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ARTHUR T. PARKER
CLASS OF 1876



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation funding



http://www.archive.org/details/bowdoinorient11bowd




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VOLUME XI.



EDITORIAL BOARD.

Akthur G. Staples, Managing Editor.
Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy,

William A. Moody, Warken O. Plimpton.

Charles H. Gilman, Business Editor.
/




BOWDOIN COLLEGE,

BRUNSWICK, MAINE.

1881-2.



PRINTED AT THE JOURNAL OFFICE, LEWISTON, MAINE.



INDEX TO VOLUME XI.



American Novel, The 166

Athletic Association Meeting (College Items) 10

Base-Ball 47, 58, 77, 87'

Base-Ball Nine, Trip of 18

Base-Ball Meeting 86

Boating Meeting 86

Boat Eaee 45

Bowdoin Stories 6

Chapel Bell's Story, The 119

Choice of an Occupation 82

Class Day Oration 68

Class Day Exercises 71

Clippings... 11, 23, 35, 49, 61, 78,89, 101, 113,

124, 137, 148, 161, 172, 184, 196

College Items.. 9, 20, 32, 43, 56, 75, 85, 98, 111,

121, 135, 147, 158, 170, 183, 194, 207

College World.. .11, 22, 34, 49, 60, 88, 100, 113

Commencement, The 79th 73

Convention, Alpha Delta Phi 42

Delta Kappa Epsilon 95

Psi Upsilon 41

Theta Delta Chi 109

ZetaPsi 147

Death of More 107

Driven to Death 202

Edgar Allan, Poe 1 78

Editorial Notes.. .1, 13, 25, 37, 51, 63, 79, 91,

103, 115, 127, 139, 151, 163, 175, 187, 199

Editors' Table.. 12, 23, 35, 49, 61, 90, lOi, 114,

125, 137, 149, 101, 173, 185, 177, 209

E.xtract.s from Exchanges 28

Exhibition, Senior and Junior 136, 208

Field Day 46

Heart of Gray lock, Tlie 189

Inter-Collegiate Rowing 156



Intemperance, Its Causes and Effects 55

Ivy Day Exercises 44

Ivy Leavings 43

Lake George Boat Race, Concerning the

Proposed 205

John Lothrop Motley 190

Modern Rip, A 109

Mystery of Baroko and Bokardo 167

Night of Horror, A 181

Necrology, '80-81 77

Our Platitudes 204

Personals 10, 22, 34, 48, 58, 77, 87, 100,

112, 124, 136, 147, 160, 172, 184, 195, 208

Race, Bowdoin Fall

Rank in College 142

Reading 106

Reveries 129

Reviews 50

Resolutions , 10, 78, 146, 160

Romance, A 94

Sophomore and Freshman Games 87

Spencer 5

Sphinx of Fate 118

Sunday Services 71

Table of Averages 31

Then and Now 190

Thoreau 17

"Two Voyages 142

Type of College Life, A 131

Valentine, A 180

Walt Whitman 54

When Greek Meets Greek 130

COMMUNICATIONS.

Against Music During Study Hours 167

An Anecdote 31



IV



INDEX.



PAGE

Base-Ball 96

Boating Prospects 193

Bugle Editors 110

Bugle Election 32

Cast of Byron Offered to the Collection 20

College Song Book

Compulsory Chapel 83

Compulsory Chapel, Reply to 96

French 133

Freshmen Excuses 157

Gymnasium 182

Gymnasium, Expedients for 121

Historical Matter in Library 68

Opening of Library Sunday Afternoons 157

Orient, Criticism on 206

Reading Room, Care of 31

Reading Room, Magazines 8

Wliat We Would Lilve to Know 8



PAGE
POETRY.

