Copyright
Benjamin Whitman.

Nelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r online

. (page 65 of 192)
Online LibraryBenjamin WhitmanNelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r → online text (page 65 of 192)
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These are as follows — the "first being the pres-
ent name and the last the original :

Fifth (east of Parade), Hickory Lane.

Sixth (east of Parade), Birch Lane.

Seventh (east of Parade), Maple Lane.

Eighth (east of Parade), Ironwood Lane.



Ninth (east of Parade), Dogwood Lane.

Tenth (east of Parade), Elm Lane.

Eleventh (east of Parade), Locust Lane.

Twelfth (east of Parade), Pear Lane.

Thirteenth, Canal street.

Fourteenth, Washington street.

Fifteenth, Penn street, also as Pearl be-
tween German and Parade.

Si.xteenth, Court, also as Sterrett between
French and Holland.

Seventeenth, Lafayette, also as Ichabod.

Eighteenth, Buffalo street or road.

Nineteenth, Green street.

Twentieth, Monroe street.

Twenty-first, Simpson street.

Twenty second. Brown street.

Twenty-third, Washington street.

Twenty-fourth, Franklin street.

Twenty-fifth, Eagle street.

Twenty-sixth, South street, also as Ridge
road.

Twenty-eighth, W^ater street, also as Ar-
buckle.

Ash (south of Twenty-eighth), Lemon
street.

Reed, Maclay street.

East avenue (south of Twenty-eighth)
Vine street.

Twenty-ninth (between Ash and East av-
enue), Cameron street.

Wayne, Beech Lane.

Wallace, Hemlock Lane.

WIDTH OF STREETS, ETC.

The map in the water office furnishes the
information below in regard to the width of
the several thoroughfares in the city :

East and west streets are all sixty feet
wide, except the follo'ving:

Lake road, fifty feet.

Sixth and Tenth streets, 100 feet.

Seventh street, east of city limits, fifty
feet.

Twelfth street to East avenue, 100 feet ;
east of East avenue, eighty feet.

Fourteenth street, from Turnpike to Sas-
safras, fifty feet.

Sixteenth street, from Peach to State,
forty-five feet ; fiom Raspberry to Cranberry,
fifty feet.

Seventeenth street, from State west, fifty
feet.

Eighteenth street, fifty feet.



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OF ERIE COUNTY.



395



Twenty-first, Twenty-second and Twenty-
third sti"eets, east of East avenue, fifty feet.

Twentj'-sixth street, 100 feet at west line
of Peach, tapering to seventy feet at Sassa-
fras ; from Sassafras to Chestnut seventy feet ;
from Peach to State, ninety feet.

Canal street, fifty teet.

Qiieen street, forty-five feet.

Diagonal streets are all sixty feet wide,
except the following:

Brown's avenue, eight}' feet.

Eliot avenue, forty-live feet.

Orchard and Horton streets, fifty feet.

Hill road, Buffalo road, old French road
and Wattsburg road, fifty feet.

Railroad and Summit streets, fifty feet.

Peach street, south of Twenty-sixth, sev-
ent}'-five feet.

Waterford avenue, seventy-five feet.

Waterford plank road, forty-five feet.

Marvin avenue, fifty feet.

North and south streets are all sixty feet
wide, except the following:

Liberty, State and Parade streets, 100 feet.

Maple (South Erie), Hazel, Hickory,
Division, Wilson, Newman, Ross. Brewster
and Elm streets, fifty feet.

Cedar street, forty feet.

Gilson avenue, eighty feet.

East avenue, from the lake to Twelfth
street, 100 feet ; south of Twelfth to the Buf-
falo road, eighty feet ; south of the Buffalo
road to Twenty-eighth street, sixty feet.

STREET NUMBERS.

The city ordinance relating to the number-
ing of streets, provides as follows :

" Beginning on Front street on the north,
and extending to the city limits on the south,
the numbers shall be placed on each separate
dwelling and business place, and shall begin
at Front street with No. 101, and all even
numbers shall be placed on the west side, and
all odd numbers on the east side of streets
running north and south, and each square on
a street shall include 100 numbers, so that the
first number on each square shall be the be-
ginning of hundreds corresponding to the
number of the street on the north side of the
square or block, and for the purpose of so
numbering twenty and seven-twelfths feet
shall be considered a lot on all the streets in
said city.

