James Boswell.

Life of Johnson, Volume 6 Addenda, index, dicta philosophi, etc online

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George III praises his good breeding, iii. 68, n. 4;
goat, the, not the kid, iv. 107, n. 2;
Gordon Riots, iii. 430;
'grave, sober, decent,' iii. 77;
_Heroic Epistle_, attacked in the, v. 186;
Hogarth, caricatured by, v. 186;
Horace, a contested passage in, iii. 73;
House of Commons afraid of him, iv. 140, n. 1;
expunges the resolution for his expulsion, ii. 112:
See under MIDDLESEX ELECTION;
how to speak at its bar, iii. 224;
Inverary, visits, iii. 73;
'Jack Ketch,' iii. 66;
Johnson's account of 'Jack's' conversation, iii. 183;
'animosity' against him, i. 349;
attacks him, ii. 135, n. 1; iii. 64; v. 339;
attacks, i. 429, n. 1; iii. 64, n. 2;
after their reconciliation, in. 79, n. 1;
calls on, iv. 107;
compared with, iii. 64, 78;
_Dictionary_, letter _H_, i. 300, 349, n. 1;
meets, at Mr. Dilly's, iii. 64-79, 201; v. 339, n. 5;
second meeting, iv. 101-7;
invites, to dinner, iv. 224, n. 2;
letter to him, iv. 224, n. 2;
and Mrs. Macaulay's footman, iii. 78;
political definitions, i. 295, n. 1;
repartee about a resolution of the House, iv. 104;
says that he 'should be well ducked,' i. 394;
sends him the Lives, iv. 107;
talking of liberty, iii. 224;
tête-à-tête with, iv. 107;
_Junius_, suspected to be, iii. 376, n. 4;
_Letter to Samuel Johnson, LL.D._, iv. 30, n. 3;
libel, prosecution for, iii. 78;
library, sells his, iv. 105, n. 2;
Lord Mayor, iii. 68, n. 4, 459-460;
kept from being, v. 339;
_Memoirs_ by Almon, i. 349, n. 1;
Middlesex election: See under MIDDLESEX ELECTION;
Monks of Medmenham Abbey, i. 125, n. 1;
_North Briton_, No. 45, i. 394, n. 1; ii. 72, n. 3;
Earl of Bute attacked, ii. 300, n. 5;
oratory, on, iv. 104;
'phoenix of convivial felicity,' iii. 183;
physiognomy, ii. 154, n. 1;
Pope's repartee, iv. 50;
prison, in, ii. 111, n. 2; iii. 46, n. 5, 460;
profanity, his, iv. 216;
quotation, censures, iv. 102;
riots in London in 1768, iii. 46, n. 5;
Scotland, raillery at, iii. 73, 77; iv. 101;
sentimental anecdote, iv. 347, n. 2;
Settle, the City Poet, iii. 75;
Shelburne, opposed by, iv. 175, n. 1;
Shelburne and Malagrida, iv. 174, n. 5;
Sheriff, v. 186, n. 4;
Smollett's letter to him, i. 348;
'Wilkes and Liberty,' ii. 60, n. 2; v. 312;
'Wilkite, no,' iii. 430, n. 4.
WILKES, Miss, iv. 224, n. 2.
WILKIE, William, D.D., Hume's Scotch Homer, ii. 53, n. 1; iv. 186, n. 2.
WILKIN, Simon, editor of Sir Thomas Brown's _Works_, iii. 293, n. 2.
WILKINS, Bishop, ii. 256, n. 3.
WILKINS, landlord of the Three Crowns, Lichfield, ii. 461, 462; iii. 411.
WILKS, the actor,
acted Juba in _Cato_, v. 126, n. 2;
Addison's loan to Steele, iv. 53;
Johnson celebrates his virtues, i. 167, n, 1;
manager of Drury Lane Theatre, v. 244, n. 2.
