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Special Note: Students can receive credit for more than one of COSCI 12a, 13b
(13bR), 14a (14aR) only with prior written permission from the chairman of the Com-
puter Science Concentration.

COSCI 5a (PHSCI 5a) Freshman Seminar: Machines, Languages and Minds:
Meaning and Symbol Processing in Computational,
Formal, and Natural Systems

COSCI 12a (PHYS 12a) Introduction to Computers

COSCI 13b, bR (PHYS 13b, bR) Problem Solving with Computers (BASIC)

COSCI 14a,aR (PHYS 14a,aR) Problem Solving with Computers (FORTRAN)

COSCI 15a (PHYS 15a) Introduction to Computer Science

COSCI 15b (PHYS 15b) Fundamentals of Data Structures
*COSCI 22b (PHYS 22b) Computer Simulation and Feedback Systems

COSCI 24a Systems Programming

COSCI 27b General Introduction to Programming Languages

COSCI 28a Algorithms and Data Structures

COSCI 32a (PHYS 32a) Logic Circuits and Computer Design Laboratory

COSCI 32b (PHYS 32b) Microprocessors

COSCI 33b (PHYS 33b) Numerical Methods

COSCI 34a Computer Architecture

COSCI 35aR Formal Languages and Syntactic Analysis

COSCI 36aR (PHYS 36aR) Analysis of Algorithms

COSCI 45a Advanced Projects I

COSCI 45b Advanced Projects II

COSCI 52b LISP and Heuristic Programming
*COSCI 53a Artificial Intelligence and Natural Language Processing

COSCI 97a,b Tutorial in Computer Science

COSCI 98a,b Readings in Computer Science

COSCI 99 Senior Research
♦COSCI 151a (MATH 151a) Theory of Recursive Functions

ECONOMICS

Professor F. Trenery Dolbear, Jr., Chairman; Professors Joseph S. Berliner****
(Advising Head), Anne P. Carter, Robert Evans, Jr., Richard S. Weekstein; Associate
Professor Barney K. Schwaiberg*; Assistant Professors Yale M. Braunstein, Randall K.
Filer, Peter A. Petri***; Instructors Lawrence B. Pulley, Daniel Richards (Spring
Term); Lecturer James Diggins (Fall Term).
* On Leave Fall Term 1979-80
** On Leave Spring Term 1979-80
**• On Leave A.Y. 1979-80
**** Half-Time Leave A.Y. 1979-80



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Requirements for Concentration

1. ECON 2a and 8b. A grade of C- or higher is required in these courses.

2. ECON 80a, 82b, and 83.

3. Four elective courses in Economics. ECON 98 and ECON 99 may not be used to
meet this requirement.

Advisers: Every concentrator is assigned an academic adviser who should be consulted
about selection of economics electives and sequencing of courses.

Mathematics and Computer Science: Many students find calculus, linear algebra and
computer programming useful preparation for advanced economics courses. See adviser
for information on which courses are appropriate.

ECON 2a,aR Introduction to Economics

ECON 8b,bR Analysis of Economic Problems

ECON 12a Managerial Accounting
*ECON 22a American Economic History

ECON 24aR The Soviet Economy

ECON 27bR The Economy of Japan

ECON 32bR Comparative Systems

ECON 34aR (SOWEL 3.54) Economics of the Public Sector

ECON 37aR The Political Economy of Cities

ECON 44b Economics of the Arts

ECON 45b (POL 122b) PoUcy Analysis and Policy Implementation
*ECON 54b Economic Aspects of Medical Care
*ECON 57a The Economics of Environment and Resources

ECON 59b Economics of Education

ECON 71a Financial Markets

ECON 74bR Law and Economics

ECON 75aR The Economics of Underdeveloped Countries

ECON 76bR Labor Economics
*ECON 78b Income Maintenance Programs and Policies

ECON 80a, aR Microeconomic Theory

ECON 82b, bR Macroeconomic Theory

ECON 83a,aR Statistics for Economic Analysis

ECON 84b Econometrics
*ECON 85b Input Output Analysis
*ECON 86b Quantitative Models of the Economy
*ECON 89a Introduction to Mathematical Economics

