Copyright
Brigham Young University.

The banyan (Volume 1975; volume 61) online

. (page 1 of 13)
Online LibraryBrigham Young UniversityThe banyan (Volume 1975; volume 61) → online text (page 1 of 13)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


'mimm




rrr t^ t ]



mmmimmmsmm




1975 Banyan

Brigham Young University

Provo, Utah



Look to the future— preserve the past,

But what is future is soon present,

And the present is soon past,

And time never stops.



But imagine you

could stop time
To examine tlie

past, present,

and future.
Before time changed

it all.
What would it look like?




The present,

End of another year of schooling,

May be the last.



txx>lit>fMIkm»i»




^-.^-^S-'-ife^



th«BiWe
Poges



Look through these pages.

Relive the events, the moods.

Remember the people.

Remember BYU!




.^-^«..^:-V



ma



!i



TIME YESTERDAY. . . 16



TIME TODAY



. . 50



TIME TOMORROW. . 422





*^



'A,



H^ ^^^



^W"



■^:: K



^'.-;



ysszswA y



1875- 1975



Zhose were the days my friend.



\



ssooo



WARREN ALLRED.





BARRY HARRIS



Only

Ttoee Utile Juidon
In a Mttle row,
Biat watch tli«sn lor
another year
id you »haU see how they wUl

ITOW.



,J«, /?53 MOftdkuuh&tO J^ uMU^OAlti 1 1^0.00.



/'?A5



■|*H.^^t - Jbrtk O^Ml IhtAMc



riiii I m l iiifci I i. .,<■






J^^^
X*^-*^-









t:>^m Xiffe



LEFT: Amanda Knight Hall where
94 girls and two people dwell in
peace and quietness, it is said. Miss
Warnick and Miss Waspe are the
administration. BELOW; Allen Hall
where 84 young gentlemen, it is
said, room in quietness and peace,
it is said.







.nil!!'



ill"



■r^-




m^'






m



~




Oni^ n *«''' -/^-<'<"" <'^^'" 'U^^"^ -i^^' d\<x/J^^^

1.4.1,1 U- '"J "/* /9O9.



z:^'









t.







We thought they'd
fieixr end.



X}VLJb VciM Uo/no U4JJML J^oJU^M^Mij yUi^ /^(ffZ. Column



^^0



i




P 3w,rl



%



tic;.



111







T'



ae




<



Lol; Lockheed. Bernard Eomc-, Roger Sor.t. J.inxe White, Lloyd C-







Wc 'd s'mg ami damx



\t^S^k\



^



'i ^



\







y w'~^ - - f












HHH___I_1^H


-fli






..fl




¥^3lS9ySGB1


91S8W




fc^ • 7 « 't' f T>^^ > ^ ■^^•1


/* LI




*y ^^A. l-v^ ♦ m M


f 1?^




x^C^K ^-N^ASTxwS^^^k


■^8k




K^' A % %'^^


V *




lll-^^


II




■ WBl "llE


■■■


, JHWI^ll,MP


rj




^ 1



m %



0^~




^,cjxt. iqjj^ CAi>^ p^ hy^ ^^ /^^t ":



r ^


^m


-'jpi ^^^^^ T^^^^^




■ '^^ ivJ




/


K p]| J


r ' i m


i^


l^^jLji




k


f/^ C-«


€^ti J






'0".t M.S. I>r:iin;itic Cliib

MMUP iM<J^ ^ /^^ i^ '^ P^^ iy^ i)^^



forcuer and a day.







N^



,^



S:-^:-










1



%r^,^



-«*^



III






'-I



We live the life we ekoose.



^'



r.^i?



'.l!>^j



y>P^^






-J' ' \ u






*- ^^\



r^^^^^a


W^^^^^ /


Es


h^^r


w^ ~^H


i



s^ 'i'-i. -y>



'. (!"A''Sr»a\ A". ■ ■ . rJil.'J



-u^-<^?>. * v%**4t:"



'*v-^



BECOMING






mm:







ljinH4JLP^(f^ -^ :iJ»^ ms



Cipn>



1ft QUI



ms:



um§m



a sm^i



We'd fight ami never lose.

I



f



•} ■?




n



^aA'



GlO^"!'/



t



k

i




I



'■?,

l'"?®^



I



-^^^%



Km






Jf»




..jgars Win National
Invitational Tournament



i^



ougars Win WAC Championship

9^ .^ V.



