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Correspondence of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke; between the year 1744 and the period of his decease, in 1797 (Volume 2) online

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CORRESPONDENCE



OF



THE RIGHT HONOURABLE



EDMUND BURKE;



BETWEEN THE YEAR 1744,
4 * .

AND THE PERIOD OF HIS DECEASE, IN 1797.



EDITED BY

CHARLES WILLIAM, EARL FITZWILLIAM,

AND LIEUTENANT-GENERAL

SIR RICHARD BOURKE, K.C.B.



IN FOUR VOLUMES.

VOL. II.



LONDON:
FRANCIS & JOHN EIVINGTON,

ST. PAUI/S CHURCH YARD, & WATERLOO PLACE.
1844.



A 15
V,



LONDON :

GILBERT & RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,
ST. JOHN'S SQUARE.



CONTENTS



VOL. II.



1775.

DATE PAGE

Jan. 10. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 1

Jan. 12. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham. ... 5

Jan. 15. Edm. Burke, Esq., to James Barry, Esq 9

Jan. 20. Edm. Burke, Esq., to a Committee at Bristol .... 11

Feb. 8. Duke of Richmond to Edm. Burke, Esq 14

Feb. 9. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Wm. Burgh, Esq 16

Feb. 9. Marquis of Rockingham to Edm. Burke, Esq .... 20

Feb. 13. Marquis of Rockingham to Edm. Burke, Esq.. .. 21

Feb. 1 9. Lord North to Edm. Burke, Esq 23

March 9- Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 24

May 15. Dr. Benj. Franklin to Edm. Burke, Esq 27

June 16. Duke of Richmond to Edm. Burke, Esq 28

June 28. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 31

Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham. ... 33

July 11. Marquis of Rockingham to Edm. Burke, Esq.. .. 35

July 19- Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 37

Aug. 4. Edm. Burke, Esq,, to Marquis of Rockingham. ... 39

Aug. 21. Arthur Lee, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 42

Aug. 22. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Arthur Lee, Esq ib.

Aug. 22. Wm. Baker, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 44

Aug. 23. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham. ... 46

Sept. 14. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham. ... 57

A 2



iv CONTENTS.

1775.

DATE PAGE

Sept. 24. Marquis of Rockingham to Edm. Burke, Esq 66

Sept. 26. Edrn. Burke, Esq., to Duke of Richmond 71

Oct. 5. Duke of Portland to Edm. Burke, Esq 76

Oct. 17. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham. ... 78

Oct. 20. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 79

Oct. 24. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 81

Oct. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham 82

Nov. 2. Marquis of Rockingham to Edm. Burke, Esq. ... 84

Nov. 3. Lord John Cavendish to Edm. Burke, Esq 86

Nov. 25. Duke of Richmond to Edm. Burke, Esq ib.

Dec. 15. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 88

Dec. 28. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 89

1776.

Feb. 10. Mrs. Montague to Edm. Burke, Esq 91

March 17. Wm. Eden, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 92

March 18. Wm. Eden, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 94

March. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 95

April 3. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 98

April 22. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 101

May 4. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham . . 102

May 4. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marchioness of Rockingham 104

May 30. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 106

July 1 1 . Edm. Burke, Esq., to John Bourke, Esq 109

Aug. 26. Duke of Richmond to Edm. Burke, Esq 112

Oct. Amendment to the Address to his Majesty 121

Oct. 31. Duke of Richmond to Edm. Burke, Esq 127

Nov. 2. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq ib.

Dec. 15. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Dr. Brocklesby 130

1777.

Jan. 6. Marquis of Rockingham to Edm. Burke, Esq. . . . 132
Jan. 13. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Richard Champion, Esq.... 134
Jan. 21. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Richard Champion, Esq. . . . 135
Jan. 22. Sir A. I. Elton, Town Clerk of Bristol, to Edm.

Burke, Esq 136



CONTENTS.



1777.