" All buildings on streets running east and



west shall be numbered beginning at State
street and numbering east and west therefrom
to the limits of the city ; even numbers shall
be placed on the north side and odd numbers
on the south side of said street and shall begin
I at State street with No. one, and each square
shall include 100 numbers."'



The streets and public grounds of the city
of Erie were lighted on August 1, 1895, by
478 gas lamps at $21.50 each per annum, and
by 270 electric arc lamps each of 2,000 candle
power at $62.05 per annum. The electric
lighting has been furnished from the begin-
ning by the Edison company, Chas. H.
Strong, president. The contract for 1895 re-
quires the lights to be supplied from dusk to
daylight everj^ night in the year.



The city is well sewered, and is steadily
being improved in this respect. Up to 1894
more than thirty-six and one-half miles of

I sewers had been built, over ten miles of
which were brick and the balance tile. This
was increased in 1894-5 to the extent of 2.876

! miles, making a total length of sewerage in

j August, 1895, of nearly thirty-nine and one-
sixth miles. The cost of the sewerage has

I been $607,200.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS, CHURCHES, ETC.

, The main public edifices are the United

j States building, at State street and North
I Park row (used as the postofTice, collector's
' oflice, etc.) ; the old Custom House on State
street near Fourth, the Court House, the City
Hall and the County Jail.

Of church buildings there are three Bap-
tist, six Lutheran, five Methodist Episcopal,
four Presbyterian, one United Preslayterian,
four Episcopalian, ten Roman Catholic and
two more projected, one LTniversalist, one
Church of Christ, (known as the Tabernacle),
one Christian and one Hebrew synagogue.
The Young Men's Christian Association have
a good building at Tenth and Peach streets.
1 The structures used for charitable purposes

are the Soldiers' and Sailors' Home, the Home
1 for the Friendless, the Hamot Hospital, St.
I Vincent's Hospital, St. Joseph's Orphan Asy-
lum and the Old Folks' Home.



396



NELSON'S BIOQBAPEICAL DICTIONARY



There are three academy buildings : Villa
Maria, St. Benedict's and the Erie academy.

The principal places of amusement are the
Opera Ilouse and Wonderland, but there are
numerous halls for public entertainment.
Among these are: Music Hall, Wayne, Ga-
bel's, Penn, Liedertafel, Maennerchor, Wal-
ther's, Grand Army, Jarecki's and the East
Erie.

The public school buildings are unusually
large and well-planned, and the Central School
building is one of the most imposing in the
United States.

The city contains four very fine market
houses, owned by private companies or cor-
porations.

In the vicinity are numerous pleasure re-
sorts and club houses, some of which have a
wide reputation. The bay and lake, the well-
paved and shaded streets, the splendid roads,
the pure atmosphere, and the rich surrounding
country, combine to make the city one of the
most delightful residences that can be im-
agined. No person need leave Erie in order to
secure health, comfort or pleasure.

RAILROADS, TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES,
ETC.

With five important lines of railroad — the
Lake Shore, the New York, Chicago and St.
Louis, the Philadelphia and Erie, the Erie and
Pittsburg, and the Pittsburg, Shenango and
Lake Erie — reaching east, west and south;
and with the advantages of lake navigation
seven to eight months in each year, Erie has
transportation facilities that are almost un-
rivalled. These, and the convenience to the
coal regions, render it a profitable point for
manufactures, and the city has become one of
the leading manufacturing centers in the
Union. The manufacturing interests are of
such wide diversity and the business facilities
so unusual that Erie is never affected by panics
or hard times as places are that have to depend
on a single industry or limited means of trans-
portation.

The city is supplied with an abundance of
pure water, has an excellent electric motor
system, and is lighted with both gas and elec-
tricity. Natural gas is brought in from the
mountain regions of Pennsylvania, and nearly
every store, office and house has the benefit of
this great convenience. It has live news-



papers, an able bar, an earnest pulpit, and a
social, intelligent and refined population. Take
it all together, few places have the advantages
that Erie possesses, and the person who cannot
content himself within its limits will never be
satisfied this side of Paradise.

[For a fuller account of the several sub-
jects referred to above see other chapters of
this work.]

LOCAL NAMES.