■ -Lm i .. .: -^








WM










fi



I



^^



Srr



< -



't





^


^^■B '•^l^^^^^t iH^Hr






BEAT UTftIi iiiSLK PHECEDES CAWE





Y Band dnd students
paying tribute to
their Alma Paters
monument In Salt
y^. Lake City, just be-

fore the big garne.



^fi'^i-i



rwi*?^.






"m*.




Station KSL. Brlgham
Young University
Pepsters broadcast-
ng the'r Homecom-
ing program.



tvl a I c o I m Le Sueur
chairman of the
Homecoming cele
bration.



Our A. C. playmates
at the Paramount.



Here come -the jolly
butcher boys — — !



like son?
Georgia Balllf. drum



Cougars 29-0 In Ute Stadium OS^S)



L/\L



vmw^Ji'i;



!5F'.f?!:>^;



T— f^^



■ (IKK-M-






7^r ive were young and' sure
to have our way.



* vl






<im'^^ - ^









\ ^,? '



^Jent Administration



Tiimm




Carrying on the spirit and tradition of
3YU, this charming and efficient trio capably
iirected the student body through a year of
Ifun and achievement.

Above: President Lora Hilton.

Center: Secretary Elaine Grov/.

Below: Social Chairman Lillle Stewart.



sip



iii










f



4^Hh UjllIC ^^ /^V/.



^nadi We



And whcrt if they do
look funny? It's Frosh
Week at B.Y.U. With the
traditional skull caps oi
blue and white, and the
"whiskers" of the Cou-
gar, the Freshman Class
appeared upon the
Campus, and willingly
submitted to "Ship"
Snow's initiations to
make them collegiate
guys and gals.




Ca, Ca, £a, Ca, jCa, Ca,







/<^r



:'f ^V



.^r - *



r''^**^'



V-



•i:



w^



jCm. JCa,



Ca, Ca,






L.s-



Ill 4j



iqf^q doft CU^ JiuAJuio fiCbn/i(u^pAjt C^
4U^ (UAUn^-



Zkose were the days,






'■'wm



1^3^ HUjf6(iA(fUu^



Are you ready?! Let's gol Here are
le boys who led the Cougar cheers
<hich spurred football, basketball, and
snnis teams on to greater heights,
ipark lo rallies, the masters ol cheers
ire obove Dean Peay, Ray Hanks,
jnd lulius Bertrand It seems that the
3oys are having a bit of fun stroking
he kilty Center, you have head=
nosier Hanks going into his dance.
knd below, Kenneth Aycock and head-
nosier Hanks do a Utile posing to
5hov/ who was doing the cheerleading
3l Ihe end oi the year



<r).




.^.



« u



. r %^



fo^ pAjt^iAdui:^' J<!t^ WW'a^4<? a^^^^f^cUiM. ^4/>6jU^{^ y(Au jtUu.



w



1^^.









't^J



fi>



^^1






r



Mi



.•*!






'M-!i



ti,,'-^'.



^'^■y^



Tifday, November 22, 1963










ifutim^^^^^'



Oh yes. those were
the the days.




:^ ■ '^ - «^J



YOU'VE



COME



LONG



WAY



BYU..




zomv



STUDENTS
ARE
ACTIVE



THROUGH



COLLEGE



LIVING



r^^° .^




1 M ' ^ '



1 got through registration . . . 1^






^i^.'BKk*'



I








I don't let it
get me down,



v^




... I find
other things
to Iceep me
occupied.







T



■t:^



\::'i^



^^^







I^»^



IMtfW^IMftSkii J BiS^^^^



I've even gone out a few times,





^



I'm getting lots of sleep





*• A.








f




P.S. Could you send
me some extra money?



'FAN FAIR '74l an experience in variety,
entertainment and most of all excitement" .




Entertainment was the Supremes and Dave
Logglns in ttie Homecoming Concert and
a $20,000 variety sliow produced by
University Programs. Featured were var-
ious performing groups; Stuart Peterson,
star of 'Where the Red Fern Grows " and
disc jockey Danny Kramer as master
of ceremonies.




n - ;r^9






i trf





Excitement was the electric atmosphere of a
decisive victory over Wyoming, the ice cream eating
contest and stick pulling, watching the tall man fall
from his stilts, seeing a thousand balloons soar into
the air after a touchdown. Queen Sandi Smith and
her attendants Kerry Harris and Kathy Norris reigning
at the various events, and going to the dance with
that special someone.




