Richard Francis Burton.

A plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments : now entituled, The book of the thousand nights and a night : with introduction, explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men, and a terminal essay upon the history of The nights (Volume 7) online

. (page 1 of 40)
Online LibraryRichard Francis BurtonA plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments : now entituled, The book of the thousand nights and a night : with introduction, explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men, and a terminal essay upon the history of The nights (Volume 7) → online text (page 1 of 40)
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In Memory of




IN

Raymond Best

THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

RIVERSIDE



TO THE PURE ALL THINGS ARE PURE"

(Puris omnia pura)

Arab Proverb.

'Niuna corrotta mente intese mai sanamente parole."

"Decameron " conclusion.



'Erubuit, posuitque meuxn Lucre tia librum

Sed coram Bruto. Brute I recede, leget. "

Martial.



" Mieulx est de ris que de larmes escripre,

Pour ce que rire est le propre des hommes."

RABELAIS.



"The pleasure we derive from perusing the Thousand-and-One
Stones makes us regret that we possess only a comparatively small
pert of these twily enchanting fictions."

CRICHTON'S "History of Arabia.




PLAIN AND LITERAL TRANSLATION OF THE
ARABIAN NIGHTS' ENTERTAINMENTS, NOW



ENTITULED



THE BOOK OF THE



anfc



INTRODUCTION EXPLANATORY NOTES ON THE
MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF MOSLEM MEN AND A
TERMINAL ESSAY UPON THE HISTORY OF THE
NIGHTS

VOLUME VII.



BY



RICHARD F. BURTON




PRINTED BY THE BURTON CLUB FOR PRIVATE
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY



FvJ ///

B ? ,
v>7



iflrrra

This edition, issued by The Burton
Club, is limited to one thousand sets,
of which this is

Number-



I INSCRIBE THESE PAGES

TO

AN OLD AND VALUED FRIEND.

JOHN W. LARKING

(WHILOME OF ALEXANDRIA),

JW WHOSE HOSPITABLE HOME ("THE SYCAMORES") I MADE MY FINAL

PREPARATIONS FOR A PILGRIMAGE TO MECCAH

AND EL-MEDINAH.

R. F. BURTON.



CONTENTS OF THE SEVENTH VOLUME.



MM

CONTINUATION OF THE HISTORY OF GHARIB AND His BROTHER AJIB . i

OTBAH AND RAYYA 91

HIND DAUGHTER OF AL-NU'MAN AND AL-HAJJAJ .... 96

KHUZAYMAH BIN BISHR AND IKRIMAH AL-FAYYAZ ... 99

YUNUS THE SCRIBE AND THE CALIPH WALID BIN SAHL . . 104

HARUN AL-RASHID AND THE ARAB GIRL 108

AL-ASMA'I AND THE THREE GIRLS OF BASSORAH . . .no

IBRAHIM OF MOSUL AND THE DEVIL 113

(Lane, Vol. I. page 223.)

THE LOVERS OF THE BANU UZRAH 117

THE BADAWI AND HIS WIFE 124

(Lane, Vol. I. 52 1. )

THE LOVERS OF BASSORAH 130

ISHAK OF MOSUL AND HIS MISTRESS AND THE DEVIL . . 136

THE LOVERS OF AL-MEDINAH 139

(Lane, Another Anecdote of Two Lovers, HI. 252 J

AL-MALIK AL-NASIR AND HIS WAZIR 142



viii Contents.

THE ROGUERIES OF DALILAH THE CRAFTY AND HER DAUGHTER

ZAYNAB THE CONEY-CATCHER 144

(Lane omits, j

THE ADVENTURES OF MERCURY ALI OF CAIRO .... 172

(Lane omits.)

ARDASHIR AND HAYAT AL-NUFUS 209

(Lane omits.)

JULNAR THE SEA-BORN AND HER SON KING BADR BASIM OF

PERSIA . . 264

(Lane, 111. 255, The Story ofjullanar of the Sea.)

KING MOHAMMED BIN SABAIK AND THE MERCHANT HASAN . 308
(Lane, III. 373, Notes to Chaft. xxiv.)

a. STORY OF PRINCE SAYK AL-MULUK AND THE PRINCESS BADI'A AL-JAMAL . 314

(Lane, III. 308, The Story of Self El-Mulook and Badeea El-Jamal, with the Intro-
duction transferred to a note, p. yj2.)



