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PRESENTED



BY



The Trustees



OF



THE BRITISH MUSEUM,



EXCHANGE

I ' O tQQ>t



EXCHANGE




BIOLOGY

LIBRARY

G





FREDERICK COURTENEY SELOUS.

Portrait study by Leo Weinthal- 1906.



CATALOGUE



OF THE



SELOUS COLLECTION



or



BIG GAME



IX THE



BJUTISH MUSEUM (NATUEAL HISTOBY),



BY

J. G. DOLLMAN, B.A.



L N D N -
PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES.

SOU) HY

LONGMAN*, GREEN & Co., 39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON, E.G. 4;

H. QUAR1TCH, LTD., 11 GKAFTON STREET, NEW BOND STREET, LONDON, W. 1 ;

DULAU & Co., LTD., 34-.J6 MARGARET STREET, CAVENDISH SQUARE, LONDON, W. 1,

AM) AT THE

BRITISH MUSEUM (N A T U R A L H 1 8 T O R Y), CROMWELL ROAD, S.W. 7.



[All r'ujlits reserve<l.~]



AT- ll '. ; -



BIOLOGY

LIBRARY

G




R J N T K D II Y TAYLOR AND FRANCIS,
IIKI) LION COURT, FI-EKT STRKET.



PREFACE



J



Bv r the kind permission of the Editor, the following obituary
notice is reproduced, with some omissions and verbal alterations,
from The Times of January 8th, 1917.

" Captain F. C. Selous, D.S.O., the famous South African
explorer and big game hunter, was killed in action in East Africa
on January 4th at the age of 65. Last September he was awarded
the D.S.O. ' for conspicuous gallantry, resource and endurance,' the
official report adding that he set a magnificent example to all
ranks, and that the value of his services with his battalion could
not be overestimated.

Captain Frederick Courteney Selous was born in London on
December 31, 1851. He was educated at Rugby and afterwards
at Neuchatel and Wiesbaden. At the age of 19 he left England
with 400 in his packet, determined to earn his living as a
professional elephant hunter. With this object he made his way
to the Kimberley diamond fields, then recently discovered. On
learning that the right season of the year for a trip to the interior
was not due for some months, young Selous joined a trading
expedition into Griqualand. In 1S72 he at last set forth for the
interior, that is, the territory now known as Southern Rhodesia,
then terrorized by the Matabele and their martial chief Lobengula.
Without the permission of this monarch no one might enter
M ttabeleland or the neighbouring territories. Selous approached
Lobengula about the matter, and the king was pleased to jest at



53029



IV PREFACE.

his petitioner's youthful appearance and to regard the idea of his
attacking an elephant with derision. He gave the desired
permission, which was taken advantage of promptly ; not only did
Selous hag many elephants hefore he came of age, but by the
time he was five -and- twenty he was known far and wide in
South Africa as one of the most successful ivory hunters of
the day.

About this time many of the Boer elephant hunters were
giving up the profession; the elephants had given up their old
haunts of the open veld and the herds had retreated to the forest
country. Here the use of horses was impossible, and malarial and
other fevers took toll of the hunters ; a few of the bolder spirits
made up their minds to stick to elephant hunting, and it was
among these hardy and experienced men that Selous speedily made
a great reputation for courage, bushcraft and endurance. A man
of beautiful proportions, with a chest of extraordinary depth and
breadth, he is described as the best white runner that the Matabele
had ever seen, and more than once he owed his life to his power of
sprinting, jumping and swerving. The life of constant hardship
toughened him, and he seldom suffered from fever.

Until 1881 Selous devoted himself mainly to elephant hunt-
ing, save for one holiday to England in 1875. In the former year
he returned home for the second time, and shortly afterwards
published ' A Hunter's Wanderings in Africa,' a book which ran
through five editions, and took rank immediately among the
classical works on African hunting. His keen interest in topo-
graphy led to a succession of contributions to the Journal of
the Roval Geographical Society, which in due time awarded him
its gold medal. By the end of 1881 he was back at the Cape, and
for the next six years wandered about the Matabele and other
territory to the Zambesi, devoting himself mainly to procuring
specimens of the African fauna for museums and private collections
at home. Many of the finest specimens to be seen in the Natural
History Museum were procured by Selous during these years.