WILL, free. See FREE WILL.
WILL-MAKING, ii. 261; iv. 402, n. 1.
WILLES, Chief Justice,
'attached to the Prince of Wales,' i. 147, n. 1;
Bet Flint's trial, iv. 103, n. 3;
Johnson's schoolfellow, i. 45, n. 4.
WILLIAM III,
Dodwell, Henry, will not persecute, v. 437, n. 3;
Irish, not the lawful sovereign of the, ii. 255;
Johnson's_ Dictionary_, in, i. 295, n. 1;
resplendent qualities, his, ii. 341, n. 4;
Revolution Society, commemorated by the, iv. 40, n. 4;
Shebbeare, satirised by, ii. 112, n. 3; iii. 15, n. 3;
torture in Scotland, legal in his reign, i. 467, n. 1;
'worthless scoundrel,' ii. 341-2;
'that scoundrel,' v. 255;
mentioned, iv. 342; v. 234.
WILLIAMS, Anna,
account of her, i. 232; ii. 99; iv. 235, n. i, 239, n. 4;
allowance from Mrs. Montagu, iii. 48, n. 1; iv. 65, n. 1;
from Lady Philipps, v. 276, n. 2;
_Adventurer_, Bathurst's Essays in the, i. 254;
benefit at Drury Lane, i. 159 n. 1, 393, n. 1;
Bet Flint, did not love, iv. 103, n. 1;
Bolt Court, room in, ii. 427, n. 1;
Boswells envy of Goldsmith's taking tea with her, i. 421;
'a privileged man,' i. 463; ii. 99;
and the Jack Wilkes dinner, iii. 67;
'loves,' ii. 145;
carving, ii. 99, n. 2;
conversation, i. 463;
death, iv. 65, n. 1, 235;
drunkenness, on, ii. 435, n. 7;
eating, mode of, iii. 26;
electrical experiments, ii. 26, n. 2;
Garrick refuses her an order, i. 392;
Gordon Riots, left London at the, iii. 435;
'hates everybody,' iii. 368;
Hetherington's Charity, ii. 286;
illness, ii. 412; iii. 93, 95; 123, 128, 132, 211, 215, 363;
iv. 142, 170, 233-4;
jealousy, iii. 55;
Johnson's attention to her, iii. 341;
pleasure in her society, i. 232, n. 1; iii. 462;
iv. 235, 239, 241, 249, n. 2;
takes the sacrament in her room, iv. 235, n. 1, 270;
tea with her, i. 421; ii. 99;
turns Captain Macheath, iv. 95;
Johnson's Court, room in, ii. 5;
_Miscellanies_, i. 148, 177, n. 2; ii. 25-6; iii. 104;
peevishness, iii. 26, 128, 220;
quarrels with the rest of the household, iii. 368, 461;
second sight, instance of, ii. 150;
tea, mode of making, ii. 99;
will, her, iv. 241;
mentioned, i. 227, n. 2, 241, 242, 274, 326, 328, 350, n. 3,
369, 382; ii. 45, 77, 164, 209, 214, 215, 226, 242, 269, 310, 333,
357, 360, 386, 434; iii. 6, 44, 79, 92, 222, 269, 271, 313, 380;
iv. 92, 210; v. 98.
WILLIAMS, Sir Charles Hanbury,
Johnson's pamphlet against him, ii. 33;
speaks contemptuously of him, v. 268;
lines on Pulteney, v. 268, n. 3.
WILLIAMS, Helen Maria, iv. 282.
WILLIAMS, Zachariah, i. 274, n. 2, 301.
WILLIS, Dr. Thomas, _De Anima Brutorum_, v. 314, n. 1.
WILMOT, Chief Justice, i. 45, n. 4.
_Wilson against Smith and Armour_, ii. 196, n. 1.
WILSON, Father, ii. 390.
WILSON, Florence, _De tranquillitate animi_, iii. 215.
WILSON, Rev. Mr.,
dedicates his _Archaeological Dictionary_ to Johnson, iv. 162.
