Copyright
Benjamin Whitman.

Nelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r online

. (page 80 of 192)
Online LibraryBenjamin WhitmanNelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r → online text (page 80 of 192)
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feature in the business life of the city.

ERIE ELECTRIC MOTOR COMPANY.

The Erie City Passenger Railway Com-
pany was chartered by a Legislative act, ap-
proved March 1, 1867, to carry passengers
through the streets of Erie by means of cars
drawn by horses. The main stockholder was
Anthony J. Drexel, of Philadelphia, who was
represented in Erie by E. J. Cowell. Among
others interested originally, or who afterward
became interested were the Berst family, \V.
W. Reed and J. C. Spencer. In 1868 the
main line was built from Second street south
on State to Turnpike ; thence across to Peach ;
thence south on Peach to Twenty-sixth street,
and in December of that year opened for travel.
Up to May, 1873, the fare charged was seven
cents. On that date it was reduced to five
cents. The line was soon extended down
State street to the public dock. In 1880, the
company erected the stables at Second and
State streets ; and in the fall of 1883 it ex-
tended its lines out Eighth street, from State
to Raspberry ; out Eleventh street, from State
to Parade, and up Parade to Fourteenth street.
Afterward, tracks were put down on East and
West Eighteenth streets; the Eighth street
track was run to the city limits; and the
Eleventh street line to Wayne street, the Pa-
rade street line being abandoned. The cars
were operated under the charge of the drivers,
without conductors, and the fares were de-
posited by passengers in a cash box designed
for the purpose.

On the 28th of July, 1888, all of the stock
of the Erie Passenger Railway Company was
purchased by J. S. Casement, S. T. Everett
and associates, who organized the Erie Elec-
tric Motor Company. The venture was some-
what of an experiment, as there were at the
time not more than a dozen electric roads in
the country. The Motor Company leased the
franchise of the old company for 999 years,
and on the 22d of September, having received
authority from Councils, went to work to fit
up the line for electric power. The horse car
stables at Second and State streets were con-
verted into a motor house, and the first elec-
tric car appeared on the streets of Erie on the
29th of June, 1889.

Since then the company has built lines on
East Sixth street to East avenue ; on West



Twelfth street to Cranberry ; on Eleventh
street to East avenue ; on East avenue to
Twelfth street ; on Twelfth street east to the
city limits ; on French street to Twenty-sixth ;
on Twenty-sixth east to Wayne ; on Wayne
north to Twenty-fifth ; on Peach street from
Twelfth to Eighteenth ; and from Twenty-
sixth to the city limits ; on Twenty-sixth from
Peach to Liberty ; and on the Lake road from
the city limits to the Head. The line last
mentioned was built to Trinity Cemetery in
1890, and to the water's edge in 1891. In
1892 the power house was changed to the foot
of Peach street, and the old building wholly
converted into a storage place for cars. The
company represents $700,000 capital and em-
ploys about 150 men. Its ofKcers are : Presi-
dent, J. S. Casement ; Vice-President, John C.
Brady; Secretary and Treasurer, J. L. Stern-
berg; Directors, J. S. Casement, S. T. Ever-
ett, John C. Brady and W. W. Reed. J. F.
Pfetch was Superintendent until August, 1893,
when he was succeeded by H. F. Wilber. It
is but just to add that no city in the country
has a better street car system than Erie, and
no public corporation exists that has shown a
more progressive and obliging spirit than the
Erie Electric Motor Company.

ERIE TRANSFER COMPANY.

This corporation was chartered by act
of Assembly of April 25, 1873, with
a capital of $15,000, and the privilege of
increasing it to $50,000. Its object, as stated
in the law, is " the transacting of express
business in the city and county of Erie," and
the carrying of passengers and baggage to and
from the hotels, private houses and railroad
depots of the city. Among the early stock-
holders were W. A. Baldwin, Theo. N. Ely,
Jno. W. Reynolds, J. Louis Linn, G. J. Ball,
S. B. Kennedy, Jno. E. Payne, J. J Wads-
worth, Geo. V. Maus, J. S. Scobell,
Dr. J. L. Stewart, John Eliot and H.
Souther. Dr. Stewart was President for a
number of years, and S. B. Kennedy was
Superintendent. The stable on Fifth street
was established in 1880, and the office on
Ninth street in January, 1887. Most of the
original parties have withdrawn, and the
bulk of the stock is now owned by L. Kester,
John Eliot and F. J. Kester. L. Kester has
been President and Superintendent, and F.
I J. Kester Treasurer for about nine years.



