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Benjamin Whitman.

Nelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r online

. (page 176 of 192)
Online LibraryBenjamin WhitmanNelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r → online text (page 176 of 192)
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Valley at that time. Levi was the second white male
child born in that valley. Isaac Farr, the [pioneer of
that section, was born in Vermont in 1775; his parents
were natives of England. C. B. Farr had his early
experience among the oil derricks of McKean county,
and came to Erie county at the age of 17. He pur-
chased his present place in 1888 from his father. He
is engaged in fruit raising and gardening, and his
place is located about three miles northeast of the
"grape city." Mr. Farr was married September 22,
1885, to Miss Nettie, daughter of L. P. and Louisa
(Vermilyae) Merihew, of North East township. They
have one child, Noel Clifton. Mr. Farr is a member
of the Jr. O. U. A. M.

Joseph Rhodes, postoffice NorthviUe, Pa., rail-
road station State Line, N. Y. Mr. Rhodes is a native
of New Jersey, and was born November 1, 1828. He
is a son of George and Annie (Vanderhoff) Rhodes.
The father was born September 13, 1797, in New Jer-
sey, and the mother July 11, 1798. The father was a
blacksmith and wagonmaker by trade, and came to
Genoa, Cayuga county, N. Y., at an early date. He
was an excellent workman, and noted throughout cen-
tral New York State for the perfection of his forged
fish-hooks. He followed his trade at Genoa, N. Y.,
and several years at Rhodesport, and was next en-
gaged in boating and boat building for several years.
About 1842 the family removed to Corning, N. Y., and
about the time they moved he caught a severe cold
through exposure on Lake Seneca, and went to Cor-
ning, where he died June 24, 1842. His wife died Feb-
auary 10, 1881. They reared a family of seven chil-
dren: Lucetta, born September 1, 1818, and died



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OF ERIE COUNTY.



March 20, 1840; Hattie Caroline, born November 12,
1824, now Mrs. Robert Clark, Corning-, N. Y.; Catherine
Maria, born November :!n, Isl'S. m.irried Alonzo Buck-
ley, and resides in tin \\c.,t; llnsca, born April 28,
1831, Olean, N. Y.; |..liii, lu.ni .Xiiyust 3, 1833, lives in
Chicago; Lydia Saniantha, b.iin September 13, 1837,
died September 7, 1847; and Kachael Ann, born No-
vember 23, 1839, died October 23, 1840. Joseph
Rhodes came to New York State with his parents
when he was 1 year old. He showed a talent for me-
chanical work ever since he was a child, and when a
youth naturally and easily learned the carpenter's
trade, and followed this occupation as a railroad car-
penter for several years, with his home at Corning.
In 1875 he bought one-half interest in the cider and
vinegar factory which he now owns. It is situated on
the Buffalo road, near State Line. In 1877 he bought
the entire concern, and since then has been engaged
in the manufacture of cider, vinegar and unfermented
grape cider. He manufactures about 80,000 gallons
of vinegar per year. Mr. Rhodes was married first at
Akron, O., March 21, 1863, to Miss Sarah Townsend,
of Akron, O. She died January 16, 1889, leaving one
child, Marcus, who now resides at Dayton, N. Y. Mr.
Rhodes was again married July 23, 1890, to Miss Har-
riet Baker. Mr. Rhodes is a member of the State
Police, and politically is a Republican. Mr. Rhodes'
great-greatgrandfather, Joseph Rhodes, lived and died
in Horton," Yorkshire, England. His son, Charles
Rhodes, when a lad of 17 years, was seized by a press
gang, while attending school in a seaport town, with
his school books in his hand, put on board a man-of-
war, and it was three years before he finally escaped,
while the vessel was at anchor in New York harbor.
He found a position as a school teacher in Freehold,
N. J., where he was married on the 6th of August,
1750, to Alice Van Kirk. He was a farmer during the
Revolution, and the British took possession of his
farm. Later he conducted a hotel, built a gristmill,
sawmill and distillery. He was for a long time
county clerk of Sussex county, holding the office at
the time of his death. He made a trip to England to
secure property left him by his father. George
Rhodes, the father of our subject, was the third child
of Joseph Rhodes, above mentioned, by his second
wife, Catherine Wintermate.