Alpheus Spring Packard 189

Anna 16

Auf Wiedersehen 28

Awakening Life 30

Class Day Poem 66

Evening Prayers in Chapel 53

Golden Rod 81

Ivy Poem 40

Miss Vesta 42

My Messenger 56

New Meaning to Give and Take, A 5

"Poem" 93

Reflection 129

Rondeau 1 65

Senior's Vision, The 178

Soldier, The 118

Unrest 141

Opera — •' Hand-Downs " 153



Vol. XI.



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 2T, 1881.



No. 1.



A CLKAR, STEADY LIGHT the STUDENT'S
COMFORT AND NECESSITY.

The ''Argand Library,"

AND THE ADOTLTSTABLE HAJfGIXG

SATISFY ALL DEMANDS.

Try the new"Oxford" and "iVIoehring" Burners

IN PLACE OF THE OLD KINDS.

ROOM FITTINGS IN VARIETY FOR SALE.

JOHN FURBISH.



Books, Statiooeff, and Paper Haopgs,

53 Exchange Street, PORTLAIVD, ME.

BLANK BOOKS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY



*v.«ll§f-*^«.



* SPRING STYLES *

OF

Nobby Stiff and Soft Hats

JXTST JEt:E;C3:EI"VE!X>.

NEW STYLES in LINEN COLLARS & CUFFS.
NEW PATTERNS in NECK- WEAR.



FINE ASSORTMENT OF



SPRING OVERCOATS AND SUITS,

AT

ELLIOT'S, Opposite Town Clock.
FRi^N'K: E. ROBERTS

Has the Largest and Beat Assortment of Gentlemen's

Boots, Shoes, Rubbers, and Slippers

Corner of Main and Mason Streets.




CilllTIOli TO SMOKllS.

Be^vare of Imitations and Counterfeits.

Examine each Cigarette ; see that every wrapper has

New Cigarette, ^.^^ff
The VETERAN, -^^^'



TRY IT.
^^' Fine, Mild i Sweet,

Fac simile Signature on it No Bogus Patented Sub-
stitutes or flavoring used in our genuine brands.

KINNEY TOBACCO CO., N. Y.

SOLD BY ALL DETLLEES THROUGHOUT THE WOULD.

FOR YOUR

NOBBY HAT

Go or Send to

MERRY, The Hatter,

237 Middle Street, PORTLAND.

SIGN OF THE GOLD HAT.



LORING, SHORT & HARMON,

PORTLAND,

Visiting, Class Cards and Monograms

EKGEAVED IN THE MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE.

FRENCH and ENGLISH STATIONERY

AGENOY rOR



UNDER FALMOUTH HOTEL.



JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC.,

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEST QUALITY, AND LOWEST PRICES,

521 Congress Street, cor. Casco,

PORTLAND, _ _ _ _ MAINE.
A. CARTER. J. W. D. CARTER.



BOWDOIN ORIENT.



BOWDOIN COLLEGE.



A reorganization of the Course of Instruction
has recently been made, in which the distinction be-
tween Classical and Scientific Courses is not main-
tained, but all academic undergraduates are placed
on one footing, with the opportunity of following, to
a considerable extent, such lines of study as they
prefer.

All students entering the College proper, are ex-
amined on the same course of preparatory studies.
After the second year a liberal range of electives is
offered, within which a student may follow his choice
to the extent of one-quarter of the whole amount
pursued.

The so-called scientific studies, formerly treated
as a distinct course, are still, for the most part, re-
tained either in the required or elective lists. More
place is also given to the Modern Languages than
they have hitherto had.

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is given to all
who complete the Academic Course.

The Engineering Department remaius as here-
tofore, and facilities are offered for study of the
various branches of this science. The means of
theoretical instruction are ample, and the town of
Brunswick being one of the principal railroad cen-
tres in the State, and in the immediate vicinity of
many important public works, afibrds excellent
opportunities for the study of actual structures.
The College also enjoys many favors from the United
States Coast Survey Office. The admission is the
same as to the Academic Department, omitting the
Greek, except that a full equivalent in French will
be taken, if desired, in the place of Latin.

