Boston Dorchester Historical Society (Dorchester.

Souvenir program, celebration, Dorchester historical society of the two hundred and seventy-eighth anniversary of the settlement of Dorchester in the year 1630. On Savin hill, Saturday, June 6, 1908 online

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Online LibraryBoston Dorchester Historical Society (DorchesterSouvenir program, celebration, Dorchester historical society of the two hundred and seventy-eighth anniversary of the settlement of Dorchester in the year 1630. On Savin hill, Saturday, June 6, 1908 → online text (page 1 of 1)
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3Borcl)ester historical ^octetp

DORCHESTER, JUNE 6
1908





SOUVENIR PROGRAM

Celebration

DORCHESTER
HISTORICAL SOCIETY

OF THE

Two Hundred and Seventy-eighth

Anniversary of the Settlement of

DORCHESTER

in the year

1630



ON SAVIN HILL

SATURDAY, JUNE 6, 1908

BAND CONCERT, 1.30 P.M. EXERCISES, 2.00 P.M.



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DORCHESTER HISTORICAL SOCIETY

OFFICERS

President, Richard C. Humphreys.
Vice-President, James H. Stark.
Secretary and Treasurer, John A. Fowle.
Auditor, Thomas F. Temple.

DIRECTORS

W. E. Dunham.

James F. Wattles.
The Dorchester HxsTORtCAL Socxetv occupies and owns the «Olb
Blake House" built in 1648.

The Soeietv was formed to perpetuate the memory of those who
^Dorchester. Its motto is found on the old Town Sea,,-
Piety, Learning, Industry.
In the Blake Hol-se are to he seen articles connected with the early
History of Dorchester and relics of the CrvilWar.

Citizens of Dorchester should be members of this Society. Membership
is One Dollar a year. The Blake House is opened free on Tuesday
and Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m.






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GREETING

The Dorchester Historical Society extends to all present a
cordial greeting to the 278th anniversary of the settlement of Good
0l d Dorchester, to enjoy with us the contemplation of the scene
from this noted hill.

As we look from its eminence down the Harbor to the sandy beach
now called Point Allerton where the One Hundred «d Forty Pas-
sengers from the little craft named "Mary «, John" landed in Six-
teen Hundred and Thirty, and made it such a consecrated spot.

We see the place where their feet first touched American soil. There
they all fell on their knees and offered up a silent prayer £ thanks
givfng for the successful ending of their perilous voyage hen they
assembled together and sang the old hymn beginning with the line
"Thou, Lord, hast been our Sure Defence.
Then we seem to see them in their boats coming across Dorchester
Bay, and landing near the foot of this hill which they called Rock Hill.
Here they built a Fort, and placed in it several cannon.

If we turn to the West.we can see the place on the comer of Pleasant
and Cottage Streets where our forefathers settled.

,,,„ r , BIVS ;„ which to reside, there they built
There they erected Log Cabins in wm sett iers'

the Church, and laid out roads, soon to be bordered with the

Historic Houses. . ,

In that sacred church building built of the logs they «- « «

4. FIRST FREE PUBEIC ScHOOE ^^^^Z^Li

First Town Meeting on tins continen . rhe "^
themselves by many acts and deeds, as shown in the Histones
Good Old Dorchester.



Edward Everett was born near the Blake House, and in an ora-
tion on Dorchester, delivered in 1855, Mr. Everett said, in alluding to
Savin Hill, —

"Old Hill as we called it in my boyhood, more than fifty years ago
notwithstanding the tasteful villas which adorn its base, it exhibits the
same groupings of Cedars and the same magnificent Rocks and com-
mands the same fine view of the Harbor which it did before a single
house was built within its precincts. Venerable trees, which seemed big
to me in my childhood, seem but little bigger now, though I can trace
the storms of fifty winters on some of their well-recollected branches."

We may turn in any direction, and "view the landscape o'er" we are
charmed with the view, not excelled in any part of our good old
Massachusetts .

Critics may call our ancestors austere and illiberal in many of their
acts, but History shows that they were sincere and right in almost all
they did. They "builded better than they knew."

On this our anniversary "Dorchester Day" we meet again to
dwell on the scenes of Long Ago, to recall the memories of our an-
cestors, to dwell upon their aims, their characters, their acts, andwitli
pride to think of their successes. May each of us strive to emulate
their example and keep alive their love of Freedom and Patriotism!



DORCHESTER DAY CELEBRATION

278th Anniversary of the
Settlement of Dorchester

Under the auspices of the

Sorrtjeafrr Ifiatnrtral ^ortrtg

JUNE 6, 1908



MUSIC, 1.30 P.M. ADDRESSES, 2 P.M.



EXERCISES AT SAVIN HILL



MUSIC

OPENING ADDRESS . . Richard C. Humphreys

President of the Dorchester Historical Society

SINGING by one hundred and fifty school-children, " To Thee, O
Country"

ADDRESS Rev. Arthur Little, D.D.

MUSIC

READING Miss Wilhelmina C. Heuser

ADDRESS Harry H. Ham, Esq.

SINGING by school-children/'Almighty Lord"

PRESENTATION OF PRIZES to the school-children for the
best compositions on " Old Dorchester"

SINGING, "America"



At 4 o'clock the regatta on Dorchester Bay will start, and can be seen from the hill




Old Blake House, 1648



Compliments of the
DORCHESTER HISTORICAL SOCIETY

OFFICERS
President, RICHARD C. HUMPHREYS
Vice-President, JAMES H. STARK
Secretary and Treasurer, JOHN A. FOWLE
Auditor, THOMAS F. TEMPLE

DIRECTORS
EDWARD A. HUEBENER
J. L. MILLER
A. F. DELANO



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS




012 608 721 4





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Online LibraryBoston Dorchester Historical Society (DorchesterSouvenir program, celebration, Dorchester historical society of the two hundred and seventy-eighth anniversary of the settlement of Dorchester in the year 1630. On Savin hill, Saturday, June 6, 1908 → online text (page 1 of 1)