In early j'ears the outside territory now
included within the city or adjacent to it was
divided into various small settlements, each of
which had a local title that in some cases still
adheres to it. The names which are most
frequently heard now-a-days are Cloughs-
burg, Stumptown, New Jerusalem, or Jeru-
salem, Kingtown, Federal Hill, Marvintown,
South Erie, Warfeltown and Weigelville.

Cloug/isburg was named after Rufus
Clough, who located on the southwest corner
of Sixth and Parade streets, opened a black-
smith shop and subsequently a grocery. The
house of Col. Charles M. Lynch was the
residence of Maj. Clough during the latter
part of his career.

Stuinptozvii grew up during the last war
with Great Britain, when troops were called
to Erie in January, 1814. A number of cab-
ins were built by them for quarters, extending
from Peach street to the gully of Lee's run,
and that part of Erie became known by the
name above given.

A'cu' Jerusalem was christened by Will-
iam Himrod, sr., who, in 1828-'29, bought a
tract of land west of Sassafras and north of
Sixth street. At that time there were but two
families living west of Lee's run and north
of Sixth street, except upon the bank of the
bay, where a few scattering houses had been
erected. Mr. Himrod, who resided at French
and Second streets, called his own home
" Jericho," because, as he said, it was on the
side of a hill, and, upon laying off his new
purchase, he named it "New Jerusalem." A
veteran lady of the city says, jokingly, that it
received the title "because it was so hard to
get to," there being a deep ravine — that of
Lee's run — between the settlement and the
rest of the town, with only one or two rickety
bridges crossing the stream. One of the con-
ditions made by Mr. Himrod in selling lots
was that each purchaser should build and oc-




G^/)\



^-i^-t-^



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OF ERIE COUNTr.



cupy a house, the result of which was that
quite a village sprung up in a few years.

Kiugtozvn was laid out by Alfred King, on
some outlets owned by him a little southeast
of the Garrison ground, now occupied by the
Soldiers' and Sailors' Home.

Federal Hill was the summit of the ridge
at Peach and Twenty-sixth streets. The name
was given to it by George Moore, on account
of the number of "Federals" who resided
there. It was quite a settlement as early as
the war of 1812, and several public houses
and stores were located at that point. One
of the hotels was the "American Eagle,"
from which it also came to be known as Eagle
Village. The settlement was a great stoppmg
place for travelers, being the terminus of the
Waterford pike and Ridge road. It was long
the voting place of Mill Creek township.
Sixty years ago a mile of woods lay between
Federal Hill and Erie, from the business part
of which the village was nearly two miles
distant. Among those who resided on "Fed-
eral Hill" were George Moore, Capt. John
Justice, Ira Glazier, Dr. P. Faulkner, John
Sweeney, Simeon Dunn and Dr. Plara
Thaj'er.

Marvinto~i.'n was the home of Elisha Mar-
vin, who lived at the " Sennett place," near
the junction of Parade street and the Watts-
burg road, and owned most of the land
around. Being the intersection of two roads,
a small village sprang into existence, and in
1852-53 Mr. Marvin employed Samuel Low
to lay out the land in lots. The lots were sold
principally to Germans, and finally Mr. Mar-
vin disposed of his home to Pardon Sennett.

South Eric grew up in consequence of the
building of the Lake Shore R. R., which
was finished to Eiie January 10, 1852. The
place was incorporated as a borough in 1866,
and became a part of Erie by the extension of
the city limits in 1870. The borough limits
included the territory bounded by Eighteenth,
Twenty-'.ixth, Parade and Cherry streets.

Warfcltou'ii, a recent cognomen, embraces
the farm of M. Warfel, sr., on the southeast
side of the city, along the Philadelphia and
Erie R. R. It was laid out into lots by Jacob
Warfel, and has grown with surprising rap-
idity.

Weig-elfozvn or Weigclvillc , as it is vari-
ously called, at the intersection of Brown's
avenue with the Ridge road, wa.s named after



George Weigel, sr., who bought fifty acres in
1833, and laid out the Ridge road front into
building lots. The hotel at Weigletown was
long a famous stopping place for parties com-
ing to and driving from Erie. The village
was then a mile and a half from the original
borough limits.



The city is divided into six wards and
thirty-two election districts. The limits of
the wards are as follows :



W,



■ds.



First Ward — All that portion of the city
east of State and north of Eighth street.

Second Ward — East of State from Eighth
to Eighteenth street.