The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night.



Nofo fofjen ft foas tfje &tx ^untorcfc anfc ^frtg-sebcnt!)

SHAHRAZAD continued, It hath reached me, O auspicious King,
that Sa'adan having broken into the palace of King Jamak and
pounded to pieces those therein, the survivors cried out, " Quarter t
Quarter ! " ; and Sa'adan said to them, " Pinion your King ! " So
they bound Jamak and took him up, and Sa'adan drove them
before him like sheep and brought them to Gharib's presence, after
the most part of the citizens had perished by the enemy's swords.
When the King of Babel came to himself, he found himself bound
and heard Sa'adan say, " I will sup to-night off this King Jamak :"
whereupon he turned to Gharib and cried to him, " I throw myself
on thy mercy." Replied Gharib, " Become a Moslem, and thou
shalt be safe from the Ghul and from the vengeance of the Living
One who ceaseth not." So Jamak professed Al-Islam with heart
and tongue and Gharib bade loose his bonds. Then he expounded
The Faith to his people and they all became True Believers ; after
which Jamak returned to the city and despatched thence provaurit
and henchmen to Gharib; and wine to the camp before Babel
where they passed the night. On the morrow, Gharib gave the
signal for the march and they fared on till they came to Mayya-
farikfn, 1 which they found empty, for its people had heard what
had befallen Babel and had fled to Cufa-city and told Ajib.
When he heard the news, his Doom-day appeared to him and he
assembled his braves and informing them of the enemy's approach'
ordered them make ready to do battle with his brother's host j
after which he numbered them and found them thirty thousand
horse and ten thousand foot. 2 So, needing more, he levied other
fifty thousand men, cavalry and infantry, and taking horse amid a
mighty host, rode forwards, till he came upon his brother's army
encamped before Mosul and pitched his tents in face of their lines.
Then Gharib wrote a writ and said to his officers. " Which of you
will carry this letter to Ajib ? " Whereupon Sahim sprang to his
feet and cried, " O King of the Age, I will bear thy missive and
bring thee back an answer." So Gharib gave him the epistle and



1 Mayyafarikin, whose adjective for shortness is "Fariki": the place is often men-
tioned in the Nights as the then capital of Diyar Bakr, thirty parasangs from Na"sibin,
the classical Nisibis, between the upper Euphrates and Tigris.

2 This proportion is singular to moderns but characterised Arab and more especially
Turcoman armies.

VOL. VII. A



2 A If Layluh wa Laylah.

he repaired to the pavilion of Ajib who, when informed of his
coming, said, " Admit him I " and when he stood in the presence
asked him, " Whence comest thou ?" Answered Sahim, " From the
King of the Arabs and the Persians, son-in-law of Chosroe, King
of the world, who sendeth thee a writ ; so do thou return him a
reply." Quoth Ajib, " Give me the letter ;" accordingly Sahim
gave it to him and he tore it open and found therein : " In the
name of Allah the Compassionating, the Compassionate ! Peace
on Abraham the Friend await ! But afterwards. As soon as this
letter shall come to thy hand, do thou confess the Unity of the
Bountiful King, Causer of causes and Mover of the clouds j 1 and
leave worshipping idols. An thou do this thing, thou art my
brother and ruler over us and I will pardon thee the deaths of my
father and mother, nor will I reproach thee with what thou hast
done. But an thou obey not my bidding, behold, I will hasten to
thee and cut off thy head and lay waste thy dominions. Verily, I
give thee good counsel, and the Peace be on those who pace the
path of salvation and obey the Most High King ! " When Ajib
read these words and knew the threat they contained, his eyes
sank into the crown of his head and he gnashed his teeth and flew
into a furious rage. Then he tore the letter in pieces and threw it
away, which vexed Sahim and he cried out upon Ajib, saying,
" Allah wither thy hand for the deed thou hast done ! " With this
Ajib cried out to his men, saying, " Seize yonder hound and hew
him in pieces with your hangers." 2 So they ran at Sahim ; but he

1 Such is the bathos caused by the Saja' -assonance : in the music of the Arabic it
contrasts strangely with the baldness of translation. The same is the case with the
Koran, beautiful in the original and miserably dull in European languages ; it is like the
glorious style of the " Anglican Version " by the side of its bastard brothers in Hindo-
stani or Marathi ; one of these marvels of stupidity translating the " Lamb of God " by
" God's little goat."