ECON 97c (ENVST 97c) Seminar on the Environment

ECON 98a,b Independent Study

ECON 99 Senior Research
*ECON 133a Public Choice
*ECON 134b The Public Sector
*ECON 135a Industrial Organization
*ECON 136b Managerial Economics

ECON 141bR The Economics of Technological Change
*ECON 150b Social Economics
*ECON 151a The Economics of the Family
*ECON 160a International Trade



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ECON 168b The History of Economics

*ECON 169a Radical Economics (Through the Looking Glass)
*ECON 173b Inflation Seminar

ECON 179bR The Legal Regulation of Economic Activity

ECON 180aR Advanced Microeconomic Theory

ECON 182a Advanced Macroeconomics
*ECON 190b Advanced Topics in Economic Theory and PoHcy

EDUCATION PROGRAM

Peter D. Witt, Director

Education is not a field of concentration but a program that trains undergraduates
for elementary and secondary school teaching. It is also valuable for those planning
careers in related fields such as special education, counseling, clinical psychology, and
social work. In addition, some take the program simply as a worthwhile supplement to
their liberal education at Bran dels.

In response to impending new state certification regulations. Education Program
requirements are changing over the next two years. Following are the requirements, by
class, for the secondary (high school) and elementary programs:

SECONDARY

Class of 1980 (no change): PSYCH 5 and 115a or aR (prerequisites to student
teaching); an elective dealing with the problems of education; ED 102a concurrent with
ED llOaA (fall term of senior year).

Class of 1981: PSYCH 5 and 115a or aR (prerequisites to student teaching); ED 100b
in spring of junior year (prerequisite to student teaching); and elective dealing with the
problems of education, preferably SOC 152b; ED 102a concurrent with ED llOaA (fall
term of senior year). In addition, teachers of Social Studies should take HIST 51a (or
AMSTD 102a) and HIST 51b. Teachers of Enghsh should take LING lOOa.

Classes of 1982 and 1983: PSYCH 5, 115a or aR, and SOC 152b (prerequisites to
student teaching); ED 100b in spring of junior year (prerequisite to student teaching);
an elective deaUng with the problems of education; ED 102a concurrent with ED 1 lOaA
(fall term of senior year). In addition, teachers of Social Studies must take HIST 51a (or
AMSTD 102a) and HIST 51b. Teachers of Enghsh must take LING 100a.

ELEMENTARY

Class of 1980, and class of 1981 (student teaching as juniors): PSYCH 5, 1 15a or aR,

and ED 107a (prerequisites to student teaching); ED 101 concurrent, in spring term,
with ED lllbB (spring of junior or senior year).

Class of 1981 (student teaching as seniors), and classes of 1982 and 1983: PSYCH 5,
115a or aR, and ED 107a or aR (prerequisites to student teaching); ED 100a in fall of
junior year (prerequisite to student teaching); ED 101 concurrent, in spring term, with
ED lllbB Gunior or senior year).

Note: Beginning in 1980-81, ED 107a will become a second semester (spring) course
only. Therefore, students planning to take ED lllbB in the spring of 1981 must take
ED 107a or aR no later than spring of 1980.



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Students who cannot fulfill all the requirements but are nevertheless interested in
student teaching should consult the director about possible alternatives. However,
students who fail to complete one of the programs listed above will not be recommended
by Brandeis for Massachusetts certification.

ED 98a,b Individual Readings and Research in Education

ED 100b Introduction to Teaching in the Secondary School

ED 101 Elementary School Curriculum and Methods

ED 102a Seminar: Teaching in the Secondary School

ED 107a,aR (AAAS 107a,aR) Seminar: Teaching of Elementary Reading

and Educational Materials Workshop I
ED llOaA Practice Teaching: Secondary School
ED lllbB Practice Teaching: Elementary School



ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE

English and American Literature: Professor John H. Smith, Chairman; University
Professor J. V. Cunningham; Professors Allen Grossman, Milton Hindus**, Benjamin
B. Hoover (Director of Graduate Studies), Robert O. Preyer, Peter Swiggart, Aileen
Ward; Visiting Professors John Irving, Franlt T. Prince, Margaret Rey; Associate
Professors Michael T. Gilmore, Karen W. Klein (Director of Undergraduate Studies),
Alan Levitan**, Richard J. Onorato**, Susan Staves; Assistant Professors Judith
Ferster (Director of Freshman Writing), Philip Fisher, James B. Merod, Richard
Yanowitz (Mellon Scholar); Lecturers Judy Lee, Jonathan Loesberg (with rank of
Assistant Professor); Adjunct Instructor Kittredge Henchman-Locke; Writer-In-
Residence Alan Lelchuk**.

