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BOSTON

PUBLIC

LIBRARY








JAMAICA
PLAIN

ZONING COMMITTEE
RESOURCE NOTEBOOK



BOSTC

f l ic"

LI




MAY 1988



BOSTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

STEPHEN COYLE

Director

ROBERT L. FARRELL

Chalrman

JOSEPH J. WALSH

Vice-Chairman

JAMES K. FLAHERTY

Treaaunr
CLARENCE J. JONES

Vlca-lroasunr

MICHAEL F.DONLAN

Vice-Chairman, Sub-Committaas

KANESIMONIAN

Sacntary



call number: M3 . B16/RA/87 . 17

author: Boston. Redevelopment Authority.

title: CITIZEN'S GUIDE TO NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS DISTRICTS IN BOSTON:
ZONING AND OTHER TOOLS FOR IMPROVEMENT.

description: 20p.; illus.

abstract: ...outlines basic features of neighborhood business districts
and explains the purposes of zoning. . .

date: 19870000

subjects: Business Districts - MA - Boston - Economic Development -
Guides
Neighborhoods - MA - Boston - Economic Development - Guides
Zoning - MA - Boston - Guides

- no. 4 of 4 —
OPTIONS: G = GO on with list

RETURN = go back to search screen L = begin LIST over

MORE to come, C/R for 1 line, space for screen:






call number: M3 . Bl 6/RA/8 6 . 6

author: Boston. Redevelopment Authority.

title: CITIZEN'S GUIDE TO ZONING FOR BOSTON.

description: 24p., diagrams, maps

abstract: ...discusses what zoning is, its purposes, and the zoning
process . . .

date: 19860000

subjects: Zoning - MA - Boston - Guides.

- no. 1 of 4 —

OPTIONS: G = GO on with list

RETURN = go back to search screen L = begin LIST over

[ number] = display record number [ ?] F display FULL record

Please enter RETURN, number of desired record, " G" , or " L" :






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TABLE OF CONTENTS



INTRODUCTION



I POD Process

IPOD Policy Options

Zoning Committee Members and Procedures

Schedule of Meetings



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2
3
4



TOOLS, TECHNIQUES AND PROCEDURES



Zoning Procedures

Development Review Procedures

How to Apply to the Board of Appeal

How to Apply for a Building Permit

National Register and Boston Landmarks Designation



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7
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JAMAICA PLAIN PROFILE



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Zoning Map and District Descriptions
Historic Preservation Study
Open Space Study



ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES



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11
12



Questionnaire Results
Subcommittee Reports
Goals and Objectives
Policy Recommendations






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SUB -AREAS






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INTRODUCTION

IPOD PROCESS
IPOD POLICY OPTIONS
ZONING COMMITTEE MEMBERS
SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS



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THE INTERIM PLANNING OVERLAY DISTRICT
WHAT IT IS - WHAT IT DOES



The current Boston Zoning Code has been in effect for more than twenty years.
Some amendments to the Code have been made. But over twenty years, the city
has grown and changed and old zoning regulations may no longer serve the needs
of the neighborhoods.

Rezoning takes time. Therefore, the city has created processes to ease problems
caused by outdated zoning. In 1984 the Zoning Commission authorized the
creation of the Interim Planning Overlay Districts (IPODs).

An I POD provides temporary zoning regulations for an area where the Zoning
Commission has determined that current zoning may be inappropriate. An IPOD is
designed to allow comprehensive planning and rezoning of a neighborhood in
keeping with the community's needs. These temporary regulations may stay in
effect for a maximum of two years; afterwards, new zoning may be put in place.
If no changes are necessary, the old zoning regulations remain in effect.

An IPOD defines the physical boundaries of the neighborhood in question. It
establishes a time period for which the IPOD will be in effect. It then details
the characteristics of the district which suggest that the current zoning may be
inappropriate. For instance, an area zoned for business in the original code may
have become residential over the years. If a developer wants to build a business
next to single-family homes in such a district, the old zoning allows him to do
so. However, it couid cause an inappropriate mix of land uses in the neighbor-
hood.
NPZ/006.RPT



An IPOD attempts to deal with this problem. An IPOD also provides a list of
goals to be achieved in developing new zoning. These goals result from a process
by which a community review committee works with the BRA Zoning staff and
Mayor's Office of Neighborhood Services to identify the problems and consider
solutions. These solutions are then put in place as Interim Controls. Interim
Controls regulate neighborhood development while the IPOD is in place.