DATE PAGE

Jan. 23. Rich. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 138

Jan. 30. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Sir A. I. Elton, Town Clerk

of Bristol 141

Jan. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 145

Feb. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 148

April 3. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 149

April 4. From a gentleman in Philadelphia to Edm. Burke,

Esq 152

May 9. Edm. Burke, Esq., to 155

June 2. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Gen. Oglethorpe 157

June 5. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Lord North 159

June 10. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Dr. Robertson 161

June 26. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 165

July 3. Edm. Burke, Esq , to Rich. Champion, Esq 167

July 21 . Edm. Burke, Esq., to Dr. Brocklesby 170

Aug. 11. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 171

Aug. 26. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Earl of Abingdon 174

Aug. 28. Earl of Abingdon to Edm. Burke, Esq 177

Sept. 1 . Wm. Burke, Esq., to Philip Francis, Esq 179

Sept. 8. Hon. Charles James Fox to Edm. Burke, Esq. ... 181

Oct. 1. Philip Francis, Esq., to Wm. Burke, Esq 183

Oct. 9. Wm. Baker, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 186

Oct. 22. Wm. Baker, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 187

Oct. 31. Edm. Burke, Esq., to a Member of the Bell Club,

Bristol 192

Nov. 5. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham. ... 198

Dec. 9. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 201

Dec. 25. Wm. Baker, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 205

1778.

Mar. 3. James Boswell, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 207

April 11. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 210

April 14. Edm. Burke, Esq , to Rich. Champion, Esq 211

April 24. Edm. Burke, Esq., to John Noble, Esq 214

April 30. Edin. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 218



VI CONTENTS.

1778.

DATE PAGE

May 12. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Samuel Span, Esq., Master

of Merchants' Hall, Bristol 219

May 12. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Messrs. Harford, Cowles,

& Co 221

jJuly 1. Rt. Hon. Edm. Sexton Pery to Edm. Burke, Esq.. . 223

June. Hon. Charles James Fox to Edm. Burke, Esq 225

July 2. Alexander Wedderburne, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq. 226

July 10. Rt. Hon. Edm. Sexton Pery to Edm. Burke, Esq. . 227

July 28. Rt. Hon. Edm. Sexton Pery to Edm. Burke, Esq. . 230

Aug. 11. Rt. Hon. Edm. Sexton Pery to Edm. Burke, Esq. . 232

Aug. 11. Luke Gardiner, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 233

Aug. 18. Dr. John Curry to Edm. Burke, Esq 237

Aug. 26. Rt. Hon. Edm. Sexton Pery to Edm. Burke, Esq. . 239

Oct. 9. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 240

Dec. 14. Wm. Burke, Esq., to Philip Francis, Esq 244

Dec. 24. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Philip Francis, Esq 247

1779-

Feb. 28. Wm. Jones, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 252

Mar. 25. Mr. Patrick Bowie to Edm. Burke, Esq 253

Mar. 30. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Mr. Patrick Bowie 255

April 17. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Michael Miller, Esq., Master

of Merchants' Hall, Bristol 261

April 24. Rev. John Erskine to Edmund Burke, Esq 266

April. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rev. John Erskine 268

May 25. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Shackleton 274

June 15. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 279

Aug. 6. Dr. John Curry to Edm. Burke, Esq 281

Aug. 8. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham. . . . 282

Aug. 13. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 286

Aug. 9- Mr. Anthony Dermott to Edm. Burke, Esq 290

Aug. 1 4. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Dr. John Curry 291

Aug. 1 7. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Mr. Anthony Dermott .... 295

Aug. 20. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 297

Aug. 29. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 303

Sept. 4. Dr. John Curry to Edm. Burke, Esq 305



CONTENTS. Vll
1779.

DATE PAGE

Dec. Q. Edm. Burke, Esq., to the Mayor of Bristol 308

Edm. Burke, Esq., to Baron Mazeres 310

1780.