Linguistics: Professor Ray S. Jackendoff, Chairman; Assistant Professors Jane B.
Grimshaw*, Joan Mating.
* On Leave Fall Term 1979-80
** On Leave Spring Term 1979-80

Requirements for Concentration

MAIN TRACK

Eight semester courses are required, including the following:

(a) HUM la or b, which should be taken during the freshman year if possible;

(b) a semester course in literary method, ENG 1 la or aR, which must be taken during
the student's first year as an EngHsh major,

(c) one semester course in each of five different periods, chosen from the following
six, as identified by the course-numbering system described below:

(1) Medieval British literature (roughly before 1500)

(2) Renaissance British literature (circa 1500-1660)

(3) Restoration/Eighteenth-Century British or American literature
(circa 1660-1800)

(4) Nineteenth-Century British Hterature



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(5) Nineteenth-Century American literature

(6) Twentieth -Century British or American literature;
(d) one of the following senior options:

(1) the senior essay, ENG 99a or b

(2) a senior tutorial, courses numbered 91 -97a or b

(3) senior thesis, ENG 98

WRITING TRACK

Ten semester courses are required, which must include the following:

(a) HUM la or b, which should be taken during the freshman year if possible;

(b) a semester course in literary method, ENG 1 la or aR, which must be taken during
the student's first year as an English major;

(c) three semester courses in directed writing, ENG 109a or b, ENG 119a or b,
ENG 129a or b;

(d) one semester course in each of three different periods, chosen from the Main
Track list;

(e) senior thesis, ENG 98 to produce a body of writing of appropriate scope (two
semesters).

Students will be accepted into the program by three Department faculty members, at
least one of whom is tenured, who will judge a portfolio of writing submitted in the
sophomore year.

Students who choose the writing track are advised to complete the requirements for
the Main Track as well.

ENGLISH AND LINGUISTICS TRACK

Nine semester courses are required, including the following: any four periods from
the requirement listed above under (c) of the Main Track; any four semester courses in
Linguistics; and LING 99. Each program should be worked out in consultation with the
Linguistics Co-ordinator.

Except for courses in the 90-109 range, English Department courses are numbered
systematically. The final digit for any course number identifies the subject area, as
follows:

0- Courses in a literary genre

1- Courses in literary theory

2 -Medieval literature

3 -Renaissance literature

4 -Restoration/Eighteenth-Century British or American literature

5 -Nineteenth-Century British literature

6 -Nineteenth-Century American literature

7 -Twentieth-Century British or American literature

8 -Miscellaneous literary subjects

9 -Writing courses
Only one ENG 90a or b (Independent Study) semester course per semester may be
used to satisfy major requirements. Students planning to use ENG 90 courses to meet



85



concentration requirements should see the Director of Undergraduate Advising in the
Department of English and American Literature.

Honors: The Department awards honors to its concentrators on the basis of honor
work done in regular EngHsh courses, with special emphasis on the work done for the
senior option. No special program or project is required.

See also English and Classics.

BASIC COMPOSITION la

FRESHMAN WRITING SEMINAR la, aR
*ENG 3b The Seventeenth Century

ENG 4a The Eighteenth Century
*ENG 5a Writers in the Victorian Age

ENG 6a,aR (AMSTD 8a,aR) (HUM 4a,aR) American Literature from

1832 to 1900

ENG 7a,aR (AMSTD 9a,aR) (HUM 4b,bR) American Literature from

1900 to 1965
*ENG 8a Freshman Seminar: Art and Nature

ENG 9a,aR Advanced Writing Seminar

ENG 10b Poetry: A Basic Course

ENG lla,llaR Introduction to Literary Method

ENG 18a (HUM la) The Representation of Experience in the Western World
from Homer & Hesiod to Plato