During the maximum two-year IPOD period, applicants for a building permit,
change-in-use permit, or change-in-occupancy permit (except for single- and two-
family residential uses as specified in the IPOD regulation) must receive an
Interim Planning Permit from the Board of Appeal. Before the Board acts, it will
hold a public hearing and will receive a report from the Boston Redevelopment
Authority which states whether the proposed action is consistent with the
planning goals and land-use objectives of the IPOD. The BRA's report will not be
made until it has reviewed the proposal with the community, and the report will
include input from the community review committee. An Interim Planning Permit
will be issued if the Board finds that the proposal is consistent with the goals
and objectives of the IPOD and will not adversely affect the comprehensive
planning process.

An IPOD is NOT a moratorium on development. But it does guide growth along
lines more acceptable to the community until new zoning regulations can be put
into place by the city. It also provides for community input into the neighbor-
hood planning process and into the design of new zoning regulations.

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IPOD Policy Recommendations

In numerous meetings held in neighborhoods throughout Boston, common
planning and zoning issues have been identified and discussed by community
review committees, staff of the Boston Redevelopment Authority, and the
Mayor's Office of Neighborhood Services. As a result of these meetings,
twelve policy recommendations have been developed to address the major
planning and zoning issues within the context of the Interim Planning Overlay
District (IPOD). The recommendations, summarized below, entail revising
existing zoning, undertaking planning analyses, and creating new types of
zoning for Boston. Most of the recommendations are applicable to all neigh-
borhoods. Additional recommendations and changes to existing ones may
develop, however, as community meetings and the IPOD process continue in
Boston's neighborhoods.

o Boulevard Planning District

The neighborhoods' major arterials and cross streets (Boulevards) serve
as an economic and social framework of community life. Therefore, the
planning of these Boulevards requires comprehensive analysis and com-
munity input. To facilitate this planning, Boulevard Planning Districts
(BPDs) would be established on major arterials and cross streets.
During the IPOD planning process, BPD regulations and design guide-
lines would be developed to encourage a mix of uses that promote and
sustain economic viability and residential stability, preserve open space,
protect historic structures, provide adequate parking and transportation
access, and promote good urban design. Site plan review by the Boston
Redevelopment Authority would be required for most projects proposed in
the Boulevard Planning Districts.

o Neighborhood Business District

Local neighborhood business districts provide retail and service uses to
area residents. Promoting these districts is a planning goal of many
neighborhoods, requiring comprehensive analysis and community input.
To facilitate this planning, Neighborhood Business Districts would be
designated, and NBD regulations and design guidelines would be developed
to: encourage a mix of uses that promote and sustain economic viability
and residential stability; preserve open space; protect historic struc-
tures; provide adequate parking and transportation access; and promote
good urban design.

o Affordable Housing Reserve District

Underutilized publicly owned land would be mapped as Affordable
Housing Reserve (AHR) Districts to accommodate residential uses. In
this district, seventy-five percent (75%) of the gross floor area of any
proposed project would be housing, of which a certain proportion would
be affordable. Densities in the housing reserve district would be
approximately: 12 units per acre, low density; 24 units per acre,
moderate density; or, 36 units per acre, high density.



ZON6/I/030288/1



o Mixed Use Reserve District

Underutilized publicly owned land would be mapped as a Mixed Use
Reserve District. A project in this district would be developed as a
Planned Development Area with one or a combination of housing, open
space, office, commercial, light manufacturing, and public service uses.

o Industrial Economy Reserve District

On certain Economic Development and Industrial Corporation (EDIC)
parcels, an Industrial Economy Reserve District would be established to
preserve the availability of industrial land and to promote the growth of
light manufacturing uses that create job opportunities.

o New Light Manufacturing District

A new Light Manufacturing District would be developed during the
community planning period. Where appropriate, it would replace portions
of existing manufacturing and industrial zones and permit light
manufacturing uses that minimize adverse environmental impacts and
truck traffic, and maximize employment opportunities. Buffer zones
would be required around manufacturing districts that abut residential
districts.

