Copyright
Benjamin Whitman.

Nelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r online

. (page 137 of 192)
Online LibraryBenjamin WhitmanNelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r → online text (page 137 of 192)
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Lewis is a member of the Royal Arcanum and the G.
A. R. The family attend the M. E. Church, and
politically he is a Republican.

Harry Turner, locomotive engineer on the L. S.
& M. S. R. R., Erie, Pa., was born August 5, 1844, in



712



NELSON'S BIOGltAPUICAL DICTIOlSABY



Durhamshire, England. His father served for many
years in the English navy. Harry came to America
in 1859 and served an apprenticeship at the machin-
ist's trade in the L. S. & M. S. shops in Cleveland,
Ohio. After completing his trade he worked there as
journeyman a short time, when he went to Akron,
Ohio, and worked at his trade three years. He then
took a position on the L. S. & M. S. R. R. as fireman,
and about two and a half years later was promoted to
the post of engineer. After running the freight engine
a while he was given a mixed run of passenger and
freight, and in 1884 he was assigned on the fast mail
and limited between Cleveland and Erie. This is one
of the fastest runs in the country, making but one stop,
which is at Ashtabula. He was married December
25, 1872, to Miss Rubadell, daughter of James L. King,
of Erie. They have two children, Laura and Charles.
Mr. Turner settled in Erie about the time of his mar-
riage. He is a member of the Masonic order. United
Workmen, and B. of L. E. He is considered one of
the best engineers on the road, and the confidence of
his superiors is evinced by giving him the manage-
ment of the responsible run to which he is now en-
trusted. He is possessed of those qualities of nerve
and skill so requisite in the modern locomotive engi-
neer and is a typical railroad man.

Edward Kraus, merchant, Erie, Pa., born in
Germany July 20, 1845, is a son of Joseph and Mar-
garet (Hoe) Kraus, and the younger of two children.
The family emigrated to America and settled in Erie
county when Edward was about 3 years of age. He
was reared and educated in Erie county, and served
an apprenticeship at the painter's trade; he next en-
gaged in the handling of meats a short time. Later
he became interested in the restaurant business in
Erie and followed it fifteen years. In 1890 he con-
structed a large modern brick block at 810 Parade
street, where he is engaged in his present business.
He was married February 11, 1873, to Miss Lizzie,
daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Metz) Huster. They
have ten children, Edward, John, George, Alois,
Charles, Elizabeth, Clara, Amanduz (deceased), Emil
and Mary. The family are members of the Catholic
Church. Politically Mr. Kraus is a Democrat.

Palmer E. Egglestoii, foreman for the Lovell
Manufacturing Comjiany, Erie, Pa., was born at Gen-
eva, Ashtabula county, O., February 10, 1859, and is a
son of Erastus and Sarah (Nichols) Eggleston, the for-
mer a native of Winstead, Conn., and a descendant of
one of the oldest New England families. He came to
Ohio in 1844, and always engaged in the manufacture
of agricultural implements, and was during his day
superintendent of several leading firms in that line.
He died September 12, 1888, and his wife died about
a year later. In the family there were seven children,
all of whom are living; Foster, superintendent of the
Jackson State Penitentiary, of Michigan; Orlena, mar-
ried Mr. Freeman Thorpe, well-known artist in Find-
lay, O., has painted many celebrated pictures, with
which the citizens of Erie are familiar; Viola, married
S. H. McKenstry, of Geneva, O.; Palmer E., Charles
Homer, Cleveland, O.; Lettie, married Charles Mah-
len, of Titusville, Pa. Palmer E. Eggleston was reared
and educated in his native town, and since his boyhood
has been more or less engaged in the manufacture
of agricultural implements in various parts of the



country, having made that branch of industry his spe-
cial study. In April, 1883, he came to Erie and ac-
cepted the position as foreman of the Lovell Manu-
facturing Company, which position he has since held.
He was married, December 25, 1880, to Miss Winni-
fred, daughter of John and Melissa (Murphy) More-
land, of Geneva, O. They have had two children,
Olive and John, both deceased. Mrs. Eggleston is a
well-known musician in the city of Erie. She devotes
most of her attention to vocal music, and at present
sings in the First Presbyterian Church choir, where she
has been engaged for some time. Mr. Eggleston's po-
sition is one of great responsibility, and is due to his
skill and faithfulness. He is a man thoroughly quali-
fied for the trust and responsibility which is imposed
upon him. Politically he is a Republican.

