Richard Francis Burton.

The book of the thousand nights and a night; a plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments, with introd., explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men and a terminal essay upon the history of the nights (Volume 9) online

. (page 1 of 38)
Online LibraryRichard Francis BurtonThe book of the thousand nights and a night; a plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments, with introd., explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men and a terminal essay upon the history of the nights (Volume 9) → online text (page 1 of 38)
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NY PUBLIC LIBRARY THE BRANCH LIBRARIES



3 3333 06046 5016



39S . 2 ARABIAN NIGHTS EC910iW, '? ^ ^ I z I (f
Book of the thousand nights a$d s

vol. 9





MID-MANHATTAN LIBRARY

History & Social Science Department

8 East 40th Street
New York, N. Y. 10016



CC4



TO THE PURE ALL THINGS ARE PURE"

(Puris omnia pura)

Arab Proverb,

Niuna corrotta mente intese mai sanamente parole."

"Decameron " conclusion.



'Erubuit, posuitque meurn Lucretia librum

Sed coram Bruto. Brute I recede, leget. "

Martial.



"Mieulx est de ris que de larmes escripre,

Pour ce que rire est le propre des hommes. "

RABELAIS.



"The pleasure we derive from perusing the Thousand-and-Ctae
Stories makes us regret that we possess only a comparatively small
part of these truly enchanting fictions."

CRICHTOM'S "History of Arabia.




, m -,

r

-f , '

1







PLAIN AND LITERAL TRANSLATION OF THE



ARABIAN NIGHTS' ENTERTAINMENTS, NOW



ENTITULED



THE BOOK OF THE




antr a




WITH INTRODUCTION EXPLANATORY NOTES ON THE
MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF MOSLEM MEN AND A
TERMINAL ESSAY UPON THE HISTORY OF



X IG HTS



VOLUME IX



BY



RICHARD F. BURTON




PRINTED BY THE BURTON CLUB FOR PRIVATE
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY






Shammar Edition

Limited to one thousand numbered sets,
of which this is






,

-



To ALEXANDER BAIRD OF URIE,



MY DEAR BAIRD,

I avail myself of a privilege of authorship, not yet utterly
obsolete, to place your name at the head of this volume, Your long
residence in Egypt and your extensive acquaintance with its "politic,"
private and public, make you a thoroughly competent judge of the merits
and demerits of this volume ; and encourage me to hope that in reading
it you will take something of the pleasure I have had in writing it.

RICHARD F. BURTON.
TANGIER, December $ist, 1885.



10



CONTENTS OF THE NINTH VOLUME.



PACH

ALI NUR AL-DIN AND MIRIAM THE GIRDLE-GIRL (Continued) . i

(Lane omits, III. S7 2 -)

THE MAN OF UPPER EGYPT AND HIS PRANKISH WIFE . . 19

(Lane omits.)

THE RUINED MAN OF BAGHDAD AND HIS SLAVE-GIRL . . 24
( 'Lane, Anecdote of a Man of Baghdad and His Slave-Girl, III. 572 )

KING JALI'AD OF HIND AND HIS WAZIR SHIMAS : FOLLOWED
BY THE HISTORY OF KING WIRD KHAN, SON OF KING

JALI'AD, WITH HIS WOMEN AND WAZIRS . -32

a. THE MOUSE AND THE CAT 35

b. THE FAKIR AND His JAR OF BUTTER ... 40
t. THE FISHES AND THE CRAB ... 43

d. THE CROW AND THE SERPENT ... 46

e. THE WILD Ass AND THE JACKAL 48

/ THE UNJUST KING AND THE PILGRIM PRINCE . 50

g. THE CROWS AND THE HAWK ... 53

h. THE SERPENT-CHARMER AND His WIFE . 5 6
*. THE SPIDER AND THE WIND

j. THE Two KINGS .... . . 65



v iii Contents.

