Copyright
Benjamin Whitman.

Nelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r online

. (page 141 of 192)
Online LibraryBenjamin WhitmanNelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r → online text (page 141 of 192)
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that road and ten years later was promoted to con-
ductor. During all this time he has been employed on
the Cleveland and Buffalo division. Mr. Welsh was
married January 21, 1880, to Miss Addie Irene, daugh-
ter of John A. and Elizabeth (Andrews) Pogson, of
Erie. Her parents were natives of England. They
settled in Erie in 1828. The father died in 1888 aged
88 years and the mother now resides in Fairview town-
ship. Mr. and Mrs. Welsh have had four children,
viz.: Lot, Earl (deceased), Ines Goldenine, May (de-
ceased) and Addie (deceased). Mr. Welsh is a mem-
ber of the A. O. U. W., and politically is a Democrat.

John F. Lane, passenger conductor on the L. S.
& M. S. R. R., Erie, Pa., was born in Rochester, N. Y.,
September 20, 1840, and is a son of Ameas and Mary
(Barry) Lane, both natives of Quebec, Canada, the
former of Irish and the latter of French descent.
They settled in Rochester in 1837, and in 1861 remQved



to Marshall, Mich. The father was a cooper by trade
and always carried on quite an extensive manufacturing
business in that line. He was also quite an extensive
politician of his day, and always devoted considerable
attention to all political campaigns. In the family
there were seven children, viz.: Margaret (deceased);
William (deceased); John F., our subject; Daniel, man-
ager of the Standard Oil Cimiiiany, Muskegon, Mich.;
Mary, now Mrs. Connors, Jackson, Mich.; Elizabeth,
Mrs. Smith, Grand Rapids, Mich., and William, 2 (de-
ceased). The father died m Jackson, Mich., in 1888,
and the mother died in Marshall, Mich., in 1862.

John F. was reared in Rochester, and received a
high school education, and when he was a boy, naturally
spent considerable time in his father's cooper shop, al-
though without any intent or effort to learn the trade,
and early in life engaged in clerking in Rochester, and
when the family removed to Michigan, he accom-
panied them and followed the same occupation there,
l3Ut soon tired of the small salary and long hours of a
clerk, and decided to try some other vocation and with
his limited knowledge and experience at the cooper
trade, he decided to make that his first venture. He
accordingly found employment and was a successful
journeyman from the start. He followed that occupa-
tion three years. Starting in Marshall, Mich., he
worked in several towns in that State, and in Chicago,
New York and various other cities and towns through-
out the country. In 1865 he entered the employ of
the L. S. & M. S. R. R. Company as brakeman on the
Erie division, and in 1868 was promoted to freight con-
ductor and took his first passenger run in 1872 and ran
local passenger until 1890, when he commenced run-
ning on the through passenger from Toledo to Buffalo,
where he is at present employed. Since he has been
connected with the passenger service, his long record
has been uninterrupted by a single accident, and he is
regarded as one of the most experienced and compe-
tent conductors on the road. Mr. Lane was united in
marriage October 4, 1870, to Miss Mary E. Challice, of
McKean, Erie county. To this union has been born
one child, Eva, who now resides at home. He is a
32d degree Mason and a member of Evergreen Lodge,
No. 222, F. & A. M.; Conneaut Chapter, No. 76, R. A.
M.; Conneaut Council, No. 40, R. & S. M.; Rose Chap-
ter, No. 22, O. E. S.; Al Koran Temple, Mystic Shrine;
and Cache Commandery, No. 27, K. T. Politically
Mr. Lane is a Democrat.

J. H. Hunt, passenger conductor on the L. S. &
M. S. R. R., Erie, Pa., was born at Belle Valley, Mill
Creek township, Erie county, March 9, 1842. His
parents were Henry and Mary (Simons) Hunt, the
former a native of England and the latter of Pennsyl-
vania. They reared' a family of eight children, viz.:
John, Lovell; Edwin (deceased); Harriet (deceased);
William (deceased); Henry (deceased); J. H.; Char-
lotte, Mrs. E. L. Whittlesey, Erie, Pa.; Sarah, Mrs.
Edward Wood, Waterford, Pa. The mother died in
1850 and the father in 1875. J. H. Hunt was reared on
his father's farm in Belle Valley and was educated in
the common schools of Erie county, and before he was
21 years of age he worked as a farm laborer five
years. January 28, 1863, he entered the employ of the L.
S. & M. S. R. R. Company in thecapacity of brakeman,
and one year later was made a freight conductor, and
in 1872 was given a passenger run, in which capacity
he has since served. He now has charge of one of



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OF ERIE COUliTY.