M. A. Cray, conductor on the E. & P. R. R., Erie,
Pa., was born at Fairview, Erie county, Pa., August
19, 1857. He is a son of William and Johanna (Col-
lins) Cray, the former a native of Drewscourt, parish
of Ballyhagran, County Limerick, Ireland, and was
born September 21, 1822; the latter was a native of
England and was born January 20, 1832. She was the
only daughter of John and Catherine (Burke) Collins,
natives of Ballyhagran, County Limerick, Ireland.
The latter was born in 1803, and died April 1, 1883.
William Cray, M. A. Cray's father, emigrated to
America, accompanied by his wife and her mother, in
November, 1850, and after a stormy voyage of seven
weeks, landed at Castle Garden, N. Y. They imme-
diately came west and settled in Erie county. Mr.
Cray immediately obtained work on the Waterford
plank road, where he remained a short time. About
this time the L. S. & M. S. R. R. was under course of
construction, and he entered the employ of that com-
pany, and remained with them until 1873, the last ten
years of which he was section foreman. In 1873 the
family removed to Erie, where the father died Sep-
tember 17, 1890, and the mother now resides at Con-
neaut, Ohio, with her daughter. William and Johanna
Cray were the parents of six children, viz.: John, born
January 17, 1851, married Miss Rose Clark, of Swan-
ville. Pa. He lost his life in an accident on the E. &
P. R. R. at Albion, February 24, 1885; James, born
March 19, 1852, married Miss Julia Leach, of St. Cath-
erines, Ontario; he is an engineer on the N. Y., C. & St.
L. R. R., and resides at Conneaut, Ohio; William,
born March 19, 18-53, married Miss Ida Rapp, of
Sharpsville, Pa.; he is a conductor on theE. & P. R. R.
and resides at Erie; Nellie, born May 25, 1854, mar-
ried James lewett, conductor on the L. S. & M. S.
R. R.; she died January 19, 1882; Michael A., and
Catherine, born May 15, 1863, married Patrick
O'Brien, engineer on the N. Y., C. & St. L. R. R.;
they reside "at Conneaut, Ohio. Michael A. Cray
attended the public schools until he was 14 years of
age, when he commenced his career as a railroad man.
He entered the employ of the L. S. & M. S. R. R.,
first as water boy, then worked as tracknian, switch-
man, brakeman and fireman. He served in the latter
capacity three and a half years, when he concluded to
follow some other occupation, and accordingly en-
tered the employ of the Erie City Iron Works, where
he remained two years. During this time railroading
had its old-time fascination for him, and, unable to
stand it longer, he entered the employ of the E. & P.
R. R. Company as brakeman March 7, 1881. He was



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OF ERIE COUNTY.



713



promoted to conductor January 10, 1887, which posi-
tion he has since satisfactorily held. Mr. Cray was
married September 15, 1881, to Miss Arvilla, only
daughter of Charles Newton, who at that time was an
engineer on the L. S. & M. S. R. R., but on account of
poor health retired from railroading and went to
Michigan and now resides at Addison, that state.
Mr. and Mrs. Cray have eight children, viz.: Charles,
born October 30, 1882; Nellie, born, February 24, 1884;
Arthur, born September 28, 1885; Emma, born Janu-
ary 10, 1887; Edna, born December 24, 1888; Porter,
born February 1, 1890; Paul, born December 15, 1892,
and Marie, born February 27, 1894. He is a member
of the O. R. C, the C. M. B. A. and the P. V. R. He
is one of the responsible and respected citizens of the
community.