ENG 28a Survey of English Literature, Part I

ENG 28b Survey of English Literature, Part II
*ENG 30a (HUM 13a) The Irrational in Literature

ENG 33a,b (THA 124a, 124b) Shakespeare
*ENG 37b (AMSTD 125b, THA 125b) History of American Drama: 1919-Present

ENG 38a (AMSTD 125a, THA 125a) History of American Drama: 1665-1919
*ENG 47a American Poetry 1890-1950

ENG 58a Existentialism and American Fiction
*ENG 60a Science Fiction and the Romantic Imagination

ENG 67bR Modern Poetry
*ENG 71a History of Literary Criticism

ENG 75bR The Nineteenth Century Novel

ENG 77a (HUM 61a) Modern Novel

ENG 80a Readings in the Short Novel
*ENG 87b Contemporary Fiction

ENG 88b (NEJS 93b) (COLIT 101b) Homer and the Bible
*ENG 89a Writing About Fiction

ENG 90a,b Independent Study

ENG 91a Senior Seminar: D. H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf

ENG 91b Senior Seminar: The Modern Movement in England

ENG 98 Senior Thesis

ENG 99a,b The Senior Essay

ENG 109a,b Directed Writing: Fiction

ENG 119a Directed Writing: Poetry
*ENG 119b Directed Writing: Poetry

ENG 120bR The Tradition of the Short Poem in English



86



ENG 122a Old English

ENG 122b Old English Epic
*ENG 123a Renaissance Poetry

ENG 123b (CLASS 106b) The Renaissance of Ovid in England
*ENG 127a D. H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf

ENG 127bR The Contemporary and the Avant Garde
*ENG 128b Music and Poetry

ENG 132bR Chaucer
*ENG 133a (THA 140a) Advanced Shakespeare

ENG 134aR (WOMEN'S STUDIES) The Women of Letters in the Eighteenth

Century

ENG 135a Romantic Poetry
*ENG 135b Romantic Poetry
*ENG 136a Whitman and His Archive
*ENG 137a Twentieth-Century Poets: Frost, Eliot, Pound

A. Five semester-courses in English, including ENG 11a and including semester-
Keats and Spencer
*ENG 140b The Long Narrative Poem
*ENG 142a Intention and Interpretation in Medieval Literature

ENG 142bR (HUM 125a) (THA 170bR) Medieval European Drama
*ENG 143a (THA 170) EHzabethan and Jacobean Drama
*ENG 145b Victorian Poetry and Poetics
*ENG 147a Faulkner and Fitzgerald

ENG 147bR (THA 182bR) American Drama
*ENG 148b (ENCLA 148b) Classical Background of English Literature: Myths

ENG 151b (COLIT 151b) Contemporary Critical Theories
*ENG 153b Milton
*ENG 154b Augustan Satire
*ENG 155a Women as Men of Letters in Nineteenth-Century England

ENG 156a (AMSTD 156a) Dissent in American Literature: From the

Revolution to the Civil War
*ENG 157a The Poetry of W. B. Yeats and Robert Frost

ENG 157b (THA 157b) Modern British Drama and Theater
*ENG 158a Readings in American Poetry

ENG 158aR American Poetry

ENG 163a Seventeenth-Century Poetry

ENG 164bR (THA 165bR) Restoration Drama
*ENG 166a Herman Melville
*ENG 167a The Irish Literary Renaissance

ENG 174b Eighteenth-Century Novel

ENG 176a Hawthorne and Melville

ENG 176b Hawthorne, Melville, and Poe

ENG 177b (WOMEN'S STUDIES) Contemporary Women Writers
*ENG 178a Literature and Language Meaning

ENG 185aR (COLIT 185aR) Dickens and Dostoevsky
*ENG 187a The Modern Novel I
*ENG 187b The Modern Novel II

ENG 198aR (LING 140aR) History of the English Language



87



ENGLISH AND CLASSICS

Committee: Professors John H. Smith and Douglas J. Stewart

Requirements for Concentration

A. Five semester- courses in English, including ENG 11a and including semester-
courses in any three of the periods required for concentration in English and American
Literature.