Jan. 7- Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham 313

Jan. 24. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 316

Jan. 27. Thomas Burgh, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 319

Feb. 11. Economical Administration of the Civil Government 321

April 4. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Joseph Harford, Esq 335

May 6. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Shackleton 345

May 22. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Sir W. W. Wynne, Bart. . . 347

May 24. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 349

June 7- Rich. Burke, Sen., Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq. 350

June 13. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Shackleton 352

June 15. Edm. Burke, Esq , to Lord Chief Justice of the

Common Pleas 356

June. Lord North to Edm. Burke, Esq 361

July 24. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Viscount Courtenay 363

Aug. 10. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Mr. Watts, Bristol 367

Aug. 11. Edm. Burke, Esq., to John Noble, Esq 372

Sept. 15. Hon. Charles James Fox to Edm. Burke, Esq. . . . 376

Sept. 26. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 379

Sept. 27. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Joseph Harford, Esq 381

Oct. 3. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Earl of Hillsborough and

Lord Viscount Stormont 390

Oct. 28. Sir A. I. Elton, Town Clerk of Bristol, to Edm.

Burke, Esq 394

Dec. 2. Edm. Burke, Esq., to 395

1781.

Jan. 7. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq 398

Mar. 16. Rich. Burke, Esq., to Rich. Champion, Esq...... 403

Mar. 23. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Sir Thomas Rumbold, Bart. 406

Mar. 27. Mr. George Crabbe to Edm. Burke, Esq 413

April 10. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Mr. Tighe 415

Aug. 2. General Burgoyne to Edm. Burke, Esq 417



Vlll CONTENTS.

1781.

DATE PAGE

Aug. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Dr. Benj. Franklin 420

Aug. 14. Sir Joshua Reynolds to Edm. Burke, Esq 424

Aug. 24. Mr. George Crabbe to Edm. Burke, Esq 429

Sept. 15. George Goold, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 432

Sept. 18. Lord Petre to Edm. Burke, Esq 436

Sept. Edm. Burke, Esq , to Lord Petre 437

Oct. 15. Dr. Benj. Franklin to Edm. Burke, Esq 439

Dec. 2. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Mons. Bourdieu 441

Dec. 16. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Mons. Bourdieu 444

Dec. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Dr. Benj. Franklin 450

1782.

Mar. 17. Wm. Jones, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 454

Mar. 22. Wm. Eden, Esq., to Edm. Burke, Esq 459

Mar. 22. Edm. Burke, Esq., to Marquis of Rockingham. .. . 461

April 4. Bishop of Killaloe to Rt. Hon. Edm. Burke 463

April. Rt. Hon. Edm. Burke to Marquis of Rockingham 466

April. Sketch of a Memorial or Speech from the Marquis

of Rockingham to the King ...... 468

April 16. Rev. George Crabbe to Rt. Hon. Edm. Burke 475

April 24. Rev. Walker King to Wm. Burke, Esq 476

April 24. Rt. Hon. Edm. Burke to Wm. Burke, Esq 483

May. Rt. Hon. Edm. Burke to Marquis of Rockingham 486

May 7- Wm. Jones, Esq., to Rt. Hon. Edm. Burke 487

July 3. Earl Fitzwilliam to Rt. Hon. Edm. Burke 491



CORRESPONDENCE,



EDMUND BURKE, ESQ., TO RICHARD CHAMPION, ESQ.

Beconsfield, January 10, 1775.

MY DEAR CHAMPION,

Depend upon it, I never shall complain of the
excess of your kindness, or of your frequent
obliging remembrance of me and my affairs. If
I make any progress in the good opinion and
esteem of those whom I beg leave to call my
fellow citizens, I owe it wholly, and shall ever
acknowledge it, to the generous zeal of those
friends who are resolved to make me appear of
some value, by the pains they take to keep me in
their service. The present crisis is, indeed, of the
importance that you state it. It is important to
the commerce, and nearly as important to every
interest of this kingdom. If the merchants had
thought fit to interfere last winter, the distresses
of this might certainly have been prevented ; con-
ciliatory measures would have taken place ; and