Third Ward— West of State from Eighth
to Eighteenth street.

Fourth Ward — West of State and north
of Eighth street.

Fifth Ward— East of Peach and south of
Eighteenth street.

Sixth Ward — West of Peach and south of
Eighteenth street.

Those of the election districts are as fol-
lows :

ELECTION DISTRICTS.

First Ward.
1— East of Reed, Eighth to Lake.
2— Fifth to Eighth, State to Parade.
3— State to Parade, Lake to Third.
4— Parade to Reed, Eighth to Lake.
5— Third to Fifth, State to Parade.

Second Ward.

1 — Twelfth to Eighteenth, Ash to Parade.

2— Eighth to Tenth, Parade to State.

3— Twelfth to R. R. tracks, Parade to
State.

4— Eighth to Eleventh, East of Ash.

5— Eighth to Twelfth, Ash to Parade.

(5— Tenth to Twelfth, Parade to State.

7 — Eleventh to Eigiiteenth, Ash east to
city limits.

8 — R. R. tracks to Eighteenth, Parade to
State.

Third Ward.

1 — Twelfth to Eighteenth, State to Sassa-
fras.

2— Eighth to Tenth, State to Chestnut.



398



NELSON'S BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY



3 — Eighth to R. R. tracks, Chestnut to
Liberty.

4 — Twelfth to Eighteenth, Sassafras to
Chestnut.

5— Tenth to Twelfth, State to Chestnut.

6 — Eighth to Eighteenth, Liberty street
v^^est.

7 — R. R. tracks to Eighteenth, Chestnut
to Libert)'.

Fourth Ward.

1 — Fifth to Lake, Chestnut to Poplar.
2 — Fifth to Lake, State to Chestnut.
3 — Third to Lake, State to Chestnut.
4 — Poplar west, Eighth to Lake.
5 — Fifth to Eighth, Chestnut to Poplar.
6— Third to Fifth, State to Chestnut.

Fifth Ward.

1 — Eighteenth south, Peach to Holland
and Honecker.

2 — Eighteenth south. Parade to Wayne.

3 — Eighteenth south. Parade to Holland
and Honecker.

4 — Eighteenth south, Wayne east.

Sixth Ward.

1 — Eighteenth to Twenty-first, Peach to
Cherry.

2 — Twenty-first to Twenty-fifth, Peach to
Cherry.

3 — Cherry west. Eighteenth south.

4 — Twenty-fifth south. Peach to Cherry.

[See Political Record in General History
of Erie county.]

CITY FINANCES.

The city debt December 31, 1883, was
$1,114,584, of which .$685,677.06 were incur-
red in constructing the water system. This
had been reduced on August 1, 1895. to .$841,-
700. The interest on the debt for the year
1882 was $81,872 ; that on the present debt is
only $34,360, or less than half of what it was
twelve and a half years ago. This reduction
is due, in part, to the refunding of a large
portion of the debt at a lower rate of interest.

The taxes, &c. , collected in 1882 were $286,-
333 ; in 1894 the amount collected was as given
below, being exclusive of paving and sewer
assessments :



City taxes (regular)

Delinquent taxes

Delinquent penalty

Costs on land sold for taxes

Rents for street markets

Rents for hay and wood markets

License for Central Market Company

City tines, etc., from Mayor

City fines, etc. , from Aldermen

Liquor licenses for 1894

Billiard licenses for 1894

Moving- permits

Building permits

Boat house rents

Surveys, etc., from the Engineer's de-
partment

Premium on bonds sold

Interest on bonds sold

Interest on deposits



$216,407.83

16,820.24

2,175.56

84.20

4,250.00

708.00

100.00

2,264.40

12.00

39,750.00

327.75

85.00

41.50

57.00

336.85
2,749.50
2,666.66
1,734.72



Total $290,571.21

ASSESSMENTS.

The city assessments for 1883 and 1895
compare as follows :



Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Sixth ■



1883.


1895.


$2,164,980


$2,315,473


2,592.183


3,677,343


3,518,936


4,595,546


2,798,220


3,435,585


963,024


1.719,382


1,061,954


1,591,445



Totals $13,099,297 $17,424,774

TAX RATE FOR TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS.