k, THE BLIND MAN AND THE CRIPPLE ....... 67

/. THE FOOLISH FISHERMAN 93

OT.THE BOY AND THE THIEVES .... 95

. THE MAN AND His WIFE . 9&

o. THE MERCHANT AND THE ROBBERS 100

/. THE JACKALS AND THE WOLF i3

q. THE SHEPHERD AND THE ROGUE 106

r. THE FRANCOLIN AND THE TORTOISES . . . .113

CONCLUSION OF THE HISTORY OF KING WIRD KHAN 115

ABU KIR THE DYER AND ABU SIR THE BARBER .... 134
(Lane, III. 580, The Story of Aboo Seer and Aboo Keer. )

ABDULLAH THE FISHERMAN AND ABDULLAH THE MERMAN . 165

( Lane, III. 627. The Story of 'Abd Allah of the Land and 'Abd Allah of

the Sea).

HARUN AL-RASHID AND ABU HASAN, THE MERCHANT OF

OMAN 188

IBRAHIM AND JAMILAH 207

ABU AL-HASAN OF KHORASAN 229

KAMAR AL-ZAMAN AND THE JEWELLER'S WIFE . . . .246

ABDULLAH BIN FAZIL AND HIS BROTHERS . . . * - 34



The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night,



fofcen ft tons tfje CEigljt pjuntirrtr anfc <i'sf)tg=ntnrt) Nfg&t,

She pursued, It hath reached me, O auspicious King, that when
Nur al-Din heard the voice singing these verses he said in himself,
" Verily this be the Lady Miriam chanting without hesitation or
doubt or suspicion of one from without. 1 Would Heaven I knew
an my thought be true and if it be indeed she herself or other
self! ' : And regrets redoubled upon him and he bemoaned him-
self and recited these couplets :

"When my blamer saw me beside my love o Whom I met in a site that lay open

wide,
I spake not at meeting a word of reproach o Though oft it comfort sad heart to

chide ;
Quoth the blamer, " What means this silence that bars o Thy making answer

that hits his pride ? "
And quoth I, " O thou who as fool dost wake, o To misdoubt of

lovers and Love deride ;
The sign of lover whose love is true o When he meets his beloved is mum to

bide.

When he had made an end of these verses, the Lady Miriam
fetched inkcase and paper and wrote therein : " After honour due
to the Basmala'h, 2 may the peace of Allah be upon thee and His
mercy and blessings be ! I would have thee know that thy slave-
girl Miriam saluteth thee, who longeth sore for thee; and this is
her message to thee. As soon as this letter shall fall into thy
(hands, do thou arise without stay and delay and apply thyself to
that she would have of thee with all diligence and beware with all
wariness of transgressing her commandment and of sleeping.
When the first third of the night is past, (for that hour is of the
most favourable of times) apply thee only to saddling the two
stallions and fare forth with them both to the Sultan's Gate. 3 If
any ask thee whither thou wend, answer, I am going to exercise
the steeds, and none will hinder thee ; for the folk of this city trust
to the locking of the gates." Then she folded the letter in a

1 Arab. " Wa la rajma ghaybin : " lit. = without stone-throwing (conjecture) of one
latent.

2 i.e. saying Bismillah, etc. See vol. v. 206.

3 Where he was to await her.

VOL. IX.



2 A If Laylah wa Laylah.

silken kerchief and threw it out of the latticed window to Nur al-
Din, who took it and reading it, knew it for the handwriting of the
Lady Miriam and comprehended all its contents. So he kissed
the letter and laid it between his eyes ; then, calling to mind that
which had betided him with her of the sweets of love-liesse, he
poured forth his tears whilst he recited these couplets :

Came your writ to me in the dead of the night o And desire for you stirred

heart and sprite ;
And, remembered joys we in union joyed, o Praised the Lord who placed