484



NELSOIf-S BIOOBAPHICAL DICTIONARY



The company have a large number of hacks
and other conveyances, employ a great many
men and horses, and do a prosperous business.

ERIE REAL ESTATE TITLE COMPANY.

The object of this organization is to make
abstracts of real estate titles in the county and
preserve a record of the same. It was char-
tered May 5, 1880, with the following incor-
porators : Henry Souther, Eben Brewer, John
C. Brady, E. L. Whittelsey, W. E. Roach
and R. St. P. Lowry. The abstractors have
been : W. E. Roach, until January 1, 1891 ;
M. N. Cutler, until his death, July 29, 1894;
Miss B. P. Beckers since. Its office is in the
courthouse. The present officers of the com-
pany are : President, Geo. P. Griffith ; Secre-
tary, John C. Brady; Treasurer, E. L. Whit-
telsey.

BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS.

The first Building and Loan Association in
Erie was the Erie City, incorporated March 10,
1873. Benjamin Whitman was the first Presi-
dent and Geo. A. Allen the first Attorney. The
Erie City was followed by the Ben Franklin,
the Erie Saving Fund and the Presque Isle,
all started shortly after. Unfortunately for
the associations of that period, the panic
came on in the fall of 1873, and they did not
work out as satisfactorily as had been an-
ticipated.

The present associations are the Working-
men's, incorporated July 10, 1870, under a
peipetual charter, and the Mutual, organized
in 1880.

TELEGRAPH, TELEPHONE, EXPRESS AND GEN-
ERAL CARRYING COMPANIES.

The O'Reilly telegraph system commenced
operations in Erie January 1, 1848, and soon
became merged in the Western Union system.
For more than twenty years Erie possessed
but one telegraph line, but, about 1868, the
Atlantic and Pacific Telegraph Company
opened an office in opposition to the Western
Union. Finally, the Western Union bought
out the Atlantic and Pacific, and consolidated



the lines. The Mutual Union Telegraph
Company began business at Erie in 1881,
but it, too, was absorbed by the Western
Union. The city at present enjoys the bene-
fits of two systems — the Western Union,
W. J. Hunter, Manager, and the Postal
Telegraph Cable, C. J. Goalding, Manager.

The Erie Telephone Exchange was estab-
lished August 1, 1879, and was owned by a
local company until the latter part of 1883,
when it was purchased by the New York
and Pennsylvania Telephone and Telegraph
Company, doing business in the southern tier
of counties of New York and the northern
tier of counties of Pennsylvania. J. H.
Francis was placed in charge and remained
several years, when he was succeeded as
business manager by W. Barry Smith. The
Exchange reaches every place of any size in
this section of the country, and is in commu-
nication, by the long distance system, with
most of the important cities in the Union. Its
first location was in the Reed block, corner of
Seventh and State; but, since its change of
ownership, it has been located in the Noble
block, now known as the Penn building.

The American Express Company opened
an office at Erie in 1846, with O. D. SpafTord
as agent. He was succeeded by J. J. Lints,
and in 1858 J. Harper was appointed to fill
the position, which he has held continuously
up to the present time. The American and
Adams Express Companies ran a " union
office "until June 1, 1883, when the latter
company opened a separate office. The city
has the advantage of four competing compa-
nies at present, viz. : The American, J. Harper,
agent; the Adams, C. W. Low, agent; the
National, J. Harper, agent ; and the Wells-
Fargo, E. D. Myers, agent. The Merchants'
Union Express and Union Line Express had
offices in the city in 1868.

Besides the express companies, the city is
favored with agencies of the Anchor Line,
Empire Line and the Merchants' Dispatch,
all general carriers. Charles E. Payne is
agent of the first, Davis Rees, of the second,
and John A. Beebe of the third.




cypi^



^^^^ry^



^^S



i



CHAPTKR XII.

Public Schools, School Officers, Parochial Schools, Academies, Business Uni-
versity, Etc.