WILSON, Thomas, Fellow of Trinity College, Dublin, i. 489.
WILTON,
Boswell visits it, ii. 326, n. 5, 371;
writes to Johnson from it, iii. 118, 122.
WILTON, Miss, ii. 274.
WILTSHIRE,
militia bill of 1756, i. 307, n. 4;
mentioned, iv. 237.
WINCHESTER,
capital convictions in 1784, iv. 328, n. 1;
cathedral, iii. 457;
Franklin visits it, ii. 60, n. 2;
Johnson visits it in 1762, i. 496, n. 2;
mentioned, ii. 115.
WINCHESTER COLLEGE,
Johnson places Burney's son there, iii. 367;
Morell visits it, v. 350, n. 1;
Peregrine Pickle's governor, v. 185, n. 2.
WINDHAM, Right Hon. William,
account of him in 1784, iv. 407, n. 2;
balloons, love of, iv. 356, n. 1;
Burke's merriment, iv. 276;
Essex Head Club, member of the, iv. 254, 438;
Eumelian Club, member of the, iv. 394, n. 4;
Glasgow University, at, iii. 119;
Horsley's character, iv. 437;
Johnson's advice to him, iv. 200, n. 4;
at Ashbourn, visits, iv. 356, 362, n. 2;
attends, when dying, iv. 407, 411, 415, n. 1;
his servant nurses him, iv. 418, n. 2;
bequest to him, iv. 402, n, 2;
gift, iv. 440;
college days, i. 70, n. 3;
dexterity in retort, iv. 185;
funeral, iv. 419;
and Heberden, iv. 399, n. 6;
Latin read with pleasure by few, v. 80, n. 2;
letters to him, iv. 227, 362;
never read the _Odyssey_ through, i. 70, 72, n. 3;
pension, proposed increase of, iv. 338, n. 2;
recommends Frank to him, iv. 401, n. 4;
Literary Club, member of the, i. 479;
opposition to good measures, iv. 200, n. 4;
portrait, ii. 25, n. 2;
rascal, will make a very pretty, iv. 200;
Secretary for Ireland, iv. 200, 227, n. 2;
wants and acquisitions, iii. 354;
Wapping, explores, iv. 201, n. 1;
Warton's, Dr., amazement, ii. 41, n. 1;
mentioned, ii. 306; iv. 344.
WINDOW-TAX, v. 301, n. 1.
WINDSOR,
Beauclerk's house, i. 250;
Johnson and the Mayor, iv. 312, n. 4;
mentioned, iii. 400, n. 2.
WINDUS, John, _Journey to Mequinez_, v. 445.
_Windward_, defined, i. 293.
WINE,
abstinence a great deduction from life, iii. 169, 245, 327;
not a diminution of happiness, iii. 245;
does not admit of doubting, iii. 250;
reasons for it, ii. 435; iii. 245;
advice to one who has drunk freely, ii. 436; iii. 389;
benevolence, drunk from, iii. 327;
bottles drunk at a sitting, iii. 243, n. 4;
claret and ignorance, iii. 335;
claret, port, and brandy distinguished, iii. 381; iv. 79;
conversation and benevolence, effect on, iii. 41, 327;
daily consumption of wine, iii. 27, n. 1;
different, makes a man, v. 325;
'drives away care,' ii. 193;
drunk, the art of getting, iii. 389;
drunk for want of intellectual resources, ii. 130;
freezing, iv. 151, n. 2;
_in vino veritas_, ii. 188;
Johnson's abstinence, i. 103, n. 3;
advice to drink wine, ib.;
not to drink it, iii. 169;
'drink water and put in for a hundred,' iii. 306;
life not shortened by a free use of it, iii. 170
(See under JOHNSON, wine);