B. Five semester-courses in Latin above the LATIN 1 level or five semester-courses
in Greek above the GREEK 1 level.

C. A one-semester course of independent study (ENG 90a or b, LATIN 98a or b,
GREEK 98a or b) leading to an essay to be read by members of the Department of
Classics and the Department of English and American Literature. The essay must
concern itself with issues involved in both classical and English studies. This course
should normally be taken in the senior year.

It is recommended, though not required, that a student offering the combination of
English and Latin also acquire an elementary knowledge of Greek and that a student
offering the combination of English and Greek also acquire an elementary knowledge
of Latin. A student's course of study in this field may be supplemented by appropriate
courses in history, philosophy, art, and archaeology.

No course which is offered in fulfillment of any general degree requirement may be
counted toward concentration in this field.

Honors in English and Classics is determined by the Committee on the basis of
distinguished work in completing the concentration.

*ENCLA 148bR (ENG 148bR) Classical Background of English Literature:

Pastoral and Other Poetry

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES PROGRAM

Committee: Associate Professor Attila Klein, Chairman (Biology); Associate
Professors Robert C. Hunt (Anthropology), Hermann F. Wellenstein (Physics);
Assistant Professors Randell K. Filer (Economics), Christopher Leman*** (Politics).
*** On Leave A.Y. 1979-80

An interdisciplinary program for students concentrating in existing departments or
degree programs of the University. Courses are offered dealing with various aspects of
environmental problems and guidance is provided for students who wish to prepare for
careers related to environmental questions. It is a primary intent of the Program to
develop a conceptual framework for enabling students to consider the important scien-
tific, social, and policy issues associated with environmental questions.

Requirements for the Program

A. Three semester courses, including one science course and one social science
course, selected in consultation with the Program Committee.

B. The senior seminar.



88



ENVST 8a (UC 79K) Energy: Science, Applied Science and Society

ENVST 10b Into the Ocean World

ENVST 97c (ECON 97c) Seminar on the Environment

EUROPEAN LITERATURE

EULIT 97a Senior Essay

EULIT 99 Senior Honors Thesis

EULIT 100a Critical Approaches to European Literature

EULIT 100b The Development of a Genre — Topic for 1979-80: The Theater

EULIT 110a General Systematic and Enumerative Bibliography

FINE ARTS

Associate Professor Gerald S. Bernstein, Chairman; Professors Ludovico Borgo,
Joachim E. Gaehde, Paul Georges, Peter Grippe; Associate Professors Elaine P.
Loeffler, Robert J. Maeda; Assistant Professors Joan L. Nissman, Nancy J. Scott;
Artist-In-Residence Paul L. Brown; Lecturer Carl I. Belz.



Requirements for Concentration



Concentration may be elected in either (A) AppUed Arts (Studio), or (B) Art History
and Criticism

A. Studio Curriculum

Studio concentrators are required to take:

1. FA 1, 103 and four additional semesters of studio electives

2. Four semesters of Art History consisting of:
one course in Ancient or Medieval Art;
one course in Oriental Art;

two courses in Renaissance to Modern Art.

B. Art History Curriculum (beginning Fall, 1978).

1. General Requirements:
FA 10;

One course in Asian art (FA 12a suggested but not required);
Seminar in Methods and Approaches in History of Art (FA 197);
One full year of studio work with consent of the Instructor.

2. Thereafter, the FA history concentrator may follow one of two "tracks":

A) Ancient through Renaissance * ''track''':

Three courses, one of which should be a research course (a seminar or
reading course) in offerings in Ancient through Renaissance art, one
course post Renaissance art and two electives.

B) Renaissance through Modern * 'track'':

Three courses, one of which should be a research course (a seminar or
reading course) in offerings in Renaissance through Modern, one course
Ancient or Medieval art and two electives.
Note that in both tracks, with permission of the faculty advisor, the student
may take one or both electives in related areas outside the department.