THE first schoolhouse built in Erie was
in the year 1806, on the southwest
corner of Seventh and Holland streets,
where school building No. 2 now
stands. It was of hewed logs,
about 18x20 feet in size and was built for
the sum of thirty dollars, which was paid by
contributions of the citizens. This first temple
of learning was surrounded by the native for-
est, a foot-path leading to the school from the
village, which was mostly collected in the
vicinity of German street, below Fourth street.
The roll of the school during the year 1812 is
preserved as a historic relic. It contains the
names of thirty girls and forty boys, as follows :
Girls — Hannah Rees, Sarah Brown, Betsy
Dobbins, Julia Bell, Eleanor Stuart, Ann
Laird, Mary Wilkins, Sarah Bell, Eliza Wil-
son, Mary Wallace, Mary Curtis, Jane Hughes,
Ann Teel, Mary Wilson, Eliza Hoskinson,
Rebecca Rees, Kate Oiler, Harriet Rees, Sarah
Forster, Mary Brewster, Mary McSparren,
Mary McNair, Dorcas McDonald, Caroline
Kelso, Eliza Cummings, Adeline Kelso, Elea-
nor Lapsley, Zebinia Schantz, Mary Ann
Lapsley and Catharine McFarland.

Boys — Alexander Brewster, Dunning Mc-
Nair, John McSparren, Zedekiah Curtis,
Daniel Gillespie, Edward Hildebrand, Charles
Reed, William Brown, Harry Rees, Edwin
Kelso, George Dunn, Cvrus Reed, John Dunn,
William Bell, John Tee'l, Albert Kelso, James
Gray, Samuel Irwin, James Wilson, Robert
Erwin, Henry Schantz, William W. Dobbins,
William Hoskinson, Laird Forster, John
Hughes, Charles Wilkins, Alexander Irwin,
Jacob Snavely, George Gallagher, Barney
Gillespie, Johnson Laird, Samuel Brown,
William McDonald, James Hughes, Thomas
Growotz, Benjamin Wallace, John McFarland,
Charles Growotz, Archibald Stuart and Rich-
ard McCreary.



Lot No. 1378, upon which the school house
was built, was bought from the State August
4, 1804. by James Baird, for the sum of
twenty-five dollars. It was afterward pur-
chased by means of contributions collected by
Capt. Daniel Dobbins, and was patented in
the name of the "Presque Isle Academy."
This name appears to have been informally
given by the contributors, as no record can be
found of a corporation having been formed
with that title. For the next quarter of a
century, nothing occurred of special impor-
tance connected with the schools of Erie, ex-
cepting the establishing of the Erie Academy,
which will be referred to hereafter. The
schools that were kept up during the interval
were all maintained by private contributions.

PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM ADOPTED.

The school act of 1834 allowed each dis-
trict to decide for itself whether or not it
should adopt a public-school system, to be
maintained by a tax upon the citizens gen-
erally. Erie was one of the first places in the
State to avail itself of the provisions of the
new law. A meeting of the citizens of
Erie was held at the court house No-
vember 22, 1834, which was presided over
by Dr. William Johns, William Kelley acting
as Secretary. On motion of Elijah Babbitt
and George Kellogg, it was voted to collect
$1,000 as additional local tax to that raised by
the united action of the School Directors and
Commissioners of the county. On the 7th of
September, 1836, through the recommenda-
tion of a special committee, the borough of
Erie was divided into four sub-districts, and
during the next year four frame houses were
erected on leased ground, at a cost of $310
each, the directors not thinking it advisable to
purchase real estate. At that time 340 pupils
were enrolled. The text books were "The



486



NELSON'S BIOORAPHICAL DICTIONARY



English Reader," "Cobb's Spelling Book,"
"Goodrich's and Parley's Geographies," "Kirk-
ham's Grammar" and "Daboll's Arithmetic,"
all of which would be curiosities to the teach-
ers and children of to-daj'.

In 1844 the small frame buildings were in-
adequate to the wants of the schools, and, as a
desire sprang up to attempt something in the
way of gradation, lots were purchased, a
new plan of buildings adopted, and in the year
1848 two brick houses, each capable of ac-
commodating five teachers with their pupils,
were erected and the sub-districts abolished.
These two schools were called the "East
ward" and the "West ward," each school
having the same number ot teachers, and the
same advantages for scholars. The "East
ward" building was on the corner of Seventh
and Holland streets, now occupied by building
No. 2, while the "West ward" schoolhouse
stood on the corner of Seventh and Myrtle, on
a lot included in the grounds attached to the
present residence of William A. Galbraith. A
portion of the latter building is yet standing
in the form of a ruin, gracefully covered with
a heavy growth of ivy.