melancholy increased by it, i. 446;
patron, drinking to please a, iii. 329:
See under BOSWELL, wine, DRINKING and SPIRITUOUS LIQUORS.
WINGS OF IRON, iv. 356, n. 1.
WINIFRED'S WELL, v. 442.
WINNINGTON, Thomas, i. 502.
WIRGMAN, keeper of a toy-shop, iii. 325.
WIRTEMBERG, Prince of, ii. 180.
WISE, Francis, Radclivian Librarian,
account of him, i. 275, n. 4;
Johnson visits him at Elsfield, i. 273;
mentioned, i. 278-9, 282, 289, 322.
WISEDOME, Robert, v. 444.
WISHART, George, THE REFORMER, v. 63, n. 3.
WISHART, Dr. William, v. 252.
WIT,
basis of all wit is truth, ii. 90, n. 3;
Chesterfield on the property in it, iii. 351, n. 1;
defined in Barrow's _Sermon_, iv. 105, n. 4;
generally false reasoning, iii. 23, n. 3.
WITCHES,
evidence of their having existed, ii. 178;
Johnson's disbelief in them, ii. 179, n. 1;
'machinery of poetry,' iv. 17;
Shakespeare's, iii. 382; v. 76, 115, 347;
Wesley's belief in them, ii. 178, n. 3;
witchcraft, punished by death, v. 45;
abolished by act of parliament, ib.;
last executions, v. 46, n. 1.
WITNESSES, examination of, v. 243.
WITS,
a celebrated one, iii. 388;
the female wits, iv. 103, n. 1.
WITTEMBERG, iii. 122, n, 2.
WOFFINGTON, Margaret (Peg),
Garrick's tea, iii. 264;
sister of Mrs. Cholmondeley, iii. 318, n. 3.
WOLCOT, John (Peter Pindar), v. 415, n. 4.
WOLFE, General,' choice of difficulties,' v. 146.
WOLVERHAMPTON,
Elwall the quaker ironmonger, ii. 164;
epitaph in the church, i. 149, n. 2.
WOMEN,
Addison's time, in, iv. 217, n. 4;
carefulness with money, iv. 33;
cookery, cannot make a book of, iii. 285;
employment of them, ii. 362, n. 1;
envy of men's vices, iv. 291;
few opportunities of improving their condition, iv. 33;
fortune, of, iii. 3;
genteel, more, than men, iii. 53;
gluttony, i. 468, n. 1;
Greek and pudding-making, i. 122, n. 4;
indifferent to characters of men, iv. 291;
knowledge, none the worse for, ii. 76; v. 226;
little things, can take up with, iii. 242;
marrying a pretty woman, iv. 131;
men have more liberty allowed them, iii. 286;
natural claims, ii. 419;
over-match for men, v. 226;
Papists, surprising that they are not, iv. 289;
pious, not more, than men, iv. 289;
portrait-painting improper for them, ii. 362;
power given them by nature and law, v. 226, n. 2;
preaching, i. 463;
quality, of, iii. 353;
reading, iii. 333; iv. 217, n. 4;
soldiers, as, v. 229;
temptations, have fewer, iii. 287;
understandings better cultivated, iii. 3;
virtuous, more, than of old, iii. 3.
Women Servants, wages, ii. 217.
Women of the Town, how far admitted to taverns, iv. 75;
narrate their histories to Johnson, i. 223, n. 2; iv. 396;
one rescued by him, iv. 321;
wretched life, i. 457.
Wonders, catching greedily at them, i. 498, n. 4;
propagating them, iii. 229, n. 3.
Wood, Anthony à, _Assembly Man_, v. 57, n. 2;
on Burton's tutor at Christ Church, i. 59;
