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Howe Court



Hubert Street

Kenesaw Terrace (Prentiss Place)

Kent Street

Lamont Street

Linden Avenue

Linden Park Street (1-97)

(125-127)
(2-128)

Marble Street

Oakburn Avenue

Pratt Court

Roxbury Court

Roxbury Street (53-139)

(odd only)

Roxbury Terrace

Ruggles Street (50-144)
(59-177)

St. Francis De Sales Street

Shailer Avenue (odd only)

Sigel Court



1 of 2



Campus High School Early Land Acquisition Area Address Directory



Shawmut Avenue (697-835)
(odd only)

Sterling Street (54-84)

(even only)

Sumner Place

Texas Street (1+-16)

Tilden Place

Tremont Street (1118-1144)
(1173-1302)
(1322)
(even only)

Vernon Court

Vernon Place

Vernon Street (40-142)
(186-204)
(35-141)
(189-201)

Warwick Street (101-end)

(both sides)

Westminster Street (62-end)

(both sides)

Weston Street (2-46)
(1-15)

Whittier Street (2)

(30-33)
(even only)

Williams Square

Williams Street (51-81)

(58-8*0

2 of 2



I






CAMPUS HIGH SCHOOL EARLY LAND ACQUISITION AREA
Address and Block Directory



STREET



Auburn Street



Cabot Place



Cabot Street



Church Place
Conant Place
Cranshaw Place
Dallas Place
Downing Street
Dunlow Place
Dunlow Street

Elmwood Street
Gay Street



#



BLK.



STREET



#



BLK.



all


odd


102


Kenesaw Terrace


all


even


103


(Prentiss Place)


all


even


79B


Kent Street



all



96D



(122)-128 79B

136-(156) 78A

162-222 101

226-242 100

250-(268) 99

131-(153) 84

(207)-225 87A

233-287 96D



Lamont Street



Linden Avenue

Linden Park
Street



all

3

all

all

all even

all

34-end
all odd

(57)-(79)

81-97

42-96

(3)-(7)



101

95

89

101

87A

96A

95

96A

95

96A

91



all odd 100
all even. 105



all even 96D
1-(31) 96B
33-41 96C

all even 96C
all odd 96B

1-(17) 99
23-41 96D
43-59 96C
63-(97) 96B

(125M127) 89
(2)-(38) 97,98
42-106 96A

(110)-(128)91



Marble Street
Oakburn Avenue
Pratt Court
Roxbury Court
Roxbury Street



97,98 Roxbury Terrace
Ruggles Street



1-12


77


Madison Pk 76


all


102


all


84


all


105


53-111


105


119-125


100


127-139


97,98


all


105



Hampshire Street


(59)-(69)


88




(77)-121


89


Haskinh. street


all even


102




all odd


101


Howe Court


all


84


Hubert Street


all odd


69B




all even


69A



59-87 69A

91-129 77

131-145 78A

147-177 84

(50)-68 103

70-100 102

(124) -(144) 101



St. Francis De Sales

Street all odd 99
all even 100



STREET



BLK,



STREET



BLK,



Shailer Avenue


odd only


97,98


Westminster
Street


Madison
Park


76


Shawmut Avenue


697-(719)


70






(52)-(78)


70




723-733


69B






(84)-(98)


69B




739-753


69A






(100)


69A




757-(799)


103












803-(835)


105


Weston Street


(2)-(20)


78A












22-46


84


Sigel Court


all


96B






(D-15


79B


Sterling Street


54-84


70


Whittier


Street


2


87A




Madison Park


76






30-38


88


Summer Place


all


101


Williams


Square


all


70


Texas Street


4-16


91


Williams


Street


58-84
(51-81)


69B
70


Tilden Place


all


103










Tremont Street


1118-1144

1178-1210

1212-1292

1298-1302,1322


84
88
89
91










Vernon Court


all


100










Vernon Place


all


100










Vernon Street


40-82
84-126
128-142
186-204
35-53
(55)-97
(103)-121
(125)-141
189-201


105

100

96D

89

103

102

101

87A

88










Warwick Street


(10D-109
115-135
Madison Park


79B

78A
76











Campus High School Fact Sheet



Purpose:



1. To replace existing inadequate English High School
buildings .

2. To expand and improve the educational programs offered



Location:



Madison Park area of Lower Roxbury



Area:



35 acres



Cost:



$15,125,000 total (exclusive of site)

Phase I: $11,1400,000 for land acquisition, construction
plans, and first stage of construction.