The first public examination was held on
May 8, 1849, and the first school for teaching
the German language was started in the year
1853.

On the 8th of June, 1854. the directors or-
ganized under the new law, which went into
operation the first Monday in June of that
year. This increased the number of boards
from one to three, "East ward," "West
ward" and "Board of Controllers," the special
duties of the ward boards being the raising



and expending of a fund for building pur-
poses ; those of the Board of Controllers the
raising and expending of a fund for school
and teaching purposes. This system existed
until June, 1870, at which time the city was
enlarged and made into one district, for all
purposes pertaining to schools, under a special
act of Assemby.

LARGER SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

In 1855 the East Ward Board resolved to
erect a large building on the corner of Seventh
and Holland streets equal to the best in the
country. Considerable opposition to the pro-
ject was manifested, and the board was pe-
titioned, in strong terms, praying that the res-
olution levying a tax for a new building be re-
scinded. As the board moved on in the line
of action begun, efforts were made to have
them legally enjoined from proceeding fur-
ther. The opposition weakened, but existed
for some time. The new building was finally
completed, and occupied October, 1860. The
West Ward Board lield to a different policy —
that a number of small houses were better
than one large building, and in 1863, they
caused to be erected No. 3, a small four-
teacher house, on the corner of Sixteenth and
Sassafras streets, and in 1865 No. 4, after the
same plan, on West Fifth street, near Chest-
nut. In 1865 the East Ward Board built No.
5 on East Twelfth street, near German, a house
similar to Nos. 3 and 4, but somewhat larger.
In 1869 the West Ward Board erected No. 6,
a six-teacher house, on the corner of Tenth
and Sassafras streets, which was enlarged in
1873-74.



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OF ERIE COUNTY.



487



PRESENT BUILDINGS.



The following table shows the present school buildings, the years in which they were
erected, and other matters of value :



1^

1


•3

1


1
1


Location.


t


i


j


Value of
Lots.


Value of
Buildings.


< E

h

■S3

At
>


1
1


Contractors.


Central


2C

i
8
IC

4
8
8
8

;

8
8
10
8
8




11th and Sassafras


330
165
165
123
165
165
264
325

165

123

165

158

247-,^

248

165

206 Ji


2065i
165

r

165
330
135
205
250
165
160
165
160
170
128

li


5
2

2

62-5
4

r
1%

2

3
3
2

2H


I 30,000
6,000

10,000
8,000
8,000
8,000
3500

16 000

10,000
6,0U0
4,000
8.000
4,000
6,500
6,200
6,300

10,000

4,200

600


$115,000
10,000
20.000
15.000
27,000
40,000
1.700
18. 00
18000
40.000
30,000
15,000
30.000
18.000
27;000
18.000
18,000


i 6,000

3,50
1,500
2.000
2.800

'■^
1,800
8,.500
2,500
2,200
1,500
2,200
1,000
2.800
2,500
1,550


1890
1877
1858
1886
1895
1891
1892

\^l
1891
1871
1893
1873
1875
1893

1895
1874
1890
1883


Henry Shenk


No! 8.::..

No. 3


359
400


7th and Holland

16th and Sassafras .


John Coiistable


No. 4


5th and Chestnut

lath bet. Holland* German


F W Miller


No. 5


S Kirschner&Sons...
H. Himberger




440
486
400
477
181
407
496

431

482


21st and Sassafras

17th and Poplar


No 8


Constable & Ramsey..
H. Shenk 1


No. 9


27th and Peach


No 11


11th and French


Constables Ramsey..

John Hendry 1

G. W.Fassettf


No. 12

No. 13 ..


6th and East Avenue

10th and Ash


No 14




F. W. Miller

Henry Shenk 1

C. Kerner f

C. Kerner


No. 15

No 16


23d and Ash

8th and Walnut .






No. 18 (lot)






27th and Wayne












139


6,603








49 2-5


«55,300


$460,700


»35.900


'





Where two dates occur, they i
No. 4 was seriously damaged by fin
House No. 1 is heated by a furnace
the Smead system.

The buildings in general are a



dicate that the building has been remodeled, added to or replaced by a new structure,
on the 11th of February, 1895. The ruins had to be taken down and a new building
No. 13 by a furnace and stove; No. 6 by stoves ; Nos. 2, 4, 7, 11 and 16 by steam; all thi

credit to the city, and the Central schoolhouse, in particular, will compare favorably 1



THE HIGH SCHOOL.