Tho.se who complete satisfactorily the four years'
course in engineering will receive tlie Degree of Sc.
B. Tho.se who complete a two years' course of ad-
vanced study will receive the Degree of Civil or
Mechanical Engineer. Students not candidates for
a degree will be received at any stage for which an
examination shall show them to be fitted, and may
remain for any desired time. Further information
will be furnished on application to Professor G. L.
Voso.

Terms of Admission to the Academic Course.

Applicants for admission will bo exaiuiucd in the

following subjects :

Latin. — Latin Grammar, including Prosody; Writ-
ing Latin (.T) Lessons in Allen'.s Latin Coniiiosi-
tion are rccomincnded as indicaliiig the amount
required for examination) ; Virgil, the Bucolics,
Gcorgics, and six books of theiEucid; Cicero,
seven Orations ; Sallust.

GuKKic — IIa<lley'K Greek Grammar; Xenophon's
Anabasis, four books, and Homer's Iliad, two
book.s; Jones's Greek Prose Composition.

Ancient Gkoijuai-iiy.

Mathematics — Arithmetic, including Connnon



and Decimal Fractions, Interest, Square Root

and the Metric System ; Algebra, through Equa-
tions of the Second Degree ; Geometry, Books

I. and III. of Loomis's Geometry.

Real equivalents for any of the foregoing require-
ments will be accepted. All applicants for admission
will be required to produce testimonials of good
moral character. The time for examination is the
Friday after Commencement and the first Thursday
of the first term. In exceptional cases applicants
may be examined at other times. Candidates for
admission to advanced classes will be examined in
the studies which such classes have accomplished.

The Faculty are also ready to make arrange-
ments with the Principals of schools and academies
having a regular course preparatory for college of at
least three years' duration, whereby their pupils
may be examined for admission to college at their
respective schools, in connection with their own
final examinations.

The amount of instruction now offered and pos-
sible to be taken in the several principal lines of
study is exhibited comparatively, or reduced to one
scale in the following manner. This is, however,
only approximate, as the terms are of unequal
length :

Latin, eight terms.

Greek, eight terms.

Mathematics, eight terms.

German, four and a half terms.

English (including Anglo-Saxon), and English
Literature, three and a half terms.

French, three terms.

Italian, one term.

Spanish, one term.

Rhetoric (formal), one term. Rhetorical and
Forensic exercises, equivalent to two and a
half terms.

Natural History studies, five and a half terms.

Physics and Astronomy, four terms.

Chemistry, four terms.

History, Ancient and Modern, two terras.

Political Economy, one and a half terms.

Public Law, two terms.

Mental and Moral Philosophy, including Logic,
four terms.

Christian Evidences, one term.

Expenses.

The annual expenses are as follows : Tuition, $75.
Room rent (half), average, $2,5. Incidentals, $10.
Total regular College charges, $110.

Board is obtained in town at $:i toi $4 a week.
Other necessary expenses will probably amount to
$40 a year. Students can, however,' by forming
clubs under good management, very materially
lesson the cost of living.

Further information on application to the Presi-
dent.



Vol. XI.



BRUNSWICK, MAINE, APRIL 27, 1881.



No. 1.



BOWDOIN ORIENT.



PUBLISHED EVERY ALTERNATE WEDNESDAY, DURING THE
COLLEGIATE TEAR, BY THE CLASS OF '82, OF

BOWDOIJNT COLLEGE.

EDITORIAL BOARD.

AHTHtTR G. Staples, Managing Editor.

Charles H. Gjlman, Business Editor.

Melvin S. Holway, Eugene T. McCarthy,

"William A. Moody, Warren 0. Plimpton,

George G. Weeks.

Terms — $2.00 a year in advance ; single copies, 15 cents.

Remittances should be made to the Business Editor. Communicationa
in regard to all other matters should be directed to the Managing Editor.

Students and Alumni of the college are cordially invited to contribute
articles, personals, and items. Contributions must be accompanied by the
writer's real name.

Entered at the Post Office at Brunswick as Second Class mail matter.



