Copyright
Boston Athenaeum.

Confederate literature; a list of books and newspapers, maps, music and miscellaneous matter printed in the South during the Confederacy, nowin the Boston athenaeum online

. (page 1 of 19)
Online LibraryBoston AthenaeumConfederate literature; a list of books and newspapers, maps, music and miscellaneous matter printed in the South during the Confederacy, nowin the Boston athenaeum → online text (page 1 of 19)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


\













































*












1-J I

















































J



















































I u. LJ






PUBLICATIONS OF THE ROBERT CHARLES BILLINGS

FUND ISSUED BY THE TRUSTEES OF THE

BOSTON ATHEN^UM

I

LeForestier s Relation. Autobiography and Voyages of Frangois
LeForestier, 1749-1819, a refugee from Mauritius and a teacher in
New England. A recently discovered manuscript edited by Hasket
Derby, M.D. 1904.

II

ToplifFs Travels. Letters from Abroad in the Years 1828 and 1829,
by Samuel Topliff, Proprietor of the Merchants News Room in
Boston. From the original manuscript. Edited with a memoir and
notes by Ethel Stanwood Bolton. 1906.

Ill

The Athenaeum Centenary. The Influence and History of the Boston
Athenaeum from 1807 to 1907, with a record of its Officers and Bene
factors, and a Complete List of Proprietors. 1907.

"The Influence of the Athenaeum on Literature in America." By Barrett Wendell.

IV

The Anthology Society. Journal of the Proceedings of the Society
which conducts the Monthly Anthology & Boston Review, Boston, Oc
tober 3, 1805, to July 2, 1811. With an introduction by M. A. DeWolfe
Howe. 1910.

V

Confederate Literature. A List of Books and Newspapers, Maps,
Music and Miscellaneous Matter printed in the South during the
Confederacy, now in the Boston Athenaeum. Prepared by C. N. Baxter
and J. M. Dearborn. With an Introduction by James Ford Rhodes.
1917.



Confederate literature



A LIST OF

BOOKS AND NEWSPAPERS

MAPS, MUSIC, AND MISCELLANEOUS MATTER

PRINTED IN THE SOUTH DURING THE

CONFEDERACY, NOW IN THE

BOSTON ATHEN^UM



PREPARED BY
CHARLES N. BAXTER AND JAMES M. DEARBORN

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY

JAMES FORD RHODES



PRINTED FROM THE INCOME or THE
ROBERT CHARLES BILLINGS FUND



THE BOSTON ATHENAEUM

1917



E



-
.5 B



ROBERT CHARLES BILLINGS FUND
PUBLICATIONS NUMBER FIVE



Contents

PAGE

I. INTRODUCTION i

BY JAMES FORD RHODES

II. CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA. PUBLICATIONS i

III. STATE PUBLICATIONS 32

IV. MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS PRINTED IN THE CONFED

ERATE STATES DURING THE PERIOD OF THE CIVIL

WAR 80

V. TRACTS 141

VI. Music 147

VII. MAPS, BROADSIDES, ETC 151

VIII. NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS 154

INDEX i 8 i



3G7503



INTRODUCTION

MODERN historical teachers talk continually of the
sources. You must go to the sources is the burden of their
counsel to their students who desire to construct an historical
narrative. Their advice is proper, but older men who
started with the term of original authorities, that means the
same thing, weary of the word sources, not because the idea
suggested is not sane, but because an extension is given to
the meaning by ambitious writers, who spare no pains and
criticize others whose pains are not exerted in the same
direction. There are men, for instance, who are not satis
fied with an Act of Congress as printed in the Revised
Statutes, but must go to Washington to get a sight of the
original engrossed copy. They envy the man who had to
consult the Journal of the Confederate Congress in manu
script, and they would like to spurn the well-printed copy
furnished them by a beneficent government. They envy
Nicolay and Hay, whose work was in advance of the print
ing of the Official Records, and who therefore were obliged
toward the end of their History to consult the Records in
manuscript in the War Department archives. It may not
be well to emphasize this excessive labor as modern, apply
ing modern to the period of the scientific teaching of history
in colleges and universities; for Bancroft, according to
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, fell into "that error so
common with the graphic school of historians the exag-

iii



iv INTRODUCTION

gerated estimate of manuscripts or fragmentary material
at the expense of what is printed and permanent."