Homer M. Hill, general insurance agent, Erie,
Pa., was born in Mill Creek township, August 12, 1843,
and is a son of George and Orpha (Miner) Hill, the
former a native of Walpole, Mass., and a son of
George Hill, whose father (George) was an English
soldier, and came to America in the British service
during the Revolution. He was here but a short time
when he deserted the king's cause and joined the
American army. At the close of the war he settled
in Canton, Mass., married, reared a family, and died
there. His son, George (Homer's grandfather), was
married in Canton in 1817, and came to Erie county a
few years later. He was a woolen manufacturer, and
built two woolen mills in Erie county — one in the
Second section of Erie, on Cascade creek, and another
on Mill creek, on the Lake Pleasant road. He spent
the latter part of his life in Ashtabula, Ohio, where he
died March 28, 1851. He reared a family of nine
children: George (deceased), Elvina, Harvey, Mary
(deceased), Washington Albert, Naomi (deceased).
Perry and Porter (twins, both deceased) and Clinton.
George Hill (Homer's father) was a contractor and
builder, and followed that occupation nearly all his
life in Erie. He died in 1882. His wife, Orpha Miner,
was a native of Erie county, and a daughter of Will-
iam Miner, who was of New England stock, and one
of the pioneers of this section. Mrs. Hill now resides
in Erie. In the family were two children, one who
died in infancy and Homer M. He was educated in
the public schools of Erie and the Iron City Commer-
cial College, Pittsburg. He first engaged in the mer-
cantile business about two years, and entered the
employ of the Lake Shore and Erie and Pittsburg
railroads. He remained here until the war broke out,
when he served as clerk in the provost marshal's
office until Lee's surrender. He then entered the
employ of Noble, Brown & Co., coal merchants, as
bookkeeper, and, in 1867, entered the employ of J. F.
Downing, general agent, and served in the capacity of
adjuster, inspector and special agent until 1892, when
he engaged in the general insurance business for
himself. Mr. Hill was married, August 29, 1883, to
Miss Minnie B. Torrey, of Erie. They have two
children: George Torrey and Douglas Homer. He is
a member of the Masonic order, 32d degree Scottish
Rite, past master of Keystone Lodge, past high priest
of Temple Chapter, past T. I. G. M. of Jerusalem
Council, past T. P. G. M. Presque Isle Lodge of
Perfection. He is treasurer of Keystone Lodge and
of Temple Chapter; is a member of the Masonic board
of trustees, a member of Mt. Olivet Commandery,



Pittsburg Consistory, and Zem Zem Temple Mystic
Shrine. "He is also a member of the Royal Arcanum
and National Union. Politically he is a Democrat.

F. A. Sherrer, contractor and dealer in cut stone,
corner of Fourteenth and French streets, Erie, Pa., was
born in Cleveland, O., January 16, 1866, and is a son
of A. and Elizabeth (Lebens) Sherrer, natives of Ger-
many, now residents of Unionville, O. In the family
there were five children: William, A. W., F. A., and
Julia, married Dr. Sherwood, Unionville, O. Fred was
reared and educated in the city of Cleveland, and
learned the stone-cutter's trade with his father, who
was at that time a stonedealer and contractor in Cleve-
land. In 1885 F. A. Sherrer came to Erie and asso-
ciated with his brother, William, in his present busi-
ness. In 1894, William retired from the firm, and was ■
succeeded by his brother, F. A. Mr. Sherrer was mar-
ried, January 12, 1893, to Miss Marie Alge, of Findlay,
O. They have one child, Therese J. F. A. Sherrer is
the leading stone contractor in the city of Erie, and his
work is not by any means confined to the city limits.
He has done a large amount of building throughout
the country. A. W. Sherrer was born in Detroit, Mich.,
December 26, 1863. He also learned the stone-cutter's
trade with his father in Cleveland, and had always
been engaged as a journeyman stone-cutter in various
parts of the country, up to the time of going into busi-
ness. He is a natural mechanic, and has had a vast
amount of experience in all kinds of stone-cutting,
which places him an expert second to none. He is an
enterprising man, stands high in the business commu-
nity, and is a well-informed advocate of the Demo-
cratic party.