727



the through passenger trains between Cleveland and
Buffalo. Mr. Hunt has been a very successful rail-
road man and is fully worthy of the great confidence
and trust imposed in him by the company. He is a
man of cenial disposition and has many friends, both
among iiis cn-rni|ilii\is niid the patrons of the road.
He has ncxcr hrm -iusp.inled for a day since he
entered the cniiilov ol tin- company, and since he has
had charge of a passenger train not a single life has
been lost among his crew, and but one among his

fiassengers. He was married October 3, 1868, to Miss
sabel Daugherty, of Erie, Pa. They have four
children, viz.: Winfield Scott, Mary Blanche, John
Edwin and Clara Jane. Mr. Hunt is a member of the
Masonic fraternity, and politically stands on purely an
independent basis.

Henry Weddege, locomotive engineer, Erie, Pa.,
is among the faithful employes of the P. & E. R. R.
He was born March 8, 1856, at Hanover, Germany,
and is a son of Henry and Rachel (Nulty) Weddege,
both natives of Hanover, and now residents of Erie.
The father is a carpenter by trade, which occupation
he has followed all his life. They reared a family of
eight children, viz.: Rachael, Mrs. Michael Mehl;
Amelia, Mrs. Martin Lambein; Henry; Augusta;
William; Alvina; Albert, professional baseball player;
and Harry, fireman on the P. & E. The family
emigrated to America in 1868. Henry entered the
employ of the Byron-Johnson Stove Works, where he
remained for a short time, when he went to work in
the hook and staple factorv, where he remained until
1870. In 1871 he entered the employ of the P. & E.
R. R. Company as fireman, and on April 2, 1880, was
made an engineer, which position he has since held.
Since he has been running he has been one of the
fortunate few railroad men who have not been con-
cerned in any railroad accident of importance. Mr.
Weddege has been twice married. First, in 1878, to
Miss Louise Rice, of Erie. They had two children,
Ada and Louise. Mrs. Weddege died Anril 22, 1880,
and he was again married August 30, 1883, to Miss
Anna, daughter of Robert and Susan (Nichols) Black-
wood, the former a native of Belfast, Ireland, and the
latter of Cattaraugus county. New York. To this union
has been born one child, Florence. Mr. Blackwood
now resides at Wesleyville at the age of 84. He came
to Erie county with his parents m 1818 at the age of 6
years. The family started for Ashtabula, O., but by
reason of a severe storm and shipwreck was driven
ashore at Erie. Mr. Weddege is a member of the
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.

A. J. Holmes, locomotive engineer on the P. & E.
R. R., Erie, Pa., was born in Hamburg, N. Y., Septem-
ber 16, 1854, and is a son of Abel V. and Elizabeth
(Dimmock) Holmes, natives of New York. They were
the parents of four children, viz.: A. J., Jerome, in the
West; Charles, conductor on the C, C, C. & I. R. R.,
and Abel, Iowa City. The father is now dead, and the
mother resides at Iowa City. Mr. Holmes was reared
and educated in North Evans, N. Y., where in early
life he worked on a farm. He then followed public
works until 1872, when he entered the employ of the
L. S. & M. S. R. R. Company as brakeman, and, in
1873, was promoted to fireman, where he worked until
1876, when he entered the employ of the P. lS: E. R. R.
Company as fireman, and, in 1882, was made an engi-