In 1888, in passing through the Mashukulumbwi territory,
Selous was set upon by that tribe ; his caravan was plundered,
many of his followers were killed, and he himself, escaping with



PREFACE. V

difficulty, made liis way back in the last stages of exhaustion.
Early in 1890 he led the pioneer expedition of the Chartered
Company into Mashonaland, and so saved that valuable country
from Portuguese annexation.

The next two years were spent on surveying and similar
work for the Chartered Company, and in 1892 Selous returned to
England. In 1893 he published 'Travel and Adventure in South-
East Africa,' which contained not only an account of his many
adventures since the publication of his former book, but also
glowing descriptions of the potentialities of Mashonaland and
Manicaland. Returning to Rhodesia in the same year, he assisted
in the suppression of the first Matabele insurrection; he then came
home, as he thought, for good, and soon afterwards married Marie
Catherine Gladys (daughter of the late Canon Maddy) who survives
him. In 1895 he returned to Rhodesia with his wife to take up
the management of an estate, and was thus in time to serve
through the second Matabele War, during which his homestead
was burnt by the rebels. In 1896 he embodied these experiences,
together with a review of the causes of the Matabele wars and of
the resources of Charterland, in a book entitled ' Sunshine and
Storm in Rhodesia.'

From this time onwards Selous gratified his ruling passion,
big-game shooting, rather as an amateur than as a professional.
In 1894-5 he visited Asia Minor on a hunting tour, and in 1897
and 1898 he made two trips to the Rocky Mountains. In 1900,
1901, and 1905 he shot in Newfoundland. In 1904 and 1906 he
Avas on the Macmillan River in the Yukon territory of North-
Western Canada. In later years he once more turned his attention
to Africa, this time to British East Africa and the Nile. Through-
out his career Selous was much more than merely a successful
game-shooter. Wherever he went he took the deepest interest in
the habits and personality of all animals encountered. Keen
observation, indefatigable patience, and a retentive memory com-
bined to make him afield naturalist of veiy exceptional excellence;
and these qualities, together with his enormous experience, raised
him to the position of acknowledged doyen of the whole tribe of



VI 1'HEFACK.

modern hunters. In 1909-1910 he organized and accompanied
Mr. Roosevelt's hunting expedition in British East Africa.

In one of his later books, * African Nature Notes and
Reminiscences,' Selous summarized his vast stores of knowledge
about many of the noblest of the African wild game ; and lie
wrote also two books dealing with his adventures in Asia Minor
and in North America. All his books are written in a spirit of
transparent honesty and in a simple and direct style, reflecting the
character of the author, ^vhose straightforwardness, integrity,
hospitality, and kindness of heart were as well known to hosts of
friends as the qualities which made him so successful a hunter.
At his house at Worplesdon he built a special museum for his
numerous trophies; and nothing pleased him better than to show
visitors over this building, except, perhaps, the acquisition of fresh
additions to it."

A memorial to Selous was presented to the Natural History
Museum by the subscribers, and was unveiled at a public ceremony
on June 10th, 1920. It is the work of the late Mr. W. R. Colton,
R.A., and consists of a bust in bronze in a granite setting with a
plaque below depicting some of the better known species of African
Big Game. The stone is a block of syenite from Bon Accord
Quarry, presented by the Union Government of South Africa.

Selous gave the Museum a number of Big Game and other
mammals, but his main collection was presented by Mrs. Selous in
1919. The majority of the specimens are heads of adult males,
and these have been arranged on the walls of the corridors on the
first floor of the building under the supervision of Captain .}. G.
Dollman, who has written the Catalogue, which it is hoped may
prove of interest and utility to sportsmen.

Some extracts from Selous' books U A Hunter's Wanderings
in Africa " and " Great and Small Game of Africa " have been
reproduced by the kind permission of the publishers, Macmillan



and Co. Ltd. and Rowland Ward Ltd., respectively. The
Zoological Society of London has allowed the reprinting of extracts
from two papers by Selous that appeared in the 'Proceedings' for
1881. The thanks of the Trustees are also due to Mr. Leo
Weinthal, O.B.E., for permission to reproduce the excellent
portrait of Selous, which was taken by him in 1906.