The High School was established on the
26th of June, 1866, and has been popular
from the beginning. It was held in house
No. 2 at Seventh and Holland streets, until
September 1, 1875, when it was moved to the
Academy, under a plan for turning over the
latter property to the School Board. Litiga-
tion ensued, which resulted in the retention
of the Academy bj^ the Trustees thereof, and
the removal of the High School, in March,
1877, to its former location. It remained
there until its final and permanent change to
the Central building in September, 1891.

The principals of the school have been as
follows :

J. M. Wells, from 1866 to 1870.

Wm. Reed, jr., from April, 1870, to 1873.

H. C. Missimer, from January, 1873, to
1890.

John C. Diehl, from September, 1890, to
the present time.



The enrollment of the school was 166 in
1870; 245 in 1880; 311 in 1890; 491 in 1894-
5 ; and 500 at the beginning of the term, Sep-
tember 2, 1895.

The first graduating class, in 1869, consist-
ed of two pupils. The total number of grad-
uates, 1869 to 1895 inclusive, has been 614,
of whom 158 were males and 456 females.

CITY SUPERINTENDENT.

In July, 1865, the Board of Control elect-
ed Prof. H. S. Jones, principal teacher, to
perform the usual duties of a School Superin-
tendent. In June, 1867, he was duly elected
City Superintendent, under the act of that
year. Prof. Jones was succeeded by Prof.
H. C. Missimer in May, 1890. The city,
being a separate district from the county, has
no connection with the latter in school matters.

MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL BOARD.

Below is a list of the members of the
School Board from the organization of the



NELSON'S BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY



public schools to October,
in which they served. T
those who have officiated


1895, with the years


Frank Gunnison


1872-75


le stars (*) indicate,
as President of the






O. C. Gunnison

Wm. Hardwick


1894-97

1890-93


Board :