In the Confederate room of the Boston Athenaeum these
source advocates and the older men may meet on common
ground. The sources for the study of the unique life in the
Southern Confederacy are there. Many bound volumes of
Confederate newspapers, magazines, and reviews; school
books of arithmetic, reading, spelling, geography, and
grammar; "Maxims of War," one of which, Napoleon s,
was in constant use by Stonewall Jackson; serious books,
sermons, and tracts; almanacs and railway guides; novels
and stories to entertain the soldiers who found camp life
irksome; all these may be found in this room, the mate
rials of which were gathered for the future historian. The
source-fiend may indeed regret that many reports of battles
and other official documents have found their way into the
Official Records, as in his view each copy or reproduction
reduces the value of the source. Moreover, he is not satis
fied without seeing other collections, and so he journeys
to New York, Philadelphia, Washington, and Cleveland,
to the Southern cities and other places where he hears of
Confederate material, and exhausts himself in this thorough
search, but is happy as he reflects that his procedure is
according to the canons of scientific investigation. His tire
some journeys might have been spared had he asked one
of the courteous attendants to bring him the volume of
Emerson wherein he gives one of his views of travel.
"The soul is no traveller," Emerson wrote; "the wise man
stays at home. . . . He who travels . . . travels away from
himself. . . . Travelling is a fool s paradise."



INTRODUCTION v

The older man settles himself in the Confederate room,
and as he gazes at the bound volumes of newspapers and
at the other volumes, the outside aspect of which is elo
quent of the life in the Southern Confederacy, he thanks
his stars that he has such a privilege, and he blesses
the men who had the forethought to make so valuable a
collection for him as he thinks and writes of society at
the South. But the eager and ambitious source-fiend looks
at his labor and says, But you should see the collec
tions in Philadelphia, in Washington, and in Cleveland;
you cannot arrive at the truth unless you go to the bottom.
The bottom is here, replies the older man. This collection,
with the priceless Official Records and other books bearing
on the subject at hand, is all that I can compass. My mental
digestion is not equal to more. Pray let me remain in my
comfortable home, independent of the sleeping-car con
ductor and porter, hotel clerk, and librarian in a strange
library, the method of which, however admirable, is not
the Athenaeum method. And the older man, with right on
his side, remains. He digests his material and, believing
with Carlyle that "there is the indispensablest beauty in
knowing how to get done," he does not fathom even the
material in his beloved Athenaeum. The wise men who
brought it together at the end of the Civil War laid out
too much for him, but he does his best to show his apprecia
tion of their labor and forethought; and as he sits in that
classic Library, hallowed by so many fond associations,
he reads, observes and reflects.

It matters little to the old-fashioned student whether
the Confederate collection in the Athenaeum is the best



vi INTRODUCTION

in the country. He believes that it is second to none and
he knows that it suffices for his wants. As he pursues his
studies he has the student s feeling of gratitude to those
who had so marvelously anticipated his wants. With great
interest he reads the report of the Committee on the Library
for January, 1866 : "The sudden collapse of the Rebellion
in the early part of the year, seemed to the Committee to
furnish an opportunity which should be instantly used,
of obtaining the newspapers and other publications issued
at the South during the war; and of which very few had
ever gone beyond the Confederate States. These fugitive
publications had a peculiar historical interest and unless
secured promptly, before they were destroyed or had fallen
into the hands of collectors, they would be forever beyond
our reach. A Poor Richard s Almanac of the year 1752 is
priced on an English sale catalogue at five times its weight
in gold. And one hundred years hence, a Rebel almanac,
or a dingy file of Southern newspapers may, perhaps, reach
a corresponding value. One of the Committee [Mr. Park-
man] who was visiting Richmond soon after its capture
was supplied with funds for the purpose, and made
very valuable purchases; among which was a file of the
Richmond Examiner from February, 1861 to March 31,
1 865 the last paper printed before the city was evacuated.
From this file, not a paper is missing not one torn or
mutilated in any manner. He also secured some important
books and pamphlets. The Librarian afterwards opened
a correspondence with persons in many of the Southern
cities, by means of which a very large and valuable collec
tion of rebel documents and publications has been made.