C. TATK REGAN,

Keeper of' Zoology.

BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY),
November 20, 1921.



CATALOGUE



OF THE



SELOUS COLLECTION



OF



BIG GAME.



INTRODUCTION.



THE specimens of Big Game and other Mammals dealt with in
this Catalogue were shot by the late Captain F. C. Selous, D.S.O.,
between the years 1870 and 1910, and were presented to the
Museum by Mrs. Selous in 1919. The most important of the
expeditions made by Selous during this period and the number
of specimens collected and preserved in the Collection are shown in
the following Table :



Year.


Locality.


Specimens.


1870


Bavaria


3


1871-1875


South Africa


20


1876-1881


South Africa


54


1881-1892


South Africa


89


1893


South Africa (1st Matabili War) ,





1894


Isle of Mull , ...


1


1894-1895


Asia Minor


6


1895 1896


South Africa


30


1897


Asia Minor


1









Ai /i vH V*M



INTKODUCTION.



Year.


Locality.


Specimens.


1897
1898


Wyoming
Wyoming


13
9


1899


Transylvania


6


1900
1901


Canada and Newfoundland
Newfoundland


4
4


1902


Sardinia


5


1902-1903
1904


Kenya Colony
Yukon Territory


55
2


1905


Newfoundland


3


1906
1907
1909


Yukon Territory
Asia Minor and Norway
Kenya Colony


9
5
61


1911
1911-1912
1915-1916(on

active service)


Bahr el-Ghazal, Sudan
Kenya Colony
Kenya Colony and Tanganyika Territory


15
73

11



The Catalogue is divided into two parts, the first of which deals
with the African Big Game Collection, containing 44-3 specimens,
and the second (p. 89) with 81 specimens from Europe, Asia, and
North America.

Unless the contrary is stated, the specimens referred to are all
mounted heads of adult male individuals. All horn measurements
are given in inches.

The synonymy of the various species and subspecies given in
the Catalogue is not complete, but it is sufficient to indicate the
origin of the names used.

J. G. DOLLMAN.



16 September, 1921.



PART I.

AFRICAN SPECIMENS,



THE SELOUS COLLECTION.



ORDER PRIMATES.

Family CERCOPITHECIDJE.

Subfamily PITHEOIN^E.
WHITE-TAILED G-UEREZA.

COLOBUS ABYSStNTCUS CAUDATUS.

Colobus guereza caudatus, Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1885, p. 219, pi. xii.

Distinguished from the Abyssinian Guereza by having the white
brush of the tail very much larger, only about 3 to 6 inches of the
base of the tail being black ; the white hairs of the body-mantle,
as a rule, entirely cover the black basal part of the tail.

Typical locality, Useri, north-east slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro.
There can be but little doubt that this monkey is fairly widely
distributed throughout Kenya Colony. Several different races of
the East African White-tailed Guereza have been described, but
the distinguishing characters are perhaps of doubtful systematic
value. Owing to the licensing restrictions now in force it is
rarely that more than one or two of these monkeys are obtained
from the same locality, and in dealing with such small differences
of coloration as have been used to distinguish these various
forms, a large series of specimens is needed before such differences
can be accepted as being of any systematic importance.

1-2 19. 7. 15. 1-2. Skins, stuffed. Kenya Colony.



THE SELOUS COLLECTION.

ORDER CARNIVORA.

Family CANID.E.

SIDE-STRIPED JACKAL.
ADUSTUS.



Canis adustus, Sundevall, Ofvers. Akad. Forhandl. Stockholm, vol. iii.
p. 121, 1847.

Distinguished from the Black-backed Jackal, Canis mesomelas,
by its silvery grey coloured coat, white tail-tip, and, usually, by the
presence of a well-marked white diagonal stripe on each side of body.

Typical locality, " Caffraria interiore " ; range from the Transvaal
northwards across the Zambesi into Northern Rhodesia.

3 19. 7. 15. 3. July, 1895. Umniati River, Maslionaland, Southern
Rhodesia.



EAST AFRICAN GREAT-EARED FOX.