CONTENTS.
Tol. XI., No. ].— April 27, ]881.

Editorial Notes X

Literary :

A New Meaning to " Give and Tal<e" (poem) 5

Spenser 5

Bowdoin Stories 6

The Soldier (poem) 7

Communications :

Magazines, etc 8

What We Would Like to Know 8

College Items 9

Personal 10

College World 11

Clippings 11

Editors' Table 12



EDITORIAL HOTES.



We cautiously make tlie remark that the
Orient has with this issue entered upon an-
other year of intellectual existence. The
first decennial of the Orient has come and
gone and we usher in the eleventh volume.
We propose to make no extended salutatory ;
no settled number of promises. We don't
promise to improve the Orient. We don't
promise even to maintain its present standard;
but we humbly step into the arena, figura-



tively roll up our shirt sleeves, and go to
work. We are sorry for you, but you will be
obliged to wait to learn the future of the
Orient. We can't tell you. We only
promise you our best endeavors, and hope,
as our lowest aim, to transmit the Orient to
our successors alive and well, as healthy upon
its next birthday as it is to-da3% and as true
an exponent of Bowdoin's interests as it was
when we received it. To this end we labor.
If we can make the Orient brighter, we
shall be happy. If we can make it more in-
fluential and a better index of our college, we
shall be happy. But, failing in this, we can
still lay the flattering unction to our souls
that we have done the best we could, and
more we could not do. To this end we earn-
estly request your aid and co-operation; if
not these, then your passive good-will and
above all, your criticism.

So then, with hands joined to the work,
with desires and ambitions in unison, the pres-
ent board of editors salute you. And, as
they come before the foot-lights with their
lowest bow, they beg your tenderest care and
cheeriest good-mornings towards the first-
born of Vol. XI.



The world of college publication is new to
us and presents, apparently, a very pleasant,
busy world of earnest workers. The only
evident commotion is between the Acta and
the Record, but as we are rather late in the
day and fresh in the business, we refrahi from
drawing the evident moral.



In the beginning we wish to be under-
stood. We don't wish to make the Orient
the organ of seven, and only seven students.



BOWDOIN ORIENT.



You will agree to the reasonableness of this
desire. The Orient is the property of stu-
dents, instructors, alumni, for the expression
of anything worthy of expression, and con-
tributions, articles, verses, indicative of liter-
ary ability, will serve to give the Orient a
"brace" and make it a better representative
of Bowdoin.



The present number of the Orient is
sent to many of our friends and alumni.
We only represent that the Orient is the
organ of the college, and that to all who have
an interest in their Ahna Mater, the success
of the Orient should be a matter of some
importance. We would like the assistance of
the alumni in many ways, pecuniarily and in
the shape of contributions and articles of in-
terest; and to this end we hopefully invite
your attention.



It cannot be denied that Bowdoin labors
under a disadvantage. The climate of Maine
is not tropical, with its snow storms in the
middle of April, and with a river ice-bound
and unfit for rowing until the robins come in
May, almost. The snow storm of April 14th
had a chilling effect upon sports. It com-
pletely stopped all base-ball practice, and in-
sinuated to the ambitious oarsmen that it was
just as well to sit down and wait until the
New England climate sliould be propitious.
As late as April 20th, the base-ball ground is
entirely unfit for practice, and the water in
the Androscoggin is of a temperature consid-
erably less than boiling.

We notice a remark in a recent issue of
the Harvard Crimson, to the effect that their
grounds were in a perfect condition for sports
of all kinds. The proposed base-ball game
with the Harvards suggested the above re-
marks, and in view of this game we only call
attention to the bad condition of our own
grounds, as an evident cause for any poor
playing which the nine may indulge in.