neer, in which capacity he has since served. Mr.
Holmes is considered a careful official, yet he has ex-
perienced his share of unavoidable railroad accidents.
He was in a head-end collision at Lovell, in which
both engines were completely demolished, and he es-
caped uninjured by jumping; when he was firing, his
engine was derailed at Cummings by a misplaced
switch, and the engine rolled completely over, but he
escaped by jumping. He is one of the few railroad
men who can truthfully say that he has fired the old
wood-burners, which he did on the L. S. & M. S. He
was married, October 20, 1876, to Miss Theresa, daugh-
ter of James and Mary (Riley) Hennessey, natives of
Ireland. To this union have been born five children,
viz.: Alfred, born June 25, 1883, died February 14,
1890; Mary, born June 14, 1885, died February 14,
1890; Anson, born September 16, 1887; Annie, born
May 9, 1892; and Walter, born September 22, 1894.
Mr. Holmes is a member of the C. M. B. A., and po-
litically is a Democrat. The family are members of
the Catholic Church.

Andrew A. Burke, locomotive engineer, Erie, Pa.,
is one of the most popular and well-known engineers
on the E. & P. R. R. He was born in Ireland in 1847,
is a son of John and Mary (Colleran) Rurke, and is the
only surviving member of a family of five children.
His father died in Ireland in 1858, and his mother now
resides in the city of New York. Mr. Burke was
reared and educated in his native country, and when
18 years of age joined the Royal Irish Police, in Clif-
ton, County Galway, Ireland, where he served three
years. In 1869 he came to America and remained in
New York a short time, where he had several rela-
tives, and in May, 1869, he settled in Erie. After
working one year in the E. & P. shops he went on the
road as fireman, and in 1873 was made an engineer,
and has since managed the locomotive, much to his
own credit and to the satisfaction of his employers.
As he himself says, he has had the ordinary ups and
downs incident to a railroad man's life, but generally
he has been very successful. He was married March
4, 1869 (just before leaving Ireland), to Miss Theresa
McGinness. To this union was born eight children,
five of whom are living, viz.: Henry E.; Isabella,
married W. J. Reynoldson, Clarendon, Pa.; Mary,
Theresa, and John Charles. Mrs. Burke departed
this life April 27, 1881. He was again married June 30,
1886, to Miss Mary Burke, of Warren, Pa. They have
five children, viz.: Andrew, Augusta, Frederick (de-
ceased), Margaretta and Geraldine. Mr. Burke is a
member of the C. M. B. A., the B. L. E., and politically
is a staunch Democrat.

S. H. Fletcher, locomotive engineer on the P. &
E. R. R., Erie, Pa., was born July 25, 1865, in North
Anson, Me. He is a son of David P. and Olive
(Gatchell) Fletcher, both natives of Maine, and of old
New England stock. The father went west in 1867
and engaged in mining pursuits at Nelson Gulch, near
Helena, Mont., which he followed until his death,
which occurred January 29, 1881. In the Helena
Weekly Herald of February 3, 1881, appears the follow-
ing article: "The death of David P. Fletcher takes
from our midst one of the truest hearted men that
ever lived. He came to Helena in the early days and
engaged in mining pursuits at Nelson Gulch, near
Helena, following this vocation for years. Mr.



728



NELSON'S BIOOBAPniCAL DICTIONARY



Fletcher was a native of North Anson, Me. His fune-
ral took place this afternoon from the Masonic Hall,
and his remains were followed to the grave by a large
concourse of the fraternity and many friends." In
1874 Mrs. Fletcher, with her son, S. H., then about 10
years old, went from Maine to Helena. In making
the journey it was necessary to go to Corinne, a town
twelve miles west of Salt Lake City, on the U. P. R. R.,
and go from there to Helena, a distance of 600 miles
through the mountains by stage coach. At this time
there were many hostile Indians on the war path in
that section, and the stage coach, which preceded the
one on which Mrs. Fletcher was a passenger, was at-
tacked by Indians. After four years of regular pio-
neer life " in the wild and wooly West " Mrs. Fletcher
returned to North Anson. She now resides in Erie.
In the family there were three children, viz.: S. H.,
Caroline, born in Helena, Mont., and Thomas R., born
in North Anson, Me. Mr. S. H. Fletcher was educated
in North Anson, Me., and Helena, Mont., and in May,
1882, came to Erie and entered the employ of the P. &
E. R. R. as fireman. In 1889 he was made an engi-
neer, and is one of the youngest engineers on the road,
yet one of the most competent. He was married Oc-
tober 2, 1889, to Miss Lizzie, daughter of Newton and
Mary (Stout) Wells, of Renovo, Pa., where Mr. Wells
served as postmaster for twenty years. They have
one child, David S. Mr. Fletcher is a member of the
B. of L. E., the I. O. O. F., the P. O. S. of A. and the
Pennsylvania Volunteer Relief.