Rawlinson's collections for a continuation of the _Athenae_,
iv. 161, n. 1;
styles Blackmore gentleman, ii. 126, n. 4.
Woodcocks, ii. 55, 248.
Woodhouse, the poetical shoemaker, i. 225, n. 1, 520; ii. 127.
Woodstock. See BLENHEIM.
Woodward, Henry, the actor, ii. 208, n. 5.
Woodward, John, iv. 23, n. 3.
Woollen Act, ii. 453, n. 2.
Woolston, Rev. Thomas, v. 419, n. 2,
Woolwich, iii. 268.
Worchester, Gwynn's bridge over the Severn, v. 454, n. 2;
Johnson visits it, v. 456;
mentioned, iii. 176, n. 1.
Worcester, Battle of, iv. 234, n. 1; v. 319.
_Word to the Wise_, iii. 113.
Words, big words for little matters, i. 471;
words describing manners soon require notes, ii. 212.
Wordsworth, William,
_Edinburgh Review_ and Lord Byron, iv. 115, n. 2;
_Excursion_, quoted, v. 424;
lines to Lady Fleming, i, 461, n. 5;
Lonsdale's, first Lord, cruelty to him, v. 113, n. 1;
poet-laureate, i. 185, n. 1;
_Solitary Reaper_, v. 117, n. 3;
'We live by admiration,' ii. 360, n. 3.
Work. See LABOUR.
_Work_ him, iv. 261, n. 3; v. 243.
Workhouse, parish, iii. 187.
World, complaints of it unjust, iv. 172;
counterfeiting happiness, ii. 169, n. 3;
despised, not to be, i. 144, n. 2;
Johnson's knowledge of it, i. 215;
likes the society of a man of the world, iii. 21, n. 3;
judgment must be accepted, i. 200;
knowledge not strained through books, i. 105;
peevishly represented as very unjust, iii. 237, n. 1;
running about it, i. 215;
running from it, iv. 161, n. 3.
World, The, a club, iv. 102, n. 4.
_World, The_, Bedlam, visitors to, ii. 374, n. 1;
Chesterfield's papers on the _Dictionary_, i. 257-9;
confounded with _The World_ of 1790, iii. 16, n. 1;
contributors, i. 257, n. 3; v. 48, 238;
Johnson thinks little of it, i. 420;
name chosen by Dodsley, i. 202, n. 4.
_World, The_, newspaper of 1790, iii. 16, n. 1.
_World Displayed, Introduction to the_, i. 345.
WORRALL, T., i. 166, n. 4.
WORSHIP OF IMAGES, iii. 17, 188.
WORTHINGTON, Dr., V. 443, 449, 453.
WOTTON, Sir Henry, ii. 170, n. 3.
WOTY, Mr., i. 382.
WRAXALL, Sir Nathaniel W.,
George III's manners, ii. 40, n. 4;
Johnson, describes, iii. 426, n. 4;
and the Duchess of Devonshire, iii. 425, n. 4;
and Mrs. Montagu, iv. 64, n. 1;
meets, at Mrs. Vesey's, iii. 425;
driven away by him, iii. 426, n. 4;
Malagrida's name, iv. 174, n. 5;
_Tour to the Northern Parts of Europe_, iii. 425.
WREN, Sir Christopher, v. 249.
WRIGHT, Thomas, of Shrewsbury, v. 455, n. 1.
WRITERS. See AUTHORS.
WRITING,
Johnson's calculation about amount produced, ii. 344;
money, for, iii. 19, 162;
pleasure in it, iv. 219;
writing from one's own mind, ii. 344.
_Wronghead, Sir Francis_, ii. 50.
WURTZBURG, Bishopric of, v. 46, n. 1.
WYCHERLY, William, definition of wit, iii. 23, n. 3.
WYNNE, Colonel, v. 449.
WYNNE, Sir Thomas and Lady, v. 448, 449.
WYNNE, Mrs., v. 451.