* This incident is taken from the Life of Mohammed who, in the " Year of Missions "
(A.H. 7) sent letters to foreign potentates bidding them embrace Al-Islam ; and, his
seal being in three lines, Mohammed | Apostle | of Allah, Khusrau Parwiz ( = the
Charming) was offended because his name was placed below Mohammed's. So he tore
the letter in pieces adding, says Firdausi, these words :

Hath the Arab's daring performed such feat,
Fed on camel's milk and the lizard's meat,
That he cast on Kaydnian crown his eye ?
Fie, O whirling world ! on thy faith and fie !

Hearing of this insult Mohammed exclaimed, "Allah shall tear his kingdom!" a
prophecy which was of course fulfilled, or we should not have heard of it. These lines,
are horribly multilated in the Dabistan iii. 99.



The History of Gharib and his Brother Ajib. 3

bared blade and fell upon them and slew of them more than fifty
braves ; after which he cut his way out, though bathed in blood, and
won back to Gharib, who said, " What is this case, O Sahim ? "
And he told him what had passed, whereat he grew livid for rage
and crying " Allaho Akbar God is most great !" bade the battle-
drums beat. So the fighting-men donned their hauberks and
coats of straitwoven mail and baldrick'd themselves with their
swords ; the footmen drew out in battle-array, whilst the horsemen
mounted their prancing horses and dancing camels and levelled
their long lances, and the champions rushed into the field. Ajib
and his men also took horse and host charged down upon host.
- And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day and ceased to say
her permitted say.



Nofo to&m it toas t& &(x f^unturetr anfc {EfjtttB-tt'g&tfr Ttftgfjt,

She pursued, It hath reached me, O auspicious King, that when
Gharib and his merry men took horse, Ajib and his troops also
mounted and host charged down upon host. Then ruled the Kazi
of Battle, in whose ordinance is no wrong, for a seal is on his lips
and he speaketh not ; and the blood railed in rills and purfled
earth with curious embroidery ; heads grew gray and hotter waxed
battle and fiercer. Feet slipped and stood firm the valiant and
pushed forwards, whilst turned the faint-heart and fled, nor did
they leave fighting till the day darkened and the night starkened.
Then clashed the cymbals of retreat and the two hosts drew apart
each from other, and returned to their tents, where they nighted.
Next morning, as soon as it was day, the cymbals beat to battle
and derring-do, and the warriors donned their harness of fight and
baldrick'd 1 their blades the brightest bright and with the brown
lance bedight mounted doughty steed every knight and cried out,
saying, " This day no flight ! " And the two hosts drew out in
battle array, like the surging sea, The first to open the chapter 2 of



1 This ' Taklid " must not be translated " girt on the sword." The Arab carries his
weapon by a baldrick or bandoleer passed over his right shoulder. In modern days the
4t Majdal" over the left shoulder supports on the right hip a line of Tatarif or bra.^s
cylinders for cartridges: the other cross-belt (Al-Masdar) bears on the left side the
Kharfzah or bullet-pouch of hide ; and the Hizam or waist-belt holds the dagger and
extra cartridges. (Pilgrimage iii. 90.)

8 Arab. " Bab," which may mean door or gate. The plural form (Abwlb) occurs in
the next line, meaning that he displayed all manner of martial prowess.