OTOCYO^ YIRGATUS.
Otocyon virgatus, Miller, Smithson. Misc. Collect, vol. xlii. p. 485, 1909.

A small fox-like animal with very large ears ; distinguished
from the true foxes and dogs by having three or four upper molar
teeth and four lower ones on each side of the jaws. This form is
distinguished from the South African O. megalotis by the underside
of the body being buff-coloured instead of creamy white, and
having the tail marked above with a distinct black stripe. Miller
in his original description states that the skull differs from that of
megalotis in the flatter, less inflated auditory bullse, and the
absence of a notch between the angular and subangular processes
of the mandible.

Typical locality, Naivasha Station, Kenya Colony ; range from
Tanganyika Territory northwards through Kenya Colony towards
Abyssinia. The Abyssinia Great-eared Fox was recently described
by Cabrera * as a distinct form under the name canescens ; both

* Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 8, vol. vi. p. 462, 1910.



sELotis COLLECTION. 7

virgatus and canescens are probably only geographical races of the
South African meqalotis.

4 19. 7. 15. 6 (sex not recorded). Skin, mounted, 1912. Northern

Guaso Nyiro, Kenya Colony.

SOUTH AFRICAN HUNTING DOG.
LYCAOJN' PICTUS PICTUS.

Hyaena picta, Temminck, Ann. Gen. Sci. Phys. vol. iii. p. 54, pi. xxxv.,

1820.

Lycaon tricolor, Gray, Griffith's Animal Kingdom, vol. v. p. 151, 1827.
Lycaon pictus, Garrod, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1878, p. 373.

The presence of four toes on the fore feet distinguishes the
genus Lycaon from Canis. Ears very large. General colour a
mixture of yellowish buff, blackish brown, and white, in irregular
blotches, the pattern being extremely variable ; a dark frontal
stripe usually present. Skull heavily built and excessively broad,
with very massive teeth, superficially resembling those of the
Hyanidce.

Typical locality, Mozambique. The Hunting Dog is very
generally distributed over the greater part of South Africa ; it
still exists in certain parts of Cape Colony. The Cape Colony
Lycaon has been separated as a distinct race under the name
venaticus *, and another form has been described from Zululand
as zuluensis f.

5 19. 7. 15. 7. 21 October, 1884. Nata River, Western Matabili-

land, Southern Rhodesia.



Family



DESERT STRIPED HY^NA.

HYJLNA BEKGERI.



Hyaena (Hyaena) hienomelas bergeri, Matschie, Sitzber. Ges. nat. Freunde,
' 1910, p. 361.

Hyxna hysena bergeri, Roosevelt and Heller, Life-histories of African
Game Animals, vol. 1. p. 255, 1915.



* Burchell, Travels in S. Africa, vol. i. p. 456, 1822.

f Thomas, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 7, vol. xiv. p. 98, 1904.



8 THE SELOITS COLLECTION.

Distinguished from its near ally Hyaena liycena scliillinysi by
its smaller size, more indistinct and lighter stripes, and the
yellowish buff colour of the feet.

Typical locality, Elgeyo Escarpment, Uasin Gishu Plateau,
Kenya Colony ; range appears to extend northwards from the
Uasin Gishu Plateau and Northern Guaso Nyiro towards Lake
Rudolf and Southern Abyssinia. A name has been given to the
Striped Hyaena from the Northern Guaso Nyiro by Lonnberg *,
but according to Roosevelt and Heller f, who had the opportunity
of examining a large series of specimens from this locality, there
is no difference of systematic value between the Northern Guaso
Nyiro specimens and ~bergeri.

6 19. 7. 15.8 (sex not recorded). 1912. Northern Guaso Nyiro,

Kenya Colony.

SOUTH AFRICAN SPOTTED HY^NA.

CHOCUTA CBOCUTA CAPES sis.

Hyaena capensis, Desmarest, Mamm. vol. i. p. 216, 1820.
Crocuta capensis, Trouessart, Cat. Mamm. Suppl. p. 243, 1905.

Members of this genus are easily distinguished from the
Striped Hyaenas by the absence of the dorsal mane, smaller ears,
and the spotted markings on the body ; the skull is shorter and
wider, and the lower carnassial tooth is without the heel.

