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Richard Francis Burton.

The book of the thousand nights and a night; a plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments, with introd., explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men and a terminal essay upon the history of the nights (Volume 9) online

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Online LibraryRichard Francis BurtonThe book of the thousand nights and a night; a plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments, with introd., explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men and a terminal essay upon the history of the nights (Volume 9) → online text (page 37 of 38)
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and crossing the current made with him for the other bank, where
he cast his burthen ashore. Now the place where the dolphin
cast up Abdullah was a well- beaten highway, and presently up
came a caravan and finding him lying on the river bank, said,
" Here is a drowned man, whom the river hath cast up ; " and the
travellers gathered around to gaze at the corpse. The Shaykh of
the caravan was a man of worth, skilled in all sciences and versed



1 Arab. "Darfil" = the Gr. SeX^i's later Se\<f>iv> suggesting that the writer had read
of Arion in Herodotus i. 23.



Abdullah bin Fazil and his Brothers. 347

in the mystery of medicine and, withal, sound of judgment : so
he said to them, " O folk, what is the news ? " They answered,
" Here is a drowned man ; " whereupon he went up to Abdullah
and examining him, said to them, O folk, there is life yet in this
young man, who is a person of condition and of the sons of
the great, bred in honour and fortune, and Inshallah there is
still hope of him." Then he took him and clothing him in dry
clothes warmed him before the fire ; after which he nursed him
and tended him three days' march till he revived ; but he was
passing feeble by reason of the shock, and the chief of the caravan
proceeded to medicine him with such simples as he knew, what
while they ceased not faring on till they had travelled thirty days'
journey from Bassorah and came to a city in the land of the
Persians, by name 'Auj. 1 Here they alighted at a Khan and
spread Abdullah a bed, where he lay groaning all night and
troubling the folk with his groans. And when morning morrowed
the concierge of the Khan came to the chief of the caravan and
said to him, " What is this sick man thou hast with thee ? Verily,
he disturbeth us," Quoth the chief, " I found him by the way, on
the river-bank and well nigh drowned ; and I have tended him,
but to no effect, for he recovereth not." Said the porter, " Show
him to the Shaykhah 2 Rajihah." "Who is this Religious?"
asked the chief of the caravan, and the door-keeper answered,
" There is with us a holy woman, a clean maid and a comely,
called Rajihah, to whom they present whoso hath any ailment;
and he passeth a single night in her house and awaketh on the
morrow, whole and ailing nothing." Quoth the chief, " Direct me
to her ; " and quoth the porter, " Take up thy sick man." So he
took up Abdullah and the doorkeeper forewent him, till he came
to a hermitage, where he saw folk entering with many an ex voto
offering- and other folk coming forth, rejoicing. The porter went
in, till he came to the curtain, 3 and said, " Permission, O Shaykhah



1 'Aiij ; I can only suggest, with due diffidence, that this is intended for Kuch the
well-known Baloch city in Persian Carmania (Kirman) and meant by Richardson's
" Koch u buloch." But as the writer borrows so much from Al-Mas'udi it may possibly
be Auk in Sistan where stood the heretical city " Shadrak," chapt. cxxii.

2 i.e. The excellent (or surpassing) Religious. Shaykhah, the fern, of Shaykh, is a
she-chief, even the head of the dancing-girls will be entitled " Shaykhah."

3 The curtain would screen her from the sight of men-invalids and probably hung
across the single room of the " Zawiyah " or hermit's cell. The curtain is noticed in the
tales of two other reverend women ; vols. iv. 155 and v. 257.



348 A If Laylah wa Laylah.

/

Rajihah ! Take this sick man." Said she, " Bring him within
the curtain ; " and the porter said to Abdullah, " Enter." So he
entered and looking upon the holy woman, saw her to be his wife
whom he had brought from the City of Stone. And when he
knew her she also knew him and saluted him and he returned her
salam. Then said he, " Who brought thee hither ? "; and she
answered, " When I saw that thy brothers had cast thee away and
were contending concerning me, I threw myself into the sea ; but
my Shaykh Al-Khizr Abu al-' Abbas took me up and brought me
to this hermitage, where he gave me leave to heal the sick and
bade cry in the city : Whoso hath any ailment, let him repair to
the Shaykhah Rajihah ; and he also said to me : Tarry in this
hermitage till the time betide, and thy husband shall come to thee
here. So all the sick used to flock to me and I rubbed them and
shampoo'd them and they awoke on the morrow whole and
sound ; whereby the report of me became noised abroad among
the folk, and they brought me votive gifts, so that I have with me
abundant wealth. And now I live here in high honour and
,worship, and all the people of these parts seek my prayers."
Then she rubbed him and by the ordinance of Allah the Most
High, he became whole. Now Al-Khizr used to come to her
every Friday night, and it chanced that the day of Abdullah's
coming was a Thursday. 1 Accordingly, when the night darkened
he and she sat, after a supper of the richest meats, awaiting the
coming of Al-Khizr, who made his appearance anon and carrying
them forth of the hermitage, set them down in Abdullah's palace
at Bassorah, where he left them and went his way. As soon as it
was day, Abdullah examined the palace and knew it for his own ;
then, hearing the folk clamouring without, he looked forth of the
lattice and saw his brothers crucified, each on his own cross.
Now the reason of this was as ensueth. When they had thrown
him into the Tigris, the twain arose on the morrow, weeping and
saying, " Our brother ! the Jinniyah hath carried off our brother ! "
Then they made ready a present and sent it to the Caliph,
acquainting him with these tidings and suing from him the
government of Bassorah. He sent for them and questioned them
and they told him the false taLe we have recounted, whereupon he