4 A If Layhh wa Laylah.

war was Sahim, who drave his destrier between the two lines and
played with swords and spears and turned over all the Capitula of
combat till men of choicest wits were confounded. Then he cried
out, saying, " Who is for fighting ? Who is for jousting? Let no
sluggard come out or weakling!" Whereupon there rushed at
him a horseman of the Kafirs, as he were a flame of fire ; but
Sahim let him not stand long before him ere he overthrew him
with a thrust. Then a second came forth and he slew him also,
and a third and he tare him in twain, and a fourth and he did him
to death ; nor did they cease sallying out to him and he left not
slaying them, till it was noon, by which time he had laid low two
hundred braves. Then Ajib cried to his men, " Charge once
more," and sturdy host on sturdy host down bofle and great was
the clash of arms and battle-roar. The shining swords out rang ;
the blood in streams ran and footman rushed upon footman ;
Death showed in van and horse-hoof was shodden with skull of
man ; nor did they cease from sore smiting till waned the day
and the night came on in black array, when they drew apart
and, returning to their tents, passed the night there. As soon
as morning morrowed the two hosts mounted and sought the
field of fight ; and the Moslems looked for Gharib to back steed
and ride under the standards as was his wont, but he came not.
So Sahim sent to his brother's pavilion a slave who, finding him
not, asked the tent-pitchers, 1 but they answered, "We know
naught of him." Whereat he was greatly concerned and went
forth and told the troops, who refrained from battle, saying, " An
Gharib be absent, his foe witl destroy us." Now there was for
Gharib's absence a cause strange but true which we will set out in
order due. And it was thus. When Ajib returned to his*:amp
on the preceding night, he called one of his guardsmen by name
Sayydr and said to him, " O Sayyar, I have not treasured thee
save for a day like this ; and now I bid thee enter among
Gharib's host and, pushing into the marquee of their lord, bring
him hither to me and prove how wily thy cunning be." And
Sayyar said, " I hear and I obey." So he repaired to the enemy's
camp and stealing into Gharib's pavilion, under the darkness of
the night, when all the men had gone to their places of rest, stood
up as though he were a slave to serve Gharib, who presently,



1 Arab. " Farrdsh " (also used in Persian), a man of general utility who pitches tents,
sweeps the floors, administers floggings, etc. etc. (Pilgrimage iii. 90).



The History of Gharib and his Brother Ajib. 5

being athirst, called to him for water. So he brought him a
pitcher of water, drugged with Bhang, and Gharib could not fulfil
his need ere he fell down with head distancing heels, whereupon
Sayyar wrapped him in his cloak and carrying him to Ajib's tent,
threw him down at his feet. Quoth Ajib, " O Sayyar, what is
this?" Quoth he, "This be thy brother Gharib ;" whereat Ajib
rejoiced and said, " The blessings of the Idols light upon thee !
Loose him and wake him." So they made him sniff up vinegar
and he came to himself and opened his eyes ; then, finding
himself bound and in a tent other than his own, exclaimed, " There
is no Majesty and there is no Might save in Allah, the Glorious,
the Great ! " Thereupon Ajib cried out at him, saying, " Dost
thou draw on me, O dog, and seek to slay me and take on me
thy blood-wreak of thy father and thy mother ? I will send thee
this very day to them and rid the world of thee." Replied
Gharib, " Kafir hound ! soon shalt thou see against whom the
wheels of fate shall revolve and who shall be overthrown by the
wrath of the Almighty King, Who wotteth what is in hearts and
Who shall leave thee in Gehenna tormented and confounded !
Have ruth on thyself and say with me : There is no god but the
God and Abraham is the Friend of God!" When Ajib heard
Gharib's words, he snarked and snorted and railed at his god, the
stone, and called for the sworder and the leather-rug of blood ;
but his Wazir, who was at heart a Moslem though outwardly a
Miscreant, rose and kissing ground before him, said, "Patience, O
King, deal not hastily, but wait till we know the conquered from
the conqueror. If we prove the victors, we shall have power to
kill him and, if we be beaten, his being alive in our hands will be
a strength to us." And the Emirs said, " The Minister speaketh

sooth ! " And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day and

ceased saying her permitted say.



Nofo fo&w it foas t&* &uc ^untirrti anto &fmtB*nmtf)



She continued, It hath reached me, O auspicious King, that when
Ajib purposed to slay Gharib, the Wazir rose and said, " Deal
not hastily, for we have always power to kill him ! " So Ajib
bade lay his brother Gharib in irons and chain him up in his own
tent and set a thousand stout warriors to guard him. Meanwhile
Gharib's host when they awoke that morning and found not their