Below are the tax rates in Erie for a per-
iod of twenty-seven years, beginning in 1869
and ending in 1895. The higher rates in 1860
and '61 are explained by the statement that
valuations since that time have been presum-
ably made on a cash basis :



YEAR

1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879



1885
1886
1887



16


1


16


2


17J^


2,


16X




17


2/


17


3


17


3


17


3



5


21K


41.,


18J^


4;4


18M


5


2\y.


4


22K


5


21>^


5


23


5


23^4


8


28


by-.


24'^


5H


25


6;-2


26>^


5


25


5


25



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OP ERIE COUJSlTY.



399



1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895



17


2'A


16/4


2%


16 -4




16


2


IS


T


15


2


15




14^4'


2'A



7


26>^


7


26


8


26 'i


8


26


7


2+


H


25


7


24


S


24^4



BUILDING PERMITS.

The number of permits for building within
the city limits were as follows for six years
preceding January 1, 1895: In 1889, 283; in
1890,333; in 1891, 360; in 1892,435; in 1893,
377 ; in 1894, 352.



CHAPTER III.



Borough and City Governments — List of the Principal Officials from 1805 to
1895 Inclusive — Justices of the Peace and Aldermen Since 1823.



THE act creating Erie a borough
was passed March 29, 1805, the town
previous to that having formed a
part of and voted with Mill Creek
township. The first borough election
was held on the 5th of May in the same
year, and resulted as follows: John C.
Wallace, Burgess; Judah Colt, Rufus S.
Reed, George Buehler, Robert Hays, George
Schantz, Town Council ; Robert Irwin, High
Constable. At the first meeting of the coun-
cil, the following officers were chosen : Jas.
E. Herron, Town Clerk; Thomas Forster,
William Wallace and James Baird, Street
Commissioners; William Bell, Treasurer.

From that time until the incorporation of
Erie, the gentlemen named below filled the
office of Burgess :

1807 Thomas Wilson

1808-09 George Buehler

1810-11 John C. Wallace

1812 ;. ..Samuel Hays

1813 Judah Colt

1814-15 George Moore

1816-17 Thomas H. Sill

1818-19 George Moore

1820-21 Judah Colt

1822-24 John Morris

1825-27 John C. Wallace

1828 Tabor Beebe

1829 Thomas H. Sill

1830 William Johns

1831 George A. Eliot



1832 (elected) Thomas Forster

(Tabor Beebe acted instead).

1833 Thomas H. Sill

1834-35 Joseph M. Sterrett

1836-37 J. B. Langhead

1838 James L. White

1839 William Kelley

1840 Myron Goodwin

1841 Rufus S. Reed

1842 Thomas Stewart

1843-44 Thomas H. Sill

1845 Charles W. Kelso

1846-47 William Kelley

1848 Charles W. Kelso

1849 A. W. Brewster

1850 B. B. Vincent

1851 Thomas G. Colt

(Until he took the office of mavor).

roll of m.wors.

On the 14th of April, 1851, Erie was
chartered as a city, and in 1870 South Erie
was added to the city limits. The Mayor
was first elected for one year, and served as
president of the Select Council until 1860,
when the law was changed so that each
branch selected its own presiding officer.
From 1879 to 1888, inclusive, the term of the
Mayor was two years. By the law of May
23, 1889, under which the city is acting at
present, his term was e.xtended for three
years, and he is ineligible for re-election to
the next succeeding term. Up to 1888, the



400



J^ELSON-'S BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY



Mayor served without pay, but on the 1st of
October of that year councils passed an
ordinance fixing a salary for the office, and
obliging him to hold a Mayor's court. The
following have been the incumbents of the
office :

1851 Thomas G. Colt

1852 Murray VVhallon

1853-1854 Alfred King

1855-1856 Wilson Laird

1857 ..James Hoskinson

1858 Wilson Laird

1859-61 Sherburn Smith

1862-1864 Prescott Metcalf

1865 F. F. Farrar

1866 W. L. Scott

1867-1870 Orange Noble

1871 W. L. Scott

1872-1873 Charles M. Reed

1874-1875 Henry Rawle

1876 John W. Hammond

1877 Selden Marvin

1878-1880 D. T. Jones

1881-1882 Joseph McCarter

1883-1884 P. A. Becker

1885 F. F. Adams (resigned)

1886 F. A. Mizener (elected by Council)

1887-1888 John C. Brady

Charles S. Clarke

Walter Scott

Of the above gentlemen only Messrs. No-
ble, Reed, Rawle, Jones, McCarter, Adams,
Mizener, Brady, Clarke and Walter Scott aie
living. Ex-Mayors Whallon, Marvin, Farrar.
and Hoskinson all died in 1895.