VOL. II. B



2 CORRESPONDENCE OF THE

they would have come with more dignity, and with
far better effect, before the trial of our strength
than after it. But a confidence in ministers, and a
dread of the imputation of giving countenance to
what those ministers called faction, rendered them
all passive, and some worse than passive, in the
plans then adopted. By means of this reserve, the
authority of the mercantile interest, which ought
to have supported with efficacy and power the
opposition to the fatal cause of all this mischief,
was pleaded against us, and we were obliged to
stoop under the accumulated weight of all the in-
terests in this kingdom. I never remember the
opposition so totally abandoned as on that occa-
sion. Now, as it was foreseen, they begin to stir,
because they begin to feel. But still the same
influence which hindered them from taking any
previous measures to prevent their disaster, will,
I fear, hinder them from taking any effectual mea-
sures to redress it. The meeting in London was
large, and the sense of their situation as lively as
possible ; but, as far as I could find, they had
nothing like the sentiments of honest, free, and
constitutional resentment, which Englishmen used
formerly to feel against the authors of any public
mischief; and they seemed to entertain full as
great apprehensions of taking any steps displeasing
to the authors of their grievances, as they showed
desire of redressing them. If the spirit in Bristol



RIGHT HON. EDMUND BURKE. 3

should not be different from (I was going to say
better than) this, the draft of the petition I sub-
mit to you agreeably to your desire, will not be
accepted ; and, therefore, I am clear, ought not
to be tried. If, on the contrary, you should be
inclined to connect the censure of mischievous
measures and unwise counsellors, with the desire
of relief from the evils you suffer from them,
something of the kind I send you, but improved,
will be the most proper. Otherwise, you will natu-
rally follow the platform of the London petition,
and can be at no loss in the wording.

You tell me that Lord Clare's flummery still
prevails in Bristol. Any diet, to be sure, in hard
times, is something. This, however, is a maigre
which will scarcely keep flesh on the bones of the
manufacturers, who are starving by the measures
of those whom he supports. Whatever mode of
petition the merchants of Bristol choose to adopt
must appear ridiculous, when the corporate body
of the city has publicly admitted (by suffering
Lord Clare's construction on their thanks) that all
the American proceedings are perfectly agreeable
to them. If I stood in the situation of some of
those in the corporation, who were Lord Clare's
friends, and honour me with being mine, I would
certainly take some public method of letting him
and the world know that it was not for his Ame-
rican politics, but for his attention to the local in-

B 2



4 CORRESPONDENCE OF THE

terests and commercial welfare of this city, that I
thanked him ; and that the consideration of that,
had made me overlook the other parts of his con-
duct. I suggest this, because I do not wish to see
any place that I honour, or any friends that I
regard, supposed to thank a man for supporting
measures, against the mischievous tendency of
which they had no less than twice been obliged
to petition.

I received a letter of thanks for my little share
in the little bill. I hope to merit much more
from you locally ; and as for my American mea-
sures, they have one thing to recommend them,
a certain unity of colour which has stood wearing
for upwards of nine years, and which every day
appears more and more fresh. It is indeed dyed
in grain. I hope, if ever I merit your thanks,
that you will have no occasion to distinguish my
local services from my public conduct. Adieu,
my dear friend. I shall go to town to-morrow.
We all salute you. Pray remember me as I ought
to the committee, and by no means forget me at
the Bell \ to which I hope due regard is paid.
Esto perpetua !

I am, with great respect and affection,

Your very faithful, humble servant,
EDM. BURKE.

1 The house at which a club of Bristol whigs, chiefly sup-
porters of Mr. Burke, used to meet.



RIGHT HON. EDMUND BURKE. 5

Thistlewaite has a great many good verses in his
poem. If he is too rough a player, he is a player
against our adversary ; but, as I judge by his pre-
face, not on our part. At any rate, it is certainly
not right in you to encourage such things ; but
then it is not necessary you should be anxious
about these publications. You do not direct. I do
not find that party has ever made an apology for
any of their scurrilities.