W. G. KHtie, Erie, Pa., chief postal clerk on the N.
Y., C. & St. L. R. R., between Chicago and Cleveland,
is a descendant of one of the old pioneer families of
Erie county. He was born in Fairview township, No-
vember 16, 1863, and is a son of John A. and Rosanna
(Barri) Kline, the former a native of Fairview, born in
the same house as W. G., and the latter a native of
Switzerland. The parents now reside in Fairview
township. John A. Kline's father, also John A., settled
in Erie county, about the year 1818. He came from
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and died compara-
tively young, leaving a family of small children. W.
G. Kline was educated in the public schools of Erie
county, and in the Iron City Commercial College, of
Pittsburg. In 1885 he received the appointment of
railway postal clerk, and worked about eight months
on the line between Cleveland and Syracuse. He was
then transferred to the western division, and has since
worked between Chicago and Cleveland, and has been
successfully promoted through all the intermediate
clerkships to which his high standards of examinations
have entitled him, and in 1889 he was made chief pos-
tal clerk between Chicago and Cleveland, having
charge of eleven men on his run. He was married
June 21, 1889, to Miss Frona, daughter of Israel Heid-
ler, of Fairview township, who is also a descendant of
one of the pioneer families of Erie county. They have
two children, Edna Eva and Ruth G. Mr. Kline is one
of the most popular and efficient clerks on the road.
He is an unassuming gentleman, who is thoroughly
master of his business. He is a member of the Rail-
way Mail Service Mutual Benefit Association, and in
his political principles he is unwaveringly Democratic.



714



NELSON'S BIOOBAPHICAL DICTIONARY



Guy JohasoM, locomotive engineer on the E. &
P. R. R., Erie, Pa., thoroughly understands the duties
accompanying the occupancy of the right side of the
locomotive cab. He is a native of Summit township,
Erie county, and was born May 14, 1851, and is a son
of S. F. and Jane (Ward) Johnson, both natives of
Erie county, descendants of the early settlers in Erie
county, and of old New England stock. They now
reside in Michigan. In the family there were eleven
children, namely: James, killed by lightning on Lake
Michigan, while in the sailing service; Perry, killed
by the explosion of engine No. 1033 on the P. & E.
R. R.. at Irvington; Cyrene, resides in Kansas; Harry,
lives in Dakota; Thomas, Miles Grove, Pa.; Guy, Les-
lie, Kansas; Fayette, Oil City, Pa.; Malcolm, Oil City;
Hattie, Michigan. Guy was reared and educated in
his native township, and at the age of 14 years entered
the employ of the Lake Shore (now the L. S. & M. S.)
R. R., as brakeman, working on the Erie and Buffalo
division, and on the Cleveland and Erie division about
two years. He next worked in the machine shop at
Erie about one year, and then worked as a stationary
engineer in Erie about two years, when he entered
the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company,
as fireman, and in 1878 was promoted to the post of
engineer. Mr. Johnson is a man possessing all the
qualities of the efficient modern locomotive engineer.
He had the remarkable experience of losing three
drive wheels off a four-wheel driver locomotive. This
was in the accident of engine No. 81 at Swansville, on
the Lake Shore road. Mr. Johnson has gone through
several wrecks, but fortune, coupled with good man-
agement, has always seemed to favor him, and he has
always come out of the debris, fresh and new. He
was married in June, 1873, to Miss Helen, daughter of
James and Mary (Russell) Hugaboon, who were also
early settlers of this county, both now deceased. They
have four children: Fred E., locomotive fireman; Ger-
trude L., Maud A., and Jessie Inez. Mr. Johnson is a
member of the E. A. U., B. of L. E., and is a Repub-
lican.