Type locality, Cape Colony. In Cape Colony this hyaena
is now nearly extinct ; in Zululand and parts of the Transvaal it
is still found, and further north it is fairly plentiful. In 1900
Matschie J described a Spotted Hyaena from the Orange River
Colony under the name Hyaena ( Crocotta) gariepensis ; the
following specimens may belong to this race, but there is not suffi-
cient material at present available for examination to justify the
recognition of this form.

7 19.7.15.9. 20 July, 1880. Umfuli River, Mashonaland,

Southern Rhodesia.

8 19. 7. 15. 10 (female). October, 1892. Near Pungwe Eiver,

Mozambique.



* Hyaena schillingsi rendilis, Lonnberg, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 8,
vol. ix. p. 64, 1912

f Life-histories of African Game Animals, vol. i. p. 256, 1915.
J Sitzber. Ges. nat. Freunde, 1900, p. 26.



TUB" SELOltS COLLECTION.

EASTERN SPOTTED HYAENA.

CEOCUTA CEOCUTA GEEMINANS.

Hysena (Crocotta) germinans, Matschie, Sitzber. Ges. nat. Freunde, 1900,

p. 26.
Hyaena crocuta germinans, Roosevelt, African Game Trails, Amer. ed.,

p. 473 ; London ed., p. 485, 1910.
Crocuta crocuta germinans, Roosevelt and Heller, Life-histories of African

Game Animals, vol. i. p. 261, 1915.

Distinguished from the South African race by its smaller size
and rather narrower skull. The colour of the body is extremely
variable and the dark spots are very large.

Typical locality, Lake Rukwa, Tanganyika Territory. This
hyaena would appear to be very widely distributed in East Africa,
being found throughout the greater part of Kenya Colony and
Tanganyika Territory. North of the Northern Gruaso Nyiro and
through the Lake Rudolf region towards Abyssinia its place is
taken by Crocuta crocuta jisi, described by Heller * from the area
between the Northern Guaso Nyiro and Mount Marsabit. The
names kibonotensis, panganensis, and nzoyce must be regarded as
synonyms of germinans.

9 19. 7. 15. 11 (female). 13 December, 1902. Nairobi, Kenya
Colony.



Family FELID-ffi.

LION.
FELIS LEO.

Felis leo, Linn. Syst. Nat. ed. 10, vol. i. p. 41, 1758 ; ed. 12, vol. i. p. 60,
1766.

In " A Hunter's Wanderings in Africa " f Selous gives the
following account of the variations met with in the South African
Lion : " All over the interior of South Africa, wherever game still
exists in sufficient quantities to furnish them with food, lions are

* Smithson. Misc. Collect, vol. Ixi. no. 22, p. 5, 1914.

f p. 257, 1881.



10 THE SELOtfS COLLECTION.

to be met with, and are equally plentiful on the high, open downs
of the Mashuna country, amongst the rough broken hills, through
which run many of the tributaries of the Zambesi, in the dense
thorn-thickets to the west of the Gwai River, or in the marshy
country in the neighbourhood of Linyanti. As, however, they are
nocturnal in their habits^ and usually lie asleep during the daytime,
in beds of reeds, or in the midst of dense thickets, it is only by
chance that one comes across them, even in parts of the country
where, from hearing their voices at nights, and constantly seeing
their spoor, there can be no doubt that they are plentiful. All the
Dutch hunters in the interior, as well as many Europeans, who
pretend to higher scientific attainments, say that there are at least
three distinct species of lions in South Africa ; whilst some assert
that there are four or even five. Their distinctions are all based
upon the length and colour of the mane, the general colour of the
coat, the spots on the feet, and the comparative size of the animals.
For my part, and judging from my own very limited experience of
lions, I cannot see that there is any reason for supposing that
more than one species exists, and as out of fifty male lion skins
scarcely two will be found exactly alike in the colour and length
of the mane, I think it would be as reasonable to suppose that
there are twenty species as three. The fact is, that between the
animal with hardly a vestige of a mane, and the far handsomer
but much less common beast with a long flowing black mane, every
possible intermediate variety may be found. This I say emphati-
cally, after having seen a great many skins, and I entirely deny
that three well-marked and constant varieties exist. On June 6,
1879, I came across two fine old male lions on the Mababe flat,
lying together under the same bush, and shot them both. One
was a full-maned lion with a very dark-coloured skin, the other a
very light-coloured animal with scarcely any mane at all. In size
they were nearly as possible equal, the skins, when pegged out,
measuring 10 feet 10 inches arid 10 feet 9 inches respectively. A
few months afterwards Mr. H. C. Collison and myself again came
across two lions, the one dark-coloured, with a full, blackish mane,
the other a yellow-looking animal with but little mane. A day or
two later we shot two lionesses. The one killed by my friend
carried in her womb three cubs (two males and a female) that
would probably have seen the light a few hours later. Of the two