Phase II: +$3,725,000 for second stage of construction.



Enrollment : 5,500 total (boys and girls)

Phase I: 3,000
Phase II: 2,000 - 2,500



Characteristics : 1. Series of separate "house" buildings containing classrooms
(facilities) plus specialized facilities (e.g., language laboratories,

theatre -lecture halls, libraries, cafeterias).

2. Separate buildings for science labs, the performing arts,
graphic arts, industrial arts, home arts, business educa-
tion, auditorium.

3. Recreation and athletic facilities: gymnasiums, Olympic
size swimming pool, field house, playing fields, tennis
and handball courts, stadium.



Background -
Chronology :



1. May, 1962 : Sargent Report (Harvard Graduate School of
Education) on Boston schools. Survey and recommendations
concerning school building needs of City of Boston.

a. Undertaken with cooperation of Mayor, School Committee,
and School Buildings Commission, under contract with
BRA.

b. Recommended a new Campus -type High School.

c. Recommendations endorsed by Mayor, School Committee,
and BRA.



c



Campus High School Fact Sheet - Page 2

2. 1962-1966 ; Study and investigation of site
possibilities.

3. November 24/ 1965 ; BRA Board voted to recom-
mend to School Committee the Madison Park
site/ with commitment to make the site avail-
able through urban renewal.

4. February 28/ 1966 ; Boston School Committee
(3-2) voted to accept the Madison Park site.

5. July 25/ 1966 ; BRA Public Hearing on early
land acquisition in Madison Park area for
the Campus High School.

6. September 15/ 1966 ; BRA Board approved early
land acquisition program for Campus High
School.

7. November 8/ 1966 ; Public Facilities Commis-
sion passed resolution to build high school on
site of approximately 35 acres within the pro-
posed Campus High Project Area.

Reason for

Site Selection ; 1. Central location and exceptional accessibility

(MBTA and proposed expressways.)

2. Proximity to cultural facilities (Symphony
Hall, Museum of Fine Arts, Northeastern, etc.)

3. Deteriorated condition of site provides a
major opportunity for outstanding development.

Schedule ; 1. Preparation of educational specifications

program (6 months)

2. Construction plans (1^-2 years)

Concurrently - site acquisition, clearance,
and preparation.

3. First phase of construction (approx. 2 years)

(1968-1970)

4. First classes scheduled for September, 1970



(



c



PROPOSED CAMPUS HIGH SCHOOL



In 1962 the Harvard Graduate School of Education undertook a survey
and made recommendations concerning the school building needs of
the City of Boston. It was undertaken with the cooperation of the
Mayor, the School Committee, and the School Buildings Commission,
and under a contract with the Boston Redevelopment Authority.

The report was filed in May, 1962, and was entitled, "Boston
Schools 1962". It proposed a ten-year school building program
requiring more than 60 new schools.

The recommendations were examined by the Mayor, the School Commit-
tee, and the Redevelopment Authority and have been endorsed by
each as the foundation of the school building program for the City
of Boston.

One of the keystone recommendations in the report was the proposal
for a new High School, not only to replace the present, inadequate
English High School buildings, but to expand this school and
greatly improve and expand the programs it would offer.

In the words of the Report:

"There are, then, powerful and practical educational reasons
for the creation of a single, large high school providing
each of its students with the facilities and the educational
program he or she should be receiving."

Since the Report was issued, the various City officials concerned
with the problem have been endeavoring to find an acceptable and
suitable site.

The funds have been made available and their expenditure awaits
only the selection of a site and the preparation of the necessary
plans .

After much study the location in Lower Roxbury adjacent to the
two new expressways, the Inner Belt and the Southwest Expressway,
was voted upon by the School Department in February of 1966.