EDMUND BURKE, ESQ., TO THE MARQUIS OF
ROCKINGHAM.

Westminster, January 12, 1775.

MY DEAR LORD,

Yesterday, as you will see by the papers, the
petition was voted 2 . There had been much de-

2 This petition from London Merchants, setting forth the
losses and danger to which British commerce was exposed by
a continuance of the differences with the American colonies,
was presented to the House of Commons by Alderman Hayley
on the 23rd of January, who moved that it should be taken
into consideration by a committee of the whole House on
American affairs, already appointed for the 26th. This was
opposed by ministers, who, by a majority of 197 to 81, re-
ferred it to a select committee for the 27th. Other petitions
of the same kind were afterwards referred to this committee,
and being all equally neglected, the select committee was
named by Burke, "The Committee of Oblivion."



6 CORRESPONDENCE OF THE

bate without any real difference of opinion. The
court-party said little, and, I believe, think it
better policy to weaken the measure, than to
appear in direct opposition to what they are not
able to prevent. The alarm among the American
merchants is strong, but as yet not strong enough
to get the better of their habitual deference to
administration. Even the fears of several dispose
them to a submission to the authors of their
calamities, lest they should be provoked to make
them more intolerable. This is a very mean spirit,
and, if possible, meaner policy. But so it is. The
petition, as it was first prepared by the merchants,
was to the last degree cold and jejune. Not a
word purporting the least dislike to the proceed-
ings of the last parliament. Not a syllable that
indicated a preference of one system of American
government over another. But Baker 3 , with great
address and perseverance, carried some distant
reflection on the American laws, and some com-
pliment on the beneficial effects of the repeal of
the stamp-act.

This petition is far, and far enough, even now,
from what in common sense it ought to be ; for by
putting the whole on the sufferings of trade from
the resistance of America, it sets the nation in a



3 William Baker, Esq., of Bayford-bury, many years mem-
ber for Hertfordshire.



RIGHT HON. EDMUND BURKE. 7

very humble, and, in truth, an abject state, in case
of a concession. Had indeed the ministry been
disposed, or any prevalent party in parliament been
disposed, to overturn the obnoxious acts, as being
fundamentally unjust and impolitic, the merchants
might come with great weight and propriety, to
speak of their effect upon trade. At present, we
have no reason assigned by those who have any
strength, either within or without doors, for giving
way, but the opposition our acts have met with.
Baker has certainly made this petition better by
much than he found it. He could obtain no more;
and something would be done, whether any of us
chose it or not.

Mr. Ellis has done a great deal towards bringing
the West India merchants and planters to a right
sense of their situation. He would have suc-
ceeded better, if your lordship's old withered
Rose 4 , who in his best was no better than a
dog-rose, had not, within these few weeks, totally
altered his hue. He has seen his brother, and
he has seen Lord North. He had drawn a set
of resolutions as the basis of a petition, in which
no shadow of censure was thrown upon any of the
acts ; nor did he admit the most remote allusion
to the advantages derived from your lordship's
repeal. When Ellis first called upon me, this was

4 Rose Fuller, many years member for Rye. He died in 1777.



8 CORRESPONDENCE OF THE

the temper of Fuller, in which he would be suffi-
ciently countenanced by others. But I showed
Ellis the journals yesterday morning, where Rose
Fuller was in the chair of the committee for repeal-
ing that act, one of the tellers on the division,
and a principal actor and zealous manager in the
whole. It seems our Rosycrucian philosopher had
lost all memory of this transaction. Ellis instantly
called on him, revived his recollection, and for the
mere sake of consistency, he consented to admit
a hint concerning the repeal.

On my coming to town on Tuesday, I found a
note from the Duchess of Richmond. I dined
with her grace and Lord George. The duchess
sent off an express the next morning to Goodwood,
with your lordship's letter to the duke. As far as
the speech has circulated, it produces rather a good
effect. I wonder that Lady Rockingham had not
got the copy which was left at Grosvenor-square.
I hope her ladyship did not imagine I was insen-
sible of the honour which she did me, in wishing
to see it.