6 A If Laylah wa Laylah.

King, were as sheep sans a shepherd ; but Sa'adan the Ghul
cried out at them, saying, " O folk, don your war-gear and trust
to your Lord to defend you ! " So Arabs and Ajams mounted
horse, after clothing themselves in hauberks of iron and shirting
themselves in straight-knit mail, and sallied forth to the field, the
Chiefs and the colours moving in van. Then dashed out the
Ghul of the Mountain, with a club on his shoulder, two hundred
pounds in weight, and wheeled and careered, saying, " Ho,
worshippers of idols, come ye out and renown it this day, for 'tis
a day of onslaught ! Whoso knoweth me hath enough of my
mischief and whoso knoweth me not, I will make myself known
to him. I am Sa'adan, servant of King Gharib. Who is for
jousting ? Who is for fighting ? Let no faint-heart come forth
to me to-day or weakling." And there rushed upon him a
Champion of the Infidels, as he were a flame of fire, and drove at
him, but Sa'adan charged home at him and dealt him with his
club a blow which broke his ribs and cast him lifeless to the
earth. Then he called out to his sons and slaves, saying, " Light
the bonfire, and whoso falleth of the Kafirs do ye dress him and
roast him well in the flame, then bring him to me that I may
break my fast on him ! " So they kindled a fire midmost the
plain and laid thereon the lain, till he was cooked, when they
brought him to Sa'adan, who gnawed his flesh and crunched his
bones. When the Miscreants saw the Mountain-Ghul do this
deed they were affrighted with sore affright, but Ajib cried out to
his men, saying, " Out on you ! Fall upon the Ogre and hew
him in hunks with your scymitars ! " So twenty thousand men
ran at Sa'adan, whilst the footmen circled round him and rained
upon him darts and shafts so that he was wounded in four-and-
twenty places, and his blood ran down upon the earth, and he was
alone. Then the host of the Moslems drave at the heathenry,
calling for help upon the Lord of the three Worlds, and they
ceased not from fight and fray till the day came to an end, when
they drew apart. But the Infidels had captured Sa'adan, as he
were a drunken man for loss of blood ; and they bound him fast
and set him by Gharib who, seeing the Ghul a prisoner, said,
" There is no Majesty and there is no Might save in Allah, the
Glorious, the Great ! O Sa'adan, what case is this ? " " O my
lord," replied Sa'adan, " it is Allah (extolled and exalted be He !)
who ordaineth joy and annoy and there is no help but this and
that betide." And Gharib rejoined, "Thou speakest sooth, O



The History of Gharib and his Brother Ajib. 7

Sa'adan ! " But Ajib passed the night in joy and he said to his
men, " Mount ye on the morrow and fall upon the Moslems so
shall not one of them be left alive." And they replied,
" Hearkening and obedience ! " This is how it fared with them ;
but as regards the Moslems, they passed the night, dejected and
weeping for their King and Sa'adan ; but Sahim said to them,
" O folk, be not concerned, for the aidance of Almighty Allah is
nigh." Then he waited till midnight, when he assumed the garb
of a tent-pitcher ; and, repairing to Ajib's camp, made his way
between the tents and pavilions till he came to the King's marquee,
where he saw him seated on his throne surrounded by his Princes.
So he entered and going up to the candles which burnt in the tent,
snuffed them and sprinkled levigated henbane on the wicks ; after
which he withdrew and waited without the marquee, till the smoke
of the burning henbane reached Ajib and his Princes and they fell
to the ground like dead men. Then he left them and went to the
prison tent, where he found Gharib and Sa'adan, guarded by a
thousand braves, who were overcome with sleep. So he cried
out at the guards, saying, " Woe to you ! Sleep not ; but watch
your prisoners and light the cressets." Presently he filled a cresset
with firewood, on which he strewed henbane, and lighting it, went
round about the tent with it, till the smoke entered the nostrils of
the guards, and they all fell asleep drowned by the drug ; when he
entered the tent and rinding Gharib and Sa'adan also insensible
he aroused them by making them smell and sniff at a sponge full
of vinegar he had with him. Thereupon he loosed their bonds
and collars, and when they saw him, they blessed him and rejoiced
in him. After this they went forth and took all the arms of the
guards and Sahim said to them, " Go to your own camp ;" while
he re-entered Ajib's pavilion and, wrapping him in his cloak, lifted
him up and made for the Moslem encampment. And the Lord,
the Compassionate, protected him, so that he reached Gharib's
tent in safety and unrolled the cloak before him. Gharib looked
at its contents and seeing his brother Ajib bound, cried out,
" Allaho Akbar God is Most Great ! Aidance ! Victory !" And
he blessed Sahim and bade him arouse Ajib. So he made him
smell the vinegar mixed with incense, and he opened his eyes and,
finding himself bound and shackled, hung down his head earth-
wards. And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day and ceased

to say her permitted say.