Jacob Coppersmith, locomotive engineer, Erie,
Pa. This gentleman, who is one of the popular em-
ployes of the L. S. & M. S. R. R. Company, was born
in Erie, Augu.st 21, 1850. He is a son of John and
Annie M. (Gerber) Coppersmith, both natives of
Switzerland. The father was a surveyor in his native
land, and came to America in 1832, and settled in
Erie, where he followed fancy gardening, until the
time of his death, which occurred June 8, 1862. The
mother died January 23, 1884. They reared a family
of twelve children, of whom our subject was the
youngest. He and Wm. S., of Mill Creek township,
are the only surviving members of the family. John
P. died in Libby prison. He was a member of Co. I,
145th P. V. I. He was captured at Fredericksburg.
Henry C, who served in Miller's battery, 111th Reg.,
died at Alpine, Ga., while in the service. Jacob was
reared and educated in Erie, and at his father's death,
succeeded him in his business a short time, when he
went to work in Erie cemetery one season, and then
was engaged in pump-making for L. W. Olds, until
1870, when he went on the L. S. & M. S. as fireman.
November 27, 1872, he was promoted to engineer, and
has since been employed on the Buffalo and Cleveland
division in that capacity. He is a member of B. of L.
E., and K. of P., and is a Republican. Mr. Copper-
smith was married January 26, - 1882, to Miss Louisa
U., daughter of Christian and Mary Ann (Reiser)
Beary, of Erie, and natives of Switzerland. They
have two children, Charles W., and Rose D., the latter
deceased.

W. M. Gray, locomotive engineer on the L. S. &
M. S. R. R., Erie, Pa., was born at Painesville, Ohio,
August 19, 1852, and is a son of Elroy and Sarah
(Kent) Gray, natives of New England. They were
the parents of five children: Frances, drowned in the



Grand river, Ohio; Leroy, died at Painesville, in 1888;
he served in the 29th Reg., O. Vols., throughout the
war; Colburt, died in New Orleans, with yellow fever;
Sarah Ann, married C. A. Smith, Erie, Pa., and W.M.
Gray. The father was a member of the 29th Reg., O.
Vols. He was killed at the battle of Gettysburg, and
is buried on the field in an unknown grave. His wife
died in 1862. Mr. Gray comes from a military family.
His grandfather, Elmiah Gray, served in the war of
1812, and his grandfather, Kent, was a commissioned
officer in the Revolutionary war. W. M. Gray was
reared in Painesville, educated in the public schools
and Austinberg College, and when 13 years of age en-
listed in the U. S. navy at Memphis, Tenn., and served
as powder boy on the U. S. gunboat, " Roanoke," sev-
enteen months, when he was discharged at his own re-
quest. He then went to Denver, and remained a short
time, when he returned to Chicago. He then went to
Pittsburg, and from there to the Pennsylvania oil re-
gions in the midst of the oil excitement. He ran a
pump in the oil regions two years, and in 1863, went
to Cleveland, where he entered the employ of the
Cleveland and Pittsburg R. R. Company, as switch-
man, where he remained but a short time, when he
went to breaking on the L. S. & M. S. In October,
1873, he was promoted to the post of fireman, and, in
1879, to engmeer, in which capacity he has since
served. He has run on the road a great deal, but at
present is employed in the Erie yards. Since he has
been running he has never had an accident of any
kind, or lost a day by suspension. Mr. Gray was mar-
ried November 11, 1874, to Miss Elizabeth Wetter, of
Erie, Pa. To this union were born nine children: Em-
man (deceased), William, Emma, Agnes (deceased),
Josephine, George, Jackson, Frances, and Arthur (de-
ceased). He is a member of the B. of L. E., and
politically is a thorough Republican.