o Institutional Master Plans

To integrate future institutional development with the needs of the
residential neighborhood institutions would be required to submit an
Institutional Master Plan. The Plan would address, among other things,
development concepts, planning objectives, design features, and projected
employment, traffic, and parking impacts, and would detail institutional
expansion plans five years into the future.

o Transportation and Parking Controls

To improve parking and transportation access, provisions for the
following three elements would be developed: a Transportation Master
Plan for each neighborhood to analyze current and projected access and
parking demands, and to specify improvements within the neighborhood;
Transportation Access Plans, required for certain projects and consisting
of traffic, parking and construction management components; and
Residential Parking Requirements, which increase with the number of
units proposed in new developments.

o Open Space Plan

An integral part of neighborhood planning is the linkage of open space
to the Emerald Necklace and to the open space system of the city. An
Open Space Plan for each neighborhood would be developed during the
community planning period to provide for that linkage, for the preserva-
tion of existing open space and the addition of new open space, and for
the completion of the city's open space system.



ZON6/I/030288/1.1






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o Height Standards



To protect and promote existing and future development, interim height
standards would be established for each neighborhood. Height standards
could vary within a neighborhood, depending on the type, location, and
character of existing and proposed development.

o Use Controls

To protect each neighborhood from inappropriate development during the
I POD planning period, most proposed projects would require an Interim
Planning Permit, and certain uses would be forbidden during the planninq
period.

o Design Guidelines

To protect the character of residential areas and historic structures, to
upgrade commercial centers and boulevards, and to guide future develop-
ment in each neighborhood, Design Guidelines would be developed which
incorporate standards for parking and access, landscaping, building
design, open space, and historic preservation. These guidelines would
also include standards that address the appropriate location and design
of billboards and on-premise signs.



ZON6/I/030288/2






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JAMAICA PLAIN ZONING COMMITTEE



David W. Adams
26 Rossmore Road
Jamaica Plain, MA
522-3852



02130



Bill Allan

117 Sheridan Street

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

524-0669

Rebecca Calahan
73 Bynner Street
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
522-9537/727-1130

Stella Clancy

7 David Road

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

522-1950

Bernard C. Doherty

36 Asticou Road

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

524-2573/524-3762

Steve Fahrer

87 Mozart Street

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

524-3541

Charles Fox

21 Myrtle Street

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

522-8248

Stavros S. Frantzis
72 Robinwood Avenue
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
522-0407

James Greene

86 Moss Hill Road

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

439-4100

Richard Harris

33 Cornwall Street

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

524-6337



Lennie Lebel

12B Brewer Street

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

522-4790

Cindy Lehmbeck
47 Weld Hill Street
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
524-6631

Richard P. McDonough
812 Centre Street
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
522-0912/522-6388

Mary Jane Medved

39 Kenton Road

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

522-3616

Gwenn Murphy
4 Germania Street
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
524-0409

Kay O'Connor

60 Brookside Avenue

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

522-3018

Antonio Peniche
115 Chesnut Avenue
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
524-8589

Joyce Perkit

10 Harris Avenue

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

522-3616

Michael Reiskind

425 S. Huntington Avenue

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

Jeff Riklin

288 Lamartine Street

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

524-7001

Lola Stillman

71 Walk Hill

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

522-5591



ZON8/3E/032588/1






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Jim Murray

Mayor's Office of Neighborhood Services

709A City Hall

Boston, MA 02201

725-3485

Beth Shields

Boston Redevelopment Authority

One City Hall Square

Boston, MA 02201

722-4300



ZON8/3E/032588/3






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JAMAICA PLAIN NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL

ZONING COMMITTEE

IPOD ISSUE TASK FORCES



BUSINESS/COMMERCIAL TASK FORCE

Issues for study:

Parking, height, density, boulevard planning district, signage, design

review, mix of businesses

Members:

Stavros Frantzis, Lenny Lebel, Marie Curley

TRANSPORTATION TASK FORCE

Issues for study:

Traffic, parking, boulevard planning district

Members: Dick McDonough, Kay O'Connor, Gwen

HOUSING TASK FORCE

Issues for study:

Height, affordable housing, open space, density, subdivision, design review,

elderly housing

Members:

Jim Greene, Bill Allen, Charlie Fox

AESTHETICS

Issues for study:

Historic preservation, open space, billboards, design

Members:

Lola Stillman, Joyce Perkit, Stella Clancy

LIGHT MANUFACTURING/ INSTITUTIONAL

Issues for study:

Height, density

Members:

Rebecca Callahan, Bill Allen

SPECIAL STUDY DISTRICTS

Issues for study:

Egleston Square, Washington Street Corridor

Members:

Rebecca Callahan, Mary Jane Medved, David Adams, Marie Turley

COMMUNITY INPUT/CODE ENFORCEMENT

Members:

Steve Fahrer, Jeff Riklin, Bernie Doherty



ZON8/H/033188/1



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JAMAICA PLAIN NEIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL
ZONING COMMITTEE PROCEDURES

Committee Composition

The Zoning Committee is composed of a Chair, elected by and from the
Neighborhood Council membership. The committee has no more than 21 members
from the community. Efforts are constant to see that all sub-neighborhoods
and groups in Jamaica Plain are represented.

Members of the community interested in serving should submit name, address,
telephone number(s) and a brief biography to the Chair, who will present it
to the committee. If approved by the committee, the request to serve will go
to the Neighborhood Council for approval.

The Chair may be removed by the Council and members of the committee for
just cause, which can include, but not be limited to, three unexplained
consecutive absences from meetings.

The Zoning Committee may form ad hoc subcommittees to carry out specific
tasks.

Committee Meetings

The Zoning Committee meets the third Friday of each month to consider I POD
issues. The Committee will also meet monthly when necessary to consider
requests for variances. Agendas and related documents are circulated prior
to meetings.

Minutes of meetings will be taken, and require approval at the next meeting.

All Zoning Committee meetings are open to the public. In order to facilitate
discussion, committee members sit at the table and members of the public sit
in the "audience".

Decision Making and Discussion

The Zoning Committee makes recommendations to the full Neighborhood Council
for vote. Recommendations and other decisions are made on the motion -
second - discussion - vote by committee members model. Majority rules with
half or more current members present constituting a quorum.

At the beginning of each meeting committee members introduce themselves
and, if feasible, members of the public do the same. Members of the public
are welcome to participate in discussions, after members of the committee have
spoken. Time for discussion may be limited.

Note: Committee members who have a financial interest in a project

or particular matter coming before the zoning committee, or
have family members who have such interests, shall not partici-
pate in the vote.

In addition, members who serve in a policy making role for any group or
organization which has a financial interest in a particular matter before the
zoning committee shall not participate in the vote.

ZON8/OO/033188/1






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JAMAICA PLAIN IPQD SUB-AREA & ZONING COMMITTEE MEETINGS

November 5 Sumner Hill

December 3 Jamaica Pond

10 Zoning Committee

January 7 Zoning Committee

13 Jamaica Hills

28 Zoning Committee

February 11 Forest Hills

18 Woodbourne

25 Zoning Committee



March



April



May



10 Stoneybrook

24 Jamaica South

31 Zoning Committee

14 Zoning Committee

20 Hyde Square

28 Egleston

12 Jamaica Central

26 Zoning Committee



ZON8/3F/033188



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TOOLS, TECHNIQUES AND PROCEDURES



ZONING PROCEDURES

DEVELOPMENT REVIEW PROCEDURES

HOW TO APPLY TO THE BOARD OF APPEAL

HOW TO APPLY FOR A BUILDING PERMIT

NATIONAL REGISTER AND BOSTON LANDMARKS DESIGNATION



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ZONING PROCEDURES



City of Boston

Raymond L. Flynn, Mayor

Boston Redevelopment Authority
Robert L. Farrell, Chairman
Joseph J. Walsh, Vice-Chairman
James K. Flaherty, Treasurer
Clarence J. Jones, Vice-Treasurer
William A. McDermott, Jr., Member
Kane Simonian, Secretary
Robert J. Ryan, Director



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TABLE OF CONTENTS



PAGE



CITY OF BOSTON ZONING CODE 1

Zoning Regulations
Zoning Districts
Development Impact Projects

ZONING AUTHORITIES 2

Zoning Commission
Zoning Board of Appeal

ZONING PROCEDURES 3

Building Permit
Zoning Change

o Variance, Conditional Use Permit, Exception

o Map of Text Amendment

o Special Designations

APPENDIX - • 10

PDA Requirements



CITY OF BOSTON ZONING CODE

Zoning Regulations •

All new construction, including extensions and changes to existing structures;
all changes in land use, whether or not within a building; and all signs ana
billboards are subject to the zoning regulations of the City of Boston. The
Boston Zoning Code, which is available from the Inspectional Services
Department, mandates the maximum height, number of stories, and size of
buildings and structures; the minimum size and width of lots, size of yards,
usable open space per dwelling unit; and the use of buildings and land.
Uses are categorized as allowed, forbidden (requiring a variance) or condi-
tional (requiring a conditional use permit).