^




m




"The long road up,
r 7^, the burning of the lye,
^l-^^*^ the friendly people, and
mT^ finally the watermelon" .



. "Y" Days




Spearheaded by the ASBVU Student liody Officers,
lust 30th marked the traditional activity of white-
ihino the "Y". Mark Knudson, dressed as VVolfman.
ed students to come out in their "grubbies" and
ke the "Y" white again. It was a very successful



effort as some 4.000 students participated. President
Dallin H. Oaks, met Wolfman. was the first to throw a
bucket of whitewash. Afterwards, in Kiwanis Park.
watermelon was provided for all participants.



^



"Tell me,
how do you feel?" . . .

Health Fair




Mtns

Hi A RTS
SHUL
FAIL
THI«=





m^mmmsm mm



f




"There is something
new every week . . . Special Weeks



««




'A . . -.

f






^


^^^^_



l^o_^


hB'v .■.__.


:_ «_ ra «


-T^,-™^ = ■


■_j;= a '3


il^m=' "


-_J'_ -




^ '^ ^


^L^M.^m' = =3


^?m


^^^^^^Ea G3 a




^^^^^^^B 1 ' 1 '




mn^ — P - -


- ..'


.^v-




"Is this how the

other half lives?" . . . Student Life





THE APPLE TREE




hires of the Mind", dirocted i)\ Dr chiirles Whitman, is a
Mormon tr;incdy ahout an LDS mlssion;ir\ l-Jder Barney lohnson.
in Taiwan who is seeking a testimony of the qospel. With a cast
of excellent performers, the play proved to be a movinq e.xperience
for all. This production is BYUs entry for the original play In
the .American College Theatre Festival, (Photos by Brian Hatch)
Combining two short musicals, the "Apple Tree" presented
the audience an evening of fun. humor, and superb entertainment.
The first play, "The Diary of Adam and Kve". is a delightful satire
on human nature written by the well-known Mark Twain, Following
this play, "Passionella" was the story of Klla, the chimney sweep
who longed to be a movie star. Using the same cast for both plays,
the "Apple Tree" proved to be a great dramatic success, (Photos
by Rick Nye)



BYU ARTS PRESENT:

MUSICALS,

UN-OPERAS,

RELIGIOUS

DRAMA



students this year could attend drama productions
ranging from stirring religious stories such as ■Abraham
and Isaac ' (upper left) and "Family Portrait", a story of
Christ s life, (lower left, far upper left, lower right) to the
fun and music of the "Three Un-Operas". (lower right) BYU
Seventh Stake got into the act with their performance of
"South Pacific", (far lower right)




MUSIC MAN:

A DELIGHTFUL

MUSICAL





•;. • / 1. \^





Performed in the De|ong Concert Hall,
the production of "Music Man" combined
a favorite old story with a glamorous
new style to create an enjoyable, smooth-
flowing play. Directed by Ivan Cros-
land, the drama featured such high-
lights as a barbershop quartet, an hi-
larious dance number by the "Ladies
Au.xiliary Society", as well as the fabulous
performance of Marian, the librarian
and the dashing Professor Hill. Combined
with the fancy set and costumes with
the lively music and plot, the production
finished its successful season at the
Promised Valley Playhouse in Salt
Lake City.



^'



THE TRIAL OF ABUA BEN ZOMA




An original play by Edwin L. Walker, a former
BYU student, "The Trial of Abua Ben Zoma" is
the story of an imaginary trial between a Jew and
an Arab concerning a debt of silver. While in
many places an uproarious comedy, the play in
fact portrayed the serious problem in today's
world of actually loving one's enemies. The
cast was directed by Val Johnson, a BYU grad-
uate student who used many unique and very
effective audio-visual equipment in presenting
the play. The production was staged in the Mar
gett's Arena Theatre in the Harris Fine Arts Building






Directed by Dr. Harold Oaks.
The Emperor s New Clothes pre-
sented a delightful new approach
to childrens drama. Performed
by the Whittlin' VVhistiin Bri-
gade', a new childrens drama
corps, the cast did an e.xcellent
job of acting which was enjoy-
able for children and adults
alike. With lu.xurious costumes
and a charming set, the play was
an entertaining e.xperience for all.