James D. Fiscus, jail warden, Erie, Pa., a native
of AriiistKinir cimntv, Pennsylvania, was born Decem-
ber '21, is.is, .,11.1 IS ;i son of John and Bridget (O'Brien)
Fiscus, till- 1(111111 r a native of Ireland, and the latter
of Pennsylvania. In the family there were six chil-
dren, of whom James is the eldest. He was reared
and educated in his native county, and assisted his
father, who was a stock dealer and drover, until 1860,
when he went to the oil country. Here he engaged in
contracting and operating, and in 1865 went to Ripley,
N. Y., where he remained one year. In 1867 he moved
to North East, and kept for one year the hotel known
as the Brawley House; he then took charge of the
Depot Hotel, which he operated three years, and, in
1879, he went to Bradford, Pa., where he remained
until 1885, and served in that city on the police
force during that time, and in 1885 he returned to
North East, during which time he served one term as
borough constable. He then received an appointment
as commibsary clerk of the Fort Peck Indian agency
in Montana, which occasioned his removal to that ter-
ritory. After having served his term he returned to
Erie, and in September, 1891, was appointed jail
warden, which position he has since held. Mr. Fiscus
is well known in Erie county political circles, and is a
Staunch Democrat.



Mathew L. Kiasey, mail carrier, Erie, Pa., was
born April 3, 1864, at Port Colborne, Canada, and is a
son of Levi and Jane (Ramey) Kinsey, who are de-
scendants of the pioneer families of Stone Bridge,
Ontario. Mathew is the youngest of four children.
The family moved to Erie in 18(55, where Mathew L.
was reared and educated. He early began an appren-
ticeship at the molder's trade, which he followed until
November 5, 1891, when he was appointed mail car-
rier in the city of Erie, which position he has since
held. He was united in marriage, April 16, 1885, to
Ida, daughter of D. K. Dean, of Erie, Pa. They have
two children, Ethel and Madge. Mr. Kinsey is a
member of the I. O. O. F., the National Association of
Letter Carriers, and politically is a Republican. The
family are members of the M. E. Church.

Charles Steen, patternmaker, Erie, Pa., is a
native of Denbighshire, North Wales, and was born
June 5, 1829. He is a son of John and Sarah
(HoUoway) ■ Steen. They were the parents of four
children: Thomas, died in England; John, lives in
Cheshire, England; Mary, widow of Charles B. Jones,
North Wales, and John. The father died at the age
of 89, and the mother at 94. Charles was reared and
educated in his native town, and, when a young man,
served an apprenticeship at his trade at Wrexhem,
Wales. He then went to Derbyshire, England, and
remained in the employ of the same firm seventeen
years. In 1869 he came to America and located in
Erie, where he remained a short time, when he went
to Warren, Pa., and worked at his trade two years,
and removed to Tidoute, Pa., where he remained one
year. He then came to Erie and was employed in the
Erie Car Works from 1872 to 1874, when he entered
the employ of the E. & P. R. R. company as pattern-
maker in their shops at Erie, where he is still
employed. Mr. Steen was married, March 25, 1853,
at Pentrich, Derbyshire, England (in an old historic
church that bore the bullet imprints of the chivalric
days of Cromwell), to Miss Sarah, daughter of John
and Jane Walker, of Derbyshire, England. To this
union have been born seven children: John W., War-
ren, Pa.; Thomas (deceased); William B., Erie, Pa.;
Anna May, married Henry F. Lillibridge, Erie, Pa.;
Oswell (deceased); Frank, Youngstown, Ohio, and
Jennie, married Arthur Thompson. Mr. Steen is a
member of the A. O. of U. W., the Pennsylvania
Voluntary Relief, the Mutual Benefit Association of
the E. & P. The family are members of the Presby-
terian Church. He is a thorough Republican.

M. W. Bruadage, Erie, Pa., is a native of Camp-
ville, Tioga county, N. Y. He was born September
17, 1853, and is a son of Charles I. and Frances Mary
(Smith) Brundage. The former was a native of
Walkill, Orange county, N. Y., and the latter a native
of Susquehanna, Pa., and a daughter of Col. Rufus
Smith, who was a very prominent man of Eastern
Pennsylvania and a resident of Susquehanna. Charles
I. Brundage, the father of M. W., was a steel worker
by trade, and worked on the construction of the N. Y.
& L. E. R. R. He was drowned in Lake Erie in the
spring of 1855, at the explosion of the " Mayflower,"
He was a son of Michael Brundage, who was also a
native of Orange county, New York. Michael was a
son of Richard, who emigrated to America from Metz,
France, in 1789. He was compelled to leave his na-



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OF ERIE COUNTY.