Characteristics of the Proposed Campus High School

The new Campus High School will be unique in Greater Boston's
educational firmament. The school will offer a range in curricu-
lum and a range of facilities wider and better than any school in
Greater Boston. To this school will come students from every part
of the City, of every background, of every intellectual level and
every talent. This building will be not only unique educationally
but one of the single most important buildings that the City of
Boston is likely to construct in this generation.



The proposed site of approximately b$ acres, while admittedly
below a suburban ideal in size, would permit construction of
buildings and playfields far above those possible in most urban
institutions and above that now available at any other high
school in the inlying part of the Boston metropolitan area.
The high school is eventually planned to accommodate £,500 boys
and girls in Grades 9 through 12 who will come from all parts of
the city.

The Campus High School will not be one huge building but a series
of separate "house" buildings which, in addition to classrooms,
will each contain many specialized facilities such as language
laboratories, theater-lecture halls, cafeterias and libraries.
Other buildings will be constructed to provide space for science
labs, the performing arts (music, dance, drama), graphic arts,
an auditorium, industrial arts, home arts and business education.

Recreation and athletic facilities are planned to include two
large double gymnasiums, an Olympic-size swimming pool, a large
fieldhouse, playing fields, tennis and handball courts, and
possibly a stadium.

Why was this location selected for the new High School?

Many sites were studied during the past four years and for one
reason or another rejected. This site was finally selected as
having many advantages both for the City at large and for the
surrounding community.

Because the school will serve the entire community, it has to be
located close to a Rapid Transit station. The site is close to
Dudley Street and the Forest Hills-Everett MBTA main line.
The site will be better served in the future by the new MBTA line
proposed to follow the main line of the New York, New Haven and
Hartford Railroad. When this new line is constructed, the site
would be served by a new station located in the vicinity of
Roxbury Crossing.

The site, in addition to being accessible to the proposed new
roads and Transit facilities, is ideally located in relation to
its proximity to Northeastern, Symphony Hall, the Museum, and
other cultural facilities.

Another consideration was the present condition of the site. It
is one of the most deteriorated sections in the City of Boston.
Development of the area for a new High School will be of sub-
stantial benefit to the surrounding community by replacing with
new buildings the present vacant land and vacant deteriorated
and dilapidated buildings.




HOUSE



ATHLETIC
FIELD



FIELD HOUSE



HOUSE



LIBRARY

ADMINISTRATION

CAFETERIA



HOUSE




SCIENCE a
ADVANCED ACADEMIC



ATHLETIC
FIELD



LIBRARY

ADMINISTRATION

CAFETERIA



DISTRIBUTIVE
EDUCATION



LIBRARY

ADMINISTRATION

CAFETERIA



WORK a
STUDY




ATHLETIC
FIELD



GYMNASIUM



GYMNASIUM




DIAGRAM OP FACILITIES FOR
PROPOSED CAMPUS HIGH SCHOOL



INTER-OFFICE COMMUNICATION



qp John Stainton

AT July 19, 1966

FROM Bill Pear

AT cc: P. O'Brien

ATTENTION:

SUBJECT Campus High School 1'nrollmcnt



Sorry - no clear picture noxtf palatable subject. There
are no specific plans by the School De at as yet for
enrollment policies and procedures for the new school.

1. The current enrollment in : School is running
around 2300. "— — -

2. Possibly Girls' High (noi from 738 1
year and 830 in 1963) would ~-a 'closed and incorporated
in the Campus. The campus is to be co-ed, and English
is now all boys.

However, Ohrenberger has been indefinite on the subject
and stated different id( different times.







Sargent predicted growth from a. total 22.540 in 1965 to
24,478 in 1970 for Grades 9 - 12. (1938) However I
have made a rough estimate that already we have reached
24,000 this year.

4. There are just over 4000 ninth graders now in junior high
schools. The campus is supposed to it possible to
bring these into "the regular high school program city-wide.

Brighton, Charlestown, Dorchester, Hyde Park, Jamaica Plain anc
Roslindale High Schools are now 10-12 1 igs. Obviously
good many pupils who would now attend these schools must
future go to the central^ campus inste ad .jf ^^be^es^p^fea bedroom
for 9th graders.

This last point (4) is the best one to play up.

Don't forget the other increase in capacity - of the 3000
Voca.tional School over the 1330 present Boys 1 Trado and Anne;;
(1670) which also acts to make room for 9th graders throughout
the system by withdrawing the cooperative programs from the
district high school locations.