What will the students say to a new de-
parture? The Orient, in its new dignity,
would like to take an office, and with the aid
of the students sees no reason why it cannot.
The proposed scheme is not for a private
office where the board of editors shall sit in
secret conclave, but for a pleasant room, if
possible, where every one can have access to
the Orient file, and where the latest ex-
changes can be seen and read. There is, and
always has been, a comi^lete isolation on the
part of the students from outside news, we
mean college news, and a plan removing this
objectionable feature would, we think, be
very beneficial. The activity in sports ren-
ders college papers more interesting every
day. There is a charming room for this pur-
pose opposite the reading-room, if it could be
obtained, which, with the pecuniary aid of the
students, could be fitted up and rendered ex-
tremely serviceable.



One of the events of the week was the
beginning of work on Memorial Hall. The
approach of a strong force of three stone
masons, the appearance of a dinner i)ail in the
vicinity of the building, and the extreme ac-
tivity of Mr. Booker, could not fail to im-
press every one that the gigantic work had at
length begun. We have muchly wondered
what those four sticks of wood meant that
lay for some time between Memorial Hall and
the Cleaveland Building, and this wonder
was strengthened greatly by the fact tliat
two weeks ago we saw a seedy-looking indi-
vidual gazing thoughtfully at the massive
proportions of this unfinished building. But
we are settled to-day in our mind that the
work has already begun. We trust that these
three stone masons won't be violent with the
Hall, because we all have very tender emotions
towards the buildinsr.



The edict of the Faculty has gone forth
to the effect that we arc not to be permitted



BOWDOIN ORIENT.



to observe Memorial Day, May 30, as a holi-
day. The reason for thus depriving us of a
customary holiday was not stated, onl}' inas-
much as the Faculty objects to the manner in
which the day is usually spent by the stu-
dents. Even this reason, supposing that the
day be passed in a most objectionable manner
by a few of the students and in idleness by
the rest, would not serve to mark it from the
majority of holidays and would not, we think,
warrant its denial.

We are sorry. The students must, with
honest sorrow, see their holidays float away
into the unceasing whirlpool of hard work.
Washington's Birthday and Memorial Day are
already gone. Fast Day and Day of Prayer are
rapidly losing their grip, and if the term
were in session at that time, we should to a
moral certainty lose our Fourth of July. We
must be martyrs to the march of progress,
however. As college youths we must out-
grow such plebian joys as remembering our
soldier dead, and attend strictly to business,
while the great world in general marches rev-
erently to the cemetery and lays its tributes
of love upon the graves of the country's
defenders.



Mr. Johnson's endeavors to start a col-
lection of statuary here in Bowdoin have met
with success. The statuar}- arrived during
vacation. We were not present when it did
arrive, but our representative was on the
scene, and can tell a thrilling tale of the un-
packing. The collection, as far as it goes, is
excellent, and we consider that the thanks of
the college and town are due to Mr. John-
son for his exertions in thus endeavoring to
plant here the germ of an art collection.
We were permitted to view the collection.
It consists of plaster casts, admirably executed,
of the following masterpieces, " Apollo Belve-
dere," " Diana, the Huntress," " Venus of
Milo," Head of Jupiter, Otricoli, Head of Juno.
The Oeient is not sufficiently cesthetique to



attempt to criticise. Our art editor is unwell
and we couldn't find another,but we are assured
that the casts are excellent and well worthy
the earnest study of every one. In fact every
student in the college should feel it the high-
est privilege to be thus enabled to see like-
nesses of the greatest masterpieces. They
are in the north wing of the chapel, and will
be ready for inspection in a short time.



We are happy to be able to state that the
Faculty has kindly permitted the Junior class
the two days, Thursday and Friday, June
2d and 3d, for the ivy holidays. The last
issue of the Okibnt briefly noted the pro-
posed change in the usual plan of the spring
holidays, but failed, we think, to state the ex-
act reasons why this change was proposed,
and how it will be of advantage. An exam-
ination of the last Ivy Number of the Obient
will bring to light tiie chief reason why this
change was undertaken. We can't afford to
treat our friends to an overwhelming defeat
on every recurring Ivy Day, and this the
Oeient of that date expressly states. It
also states that the cause of this defeat is the
preceding sports, and especially the Ivy Hop,
which unfit the base-ball men for good play-
ing. For this reason they must either not
dance or not play base-ball. It is impossible
to have the hop Saturday evening, and for
this reason chiefly the days were changed.
The plan has other advantages. The sports
are arranged better and the Ivy Exercises
and Ivy Hop, coming in afternoon and even-
ing of the same day, renders the presence of
ladies and tlieir entertainment better assured
than formerly, when the most interesting feat-
ures were sandwiched in between a Field
Day at Topsham and a Boat Race on the
river.