INTRODUCTION vii

Files nearly complete have been secured of the following
daily newspapers printed in the Confederate States dur
ing the war, viz : Richmond Enquirer, Richmond Whig,
Richmond Dispatch, Richmond Sentinel, Augusta (Ga.)
Sentinel, and Mobile Advertiser. Several other partial files
have also been obtained. Complete files of the Southern
Punch (an imitator of its London namesake), Southern
Illustrated News, Magnolia, Southern Literary Messenger,
and Record, all published at Richmond, have also been
purchased." This report was undoubtedly written by the
Librarian, William F. Poole. To his activity more than
to any other one man is due this remarkable collection, a
credit to the Athenaeum and to Boston.

The Trustees, with far-seeing wisdom, at a previous
meeting had voted "that the action of the Library Com
mittee in procuring rebel newspapers, books and documents
be approved and that they be requested to continue their
endeavors to procure such papers." No historian can have
other than a thrill when he knows that Francis Parkman,
the greatest of his craft in America, was not only one of
these Trustees, but bore an active part in securing this
material. At the close of the Civil War he visited Wash
ington and Richmond to see the battlefields, which appealed
to his picturesque nature, and, furnished with a proper
amount of funds, he procured much Confederate material.
More valuable than the money were the training and experi
ence applied to his task.

The literary historian affirms that you can do naught
without the proper atmosphere. If you are going to write
about the South, he believes that you must go to that region



viii INTRODUCTION

to get it. It is proper to inquire whether this indeed be
necessary. True, if one could have been South during the
war or during Reconstruction, one would have had an
experience impossible to derive from historical documents.
But what boots it to visit the new South, which "hurrahs
for the old flag and an appropriation," which is full of
energy and desire for money-making, which knows the
value of its great crop of cotton and has gone into its
manufacture, and which has shown its belief in diversified
industries? If one desires to witness such a reconciliation
as has never before taken place after a civil war, if one
wishes to study patriotic fervor, let one go to the Southern
States ; but imagination will better create the Southern Con
federacy in the Confederate room of the Athenaeum. It
is food for thought to turn over badly printed and bound
books, to note newspapers gradually reduced in size, printed
on half sheets, on brown and on wall paper.

Said Lincoln in his second inaugural address : " Both read
the same Bible and pray to the same God; and each invokes
His aid against the other." How well is this illustrated
in the Athenaeum. There is u The Soldier s Pocket Bible.
Issued for the use of the army of Oliver Cromwell.
[Original title-page.] The Soldier s Pocket Bible, con
taining the most (if not all) of those places contained in
Holy Scripture, which do show the qualifications of his
inner man that is a fit soldier to fight the Lord s battles,
both before the fight, in the fight, and after the fight;
which Scriptures are reduced to several heads, and fitly
applied to the soldier s several occasions, and so may
supply the want of the whole Bible, which a soldier



INTRODUCTION ix

cannot conveniently carry about him; and may be also
useful for any Christian to meditate upon, now in this
miserable time of war." After the Confederate victories
of 1 862, the Bishop of Georgia, preaching in Christ Church,
Savannah, affirmed that "Our cause is in harmony with
the purposes of God in Christ Jesus" ; but when sorrowing
over the death of Bishop and General Polk, he tried to con
sole the congregation with, "They that sow in tears shall
reap in joy." After the defeats of 1863, the Bishop of
Alabama preached on "Future Good. The Explanation
of Present Reverses," while a minister took for his subject,
"The Battle is God s." As one immerses himself in this
material, one cannot help appreciating Motley s remark,
as he was studying the old letters and documents of the
sixteenth century in the Brussels archives : " It is something
to read the real bona fide signs manual of such fellows as
William of Orange, Count Egmont, Alexander Farnese,
Philip the Second, Cardinal Granvelle, and the rest of them.
It gives a realizing sense, as the Americans have it."