The 2330 difference (40004—1670) is about right as the effect
of taint 4 above on the campus.



INTER-OFFICE COMMUNICATION






John


Stainton


AT


July


19, 1966


FROM


Bill


Pear


AT CC :


F. 0'


; Brien


ATTENTION:






SUBJECT




Campus H:



1. Total Cost (per Sargent) 3300 x $2,750 $15,125,000
exclusive of site

2. Nov; Appropriated and Allocated - $11,400,000
for 3000 pupil school, -

site. Probably this is more tb
enough - unless architect is
signed to do the plans for the
entire school, as he should be.

a." 1962 Loan Order - for Land and Plans $700,000

b. 1963 Loan Order - for Land and Plans - $700,000

c. 1963 Loan Order - for construction :Jj10,000,000
Nothing can be spent on land from

the 19°3 Loan Order

3. Of this allocation in -;y2, only amount $ 700,000
usable for land

If you require the entire available $700,000 for land, there
may be trouble meeting the architect's fee and signing him up,
without ' returning to the School Committee for reallocations
of funds.



•*tz^*-'



INTER-OFFICE COMMUNICATION



7'iTO John Stainton, Project Director - Campus High School
AT

FROM David Wylie, Project Legal Officer
AT

DATE July 12, 1966
ATTENTION:
SUBJECT CAMPUS HIGH SCHOOL - STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION



The State Board of Educations recommendations to Boston dated
June 28, 1966, list the Campus High School as one of several
projects "that make no provision for the reduction of racia.1
imbalance, but which can be incorporated into the first stage
building plan because they do not restrict or interfere
construction which does tend to reduce or eliminate racial
imbalance*"

Elsewhere, it is stated of the new high school:

"This proposed school Luce or eliminate racial
imbalance to the exte it makes possible balanced
middle sehools He s uch , a_ = chaj.B^s£^ events has not -
been laid"out and established in detail in the revised
plan c "

Approval of the so-called first stage building plan, including
the new high school, is made contingent upon subsequent
approval of an acceptable second stage construction plan
submitted by the School Committee a

DW:eg

cc: E« Logue, W« Pear



£« J. Logue
July 22, 1966
John Stainton
cc: S. Diamond, P. O'Brien



Campus IIlf''h Sc hool



Some members of the ftoxbury community have felt the land area
requirements for the Ocir. chool ore excessive and have
asked us to study the poE >ducing other uses -

housing in particular. To ; was Inevitable -

inasmuch as the Rudolph pi Ian shows 10 acres

for non-residential development alon mut Avenue and the
building plan provides a generous amount of open space.

Several conclusions can be drawn from an analysis of the
Rudolph site plan.

l) Parking is inadequate - less than 500 spaces. The
minimum should be closer to 1,000. This is based on:

$ Driving # Cars ,
Total Student Enrollment - 5,500
Faculty, Administration, 300 160

Help
Visitors 20 20



2) The outdoor recreation progr Imal. It
occupies some 14 acr sts of;



1,000



1 field hockeyj 1 footiv
1 softball; 1 swimming 3
8 volley ball.



occerj 1 baseball;
it on; 6 tennis;



These facilities accommo ;- )Q students

simultaneously. 4

An increase in acre. uld allow for i nal

practice fields and/02 ball Softball areas such



Football practice

baseball
Softball
basketball
tennis



2.0 acres each
1.5 "
1.0 "

.12 acre each or 8 per acre
.12 acre each or 8 per acre



f« I



acres) is

o.valt? t'- ':

: on is '■

i

@{ ;' , . ..



,: s Ol bull






Within t ' . In 3

(64.8 acres) ®ome lo,

AX t€ motives an reuei

l) ,", inu&h lar| - kn<?d

. a the School
extra 16.4 acr-eai

3 foofhall

3 bcs

i

2'; •






l*& 1

;y. At






-

I .;



. .. • .




,



x)






3)



*)



... It c



.






i



Son-reel

-

school*

-

for not;

■ -■■■-..

a/ 3!n ■
hood*



,.



<j) Accccci:

rccz- v.