A SIMPLE STORY
ABOUT A GOOD MAN




■A Man For All Seasons" is the dramatic story of Sir
Thomas More, a conscientious man who stood alone In his
defiance of the King of England knowing that it meant cer-
tain death. Directed by Dr. Harold I. Hansen, the cast did an
excellent job of performing the moving story. The leading
role. Sir Thomas More, was brilliantly portrayed by Roger
Larson with ludith Piquet cast as Alice More. Other starring
roles included Thomas Cromwell played by Dean Kerr and
Spencer McMullin as King Henry VIII. The rich and luxurious
costumes and the Romanesque arches helped set the final
touch for the experience in medieval drama.




n



ROCK N' SOUL
TO BYU'S OWN



have gained tremendous popularity.
Students have enjoyed some great
times with the soft strains of the
Association (far upper right, left)
and the soul of the Hues Corpora-
tion, (far lower left) ... and spon-
sored by the Culture Office there
is still the all time favorite —
Concerts Impromptu where students
can play and listen and "do their
own thing . (near upper right,
lower left)





:^ /m^ .J



^m



CONCERTS

Go inside yourself singing

and try to answer just

a little thing" . . .








Performing in the first concert of ttie school year. Helene
Reddy and Peter Yarrow provided quality entertainment. Using
audience participation. Peter Yarrow got his listeners involved
in his act. Variety described Helene Reddys act as she did a
bit of "song and dance" and some "vaudeville." Ending, she
performed her famous song, "I am Woman." and received the
typical BYU standing ovation. Skiles and Henderson captivated
their audience immediately with their great sound effects as
the rowing of a boat, animal races, and Skiles' famous tire
pump and robot imitation. 13oth concerts were enjoyed by all
those attending.



BYU WELCOMES MISS OLIVIA NEWTON-JOH^




25S^q



v:^!^!!**,'



1




On lanuary 25. Miss Olivia Newton-
lohn visited the. BYU campus, oiving
the students an e.xciting concert. The
lovely. .Australian singer captured the
dudience with her beautiful singing
and cheerful personality, favoring them
with such hits as "1 Honestly Love
You", and "If You Love Me".

.Accompanying Miss Newton-Iohn was
the comedian. Fred Smoot. who formal-
ly helped with the production of Star
Trek and Sesame Street.




HOLIDAYS




During the school year, many holidays come and qo.
Thanksgiving is a time to get together with family and
friends, to rest a bit before those semester finals or to
finish that term paper. Soon after, the Christmas decora
tions go up around the campus and Provo. and students
heave a sigh of relief after finals and head home. Then
all too soon, those two weeks of parties, rest, and relax
ation are over and its time to begin another semester
.Mong about the middle of February, lovers send each
other love notes, flowers and candy on Valentine s Day.
Many a florist s truck can be seen around the girls' dorms
and apartments on this day. The mailman is also late in
his delivery just because of the extra packages he must
deliver. Holidays sure do help to break the monotony
of school!





PREFERENCE
75



The Preference Week proved to be an
enjoyable event for all BYU students. With
the theme "Colour My World" the girls could
participate in such events as a women's
rights debate, a self-defense workshop and
the inspiring devotional with Sister Belle
Spafford. the former General Relief Society
Board President. However, the highlight of
the week was the Preference dances held
at si.\ different locations ranging from the
University Mall in Orem, to the ELWC Ball-
room. Several weeks earlier the girls pre-
ferred the male of their choice for this special
Valentines Dance. No concert was scheduled
this year.






^f



7^'^



m. n





Reaching the four corners" . . . Program Bureau.





30S' J^^**^




Twenty years of
entertainment . .
Program Bureau.




Before the Sounds of Freedom, Young Ambassadors, and
the Lamanite Generation ever began, programs of student tal-
ent were being organized. Requests came for performances
from all over the world, and |anie Thompson created pro-
grams and groups to tour. One of these first programs was
"Curtain Time. USA." It began in 1960. and went to the .Middle
East. Europe, and the Orient. The 3 Ds got their start through
the Program Bureau, and went on the 1962 "Curtain Time"
to the Orient.

In 1964. the Folk Dancers went for their initial tour,
"international Holiday." They toured and traveled in Europe.
Norm Nielsen. Roseanne Tueller and |anie Thompson are
pictured on this page during that tour. Norm is now the di-
rector of the Polynesian Cultural Center in Hawaii. Expo 70
in Osaka. lapan, found the newly-formed Young Ambassadors
representing United States colleges and universities.

