diagonal stood perpen-
dicular, so of course the outside of the casement was half-
panes. The outside sash was of wood, and between the
panes was lead. At a meeting of the Congregational par-
ish April 21, 1713, Jacob Sargent, Benj. Hills and Enoch
Colby were chosen a committee to sell the old lead and
glass, and glaze the house with new sashes and glass.

STOVES.

I make a few extracts relating to the history of stoves,
from an article in the "Scientific American" of Nov. 9,
18G7.

" Stoves are comparatively of recent general use, though
they were known in this country as early as 1790. In that
year Mr. Pettibone of Philadelphia was granted a patent
for a stove which he claimed to be capable of warming
houses by pure heated air. Pettibone's stove was soon
after put up in the alms-house at Philadelphia, This was
probably the first attempt to use, at least in this country.
From this time forward, for many years, the stove was
confined to public places ; its use for warming private
houses or for cooking purposes not having been thought of.
The long box-stove, capable of taking three-feet wood, was
the only stove our ancestors knew anything about. The
first advance towards a cooking stove Avas making the
Franklin stove with an oven ; and the first that deserves
the name was an oblong affair, having an oven running
the whole length, the door of which was in front, directly
over the door for supplying fuel ; and having also a boiler-
hole and boiler on the back part of the top near the pipe.
Then a stove similar in arrangement, with swelling elliptic
sides was made, generally called the nine-plate stove.

"About 1812 cooking stoves were made at Hudson from
patterns made by Mr. Hoxie, wno was the first to elevate
the fire-box above the oven. In 1815 William T. James of
Lansingburgh, afterwards of Troy, made the stove known
as the ' James stove,' which not only continued the leading
cooking stove for nearly a quarter of a century, but may



INDUSTRIAL HISTORY. 411

yet be seen on board of small eastern coasting vessels,
where, being cheap and durable, it supplies the place of a
caboose."

In the James stove, the oven was directly over the fur-
nace, and the sides were swelled out to give place for an
oval boiler on each side ; they were cast heavy and were
very durable. They were very liable to burn whatever was
in the oven, unless the utmost care was used. I have
heard it related that when one of these stoves was first set
up, the goodman waited to be called to breakfast until out
of patience, and upon going into the house found the good-
wife in a perfect storm : the stove was good for nothing, —
the biscuit were burned, — and as a penalty for getting
such a piece of furniture he would have to dispense with
his breakfast. With a good deal of coaxing he prevailed
on her to mix another batch, which, with careful atten-
dance, he succeeded in baking, and at ten or eleven o'clock
succeeded in having his breakfast. There was a cooking-
stove made at Franconia (a heavy, coarse-made concern)
earlier than the James stove was used here, but I think
was never used in Chester. Jonathan Aiken, Esq., of
Goffstown, had used one of them several years and thrown
it by previous to 1836. Other patterns were soon intro-
duced with the oven by the side of the furnace and under
the furnace.

People were very punctual in going to meeting, and some
of them riding three, four, or even six miles on horseback,
when there was not sleighing, their horses standing out of
doors exposed to the cold, and they remaining in the
meeting-house without fire during two long services and
intermission, except that a part of the men would resort to
the neighboring tavern where they could warm inside as
well as outside. In 1821 Samuel D. Bell, Esq., drew up a
subscription paper and carried it round and collected
money and purchased a stove which was put into the Con-
gregational meeting-house. In 1822 the Rev. Clement
Parker went round at the Long Meadows and procured a
subscription, and when people plead poverty he offered to



412 HISTORY OF CHESTER.

advance the money and take bis pay in wood. The stove
was procured and put into the house in the broad aisle in
front of the pulpit, the funnel going up nearly to the ceil-
ing, and then out at the front window. The first time a
fire was kindled the stove cracked, when the conservatives
said, " / told you so."



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