X.

XAVIER, Francis, v. 392, n. 5.
XENOPHON,
delineation of characters in the _Anabasis_, iv. 31;
_Memorabilia_, iii. 367, w. 2; v. 414;
_Treatise of Oeconomy_, iii. 94.
XERXES,
described in Juvenal, ii. 228;
weeping at seeing his army, iii. 199.
XYLANDER, i. 208, n. 1.



Y.

YALDEN, Rev. Thomas,
Johnson adds him to the _Lives_, iii. 370;
his _Hymn to Darkness_, ib., n. 8.
YATES, Mr. Justice, i. 437, n. 2.
YAWNING, anecdote of, iii. 15.
YONGE, Sir William,
character, i. 197, n. 4;
_Epilogue to Irene_, i. 197;
pronunciation of _great_, ii. 161.
_Yorick's Sermons_, iv. 109, n. 1.
YORK, Address to the King, iv. 265; mentioned, iii. 439.
YORK, Archbishops of, their public dinners, iv. 367, n. 3.
See MARKHAM, Archbishop.
YORK, Duke of (James II), v. 239, n. 1.
YORK, Duke of,
goes to hear the Cock Lane ghost, i. 407, n. 1;
Johnson dedicates music to him, ii. 2;
kindness to Foote, iii. 97, n. 2.
YORK, House of, iii. 157.
YORKSHIRE, militia, i. 307, n. 4; iii. 362.
_You was_, iv. 196, n. 1.
YOUNG, Arthur,
Birmingham manufacturers in 1768, ii. 459, n. 1;
roads in the north of England, iii. 135, n. 1;
mentioned, iii. 161, n. 2.
YOUNG, Dr. Edward,
blank verse of _Night Thoughts_, iv. 42, n. 7, 60;
Britannia's daughters and Bedlam, ii. 374, n. 1;
_Brunetta and Stella_, v. 270;
_Card, The_, ridiculed in, v. 270, n. 4;
Cheyne, Dr., iii. 27, n. 1;
compared with Shakespeare and Dryden, ii. 86, n. 1;
_Conjectures on Original Composition_, v. 269;
critics, defies, ii. 61, n. 4;
'death-bed a detector of the heart,' v. 397, n. 1;
epigram on Lord Stanhope, iv. 102, n. 4;
'For bankrupts write,' &c., iii. 434, n. 6;
gloomy, how far, iv. 59, 120;
'Good breeding sends the satire,' &c., iv. 298;
housekeeper, his, v. 270;
Johnson and Boswell visit his house, iv. 119-21;
Johnson calls him 'a great man,' iv. 120;
describes meeting him, v. 269;
_Dictionary_, cited in, iv. 4, n. 3;
estimate of his poetry, ii. 96; iv. 60; v. 269 - 70;
knotting, on, iii. 242, n. 3;
knowledge not great, v. 269, n. 3;
Langton's account of him, iv. 59;
_Life_ by Croft, iv. 58; v. 270, n. 4;
_Love of Fame_, v. 270;
Mead, Dr., compliments, iii. 355, n. 2;
_Night Thoughts_, ii. 96; iv. 60-1; v. 270;
'Nor takes her tea,' &c., iii. 324, n. 3;
'O my coevals,' in. 307;
preferment, pined for, iii. 251; iv. 121;
quotations, iv. 102, n. 1;
'quotidian prey,' v. 346;
_Rambler_, his copy of the, i. 215;
'Small sands the mountain,' &c., iii. 164;
sundial, iv. 60;
_Universal Passion_,
money received for it lost in the _South Sea_, iv. 121;
'Words all in vain pant,' &c., iv. 25, n. 3.
YOUNG, Mr. (Dr. Young's son),
Boswell and Johnson visit him, iv. 119-21;
quarrel with his father, v. 270.
YOUNG, Professor, of Glasgow, imitates Johnson's style, iv. 392.
YOUNG PEOPLE,
generous sentiments, i. 445;
Johnson loves their acquaintance, i. 445.
YOUTH,
companions of our, iv. 147;
scenes, i. 370; ii. 461, n. 1; v. 450.
_Yvery, History of the House of_, iv. 198.



Z.