One finds a suggestion of the blockade in the "Book of
Common Prayer" printed in London for "the use of the
Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of
America," as pasted on the front fly-leaf of this book is
this printed label, "From the cargo of the Anglo-Rebel
Blockade Runner, Minna, captured December 6, 1863 off
Wilmington by the Government Dispatch Ship Circassian"
But before the date of this capture the Episcopal Church
at the South doubtless found the supply of their vade mecum
from England precarious, for one may learn in the Athe
naeum Confederate room that their bishops and clergy



x INTRODUCTION

appealed to their brethren at the North to send down two
or three thousand prayer-books; and the United States
government gave permission for passing these through the
lines of the Union Army.

What delights the source-fiend in this collection is an
object of fault-finding by the universal critic. A part of the
collection, the critic avers, has ceased to be useful. Many
of the reports, messages, and other official documents and
much of the correspondence have been reprinted in the
"Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies,"
where they are systematically arranged and conveniently
indexed. It is true that some of the books and pamphlets
collected by Mr. Poole and Mr. Parkman have no longer
the value then attributed to them ; but they could not know
that our Government would embark upon an historical
work, impossible in Europe, and that it would have the
faithful cooperation of the defeated as well as that of
the victors. Their collection was made soon after the close
of the Civil War (say 1865-66), while the first volume of
the Official Records was not published until 1881. Rating
properly this unique work, the fact remains that, for a study
of the life in the Southern Confederacy, the collection in the
Athenaeum possesses inestimable value.

JAMES FORD RHODES.



CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA
PUBLICATIONS



Constitution.

Constitution of the Confederate States of America. Adopted
unanimously by the Congress of the Confederate States of Amer
ica, March n, 1861. Savannah: John M. Cooper & Company.

1861. 22 pp. 8.

Congress, February i8th, 1862 March i8th, 1865.

By authority. The Statutes at Large of the Confederate States
of America, commencing with the first session of the First Con
gress; 1862. Carefully collated with the originals at Richmond.
Edited by James M. Matthews, Attorney at Law, and Law Clerk
in the Department of Justice. To be continued annually. Rich
mond: R. M. Smith, Printer to Congress. 1862.

This is the cover-title. The work consists of two parts with
separate title-pages as follows:

Public Laws of the Confederate States of America, passed at the
first session of the First Congress; 1862. . . . v, (i), 56, ix pp. 8.
Private Laws of the Confederate States of America, passed at the
first session of the First Congress; 1862. ... 6, (i) pp. 8.
The omitted portions of these title-pages are identical with the
corresponding part of the cover-title.

By authority. The Statutes at Large of the Confederate States
of America, passed at the second session of the First Congress;

1862. Richmond: R. M. Smith, Printer to Congress. 1862.



2 CONFEDERATE STATES

Congress Continued.

Public Laws . . . v, (i), 57~92, ix pp. 8.
Private Laws ... 2 p. 1., [7-8] pp. 8.

By authority. The Statutes at Large of the Confederate States
of America, passed at the third session of the First Congress;

1863. . . . Richmond: R. M. Smith, Printer to Congress. 1863.

Public Laws . . . viii, 93-170, xx pp. 8.
Private Laws ... 2 p. 1., 9-12 pp. 8.

By authority. The Statutes at Large of the Confederate States
of America, passed at the fourth session of the First Congress;
1863-4 - - Richmond: R. M. Smith, Printer to Congress. 1864.

Public Laws . . . vii, (i), 171-252, xxiii pp. 8.
Private Laws ... 2 p. 1., 13-16 pp. 8.