1862-65




J. P. Hartman


1895-98


Adam Acheson


1859-62,1874-77


L. H. Haskins


1846-48


A. K. Acheson


1893-97


Samuel Hays


1838-41




......1870-73


C. Heck


1841-44


E.J. Ames


1856-59


■*Samuel Heiss


1885-93, 1895-98


J. B. Arbuckle


1892-95


John Hill


1848-54




1854-56




1887-90


J. E. Ashby

Elijah Babbitt


1882-86


T. J. Hoskinson


1871-77


1834-38, 1840-43


JohnHug^hes


1851-54


*Isaac Baker


1888-97


R. O. Hulbert


1841-56


Chas. Barth


1883-92


Smith Jackson


1834-39




1866-74

1878-81




1858-70


T. M. Bates


J. B.Johnson


1844-48


Wm. Baumann


1893-96


J. M. Justice


1863-66




1882-85

1870-72




1890-95


C. Becker


George Kellogg-


1837-40


P.A.Becker


1866-68, 1871-73


Wm. Kelly


1834-37


*Henry Beckman


1878-87


C.W.Kelso


1848-62


E. P. Bennett


1862-65


E. J. Kelso


1834-35


G. A. Bennett


1854-62


David Kennedy


1843-46


J. H. Bliss


1860-63


Alfred King


1847-49


J. V. Boyr


1863-66


F. Koehler


1887-90


F. Brevillier


1868-72, 1873-76


C. Kolb


1854-61






Henry Kneib

J. Knipe


1881-87,1893-96


A. W. Brewster


1837-43


1854-57


*Wm. S. Brown


1860-72

1870-73


*J. M. Kuhn


, 1862-68, 1877-83


M. W. Caug-hey


D. G. Landen


1857-59, 1866-68


J. D.Clark


1854-58


W.J. F. Liddell


1859-60


N. Clemens


1870 77 1881 84


John W. Little

J. J. Love


1894 96


W. L. Cleveland


1867-71


1880-83


J. R. Cochran


1857-60


R.St. P. Lowry


1890-93


Geo. P. Colt


1878-81


Georg-e Lover


1868-72


E.J. Cowell


1867-68


W. F. Lutje


1871-78


*P. Crouch


1866-67, 1871-82


W. W. Lyie


1881-87


F. J. Detzel


1887-90


M. Lysaght


1889-95


*H. W. DeWitt


1889-90, 1892-94


Jas. Lytle

M.Mauer


1844-47, 1854-57


C. K. Dickinson


1895-98


1888-93


Robert Dill


1885-88


*Henry Maver


1878-81


John Doll


1884-85, 1886-89


Henrv Mayo


1877-80


J. F. Downing-


1853-62


P. Metcalf


1862-67


Wellington Downing-


1887-90


Eugene Metz


1870-74


Gustave Dumbeck


1893-96


Linus Metz


1885-93


J. D. Dunlap


1852-58


T. E. Metzgar


1883-84


G. A. Ebisch


1876-82


George P. Miller


1889-92


J. A.Eichenlaub


1878-81


James S. Miller


1890-93


G. A. Eliot


1856-62


M. M. Moore


1880-83




1870-71


Thos. Moorhead, jr

W. F. Momeyer

Paul Mueller


1846-49


John Fairbairn


1879-82


1883-89


Peter Felbing-er


1882-94


1894-98


Jerome W. Ford


1887-93


N. Murphy


1865-68


A. E. Foster


1854-55


Dennis McCarty


1886-89


Galen Foster


1839-42


E. McComber


1870-71


*A. A. Freeman


1889-92


D. B. McCreary


1860-63


J. J. Fuessler


1874-77


C. McSparren


1849-51




1893-96

1860 63 1871 74




1877-78


John Gensheimer.


R. G. Newbegin


1893-94


E. W. Germer






J. M. Glazier


1882 85




1875-87


Chas. A. Gloth . .


1874 76


*L. W. Olds

C. L. Pierce


1862-71


H. H. Gloth


1893-96


1873-76


Felix Graf


1890-93

1872-75


Peter Pierce


1842-44


Geo. P. Griffith


W.W.Pierce


1883-86



AND HISTORICAL REFERENCE BOOK OF ERIE COUNTY.



459



Thos. Pickering 1890

W. F. Price 1872-78

W. J. Reed 1885-88

Jas. C. Reid 1846-51

W. S. Riblet 1877-83

J. H. Roach 1889-91

Louis Rosenzweig- 1880-83, 1885-6

*W. W. Ross 1881-87

J. S. Ruland 1893-97

J. W, Ryan 1872-75

W. J. Sands 1876-79

C. Sevin 1855-58

H. C. Shannon 1866-67

C. C. Shirk 1890-92

David Shirk 1857-58

R. J. Sibley 1850-54

T. H. Sill 1835-41

*B. A. Smith 1884-93

S .Z. Smith 1866-70

Henry Stahl 1870-79

George Steiner 1886-89

*J. Iv. Sternberg 1879-85

James M. Sterrett 1842-45, 1849-56

Joseph M. Sterrett 1842-50

J. Q. A. Sterrett 1873-75

Dr. J. L. Stewart 1855-60

Thomas Stewart 1845-46

Chas. E. Strick 1892-88

E. E. Stuerznickel 1866-67

Matthew Taylor 1851-52

C. M. Tibbals 1854-55

Thos. Tidman 1871-77

J. Towner 1854-57

J. A. Tracy 1834-39

F. Vogel 1879-82

*J. J. Wadsworth 1883-89

B. J. Walker 1893-97

J. F. Walther 1868-78

Jacob Warfel 1876-85

J. H. Welsh 1374-80

H. L. Wilkins 1874-80

Jos. H. Williams, sr 1839-42

*Jos. H. Williams 1891-97

B. S. Witherell 1876

C. B. Wuenschel 1892-98

Whole number, 173.

The school board, as at present constituted,
is composed of eighteen members, three from
each ward, elected for a term ot three years,
taking office the first Monday of June.

Wm. G. Arbuckle was appointed Super-
intendent of School Buildings on February 1,
1882, and has served continuously from that
date.



SCHOOL BOOKS, COURSE OF STUDY, ETC.

In accordance with the school book law of
1898, requiring public school boards to furnish
books and supplies to each pupil free of cost,
the Board purchased for the year 1893-94



Online LibraryBenjamin WhitmanNelson's biographical dictionary and historical reference book of Erie County, Pennsylvania : containing a condensed history of Pennsylvania, of Erie County, and of the several cities, boroughs and townships in the county also portraits and biographies of the governor's since 1790, and of numerous r → online text (page 80 of 192)