ZECK, George and Luke, ii. 7.
ZECKLERS, ii. 7 n. 3.
ZEILA, i. 88.
ZELIDE, ii. 56, n. 2.
ZENOBIA, ii. 127, n. 3.
_Zobeide_, iii. 38.
ZOFFANI, J., iv. 421, n. 2.
ZON, Mr., i. 274.
ZOZIMA, i. 223.




DICTA PHILOSOPHI.

A CONCORDANCE OF JOHNSON'S SAYINGS.


ABANDON. 'Sir, a man might write such stuff for ever, if he would
abandon his mind to it,' iv. 183.

ABSTRACT. 'Why, Sir, he fancies so, because he is not accustomed
to abstract,' ii. 99.

ABSURD. 'When people see a man absurd in what they understand, they
may conclude the same of him in what they do not understand,' ii. 466.

ABUSE. 'Warburton, by extending his abuse, rendered it ineffectual,'
v. 93;
'They may be invited on purpose to abuse him,' ii. 362;
'You _may_ abuse a tragedy, though you cannot write one,' i. 409.

ACCELERATION. 'You cannot conceive with what acceleration I advance
towards death,' iv. 411.

_Accommodé_. 'J'ai accommodé un dîner qui faisait trembler toute la
France' (recorded by Boswell), v. 310, n. 3.

ACTION. 'Action may augment noise, but it never can enforce
argument,' ii. 211.

ADMIRATION. 'Very near to admiration is the wish to admire,'
iii. 411, n. 2.

AGAIN. 'See him again' (Beauclerk), iv. 197.

ALIVE. 'Are we alive after all this satire?' iv. 29.

ALMANAC. 'Then, Sir, you would reduce all history to no better than
an almanac' (Boswell), ii. 366.

AMAZEMENT. 'His taste is amazement,' ii. 41, n. 1.

AMBASSADOR. 'The ambassador says well,' iii. 411.

AMBITION. 'Every man has some time in his life an ambition to be a
wag,' iv. 1, n. 2.

AMERICAN. 'I am willing to love all mankind, except an American,'
iii. 290.

AMUSEMENTS. 'I am a great friend to public amusements,' ii. 169.

ANCIENTS. 'The ancients endeavoured to make physic a science and
failed; and the moderns to make it a trade and have succeeded'
(Ballow), iii. 22, n. 4.

ANGRY. 'A man is loath to be angry at himself,' ii. 377.

ANTIQUARIAN. 'A mere antiquarian is a rugged being,' iii. 278.

APPLAUSE. 'The applause of a single human being is of great
consequence,' iv. 32.

ARGUES. 'He always gets the better when he argues alone' (Goldsmith),
ii. 236.

ARGUMENT. 'Sir, I have found you an argument, but I am not obliged
to find you an understanding,' iv. 313;
'Nay, Sir, argument is argument,' iv. 281;
'All argument is against it; but all belief is for it,' iii. 230;
'Argument is like an arrow from a cross-bow' (Boyle), iv. 282.

ASINUS. 'Plus negabit unus asinus in una hora quam centum philosophi
probaverint in centum annis,' ii. 268, n. 2.

ASPIRED. 'If he aspired to meanness his retrograde ambition was
completely gratified,' v. 148, n. 1.

ATHENIAN. 'An Athenian blockhead is the worst of all blockheads,' i. 73.

ATTACKED. 'I would rather be attacked than unnoticed,' iii. 375.

ATTENTION. 'He died of want of attention,' ii. 447.

ATTITUDENISE. 'Don't _attitudenise_,' iv. 323.

ATTORNEY. 'Now it is not necessary to know our thoughts to tell that
an attorney will sometimes do nothing,' iii. 297;
'He did not care to speak ill of any man behind his back, but he
believed the gentleman was an attorney,' ii. 126.

AUCTION-ROOM. 'Just fit to stand at the door of an auction-room with a
long pole, and cry "Pray gentlemen, walk in,"' ii. 349.

AUDACITY. 'Stubborn audacity is the last refuge of guilt,' ii. 292, n. 1.