Some of the other shows that have been done include
"Say It With Music" (the Caribbean); "14 Karat Gold" (Arctic
Zone): "Holiday in USA (Europe and the Orient): and Star-
time. BYU" (Newfoundland, Greenland. Europe and the Orient).



We see the joy when one heart is gladdened'




Under able direction of Harry Shultz, the Young Ambassadors performed for
audiences throughout Utah, Idaho, Arizona and California this school year. The
approximately 50 students, which included vocalists, dancers, a full 20-piece stage
band, and technical crew, has been tabbed as 'America's most requested collegiate
variety show. " Summer '73 found them touring in Central and South America. A
major 8-week tour of the Midwest, North and South United States and Eastern Cans '
is planned for this summer. Members of the group included Becky Barton, jerome
Beesley Tom Benmon. Cathy Bown, lim Busselberg, Tom Butler, Susan Calder, John
Cameron, Annette Carpenter, Lloyd Coleman, Barry CoUette, Sam Cordon, Robyn
Ferre, Glen Glanders, Mike Fritch, Vicki Foutz, Mike Glen, Teri Green, Dan Hams,
Sherrie Holmes, Glenn jaspering, Susan lones, Jacque Lake. Lorie Lambson, Lana
Lindsay. Richard Lindsay, Greg Lovell, Craig Low, Roger McKay, Lynn Meinzer, Lori
Marsh Cristie Olson, Steve Pay, Tricia Rappleye, Gundale Reid, Deanne Samuelson,
Harry Schultz. Dean Sheffer, Noah Sifuentes, Chuck Sidlow, Mike Strickland, Kim
Sullivan, Bob Taylor, Terry Thompson, lulie Turner, Nancy Warner, Mitch Watkins,
Sheri Webb, Rob West, Kerry Jon Williams. Linda Winter, Marty Worwood.



The Young Ambassadors.




Wherever we go, we build and
strengthen" . . . The
Sounds of Freedom.



Performing both patriotic and contemporary numbers, the BYU
Sounds of Freedom projected love of their country and of life to
thousands of people during their tours. Summer 74 found them per-
forming in South Africa for some 54,000 people. This school year,
they have traveled to Colorado, Nebraska, Missouri, Wyoming and the
Southwestern States. This summer, they expect to travel to Texas
and New Orleans.

Members of the group include Gary Andeline, Fred Barnes, Kent
Barrett, Linda Benard, Tammy Campbell. Deb Connelly, April Cummings,
Wanda Cummings, Claudia Compton, Bob DeAlba, Mike Echard, |im
Evenson, Susie Farnsworth, Randi Garner, Grant Huberty, Chris favens,
Connie Loveless, Wade Lindstrom, Allan Martin, Scott Miller, Michelle
Milne, Mark Myers, Gary Pia, Dave Pope, Dana Robinson, Craig Roberts,
Laurie Olson, Launi Simmins, Mary Swint, John Taylor.





1


^k •% ^


r\




IH >-


(


^■■■■■•^•^^•■''Ip


11




msRI




jDK i '^"^^^S^lllfl


^#j^/w


■III


^SlKui


wMIm


WW^^m


H^^


SiNHk^^




^^^^C^^V0*f ^^^


^^Et f


M^


Oii




H






p§h^hM


Ht^l


Si^^lT^HL^Vr^


Ma'i


. aI^B


i^ii' #


p^-^jl^^l


W'^^


^^^MU^a


91 1 16


1 ^Bn' ,t


'mM^


^^WB


nl






Summer of 74 was a busy one for the
Lamaniie Generation They first loured the
Eastern Seaboard performino to some 45 000
people and oave performances at such places
as Disney World m Orlando Florida: Washing-
ton, DC: and the Chicago Civic Auditorium
Then ten students went on a six week
Department of Defense L'SO tour becoming
the only Indian group to perform overseas.
During the 1974 75 school year, they have
performed in Canada Washington. Oregon
and Idaho This summer they plan a major
South American tour.