B. J. HatltlOtt, locomotive engineer on the E. &
P. R. R., Erie, Pa., is a native of Clifton, County Gal-
way, Ireland, and was born Ajiril 5, 1856. He is a son
of John and Bridget (McGinness) Hannon. The for-
mer now resides in Erie, and the latter died in Ire-
land. In the family there were four children, viz.: B.
J., Mary, Lucy and Lizzie. In 1866, the father, with
the two eldest children, emigrated to America and lo-
cated at Erie, where he has since resided. In 1875,
B. J. returned to Ireland and brought his two remain-
ing sisters to this country, who also reside in Erie
now. B. J. Hannon, after receiving a good



school education, in 1871 entered the employ of James

:ery store
mained there a short time, when he entered the



Cooper, as clerk in his grocery store in Erie. He re-



ploy of the E. & P. R. R. as timekeeper in their office
m Erie. In November, in 1872, he went firing on the
same road, and March 23, 1878, was promoted to engi-
neer, which position he has since held. As a railroader,
Mr. Hannon has had as few accidents and as good a
record as any man on the road. He was married, Sep-
tember 18, 1879, to Miss Mary Ellen, daughter of Ben-
nett and Hanora (Griffin) Jones, the former a native of
Wales, and the latter of Ireland. Mr. Jones served
on the U. S. S. " Michigan " twenty years and eleven
months, enlisting June 30, 1848. At the time of his
discharge, he was third assistant senior engineer. He
died Feljruary 19, 1893, his wife having died only two
weeks previously. Mr. and Mrs. Hannon have had
four children, viz.: John (deceased), Nora Loretta,



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OF ERIE COU^iTY.



729



Mary and Jennie. Mr. Hannon is also engaged in the
grocery business. His business is located in a hand-
some brick block on the corner of Seventh and Poplar
streets, which is owned by him, and was built in 1894.
He commenced the business the same year. He car-
ries a very complete stock of groceries,' and is doing a
prosperous business. He is a member of the B. of L.
E. and the C. M. B. A.

Thomas H. Dickson, locdUKitivr rnmm-er on the
E. lS: p. R. R., Erie, Pa., is a n.iiur nl h, Kind, where
his parents, Robert and Essh' i 1 laiiiilinn i Dickson,
still reside; thcv arc als.. ti,,Ik.> .,\ li. l.ni.l, but of
Scotch descent.' I'Ilmius u.is rr.ir.M ,111. 1 ..lu, atr.l in
his native land, .iiid ,il ihr .i_;r i.l l."i c ,1111c tc Amciica
and settled in Sharwi,, Va. Al the ,i^c,,l 17 lie t,вАЮ,k
out naturalizatmn papers, and v\ab made an .Aniencan
citizen, in Mercer, Pa. There he worked for a coal
company as messenger and office boy for a short time,
when he entered the employ of the Middlesex Coal
Company as locomotive fireman, which he followed
about two years. He then came to Erie and went to
work in the E. & P. shops as an apprentice at the
machinist trade. After learning his trade and work-
ing at it a short time he engaged as fireman for the
same company, and after firing about one year he was
made an engineer in 1878. Since his promotion Mr.
Dickson has continued in the employment of the com-
pany in that capacity. As a railroad man he has had
considerable experience, and on several occasions has
had close calls. Although he has never been con-
cerned in a railroad wreck which was in any way
attributable to his negligence, he has been the victim
of several exceptional smash-ups, but has always
been fortunate enough to escape unhurt; yet he has
never been known to leave his engine, regardless of
the apparent danger. He was married, April 16, 1877,
to Miss Lizzie McCrea, of Erie, Pa. They have five
children, viz.: Thomas A., Robert S., Nellie C, Will-
iam J. and James Don-l.is. Mr. Dicksnn is a member
of the B. of L. E., tlir A. o. 1 . W. and Uie Maswrnc
fraternity, in which he has n-criMil ,ill the d. -reus,
excei>t the Consistory; he is also a uieniber uf .Mystic
Shrine.