By authority. The Statutes at Large of the Confederate States
of America, passed at the first session of the Second Congress;

1864. . . . Richmond: R. M. Smith, Printer to Congress. 1864.

Public Laws . . . viii, 253-288, xii pp. 8.
Private Laws ... 2 p. 1., 17-18 pp. 8







Military Laws of the Confederate States, embracing all the
legislation of Congress appertaining to military affairs from the
first to the last session inclusive, with a copious index. J. W.
Randolph: 121 Main Street, Richmond, Va., 1863. 92, xvi pp.
12.

This has a shorter cover-title.

Laws of Congress in regard to Taxes, Currency and Conscrip
tion, passed February 1864. Printed by order of the Virginia
Senate. Richmond: James E. Goode, Senate Printer. 1864.
35 PP. 8.

An Act to further provide for the public defence. [Approved
April 16, 1862.] Richmond: 1862. 8 pp. 8. No title-page.

This contains on pages 4 to 5, "An Act to amend an Act entitled
An Act, to provide further for the public defence/ approved



PUBLICATIONS 3

Congress Continued.

April 16, 1862." Approved September 27, 1862; and on pages
5 to 8, "An Act to exempt certain persons from military duty,
and to repeal an act entitled An Act to exempt certain persons
from enrolment for service in the army of the Confederate States,
approved 2ist April, 1862." Approved October II, 1862.



An Act to impose regulations upon the foreign commerce of the
Confederate States, to provide for the public defence. [Approved
February 6, 1864.] Richmond: 1864. IO pp. 8. No title-
page.

This contains on pages 4 to 10: "Regulations to carry into effect
the Act to impose regulations upon the foreign commerce of the
Confederate States, to provide for the public defence, approved
6th February, 1864." This is signed at the end: G. A. Trenholm,
Secretary of Treasury. James A. Seddon, Secretary of War.
Approved 3d August, 1864. Jefferson Davis.

Address of Congress to the People of the Confederate States.
[Richmond: 1864.] 8pp. 8. No title-page.

This is a "Joint resolution in relation to the war." It is signed
by T. J. Semmes, J. L. Orr, A. E. Maxwell, Committee on the
part of the Senate; J. W. Clapp, J. L. M. Curry, Julian Hart-
ridge, John Goode, Jr., W. N. H. Smith, Committee of the House
of Representatives; and also by Thomas S. Bocock, Speaker of the
House, and seventy other representatives.

Report of Evidence taken before a Joint Special Committee of
both houses of the Confederate Congress, to investigate the affairs
of the Navy Department. P. Kean, Reporter. Richmond, Va:
Geo. P. Evans & Co., Printers, "Whig" Building. [1863.]
472 pp. i pi. 8.



Minority Report of the Special Committee to Investigate the
Affairs of the Navy Department. Richmond, 1863. 4 pp. 8.
No title-page.

There are two reports, one signed by Lucius J. Dupre, and the
other by H. S. Foote.



4 CONFEDERATE STATES

Senate.

Rules for conducting business in the Senate of the Confederate
States of America. Richmond: R. M. Smith, Public Printer.
1864. i8pp. 16.

The cover-title is the same.

Report of the Committee on Finance on the Bill (H. R. 18)
to lay taxes for the common defence, and carry on the government
of the Confederate States. [Senate Report, No. 9. April 6, 1863.
Three hundred copies ordered to be printed.] [Richmond:
1863.] 14 pp. 8. No title-page.

Report of the Minority of the Committee on Finance on the
Bill (H. R. 379) to levy additional Taxes for the year 1865,
for the support of the Government. [By Mr. Oldham. Senate,
Feb. 28, 1865. Ordered to be printed.] [Richmond: 1865.]
18 pp. 8. No title-page.

This contains on pages II to 18, "A Bill to levy additional Taxes
for the Common Defence and Support of the Government."