The members of the group include Al
Armenia Chuck Blake, lack Bonneau Helene
Buck Carnes Burson Carlos Chavez LeRoy
Chavez Martha Chavez. |oel Clark. Mllli
Cody Deanna Crowfoot Lafe Damon, Valerie
Duerden Bernlce Francisco .Mark Caudette,
Ian Gutierrez MacArthur s Shirley Halona.
Henri Headdress, Dennis leffrey GingerLei
Kaanapu Gary Lewis. Leslie Ann Lilly Lora
Locklear Alberta .Maize Tony .McCabe
Ramona Nez, Gordon Oles Zeke & Pauline
Sanchez Susan Seneca Ken Sekaquaplewa,
Cynthia Stewart Wall Taylor Arkie L'pshaw
RosieToledo Their director is lame Thompson,





Performing a variety of musical numbers, tlie Sounds of Freedom,
Young Ambassadors and the Lamanlte Generation of the Program Bureau
put on a show during Homecoming Week that will be remembered by
many. They displayed just a fraction of their talent during the
show and were professional in every sense of the word. Danny Kramer was
the MC of the show, with Stuart Peterson, a star of "Where the Red Fern
Grows," as a special guest.




A collage of professional entertainment'



Frolics




1


w




BHH


1









^




^


^^^MIlii^^jgJ^^H


.-^v-




^

^


B


ft


k?4H



119 I



Probably the person who has done the most to spread BYU to
the four corners of the earth is Janie Thompson, creative director of
the Program Bureau. She has traveled approximately a half a million
miles with tour groups during her 22 years at BYU. She performed her-
self while a student here, and she saw the need to organize student
talent and share it with others around the world. She began by making
up a file of hundreds of students and their talents. Then, she organized
them into a show and toured both the US and world with them under
the auspices of the State Department and the Department of Defense.
She has been given numerous awards from these two US departments.
Her latest endeavor has been the popular and influential ■'Lamanite
Generation." At this years Homecoming football game, she was
honored and was selected to light the "Y."




Spreading happiness to children.





Directed by Dr. Harold R. Oaks of the Drama
Department, the new Childrens Theatre group.
The Whittlin Whistlln Brigade, delighted audiences
throughout the year. Some of their productions
included The Emperors New Clothes', and the
Breeders Theatre versions of "The Mirrorman and the
Dandelion Wine."



^



For my soul delighteth in the song of the heart; yea the song

of the righteous is a prayer unto me. ". .

ACappella Choir




ttmmfBmsm^Ba



m





The internationally famous Brigham Young University
A Capella Choir, a classical choral group of 70 students
has toured Europe three times. It earned the distinction of
being the first non-Catholic choir to sing in the Notre
Dame Cathedral in Paris.

Dr. Ralph Woodward is coordinator of musical activities
at BYU and conducts both the A Capella Choir and Male
Chorus. He spends hours selecting the 70 singers from
hundreds who audition, his skill is evidenced in the out-
standing and versatile repertoire.



Professionalism and excellence in
musical performance" . . .



Synthesis, a contemporary jazz rock
group dedicated to the artistic performance
of and improvision of well known and
original musical works. Under the direction
of Newell Dayley the students are selected
by audition and must demonstrate highly
developed ability and ability to improve
as well. Synthesis began at BYU in 1962
and has grown and developed to the
professional and well received group it
is today.

Philharmonic Orchestra, directed by
Dr. Ralph Laycock, is the most proficient
of three full time orchestras at BYU.
The orchestra has earned a reputation
for excellence wherever it has performed,
reviewers have praised the student musi-
cians for a high degree of professionalism.
The group also participates in opera and
oratorio performances with other BYU
music groups. The Orchestra tours annually
and completed a mid-semester trip of
Arizona recently.




Perfection and style the major demands
in Ballroom Dancing" . . .





The Ballroom Dance Team will again participate tliis year in tl
British Championships in Blackpool, England, a world-wide competitio
Previously the team won the coveted first place team for national awai
The Medals Ball, the World of Dance, and the International Ball were
few of their performances this year. This professional group is unc
the direction of Emerson Lyman of the College of Physical Educatic



B




"Enthusiasm

and energy!" . . .

International Folk Dancers.




The Brigham Young University International Folk-
dancers thrill national and international audiences alike.
Among other accomplishments this year. Folkdancers can
boast of activities such as their 15th annual "Christmas
Around The World" concert, participation in the world
of dance, a one hour film for the New York Dance archives
and in luly the 11th Annual European Festivals tour.

Mary Bee Jensen, the outstanding director of the
International Folkdancers. will represent the entire United


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Online LibraryBrigham Young UniversityThe banyan (Volume 1975; volume 61) → online text (page 1 of 13)