AUTHORS. 'Authors are like privateers, always fair game for one another,'
iv. 191, n. 1;
'The chief glory of every people arises from its authors,' v. 137, n. 2.

AVARICE. 'You despise a man for avarice, but do not hate him,' iii. 71.


B.

BABIES. 'Babies do not want to hear about babies,' iv. 8, n. 3.

BAITED. 'I will not be baited with _what_ and _why_,' iii. 268.

BANDY. 'It was not for me to bandy civilities with my Sovereign,' ii. 35.

BARK. 'Let him come out as I do and bark,' iv. 161, n. 3.

BARREN. 'He was a barren rascal,' ii. 174.

BAWDY. 'A fellow who swore and talked bawdy,' ii. 64.

BAWDY-HOUSE. 'Sir, your wife, under pretence of keeping a bawdy-house,
is a receiver of stolen goods,' iv. 26.

BEAST. 'He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being
a man,' ii. 435, n. 7.

BEAT. 'Why, Sir, I believe it is the first time he has _beat_; he may
have been _beaten_ before,' ii. 210.

BEATEN. 'The more time is beaten, the less it is kept' (Rousseau), iv.
283, n. 1.

BELIEF. 'Every man who attacks my belief ... makes me uneasy; and I
am angry with him who makes me uneasy,' iii. 10.

BELIEVE. 'We don't know _which_ half to believe,' iv. 178.

BELL. 'It is enough for me to have rung the bell to him' (Burke), iv. 27.

BELLOWS. 'So many bellows have blown the fire, that one wonder she
is not by this time become a cinder,' ii. 227.

BELLY. 'I look upon it that he who does not mind his belly will hardly
mind anything else,' i. 467.

BENEFIT. 'When the public cares the thousandth part for you that it
does for her, I will go to your benefit too,' ii. 330.

BIG. 'Don't, Sir, accustom yourself to use big words for little
matters,' i. 471.

BIGOT. 'Sir, you are a bigot to laxness,' v. 120.

BISHOP. 'A bishop has nothing to do at a tippling-house,' iv. 75;
'I should as soon think of contradicting a Bishop,' iv. 274;
'Queen Elizabeth had learning enough to have given dignity to a
bishop,' iv. 13;
'Dull enough to have been written by a bishop' (Foote), ib. n. 3.

BLADE. 'A blade of grass is always a blade of grass,' v. 439, n. 2.

BLAZE. 'The blaze of reputation cannot be blown out, but it often
dies in the socket,' iii. 423.

BLEEDS. 'When a butcher tells you that his heart bleeds for his
country he has in fact no uneasy feeling,' i. 394.

BLOOM. 'It would have come out with more bloom if it had not been
seen before by anybody,' i. 185.

BLUNT. 'There is a blunt dignity about him on every occasion' (Sir
M. Le Fleming), i. 461, n. 4.

BOARDS. 'The most vulgar ruffian that ever went upon _boards_'
(Garrick), ii. 465.

BOLDER. 'Bolder words and more timorous meaning, I think, never
were brought together,' iv. 13.

_Bon-mot_. 'It is not every man that can carry a _bon-mot_'
(Fitzherbert), ii. 350.

BOOK. 'It was like leading one to talk of a book when the author is
concealed behind the door,' i. 396;
'You have done a great thing when you have brought a boy to have
entertainment from a book,' iii. 385;
'Read diligently the great book of mankind,' i. 464;
'The parents buy the books, and the children never read them,'
iv. 8, n. 3;
'The progress which the understanding makes through a book has more
pain than pleasure in it,' iv. 218;
'It is the great excellence of a writer to put into his book as much
as his book will hold,' ii. 237.

BOOKSELLER. 'An author generated by the corruption of a bookseller,'



Online LibraryJames BoswellLife of Johnson, Volume 6 Addenda, index, dicta philosophi, etc → online text (page 42 of 46)