-

but '■'. ;

t.;

-

- ' - I " I "

3 .. ■

33? at this t:L::ae.



>



>



>



APPLICATION FOR

EARLY LAND ACQUISITION LOAN BINDER NO.

PROJECT NO. MASS. R-

Campus High School Urban Renewal Area SUBMISSION DATE:

Boston Redevelopment Authority
Boston, Massachusetts



PROJECT AREA REPORT: Table of Contents CODE NO. E-212

1. Boundary Revisions

2. Project Area Maps

3. Project Area Data

a. Form H-6120, Summary of Project Data

b. Statement of Basis for Project Area Data, Form H-6120

c. Assignment of Residential Character

d. Distribution of Deficiencies

4. Nonresidential Exception Project

5. Section 112 Qualifications

6. Clearance and Redevelopment Proposals



Mass. R- / E-212 1 of 1



'♦



vi



APPLICATION FOR BINDER NO.

EARLY LAND ACQUISITION LOAN
PROJECT NO. MASS. R-

Campus High School Urban Renewal Area SUBMISSION DATE
Boston Redevelopment Authority
Boston, Massachusetts



PROJECT AREA REPORT: Boundary Revisions CODE NO. E-212(l)



Not applicable.



Mass. R- / E-212(l) 1 of 1



APPLICATION FOR BINDER NO.

EARLY LAND ACQUISITION LOAN
PROJECT NO. MASS. R-

Campus High School Urban Renewal Area SUBMISSION DATE
Boston Redevelopment Authority
Boston, Massachusetts



PROJECT AREA REPORT: Project Area Maps CODE NO. E-212(2j



Tiie following maps are submitted under separate cover:
Map 1: Existing Land Use
Map 2: Building Deficiencies and Proposed Treatment Areas



Mass. R- / E-212(2) 1 of 1



APPLICATION FOR

EARLY LAND ACQUISITION LOAN

PROJECT NO. MASS. R-



BINDER NO.



Campus High School Urban Renewal Area
Boston Redevelopment Authority
Boston, Massachusetts



SUBMISSION DATE:



PROJECT AREA REPORT



Form H-6120



CODE NO. E-212(3) (a)



Form H-6120, Summary of Project Data , is attached herewith.



| Mass. R- / E-212(3) (a)



1 of 1



^



Page 1 of 6


Form approved
Budget Bureau No. 63-


R884.6


H-6120
(11-63)


HOUSING AND HOME FINANCE AGENCY
URBAN RENEWAL ADMINISTRATION




PROJECT LOCALITY

Boston, Massachusetts


PROJECT NAME

Campus High School


* SUMMARY OF PROJECT DATA


PROJECT NUMBER

Mass. R-


(Urban Renewal Program)


CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT IN WHICH
PROJECT AREA IS SITUATED 9th


INSTRUCTIONS: Place original and 2 copies in Binder No. I, and


one copy each in other binderi.


A. CATEGORY OF PROJECT ELIGIBILITY (Chech one; see Urban Renewa


Manual, Chapter 3-2)


CATEGORY


PRESENT CHARACTER OF AREA


EXTENT OF PRESENT
DEVELOPMENT


PROPOSED REUSE


ffl'l


Predominantly residential


Built up


Any


CD n


Predominantly residential


Predominantly open land


Any


CD in


Not predominantly residential


Built up


Predominantly residential


[]IV


Not predominantly residential


Predominantly open land


Predominantly residential


r ~| y Nonresidential
LJ Exception


Not predominantly residential


Built up


Not predominantly residential


r "1 UT Nonresidential
LJ V1 Exception


Not predominantly residential


Predominantly open land


Not predominantly residential


n vti College, University,
LJ vu or Hospital


Any


Built up


Any


*v Tl vttt College, University,
~ LJ VII I or Hospital


Any


Predominantly open land


Any


£]iX


-


Open land


Predominantly residential


[]x


-


Open land


Not predominantly residential


1 — 1 _. Area Redevelopment
LJ AI Exception


Not predominantly residential


Built up


Not predominantly residential


f ~l ttt Area Redevelopment
LJ AU Exception


Not predominantly residential


Predominantly open land


Not predominantly residential


n








B. TYPE OF TREATMENT OF AREA

£3 CLEARANCE AREA ONLY (Complete files** C. F. and S)
[[] CONSERVATION AREA ONLY (Complete Block, C. H, and I)
[X] OCM3INATION OP CLEARANCE AND CONSERVATION SECTIONS (Comp


ete Blocks C through I)