A If Lay la h wa Laylak



Nofo fcrfjcn it teas t&e &ix f^untaefc an& Jortfett) Nigfjt,

She said, It hath reached me, O auspicious King, that after Sahim
had aroused Ajib, whom he had made insensible with henbane and
had brought to his brother Gharib, the captive opened his eyes
and, feeling himself bound and shackled, hung down his head
earthwards. Thereupon cried Sahim, " O Accursed, lift thy head !"
So he raised his eyes and found himself amongst Arabs and Ajams (
and saw his brother seated on the throne of his estate and the place
of his power, wherefore he was silent and spake not. Then Gharib
cried out and said, " Strip me this hound ! " So they stripped him
and came down upon him with whips, till they weakened his body
and subdued his pride, after which Gharib set over him a guard of
an hundred knights. And when this fraternal correction had been
administered they heard shouts of, " There is no God but the
God ! " and " God is Most Great ! " from the camp of the Kafirs.
Now the cause of this was that, ten days after his nephew King
Al-Damigh, Gharib's uncle, had set out from Al-Jazirah, with
twenty thousand horse, and on nearing the field of battle, had
despatched one of his scouts to get news. The man was absent
a whole day, at the end of which time he returned and told
Al-Damigh all that had happened to Gharib with his brother.
So he waited till the night, when he fell upon the Infidels, crying
out, " Allaho Akbar 1 " and put them to the edge of the biting
scymitar. When Gharib heard the Takbir, 1 he said to Sahim,
" Go find out the cause of these shouts and war-cries." So Sahim
repaired to the field of battle and questioned the slaves and camp
followers, who told him that King Al-Damigh had come up with
twenty thousand men and had fallen upon the idolaters by night,
saying, " By the virtue of Abraham the Friend, I will not forsake
my brother's son, but will play a brave man's part and beat back
the host of Miscreants and please the Omnipotent King ! " So
Sahim returned and told his uncle's derring-do to Gharib, who
cried out to his men, saying, " Don your arms and mount your
steeds and let us succour my father's brother ! " So they took
horse and fell upon the Infidels and put them to the edge of the
sharp sword. By the morning they had killed nigh fifty thousand



1 i.e. the slogan-cry of "Allaho Akbar," which M. C. Barbier de Meynard compare*
,witb the Christian "Te Deum."



The History of Gharib and his Brother Ajib. 9

of the Kafirs and made other thirty thousand prisoners, and the
rest of Ajib's army dispersed over the length and breadth of earth*
Then the Moslems returned in victory and triumph, and Gharib rode
out to meet his uncle, whom he saluted and thanked for his help.
Quoth Al-Damigh, " I wonder if that dog Ajib fell in this day's
affair." Quoth Gharib, " O uncle, be of good cheer and keep thine
yes cool and clear : know that he is with me in chains." When
Al-Damigh heard this he rejoiced with exceeding joy and the two
kings dismounted and entered the pavilion, but found no Ajib
there ; whereupon Gharib exclaimed, " O glory of Abraham, the
Friend (with whom be peace !)," adding, " Alas, what an ill end is
this to a glorious day ! " and he cried out to the tent-pitchers, say-
ing, " Woe to you ! Where is my enemy who oweth me so much ? "
Quoth they, " When thou mountedst and we went with thee, thou
didst not bid us guard him ;" and Gharib exclaimed, " There is no
Majesty and there is no Might save in Allah, the Glorious, the
Great!" But Al-Damigh said to him, "Hasten not nor be con-
cerned, for where can he go, and we in pursuit of him ? " Now
the manner of Ajib's escape was in this wise. His page Sayyar



Online LibraryRichard Francis BurtonA plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments : now entituled, The book of the thousand nights and a night : with introduction, explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men, and a terminal essay upon the history of The nights (Volume 7) → online text (page 1 of 40)