715



tive land for having taken part in an insurrection
against the government. He settled in Orange county,
New York, and followed farming during the remain-
der of his life. The mother of M. W. died in Erie
April 14, 1891. In the Brundage family there were
four children: Hattie (deceased), Emeroy, Bingham-
ton, N. Y.; Margaret, now Mrs. E. A. Tuttle, of Frank-
lin, Susquehanna county. Pa., and M. W. Brundage,
■who was reared in Franklin, Susquehanna county. Pa.,
with his grandfather. Col. Smith. He received a pub-
lic school education, and when a young man entered
the moldmg department of the N. Y."& L. E. R. R.
shops at Susquehanna, Pa. Here he served an ap-
prenticeship at tin- mulder's trade and worked there
as journeyman until 1881, when he went to Chicago
and remained until 1886, during which time he was
employed by the Crane Bros. Manufacturing Com-
pany, The Allen Paper Car Wheel Company, and the
Pullman Company. In 1886 he came to Erie, entered
the employ of the Erie City Iron Works and remained
but a short time, when he was employed by the Jarecki
Manufacturing Company, where he is at present en-
gaged. Mr. Brundage was married October 5, 1881,
to Miss Metta Z., daughter of George N. Brown, of
Susquehanna, Pa. They have two children, Genevieve
and Frank Edward. Mr. Brundage is a member of
the K. of P., the E. A. U. and the Brotherhood of Ma-
chine Molders, and politically is a staunch and active
Democrat. The family are members of Chestnut Street
Presbyterian Church, where he is choir leader. He is a
musician of considerable talent and has been a mem-
ber of a great many bands in places where he has
traveled throughout the country. He can play almost
any instrument found in the average brass band.

Jatnes H. Ray, locomotive engineer on the E. &
P. R. R., Erie, Pa., was born in Buffalo, N. Y., May 16,
1861, and is a son of John G. and Margaret (Nolan)
Ray, natives of Ireland, and now residents of Erie.
The father is a machinist. They were the parents of
seven children; William E., Erie; James H., John J.
(died at the age of 21), Thomas F., of Erie; Mary A.
(died at the age of '21), Maggie (died at the age of 9
years), George B., Erie. The family settled in Erie in
1868. James was reared and educated in Erie, and,
when about 11 years of age, entered the employ of the
E. & P. R. R. Company, in their shops in Erie, and
served five years at the machinist's trade, when he
went firing for that company. In 1885 he was pro-
moted to the post of engineer. He was married Au-
gust 17, 1891, to Miss Mary Dalton, of New Castle, Pa.
They have one child, Margaret. Mr. Ray is a mem-
ber of the B. of L. E. and the Pennsylvania Relief.
He is a popular and successful railroad man.

A. B. Heard, a native of Crawford county, Penn-
sylvania, was born May 31, 1842. He is a son of Ran-
dolph and Mary (Hamilton) Heard, the former a na-
tive of Trenton, N. J., and the latter of Crawford
county, Pennsylvania. Randolph Heard was a son of
George and Alcha (Warner) Heard. They settled in
Crawford county in 1796, when Randolph was about
1 year old. They reared a family of seven children:
Randolph (deceased), Fannie (deceased), Mary (de-
ceased), Louis (deceased), James (deceased), Johanna
(deceased), and George (deceased). When George
Heard settled in Crawford county it was a dense wil-
derness, and there was a great deal of trouble with the



Indians there for several years after his settlement.
He built his first log cabin in Meadville, on the pres-
ent site of the trotting park there. He spent his life
in pioneer farming and lumbering, and died in 1844,
aged 79 years. His wife died in 1812, when compara-



Online LibraryBenjamin WhitmanNelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r → online text (page 137 of 192)