THE SELOUS COELECTIOS. 11

male cubs the one, owing to the dark colour of the tips of the
hairs, was almost black, whilst the other was reddish yellow. The

skin of the female cub was also of a light colour "

The Lion has been completely exterminated in the country south
of the Orange River ; it still occurs in parts of the Transvaal and
Zululand, and in Rhodesia and Bechuanaland is found in consider-
able numbers.

10 19.7 15.14. Skin. 10 November, 1883. Umzweswi River,

Mashonaland, Southern Rhodesia.

11 19 .7. 15. 15. Skin. 6 October, 1884. North Kalahari, near

Metsi butluku.

12 19.7.15.16. Skin. October, 1892. Between Pungwe Eiver

and Lake Sungwe, Mozambique.

13 19.7.15.17. Skin. 16 July, 1880. Near junction of Gwibi

and Hanyani Rivers, Mashonaland, Southern Rhodesia.

14 __19. 7. 15. 18 (female). Skin. 16 July, 1880. Near junction of

Gwibi and Hanyani Rivers, Southern Rhodesia.

15 19. 7. 15. 19 (female). 16 July, 1880. Near junction of Gwibi

and Hanyani Rivers, Southern Rhodesia.
16-17 19.7.15.20-21. Skins. 6 June, 1879. Mababi Plain, Khama's

Country, Bechuanaland.
18-19 19.7.15.22-23 (females). Skins. 4 June, 1879. Mababi

Plain, Khama's Country. Bechuanaland.

20 19. 7. 15. 24 (female). Skin. 20 October, 1879. Mababi

Plain, Khama's Country, Bechuanaland.

21 19. 7. 15. 25. Skin. 5 May, 1879. Botletlie River, Khama's

Country, Bechuanaland.

22 19.7.15.26. Skin. 22 June, 1882. Bili River, Mashonaland,

Southern Rhodesia.

23 19. 7. 15. 27 (female). Skin. 14 September, 1879. Linyanti,

north bank of Chobe River.

24 19. 7. 15.28 (female). Skin. 8 June, 1883. Umgezi River,

Mashonaland, Southern Rhodesia.

25 19.7.15.29 (female). Skin. December, 1874. Upper Tati

River, Tati District, Southern Rhodesia.

26 19.7.15.30. Skin. 1886. Umzingwani River, 20 miles south

of Bulawayo, Southern Rhodesia.

27 19.7.15.31 (female). Skin. 7 July, 1880. Near Umfuli

River, Mashonaland, Southern Rhodesia.

28 19.7.15.32. Skin, mounted. December, 1891. Hartley

Hills, Umfuli River, Mashonaland, Southern Rhodesia.



12 THE sELQtJs COLLECTION.

LEOPARD.

FELIS PAEDVS.

Felis pardus, Linn. Syst. Nat. ed. 10, vol. i. p. 41, 1758; ed. 12, vol. i.
p. 61, 1766.

The Leopard is still found in South Africa, in the country
south of the Orange River, but is gradually being exterminated.
In Southern Rhodesia the species is by no means rare.

29 19. 7. 15. 33 (female). Skin, mounted. July, 1895. Near the

Sebakwi River, Eastern Matabililand, Southern Rhodesia.

EAST AFRICAN SERVAL.
FELIS CAPENSIS HUTDEI.

Felis capensis hinder, Wroughton, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 8, vol. v.
p. 205, 1910.

Closely allied to the typical race ; dark markings broad, the


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