By this means the friends of the class
from out the state and from " over east,"
can come and go without being compelled to
remain over the Sabbath in Brunswick. The



BOWDOIN ORIENT.



conclusion that the attendance will be less on
these two daj^s than on Friday and Saturdaj',
is open to debate. The ability of business
men to leave business better on Saturday
than on Thursday, is open to the gravest
doubt, and at best a matter of conjecture.
We think that the Okient is quite unable to
assert that there will be fewer people here on
Thursday and Friday than on Friday and
Saturday, from any such reason. We have
every faith in this new plan, and trust that it
will have its desired result in the first Ivy
Day victory at Base-Ball within the memory
of the present undergraduates.



Verily college youths are progressing in
public esteem. From* grim sarcasm and
unremittent attempts at extermination the
Philadelphia American has emerged into a
better condition. During the past few weeks,
circulars have been distributed to the various
colleges, inviting college graduates and under-
graduates to compete for prizes, as tests of
practical journalism. The prizes offered are
twenty-one in number, aggregating $1,500,
and are given for the best editorials, essays
and poems. We have been requested to call
the attention of the college to this plan. If
any of you have any ability in editorial com-
position, essay writing, or in versification j^ou
are requested to lay the fruits of your inspi-
ration before the thirsting world. You are
offered every encouragement. If j'ou don't
draw a prize you are at least made famous,
since, if your article soars to the standard of
the American, you are certain of havino- it
published and paid for. The judges of this
competition are men eminently fitted for the
position. With respect to tliis scheme for
reaching tlie minds and capacities of college
undergraduates, we have not mucli to say.
The plan, to our mind, is worlliy of encour-
agemcnl. In a strictly monetary point of
view it is somewhat reprehensible perliaps,
bvit no one can for a moment doubt tliat its



ultimate object is excellent and that its effect
upon college men will be in the highest de-
gree praiseworthjr.

Any plan which can offer an inducement
to college men to shake off slothfulness, go
to work, and endeavor to test the capacity of
their intellect is, we think, praiseworthy.
There is too much drifting in college, as there
is in life. The student, who doesn't display a
natural aptitude for literature and composi-
tion, makes no endeavors in that direction,
and this state is, for the most part, produced
by college methods. According to the Record,
a student of Yale recently remarked that he
could, with a sufficiency of pens, ink, and
paper, learn to write as well in the Desert of
Sahara as in Yale College. He ascribed it to
the fact that they write and receive their
essays again without a word of comment or
criticism. Such is not the state in Bowdoin
to-day, but we are informed that it has been
in the past.

In a general sense, custom has made the
remark of tiie Yale man applicable to Bow-
doin. Even the customary letters are not
half written. As the Professor of Rhetoric
says, you scribble a sheet and sign " Yours
in haste, etc." Letter writing is not an infe-
rior kind of composition. Emerson says :
" The experience of writing letters is the
modus of inspiration. When we have ceased
to have any fullness of thought, that once
made a diary a joy as well as a necessity, and
have come to believe that an image or a
happy turn of expression is no longer at our
command, in writing a letter to a friend we
may find that we rise to thought and to a
cordial power of expression that causes no
effort." Yet in this respect, as in all others,
man}' of us arc lacking, and it is to obviate
this difficulty, encourage composition, and
discover the ability of college men, that the
American makes tliis offer. To such as liave
no desire to excel in writing, the proposal of



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