us in parting plight

i

As soon as it was dark Nur al-Din busied himself with making
ready the stallions and patiented till the first watch of the night
was past ; when, without a moment delay, Nur al-Din the lover
full of teen, saddled them with saddles of the goodliest, and leading
them forth of the stable, locked the door after him and repaired
with them to the city-gate, where he sat down to await the coming
of the Princess. Meanwhile, Miriam returned forthright to her
private apartment, where she found the one-eyed Wazir seated,
elbow-propt upon a cushion stuffed with ostrich-down ; but he was
ashamed to put forth his hand to her or to bespeak her. When
she saw him, she appealed to her Lord in heart, saying, " Allah-
umma O my God bring him not to his will of me nor to me
defilement decree after purity ! " Then she went up to him and
made a show of fondness for him and sat down by his side and
coaxed him, saying, " O my lord, what is this aversion thou dis-
playest to me ? Is it pride or coquetry on thy part ? But the
current byword saith : An the salam-salutation be little in demand,
the sitters salute those who stand. 1 So if, O my lord, thou come
not to me neither accost me, I will go to thee and accost thee."
Said he, " To thee belong favour and kindness, O Queen of the
earth in its length and breadth ; and what am I but one of thy
slaves and the least of thy servants. Indeed, I was ashamed to
intrude upon thine illustrious presence, O unique pearl, and my
face is on the earth at thy feet." She rejoined, " Leave this talk
and bring us to eat and drink." Accordingly he shouted to his
eunuchs and women an order to serve food, and they set before



1 As a rule, amongst Moslems the rider salutes the man on foot and the latter those
who sit. The saying in the text suggests the Christian byword anent Mohammed and
the Mountain, which is, I need hardly say, utterly unknown to Mahommedans.



Alt Nur al-Din and Miriam the Girdle-Girl. 3

them a tray containing birds of every kind that walk and fly and in
nests increase and multiply, such as sand-grouse and quails and
pigeon-poults and lambs and fatted geese and fried poultry and
other dishes of all sorts and colours. The Princess put out her
hand to the tray and began to eat and feed the Wazir with her fair
finger-tips and kiss him on the mouth. They ate till they had
enough and washed their hands, after which the handmaidens
removed the table of food and set on the service of wine. So
Princess Miriam filled the cup and drank and gave the Wazir to
drink and served him with assiduous service, so that he was like to
fly for joy and his breast broadened and he was of the gladdest.
When she saw that the wine had gotten the better of his senses,
she thrust her hand into her bosom and brought out a pastile of
virgin Cretan-Bhang, which she had provided against such an hour,
whereof if an elephant smelt a dirham's weight, he would sleep
from year to year. She distracted his attention and crumbled the
drug into the cup : then, filling it up, handed it to the Wazir, who
could hardly credit his senses for delight. So he took it and
kissing her hand, drank it off", but hardly had it settled in his
stomach when he fell head foremost to the ground. Then she rose
and filling two great pairs of saddle-bags with what was light of
weight and weighty of worth of jewels and jacinths and precious
stones, together with somewhat of meat and drink, donned harness
of war and armed herself for fight. She also took with her for Nur
al-Din what should rejoice him of rich and royal apparel and
splendid arms and armour, and shouldering the bags (for indeed
her strength equalled her valiancy), hastened forth from the new
palace to join her lover. On this wise fared it with the Lady

Miriam ; but as regards Nur al-Din, And Shahrazad perceived

the dawn of day and ceased to say her permitted say.



Nofo fobm it teas t&e lEtgfjt l^untirrtJ anfc 2s T itwtfet&

She resumed, It hath reached me, O auspicious King, that when
the Lady Miriam left the new palace, she went straightways to
meet her lover for indeed she was as valiant as she was strong ;
but Nur al-Din the distracted, the full of teen, sat at the city-gate
hending the horses' halters in hand, till Allah (to whom belong
Majesty and Might) sent a sleep upon him and he slept glory be
to Him who sleepeth not! Now at that time the Kings of the