I am with the truest and most affectionate
attachment, ever,

My dear lord,

Your most faithful and obedient
humble servant,

EDM. BURKE.

My birth-day ; I need not say how long ago.



RIGHT HON. EDMUND BURKE. 9



EDMUND BURKE, ESQ., TO JAMES BARRY, ESQ.
Broad Sanctuary, Sunday, Jan. 15, 1775.

MR. Burke presents his compliments to Mr.
Barry, and is extremely obliged to him for the
honour he has done him, in his early communication
of his most ingenious performance on painting;
from several parts of which he has received no
small pleasure and instruction. There are, through-
out the whole, many fine thoughts and observa-
tions, very well conceived, and very powerfully
and elegantly expressed. They would, however,
have appeared with still greater advantage, if Mr.
Barry had attended to the methodical distribution
of his subject, and to the rules of composition,
with the same care with which he has studied and
finished several of the particular members of his
work.

According to the natural order, it is evident,
that what is now the 13th chapter, ought to follow
immediately after the 8th, and the 9th to succeed
to what is now the 18th. The subject of re-
ligion, which is resumed in the 19th chapter,
ought more naturally to follow, or to make a
part of the 9th, where indeed it is far better
(indeed perfectly well) handled ; and where, in
Mr. Burke's poor opinion, as much is said upon



10 CORRESPONDENCE OF THE

the subject as it could reasonably bear. The
matter in that last chapter is not quite so well
digested, nor quite so temperately handled, as
in the former ; and, Mr. Burke fears, will not
give the satisfaction which the public will receive
from the rest.

There are a few parts which Mr. Burke could
not have understood, if he had not been previously
acquainted, by some gentlemen to whom Mr.
Barry had explained them, that they are allusions
to certain matters agitated among artists, and
satires upon some of them. With regard to the
justice or injustice of these strictures, (of which
there are several,) Mr. Burke can form no
opinion ; as he has little or no knowledge of the
art, he can be no judge of the emulations and
disputes of its professors. These parts may there-
fore, for aught he knows, be very grateful, and
possibly useful, to the several parties which sub-
sist (if any do subsist) among themselves ; but he
apprehends they will not be equally pleasing
to the world at large, which desires to be rather
entertained by their works, than troubled with
their contentions. Whatever merit there may
be in these reflections, the style of that part
which most abounds with them, is by no means
so lively, elegant, clear, or liberal, as the rest.

Mr. Burke hopes for Mr. Barry's obliging and
friendly indulgence, for his apology for the liberty



RIGHT HON. EDMUND BURKE. 11

he has taken, in laying before him what seemed
to him less perfect in a work which in general
he admires, and is persuaded the world will
admire very highly. Mr. Barry knows that objec-
tions, even from the meanest judges, may some-
times be of use to the best writers ; and certainly,
such little criticisms may be of service on future
occasions, if Mr. Barry should continue to oblige
the public with further publications on this
or any other subject, (as there are few to which
he is not very equal,) and should turn his talents
from the practice, to the theory and controverted
questions of this pleasing art.



EDMUND BURKE, ESQ., TO A COMMITTEE AT
BRISTOL.

Friday, January 20, 1775.

GENTLEMEN,

I have deferred any account of the proceedings
in parliament, until they discovered something
clear and decisive concerning the designs of
ministry, with regard to the grand object of this
sessionthe affairs of America. I am sorry
to find that they are such as, I believe, will give
you very little satisfaction, and will contribute



12 CORRESPONDENCE OF THE

as little to the advantage and repose of this
distracted empire.

This day, the Earl of Chatham made a motion,
without concert or communication with any indivi-
dual, that I know of, desiring an address to the
crown to remove the troops from Boston, as
an indication of a disposition in the mother coun-
try to conciliate with the colonies. Any thing
which led to an early declaration of an healing
system, could not be rejected by those who are
adverse to the late unhappy measures of violence.
It were to be wished, indeed, that the motion had



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