John E. Hall, locomotive engineer on the E. &
P. R. R., Erie, Pa., is one of the veteran railroaders of
Erie county. He was born in Plattsburg, \. Y., Sep-
tember 11, 18o(;, and is a son of Daniel and Elizabeth
(Brosden) Hall, both natives of Vermont, and of New
England stock. The father was a sailor, and owned a
vessel on Lake Chaniplain, wliere he was drowned
when John E. was 8 vears old. The mother died in
Buffalo in 1881. The family moved to Buffalo in 1850.
When John E. was a young man he worked as a farm
laborer, later at a milk dairy in Buffalo. In 1864 he
entered the employ of the N. Y. C. R. R. as brakeman,
which he followed but a short time, and, in 1865, came
to Erie and entered the employ of the E. & P. R. R.
as brakeman. Shortly after he was promoted to the
position of fireman, and in 1868 was made an engineer,
which position he has since held. He ran on the road
until 1882, when, on account of his long service, he
was given an easier position, running a locomotive at
the Pittsburgh docks, at Erie, Pa. I5uring Mr. Hall's
railroad experience he has "pulled" all kinds of
trains over the road. He has usually run freight, and
has repeatedly refused to take a regular passenger



run. During all his railroad experience he has had
but one accident, in which he struck a Lake Shore
train that was across the E. & P. tracks, in the Erie
yards. On this occasion he was thrown out of the cab
window and had his back severely injured. Mr. Hall
was married, April 10, 1856, to Miss Sarah A. Johnson,
of Buffalo. They have four children, viz.: Charles,
round-house foreman of the P. S. & L. E., in Green-
ville, Pa.; Ida, principal of the Erie Shorthand School;
Herbert, brass finisher, Erie, Pa., and John, brass
finisher, Erie, Pa. Mr. Hall is a member of the Penn-
sylvania \'oluntary Relief, the A. O. U. W. and the
K. of P., and in politics is perfectly independent.

John T. Jourdan, locomotive engineer on the
E. & P. R. R., Erie, Pa. This gentleman is one of
the popular young engineers of the Pennsylvania R. R.
system. He is an Erie man by birth. He was born
February 9, 1862. He is a son of John and Mary
(Horigan) Jourdan, both natives of Ireland and early
settlers in Erie county. The father worked on the
construction of the Lake Shore R. R. and is at pres-
ent employed by that company. The nuither died in
1884. John is the youngest in a family of four chil-
dren. He was reared in the city of Erie, where he
received a good common schcjol education, and at
about the age of 14, commenced work as office boy
in the master mechanic's office of the E. & P. R. R. at
Erie. He remained there but a short time, when he
began work in the machine and boiler shops, and in
1878, when he was about 17 years of age, he com-
menced firing on the road, and in August, 1885, was
promoted to engineer. Outside of the regular routine
of mishaps of a railroad man's life, Mr. Jourdan has
been very fortunate, and has never been connected
with any accident of any account. He was united in
marriage February 24, 1892, to Miss Mary T. Mc-
Carthy, of Sharon, Pa. Mr. Jourdan is a member of
the B. of L. E., the Penn. Vol. Relief and the
C. M. B.A.

J. B. Weindorf, locomotive engineer on the
E. & P. R. R., Erie, Pa. This gentleman was born
in Erie, October 15, 1851. His parents, Jacob and
Mary Ann (Stringer) Weindorf, were natives of Ger-
many; the former was born in Hessen Darmstadt,
and the latter came from Mainz. They emigrated to
America in 1840, and went directly to Cleveland; but
the same year removed to Erie, where they per-
manently settled. The father learned the carpenter's
trade in his native land, which he followed in Erie
during his life. He was employed most of his time
for the Reed estate. He also worked on the building
of the " Michigan." He died in 1858, aged 53 years,
and the mother now resides in Erie, at the age of 76.
They reared a family of eleven children: Teresa, now
Mrs. Fred Shade, of Erie; Barbara, Mrs. Andrew
Crawford, of TitusviUe, Pa.; Peter, carpenter, Lincoln,
111.; Etta, married John Longnecker, Erie; Kate,
Mrs. John Freeman (widow), Erie; J. B.; George, con-
ductor on the P., F. W. & C. R. R., Chicago; John,
boilermaker, Erie; Edward, machinist, Erie; Mary,



Online LibraryBenjamin WhitmanNelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r → online text (page 141 of 192)