4 A If Laylah wa Laylah.

Islands had spent much treasure in bribing folk to steal the two
steeds or one of them ; and in those days there was a black slave,
who had been reared in the islands skilled in horse-lifting ; where-
fore the Kings of the Franks seduced him with wealth galore to
steal one of the stallions and promised him, if he could avail to lift
the two, that they would give him a whole island and endue him
with a splendid robe of honour. He had long gone about the city of
France in disguise, but succeeded not in taking the horses, whilst
they were with the King ; but, when he gave them in free gift to
the Wazir and the monocular one carried them to his own stable,
the blackamoor thief rejoiced with joy exceeding and made sure
of success, saying in himself, " By the virtue of the Messiah and
the Faith which is no liar, I will certainly steal the twain of them ! **
Now he had gone out that very night, intending for the stable, to
lift them ; but, as he walked along, behold, he caught sight of
Nur al-Din lying asleep, with the halters in his hands. So he
went up to the horses and loosing the halters from their heads,
was about to mount one of them and drive the other before him,
when suddenly up came the Princess Miriam, carrying on her
shoulders the couple of saddle-bags. She mistook the black for
Nur al-Din and handed him one pair of bags, which he laid on
one of the stallions : after which she gave him the other and he set
it on the second steed, without word said to discover that it was not
her lover. Then they mounted and rode out of the gate * in
silence till presently she asked, " O my lord Nur al-Din, what
aileth thee to be silent ? " Whereupon the black turned to her
and cried angrily, " What sayst thou, O damsel ? " When she
heard the slave's barbarous accents, she knew that the speech was
not of Nur al-Din ; so raising her eyes she looked at him and saw
that he was a black chattel, snub-nosed and wide-mouthed, with
nostrils like ewers ; whereupon the light in her eyes became night
and she asked him, " Who art thou, O Shaykh of the sons of Ham
and what among men is thy name ? " He answered, " O daughter
of the base, my name is Mas'ud, the lifter of horses, when folk
slumber and sleep." She made him no reply, but straightway
baring her blade, smote him on the nape and the blade came out

I

1 The story-teller does not remember that " the city-folk trust to the locking of the
gates " (dccclxxxix.) ; and forgets to tell us that the Princess took the keys from the
"Wazir whom she had hocussed. In a carefully corrected Arabic Edition of The Nights,
a book much wanted, the texts which are now in a mutilated state would be supplied
with these details.



.Alt Nur al-Din and Miriam the Girdle-Girl. 5

gleaming from his throat-tendons, whereupon he fell earthwards,
weltering in his blood, and Allah hurried his soul to the Fire and
abiding-place dire. Then she took the other horse by the bridle
and retraced her steps in search of Nur al-Din, whom she found
lying, asleep and snoring, in the place where she had appointed
him to meet her, hending the halters in hand, yet knowing not his
fingers from his feet So she dismounted and gave him a cuff, 1
whereupon he awoke in affright and said to her, " O my lady,
praised be Allah for thy safe coming ! " Said she " Rise and
back this steed and hold thy tongue ! " So he rose and mounted
one of the stallions, whilst she bestrode the other, and they went
forth the city and rode on awhile in silence. Then said she to
him, "Did I not bid thee beware of sleeping? Verily, he pros-
pereth not who sleepeth." He rejoined, " O my lady, I slept not
but because of the cooling of my heart by reason of thy promise.
But what hath happened, O my lady ? " So she told him her
adventure with the black, first and last, and he said, " Praised be
Allah for safety ! " Then they fared on at full speed, committing
their affair to the Subtle, the All-wise and conversing as they
went, till they came to the place where the black lay prostrate in
the dust, as he were an Ifrit, and Miriam said to Nur al-Din,
" Dismount ; strip him of his clothes and take his arms." He
answered, " By Allah, O my lady, I dare not dismount nor ap-
proach him." And indeed he marvelled at the blackamoor's
stature and praised the Princess for her deed, wondering the while
at her valour and stout-heartedness. They fared on lustily and
ceased not so doing all that night and halted not till the day



1 Which probably would not be the last administered to him by the Amazonian young
person, who after her mate feared to approach the dead blackamdor must have known
him to be cowardly as Cairenes generally are. Moreover, he had no shame in his pol-
troonery like the recreant Fellah-soldiers, in the wretched Sawakin campaign against the
noble Sudani negroids, who excused their running away by saying, " We are Egyptians"
i.e. too good men and Moslems to lose our lives as becomes you Franks and dog-Chris-
tians. Yet under Mohammed All the Great, Fellah-soldiers conquered the " colligated "
Arabs (Pilgrimage iii. 48) of Al-Asir (Ophir) at Bissel and in Wahhabi-land and put the
Turks to flight at the battle of Nazfb, and the late General Jochmus assured me that he
saved his command, the Ottoman cavalry in Syria, by always manoeuvring to refuse a
pitched battle. But Mohammed Ali knew his men. He never failed to shoot a run-
away, and all his officers, even the lieutenants, were Turks or Albanians. Sa'id Pasha
was the first to appoint Fellah -officers and under their command the Egyptian soldier,
one of the best in the East, at once became the worst. We have at last found the right
way to make them fight, by officering them with Englishmen, but we must not neglect
the shooting process whenever they dare to turn tail.