SUBMITTED BY:




Date

'"* Boston Redevelopment i

I Local Puhlic


\uthority


Signature

Development Administrator


Agency


Title



£



Page 2 of 5



H-6120 (U-63)



C. ENVIRONMENTAL DEFICIENCIES (Check and complete one)

P*j No change in description! given on Form H-6101, Urban Renewal Area Data,
■ Rlnrk .1, anhmitt.nd for this prnjprt. nn , 1 <)

CD S* e following descriptions


CONDITION


DESCRIPTION OF EXTENT TO WHICH CONDITION EXISTS

(Give source of information. If addit ional space is required,
continue on a plain sheet and attach to this form)


1. Overcrowding or improper locution
of structures on the land


see Campus High School
Survey and Planning Application
Code No. R-102


2. Excessive dwelling unit density


■ ii


3. Conversions to incompatible types of
uses, such as roominghooses among
family dwel 1 ings


"


4. Obsolete bnilding types, such as large
.- residences or other buildings which

through lack of use or maintenance

have t blighting influence


ti


6. Detrimental land uses or conditions,
such as incompatible uses, structures
in mixed use, or adverse influences
from noise, smoke, or fumes


ii


8, Unsafe, congested, poorly designed,
or otherwise deficient streets


. ii


7, Inadequate public utilities or

community facilities contributing to
unsatisfactory living conditions or
economic decline



" >


8. Other equally significant environmental
deficiencies

1


ii



(





Page 3 of 6


























H-6120 (11-63)




DATA ON PROJECT AREA

(Complete this page only if project area includes -both clearance and conservation sections)




D. PRESEKT CHARACTER, CONDITION OF BUILDINGS, AND PROPOSED LAND USES

(Areas ihall be shown to nearest tenth of an acre. Total area within perimeter boundaries of the project shall be
accounted for, excepting only any interior areas which have been excluded from the project area. Meanings of terms
are identical with those in Urban Renewal Manual, Ch. 3-2, and material in Ch. 3-1 under (he heading "Building
^ Deficiencies")






ACREAGE


CONDITION OF
BUILDINGS


ACREAGE

BY
PROPOSED
LAND USES




ITEM


TOTAL


BY PRESENT CHARACTER


BY PROPOSED
ACQUISIT ION




IMPROVED


UNIM-
PROVEO


TOTAL
BUI LDINGS


NUMBER
WITH
DEFI-
CIENCIES




WITH

8LDGS. OR

STREETS


W/OTHER
IMPROVE-
MENTS


TO BE
ACQUIRED


NOT

TO BE

ACQUIRED




TOTAL


129.2


100.2


2.8


26.2


57-3


71.9


6^2


600







1. Streets, Alleys, Public
Rights-of-Way, Total


37.6


35.1




2.5


9.k


28.2




~




a. Major Transportation


l.k


l.k






wm,wm


l.k




__




(1) With Federal
Highway Aid








1




:; ^ 1 J 111


__




(2) Without Federal
Highway Aid








: ' •• . f :•;•..: : :


i








b. Other Streets, Alleys,
Public Rights-of-Way


36.2


33»7j




2.5


Q.k


26.8






*




2. Residential, Total


57.1


37.9


-9


18.3


31.1


26.0


U63


kk3







a. Dwelling Purposes


38.6


21.3


' .1


17.2


25 A


13.2


kn


kok







b. Related Public or
Semi public Purposes


18.5


16.6


.8


1.1


5.7


12.8


52


39







y$. Nonresidential, Total


3^.5


27.2


1.9


5-^


16.8


17.7


189


157







a. Commercial


18.0


15.7


.6


1.7


6.8


11.2


13U


Ilk


~




b. Industrial


10.6


9.2


.5


• 9


5.9


k.l


k6


35







c. Public or Semipublic
(Institutional)


5.9


2.3


.8


2.8


k.l


1.8


9


8


2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

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