Zoning Districts

The Zoning Code divides the city into several categories of residential,
business and industrial districts, with similar regulations for districts having
substantially the same character. The Code also defines several categories of
special purpose overlay districts which include planned development areas
(PDAs) and urban renewal areas (URAs); adult entertainment, restricted and
limited parking, flood hazard, institutional, and restricted roof structure
districts. In these districts, the regulations specified for the the base
district apply, except when they are in conflict with the special regulations
for a particular overlay district. For example, developments in the restricted
parking district are subject to zoning regulations of the specific base district
but because parking is a conditional use in the overlay district, proposals
which include parking require a conditional use permit. Districts are delin- (
eated on a series of twelve zoning maps, available from the Boston
Redevelopment Authority (BRA) Mapping Department or the Inspectional
Services Department (ISD).

Development Impact Projects

The Zoning Code categorizes most projects of 100,000 square feet or more as
Development Impact Projects and, to increase the availability of low and
moderate income housing, requires developers of such projects to make a
development impact payment to the Neighborhood Housing Trust or to other-
wise contribute to the creation of low and moderate income housing. A
request for a variance, conditional use permit, exception or zoning map or
text amendment triggers the need for Development impact Project approval.

Development Impact Project plans must be submitted to the BRA for staff
review. Upon staff approval, the plans are presented to the BRA Board at a
public hearing. If the Board approves the plans, the developer enters into
an agreement with the BRA and the Neighborhood Housing Trust to pay a
Development Impact Project exaction. The BRA's recommendation is sent to
the Board of Appeal and procedures for other zoning actions may be initiated.



The Building Commissioner shall not issue any building or use permit for a
Development Impact Project unless the BRA has certified on the application,
plans, drawings or specifications filed with the Commissioner that the docu-
ments have been subject to design review and are consistent with the BRA-
approved project plan and that the applicant has entered into an agreement
with the BRA and the Neighborhood Housing Trust.

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ZONING AUTHORITIES

Zoning Commission

Zoning regulations are adopted, amended, or repealed by the Zoning Commission
The eleven-member board, appointed by the Mayor and subject to confirmation
by the. City Council, is comprised of three members selected by the Mayor
and eight representatives of various development-related organizations, as
specified in the zoning enabling legislation (Chapter 665 of the Acts of 1956
as amended). Actions of the Commission require a concurrent vote of not
less than seven numbers. Amendments are subject to approval by the Mayor,
or a lapse of 15 days after presentation to the Mayor, but a concurrent vote
of nine members may overrule a mayoral veto.

Zoning Board of Appeal

The Board of Appeal is empowered to grant variances, conditional uses and
exceptions to the Zoning Code and Building Code in response to requests
from applicants who have been refused permits. The Board of Appeal con-
sists of five members appointed by the Mayor. One member is selected solely
by the Mayor and four are appointed by the Mayor from candidates nominated
by specified development-related organizations. In action on an appeal, the
Board may reverse in whole or in part the earlier decision of the Inspectional
Services Department (ISD) which is responsible for issuing zoning and
building permit approvals. Decisions of the Board require a concurrent vote
of four-fifths of its members; decisions may be overturned by the Suffolk
Superior Court or in residential cases, by the Housing Court of the City of
Boston.



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ZONING PROCEDURES

Zoning rsvitw 15 initiated by a request for a building or occupancy permit, as t
outlined below.

I. FILING FOR BUILDING AND/OR OCCUPANCY PERMIT

o The applicant submits an application for a building and/or occu-
pancy permit to Inspectional Services Department (ISO).

o ISO inspects the application for compliance with the zoning code. A
prefiling consultation with the Plans Examination/Zoning Section of


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