6 A If Laylah wa Laylah.

broke with its shine and sheen and the sun shone bright upon
plain and height when they came to a wide riverino lea wherein
the gazelles were frisking gracefully. Its surface was clothed
with green and on all sides fruit trees of every kind were seen : its
slopes for flowers like serpents' bellies showed, and birds sang on
boughs aloud and its rills in manifold runnels flowed. And indeed
it was as saith the poet and saith well and accomplisheth the
hearer's desire :

Rosy red Wady hot with summer-glow, o Where twofold tale of common growth
was piled.

In copse we halted wherein bent to us o Branches, as bendeth nurse o'er wean-
ling-child.

And pure cold water quenching thirst we sipped : o To cup-mate sweeter than
old wine and mild :

From every side it shut out sheen of sun e Screen-like, but wooed the breeze
to cool the wild :

And pebbles, sweet as maidens deckt and dight * And soft as threaded pearls,
the touch beguiled.

And as saith another :

And when birdies o'er warble its lakelet, it gars c Longing ' lover to seek it

where morning glows ;
For likest to Paradise lie its banks o With shade and fruitage and fount that

flows.

Presently Princess Miriam and Nur al-Din alighted to rest in this

Wady And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day and ceased

saying her permitted say.



Nofo fofjen tt tons tfje CBigj&t f^untfrrtr auto



She said, It hath reached me, O auspicious King, that when
Princess Miriam and Nur al-Din alighted in that valley, they
ate of its fruits and drank of its streams, after turning the stallions
loose to pasture : then they sat talking and recalling their past
and all that had befallen them and complaining one to other of
the pangs of parting and of the hardships suffered for estrange-
ment and love-longing. As they were thus engaged, behold, there

1 " Al-walhan" (as it should be printed in previous places, instead of Al-walahan) is
certainly not a P.N. in this place-



All Nur al-Din and Miriam the Girdle-Girl. 7

arose in the distance a dust-cloud which spread till it walled the
world, and they heard the neighing of horses and clank of arms
and armour. Now the reason of this was, that after the Princess
had been bestowed in wedlock upon the Wazir who had gone in
to her that night, the King went forth at daybreak, to give the
couple good morrow, taking with him, after the custom of Kings
with their daughters, a gift of silken stuffs and scattering gold and
silver among the eunuchs and tire-women, that they might snatch
at and scramble for it. And he fared on escorted by one of his
pages ; but when he came to the new palace, he found the Wazir
prostrate on the carpet, knowing not his head from his heels ; so
he searched the place right and left for his daughter, but found
her not ; whereat he was troubled sore with concern galore and
his wits forlore. Then he bade bring hot water and virgin vinegar
and frankincense * and mingling them together, blew the mixture
into the Wazir's nostrils and shook him, whereupon he cast the
Bhang forth of his stomach, as it were a bit of cheese. He re-
peated the process, whereupon the Minister came to himself and
the King questioned him of his case and that of his daughter.
He replied, " O mighty King, I have no knowledge of her save
that she poured me out a cup of wine with her own hand ; and
from that tide to this I have no recollection of aught nor know I
what is come of her." When the King heard this, the light in
his eyes became night, and he drew his scymitar and smote the
Wazir on the head, that the steel came out gleaming from between
his grinder teeth. Then, without an instant delay, he called the
grooms and syces and demanded of them the two stallions : but
they said, " O King, the two steeds were lost in the night and
together with them our chief, the Master of Horse ; for, when we
awoke in the morning, we found all the doors wide open." Cried
the King, " By the faith of me and by all wherein my belief is
stablished on certainty, none but my daughter hath taken the
steeds, she and the Moslem captive which used to tend the Church
and which took her aforetime ! Indeed I knew him right well and
none delivered him from my hand save this one-eyed Wazir ; but
now he is requited his deed." Then the King called his three
sons, who were three doughty champions, each of whom could
withstand a thousand horse in the field of strife and the stead