Report of the Select Committee to whom was referred that
portion of the Message of the President of the Confederate States,
of the 1 3th instant, relating to the Action of Congress during
the present Session. [By Mr. Orr. Senate, March 16, 1865.
Read; concurred in; injunction of secrecy removed, and report
ordered to be printed.] [Richmond: 1865.] 8 pp. 8. No
title-page.

Letter from Gen. Wise. January 3, 1864. To Hon. Jas.
Lyons, John R. Chambliss and others, of the Virginia Delegation
in Congress, endorsing without reserve the memorial of Generals
Hardee, Stevenson and other officers, dated December 17th, 1863,
from the "Army of Tennessee," respecting the army. [Presented
by Mr. Lyons. Senate, Jan. 9, 1864. Referred to the Commit
tee on Military Affairs and ordered to be printed.] [Richmond:
1864.] 2 pp. 8. No title-page.



PUBLICATIONS 5

House of Representatives.

Resolution on Finance. [By Mr. Hilton. House of Repre
sentatives No. 9. December 14, 1863. Referred to the Special
Committee on Currency, and ordered to be printed.] [Rich
mond: 1863.] 2pp. 8. No title-page.

Resolution. [By Mr. Chambliss of Virginia. House Resolu
tion, No. 21. Dec. 14, 1863. Referred to Special Committee
on Currency, and ordered to be printed.] [Richmond: 1863.]
2 pp. 8. No title-page.



Report of the Special Committee, on the recent military disas
ters at Forts Henry and Donelson, and the Evacuation of Nash
ville. Hon. H. S. Foote, Chairman, H. C. McLaughlin, Clerk.
Richmond : Enquirer Book and Job Press. Tyler, Wise, Allegre
and Smith. 1862. 178 pp. 8







Report of the Committee on Quartermaster and Commissary
Departments. [By Walter Preston, Chairman. House of Rep
resentatives, February 13, 1864. Laid on the table and ordered
to be printed.] [Richmond: 1864.] 3 pp. 8. No title-page.

Report of the Committee of Claims, on memorial and accom
panying papers of Major Caspar Tochman. [James Farrow,
from Committee.] Richmond, 1864. 39 pp. 8. No title-page.



Report on the Condition of Government Cotton, contiguous
to the Mississippi and its tributaries. [By the Chair. House of
Representatives, May 17, 1864. Laid on the table and ordered
to be printed.] [Richmond: 1864.] 7 pp. 8. No title-page.

Report of Committee on Claims. In the Case of Mary Clark.
House of Representatives May 29, 1863. [Richmond: 1864.]
4 pp. No title-page.



6 CONFEDERATE STATES

House of Representatives Continued.

Report of the Special Committee to inquire into certain out
rages of the enemy. [W. N. H. Smith, Chairman.] Richmond,
1864. 3 pp. 8. No title-page.

Minority Report of the Committee of Ways and Means on the
Tax Bill. [By A. S. Colyar. House of Representatives, May 23,
1864. Laid on the table and ordered to be printed.] [Rich
mond: 1864.] 4 pp. 8. No title-page.

Minority Report of the Committee on the Judiciary, on the
Suspension of the Habeas Corpus, by act of February I5th, 1864,
of the First Congress of the Confederate States, entitled "An Act
to suspend the privilege of the writ of Habeas Corpus in certain
cases." [By Mr. Garland. House of Representatives, May 28,
1864. Ordered to be printed.] [Richmond: 1864.] 17 pp.
No title-page.

House of Representatives.] [Secret Session. A Paper con
taining a Statement of Facts relating to the approaching Cotton
Crisis. By George McHenry. Richmond, Dec. 31, 1864. 87 pp.
8.

Two letters are placed at the beginning of this pamphlet. One is
a letter from F. S. Lyon, Chairman of the Committee of Ways
and Means, to Mr. McHenry, dated January 6 1865, enclosing


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Online LibraryBoston AthenaeumConfederate literature; a list of books and newspapers, maps, music and miscellaneous matter printed in the South during the Confederacy, nowin the Boston athenaeum → online text (page 1 of 19)