Jacob Chefferle, fruit grower. North East, Pa.,
was a veteran in the late war, is a native of Switzer-
land, and was born March 16, 1831. He was reared
and educated in his native land, and when 21 years of
age came to America, settling in Boston, Erie county,
N. Y., where he remained until the breaking out of
the rebellion, when he enlisted in Co. F, 116th N. Y.
X. I. At Plain Stone, near Ft. Hudson, May 21, 1863,
which was the first engagement in which he partici-
pated, he received wounds which disabled him from
further military service. He lost the four fingers of his
left hand and at the same time was pierced through
the right wrist by a musket ball. After recovering
sufficiently to leave the hospital he returned to his
former home in New York State. Shortly afterwards he
came to North East and engaged in farming between
Freeport and North East, where he has since resided.
He is chiefly engaged in fruit raising. He was mar-
ried in 1856 to Miss Kate Meehl, of New York State.
They have nine children, viz.: Lizzie, John, Hattie,
Henry, Frank, Julius, Charles, Emma and Lewis. He



is a member of the G. A. R., and politically is a Re-
publican.

E. A. Hart, North East, Pa., was born August 27,
1837, in North East township. He is a son of Edmund
and Mahala (Jones) Hart; the former was a native of
Erie county, Pennsylvania, and a descendant of one
of the early pioneer families. Edmund Hart settled
in North East township about 1835, and bought some
sixty-three acres about a mile and a half southeast of
the borough. He cleared this land, and followed
farming there during the remainder of his life. This
is where E. A. was born, and where he now resides,
although his present farm contains nearly twice as
much land as was originally purchased by his father.
Edmund and Mahala (Jones) Hart were the parents
of six children, viz.: E. A., L. C, North East; John
H., Central City, Neb.; Dora M., Mrs. Robert Thayer,
North East, widow; Emma T., Mrs. Charles Rothers,
Pasadena, Cal., and Ida V., Mrs. James Loucks,
Pasadena, Cal. The father died in 1893, aged 82
years, and the mother now resides in North East
borough. E. A. Hart has always been engaged in
farming in North East township, except one year he
spent in the oil country. He was united in marriage
June 10, 1862, to Miss Lydia Fairchild, of Poughkeep-
sie, N. Y. They have three children, viz.: Eva, Mrs.
George Youngs, North East township; W. S. and
Charles A. Mr. Hart is the present constable of
North East township, and has held several local
offices, having been school director nine years. Polit-
ically he is a Republican.

Charles Wilks, farmer, North East, Pa., resides
about three miles southeast of the borough, is a native
of Mechlenberg, Germany, and was born August 17,
1820. His parents were John and Mary (Holnagel)
Wilks, both of whom spent their lives in Germany.
Charles Wilks was reared and educated in his native
land, where he followed farming until he was 36 years
old, when he emigrated to America, locating for a
short time in Silver Creek, N. Y. In 1857 he "settled
in North East township, and two or three years later
purchased his present pi, ice. He was married in 1844
to Miss Sophi.i, il.niuhtrr of Christopher Shultz, a
native of Genii,in\. Tlicy reared a faniilv of five
children, viz.: 1'. C, Nnrth East; Mary, Mrs. Homer
Adkins, North East; Charles F., North East; Minnie,
Mrs. Frank Luth, PainesviUe, O., and Albert F., who
resides with his father, and has an adjoining farm,
working in partnership. He was born January 26,
1863, and has alway: devoted his attention to farming.
He was married March 26, 1885, to Miss Mary, daugh-
ter of Charles Gruel, of North East township. They
have three children, viz.: Walter W., Frank C. and
Burt H.

BensoM BiMgham, North East, Pa., is one of Erie
county's representati\ of au'o when he entered the service. He
died July 5, l!?7irl. His wife now resides at Ripley,
N. Y. C. B. Archer was educated in the common
schools of New York, and in 1870 came to Erie county
and bought a farm in Greenfield township and in 1873
bought his present place in North East. Mr. Archer
was married March 31, 1869, to Miss Henrietta Baird,
a descendant of one of the pioneer families of North
East township. They have three children: Frank,
Effie and Burt.

L. G. Youngs, nur.seryman. North East township,
Pi'nnsvl\-ania, horn in the township where he now re-
skIis I >( I riiilвАЮr 13, 1863, is a son of Sears and Jane
lH,ii|iiii ^ oungs. He was reared in North East
to\\iislii|. and educated in the public schools, the
Lake Shore Seminary, North East, and the Elyria
Academy, Elyria, O. He taught school several years,
mostly in the State of Ohio. He at one time was the



principal of the Grafton Academy, Grafton, Ohio. In
1888 he was appointed postal clerk and worked on
the Chicago, New York R. P. O. Div. of the railway
mail service untd 1890. He then resigned his position
in the mail service and has since devoted his attention
to his present place, which he had previously pur-
chaseil. He is \crv cxtensix ely engaged in fruit rais-
ing, l)esi



Online LibraryBenjamin WhitmanNelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r → online text (page 176 of 192)