1 Arab. " Kundur," Pers. and Arab, manna, mastich, frankincense, the latter being
here meant.



8 A If Laylah wa Laylah.

where cut and thrust are rife ; and bade them mount. So they
took horse forthwith and the King and the flower of his knights
and nobles and officers mounted with them and followed on the
trail of the fugitives till Miriam saw them, when she mounted her
charger and baldrick'd her blade and took her arms. Then she said
to Nur al-Din, " How is it with thee and how is thy heart for fight
and strife and fray ? ' Said he, " Verily, my steadfastness in
battle-van is as the steadfastness of the stake in bran. 1 " And he
improvised and said :

Miriam thy chiding I pray, forego ; o Nor drive me to death or injurious

blow :

How e'er can I hope to bear fray and fight o Who quake at the croak of the
corby-crow ?

1 who shiver for fear when I see the mouse o And for very funk I bepiss my

clo' !
I love no foin but the poke in bed, o When coynte well knoweth my

prickle's prow ;
This is rightful rede, and none other shows o Righteous as this in my sight, I

trow.

Now when Miriam heard his speech and the verse he made, she
laughed and smilingly said, " O my lord Nur al-Din, abide in thy
place and I will keep thee from their ill grace, though they be as
the sea-sands in number. But mount and ride in rear of me, and
if we be defeated and put to flight, beware of falling, for none can
overtake thy steed." So saying, she turned her lance-head towards
foe in plain and gave her horse the rein, whereupon he darted off
under her, like the stormy gale or like waters that from straitness
of pipes outrail. Now Miriam was the doughtiest of the folk of
her time and the unique pearl of her age and tide; for her father
had taught her, whilst she was yet little, on steeds to ride and dive
deep during the darkness of the night in the battle tide. When
the King saw her charging down upon them, he knew her but too
well and turning to his eldest son, said, " O Bartaut, 2 thou who art
surnamed Ras al-Killaut, 3 this is assuredly thy sister Miriam who
chargeth upon us, and she seeketh to wage war and fight fray with



1 So Emma takes the lead and hides her lover under her cloak during their flight to the
place where they intended to lie concealed. In both cases the women are the men.

2 Or " Bartut," in which we recognise the German Berthold.

3 i.e. Head of Killaut which makes, from the Muhit, " the name of a son of the sons
of the Jinn and the Satans."



Alt Nur al-Din and Miriam the Girdle-Girl. 9

us. So go thou out to give her battle : and I enjoin thee by the
Messiah and the Faith which is no liar, an thou get the better of
her, kill her not till thou have propounded to her the Nazarene faith.
An she return to her old creed, bring her to me prisoner ; but an
she refuse, do her die by the foulest death and make of her the
vilest of examples, as well as the accursed which is with her."
Quoth Bartaut, " Hearkening and obedience "; and, rushing out
forthright to meet his sister, said to her, " Miriam, doth not
what hath already befallen us on thine account suffice thee, but
thou must leave the faith of thy fathers and forefathers and follow
after the faith of the Vagrants in the lands, that is to say, the faith
of Al-Islam ? By the virtue of the Messiah and the Faith which
is no liar^except thou return to the creed of the Kings thy Fore-
bears and walk therein after the goodliest fashion, I will put thee
to an ill death and make of thee the most shameful of ensamples ! "
But Miriam laughed at his speech and replied, "Well-away! Far
be it that the past should present stay or that he who is dead
should again see day ! I will make thee drink the sourest of



Online LibraryRichard Francis BurtonThe book of the thousand nights and a night; a plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments, with introd., explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men and a terminal essay upon the history of the nights (Volume 9) → online text (page 1 of 38)