C. For graduating class 1979-80 only
History concentrators are required to take:

1. Ten semesters in Art History, consisting of: two courses in Ancient or
Medieval Art; one course in Oriental Art; two courses in Renaissance to



89



Modern Art; Seminar in Methods and Approaches in History of Art (FA 197);
concentrators are urged to take this course not later than in their sophomore
year. Three courses and one additional seminar in the History of Art — to be
selected with the approval of the Advisor, the Instructor and the Chairperson
of the Department. Two of these courses may be taken in related fields from
offerings in other departments if the particular program of studies chosen by
the student makes this substitution advisable and necessary.
2. One full year of studio work with consent of the Instructor.
Prospective graduate students in the History of Art are advised to acquire reading
skills in foreign languages which are necessary for graduate study.

Studio

All studio courses are full year courses beginning in the fall.
FA 1 Elements of Design in Art

Art History

FA 10 Survey of Western Art

FA 12a Survey of Asian Art

FA 20aR Introduction to the History of Art I: Antiquity and the Middle Ages

FA 20b,bR Introduction to the History of Art II: From the Renaissance to the
Modern Age

FA 21b Great Buildings of the Western World
*FA 23b The Art of Antiquity

FA 31a (CLASS 4a) The Art of Ancient Greece

FA 31b (CLASS 4b) The Art of Ancient Italy

FA 41a (Medieval Studies Program) Art of the Middle Ages I

FA 42b (Medieval Studies Program) Art of the Middle Ages II
*FA 51a Art of the Early Renaissance in Italy

FA 54R Renaissance Art in Northern Europe

FA 58b High and Late Renaissance in Italy
*FA 73b Freshman Seminar

FA 97a Sec. 1 The Application of Science in the Examination of Works of Art

FA 97a Sec. 2 Mid-Nineteenth Century American Art and Culture

FA 97a Sec. 3 The Decorative Arts of New Kingdom Egypt

FA 97b The Decorative Arts of Victorian America

FA 98a,b Independent Study

FA 99 Senior Research

Studio

FA 102 Theory and Practice of Painting

FA 103 Life Drawing

FA 104 Advanced Life Drawing

FA 108 Advanced Painting

FA 111 Sculpture

FA 112 Advanced Sculpture

FA 115 Workshop in Printmaking

FA 116 Advanced Workshop in Printmaking



90



Art History

FA 120a Modern Architecture

FA 122a (AMSTD 122a) American Architecture and Painting

FA 160a Seventeenth Century Art

FA 161b Eighteenth Century Art
*FA 162b Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century European Architecture

FA 170bR Nineteenth Century European Painting and Sculpture
*FA 171b Painting and Sculpture of the Twentieth Century

FA 178b Chinese Figurative Art: From the Han Dynasty through the Sung

FA 179b Chinese Landscape Painting: From the Sung Dynasty through the Ch'ing

FA 181bR Introduction to the Art of Japan
*FA 182a Introduction to the Art of China I
*FA 182b Introduction to the Art of China II

FA 184aR Advanced Studies in Oriental Art

FA 190b Advanced Studies in Medieval Art

FA 191bR Advanced Studies in Renaissance Art

FA 192a Advanced Studies in Modern Art
*FA 193b Advanced Studies in Ancient Art
*FA 194b Advanced Studies in American Art

FA 195a (ANTHR 153a) Primitive Art
*FA 196a Advanced Studies in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Art

FA 197b Methods and Approaches in the History of Art

FA 198b Museum Methods and Procedures

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Faculty: See ROMANCE AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

Requirements for Concentration

A. EULIT 100a and 100b in the first year of concentration, taken in sequence.

B. Advanced language study: FREN 103a and 106b.

C. Early literary movement studies: any THREE of the following courses: FREN
112a, 116b, 117a, 118b.

D. To complete the French Literature course requirement, concentrators may offer
any FOUR additional semester courses numbered above 100 in the French Literature
offerings.

E. All concentrators are required to complete the Senior Seminar, in one of the
following two ways: (1) EULIT 97a: Senior Essay, (2) EULIT 99: Senior Honors
Thesis. Departmental honors candidates must elect the Thesis option and enroll in
EULIT 99 (which is a full year course), after having first obtained the consent of the
Advisor to Concentrators at the beginning of the senior year. Honors will be awarded
on the basis of cumulative excellence in all courses taken in the concentration, including
the Senior Seminar.

Certain offerings in French literature, marked # below, are open to all students and
are conducted in Enghsh with a dual reading list, each text being available in the original
language and in English translation. Students wishing credit toward the French


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