SELECT AND COMMON COUNCILS THEIR PRES-
IDENTS AND CLERKS.

The gentlemen named below liave served
in the Select and Common Councils. Under
the law of 1889, each ward elects one Select
Councilman for four years and two Common
Councilmen for two years. Select Council-
men are required to be 25 and Common Coun-
cilmen 21 years of age. They must have been
citizens of the State four years and residents
of the ward which they claim to represent one
year next before their election. The Clerk of
the Borough Council acted as Town Clerk,
and the Clerk of the Select Council has offi-
ciated as City Clerk since the establishment of
the city government :

lihl—Thotnas G. Colt.Mayor, prcsidhig;



Select Coiiiicil, Jonas Gunnison, Clerk ; C. Mc-
Sparren, William M. Gallagher, F. Schneider,
John Zimmerly, S. M. Carpenter, A. W.
Brewster.

CoDimon Council, James D. Dunlap, Pres-
ident ; William P. Trimball, Clerk; Wilson
King, James Skinner, Thomas Dillon, Samuel
W. Keefer, Daniel G. Landon, Adam Ache-
son, L. Momeyer, O. D. .SpafFord, A. A. Craig,
Prescott Metcalf, Josiah Kellogg.

1852 — Murray Whallon, Mayor, presi-
ding; Select Council,^. H. Sherman, Clerk;
F. Schneider, D. G. Landon, P. Sennett,
John Zimmerly, J. B. Smyth, A. P. Durlin.

Common Council, William S. Lane, Presi-
dent; William Thornton, Clerk ; S. W. Keef-
er, W. B. Hayes, J. H. Riblet, G. J. Morton,
J. W. Duggan, C. Siegel, F. Mutterer, D. D.
Walker, J. B. Gunnison, H. P. Mehaffey,
John Graham.

I't^m— Alfred King, Mayor, presiding;
Select Council, W. H. Sherm'an, Clerk; A. P.
Durlin, J. B. Smyth, D. G. Landon, P. Sen-
nett, Joseph M. Sterrett, Wm. G. Arbuckle.

Common Council, John A. Tracy, Presi-
dent; Wm. Thornton, Clerk; C. B. Wright,
J. M Justice, E. A. Bennett, J. VV. Duggan,
A. Wild, E. J. Ames, M. R. Barr, A. Ache-
son, John Hearn, M. Henry, W. C. Braley.

I'^'iA— Alfred King, Mayor, presiding;
Select Council, W. H. Sherman, Clerk ; Jo-
seph M. Sterrett, J. B. Smyth, William G.
Arbuckle, A. P. Durlin, James D. Dunlap, P.
Sennett.

Cotnmon Council, Mathew R. Barr, Presi-
dent ; William Thornton, Clerk ; A. Acheson,
W. C. Braley, M. Henry, W. F. Rinder-
necht, S. Smith, E. J. Aiiies, E. A. Bennett,
John S. Carter, J. W. Duggan, Adam Wild,
Mathew Taylor.

1855— IF/A-ow Laird, Mayor, presiding;
Select Council, Thomas Moorhead, Clerk;
J;imes D. Dunlap, W. G. Arbuckle, J. M.
Sterrett, A. P. Durlin, F. Schneider, William
Hoskinson.

Common Council, Mathew R. Barr, Presi-
dent ; William Thornton, Clerk ; A. Acheson,
Robert T. Sterrett, Moses Koch, S. Smith,
M. Henry, John S. Carter, Adam Wild, David
Kennedy, John W. Hays, C. Graham, John
Goalding.

1856— Wilson Laird, Mayor, presiding;
Select Council, Thomas Moorhead, Clerk;
W. G. Arbuckle, John S. Carter, James D.



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OF ERIE COUNTY.



401



Dunlap, William Hoskinson, J. M. Sterrett,

F. Schneider.

Common Council, S. Smith, President;
William Thornton, Clerk ; Jacoh Kneip. Wm.
Himrod, Adam Wild, John Goalding, David



Online LibraryBenjamin WhitmanNelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r → online text (page 65 of 192)