1 Abdullah met his wife on Thursday, the night of which would amongst Moslems be
Friday night. .



Abdullah bin Fazil and his Brothers. 349

was exceeding wroth. 1 So that night he prayed a two-bow
prayer before daybreak, as of his wont, and called upon the tribes
of the Jinn, who came before him subject-wise, and he questioned
them of Abdullah : when they sware to him that none of them had
done him aught of hurt and said, " We know not what is become
of him." Then came Sa'idah, daughter of the Red King, and
acquainted the Caliph with the truth of Abdullah's case, and he
dismissed the Jinn. On the morrow, he subjected Nasir and
Mansur to the bastinado till they confessed, one against other :
whereupon the Caliph was enraged with them and cried, " Carry
them to Bassorah and crucify them there before Abdullah's
palace." Such was their case ; but as regards Abdullah, when he
saw his brothers crucified, he commanded to bury them, then took
horse and repairing to Baghdad, acquainted the Caliph with that
which his brothers had done with him, from first to last and told
him how he had recovered his wife ; whereat Al-Rashid marvelled
and summoning the Kazi and the witnesses, bade draw up the
marriage-contract between Abdullah and the damsel whom he had
brought from the City of Stone. So he went in to her and woned
with her at Bassorah till there came to them the Destroyer of
Delights and the Severer of societies ; and extolled be the perfec-
tion of the Living, who dieth not ! Moreover, O auspicious King,
I have heard a tale anent



i.e. with Sa'idah.



END OF VOL. IX.



INDEX.



PAGE

AL-KHAYR ~ my good sir, etc. 54
Abu al-Lays (Pr. N.j )= Father of

the Lion . . . .211
Abu Dalaf al-Ijili (a soldier famed for

liberality and culture) . . 189
Abu Kir = Father of the Pitch (Abou

Kir) . 134
Abu Sir (corruption of Pousiri =

Busiris . . . . 134

Abn Sirhan wolf .... 104
Acquittance of all possible claims after

business transactions . . 285

Ad and Thamud (pre-historic tribes) 174
Adab rz scholarship . . .41
Adami = an Adamite (opposed to

Jinn) 169

Adim al-Zauk = lack-tact . . 206

Admiral (fishing for the King's table) 159

Adultery (son of = base born) . . 331

Af'a = o<is (a snake) 37
Ahd (A1-) wa al-Misak = oath and

covenant .... 327
Ahmad bin Abi Duwad (High Chan-
cellor to the Abbasides . . 244
" Aidance from Allah and victory are

near" 317

Akasirah = Chosroes-Kings . . 323

Akl al-Hishmah = eating decorously 337

,Akka = Acre ... 19
Ala judi-k =. to thy generosity . 150 ; 208

Ala mahlak = at thy leisure . . 168
All will not be save well =: it will be

the worse for him . . . 293
Allah (will make no way for the Infi-
dels over the True Believers) . 16



Allah (I seek refuge with)

(he was jealous for Almighty) .

(I fear Him in respect of I

am governed by Him in my
dealings with)

(pardon thee, showing that the
speaker does not believe in ano-
ther's tale) ....

(the Provider) ....

(for the love of) ...

(Karim = God is bountiful) .

(grant thee grace pardon

thee) ....

(yasturak = will veil thee)

(sole Scient of the hidden things

be extolled) ....

(raised the heavens without

columns) .....

Almas = Gr. Adamas

Aloes (well appreciated in Eastern
medicine) .....

(the finest used for making

Nadd) ....

'Amal = action, operation (applied
to drugs etc.) ....

Amin (Amen) z= So it be !

Amma laka au 'alayka = either to
thee (the gain) or upon thee (the
loss)

Amr (Al ) = command, matter,
affair ....

Analphabetic Amirs

Angels (taking precedence in the
order of created beings)

Animals (have no fear of man) .



PACE

35
104



123



'54
1 66
170
167

283
309

3"

324
325

100

150

274
131



ri

67
126

Si
181



352



A If Laylah wa Laylah.



Ants (a destructive power in tropic

climates) ..... 46

Anyab (pi. of Nab) = grinder teeth . 140

A' rab = dwellers in the Desert . 293
'Arish (AI-) frontier town between

Egypt and Palestine . . . 286
'Arishah := arbour, etc. . . .219
Aiithmology (cumbrous in Arabic
for the lack of the higher nume-
rals) 123

Asar traces ... . 255

A-Sharif anta = art thou a noble ? . 231

'Atsah = sneezing .... 220

'Auj = Persian town Kuch (?) . . 347

Awak = pi. of Ukiyyah q.v. . . 2l6

'Awashik = hucklebones, cockles . 268

Az'ar having thin hair ; tail-less . 185
Azim (in the slang sense of " mighty

fine") 4

Aziz (A1-) al-Mizr = Magnifico of

Misraim . . . .119

BAB=gate, etc. (sometimes for a

sepulchral cave) .... 286

Badlah Kuniiztyah == treasure-suit . 331
Baghdad of Nullity (opposed to the

Ubiquity of the World) . .13
Baha al-Din ibn Shaddad (Judge

Advocate General under Saladin) 23

Bahimah = black cattle . . 7 1

Bakhkharam = he incensed me . 238
Bakhshish (to make a bath-man's

mouth water) . . IS 1

Bartaut = Berthold. ... 8

Basmalah = saying, Bismillah . . I

Batarikh = roe, spawn . . - 139
Bath (setting it a-working= turning

on the water) .... 149

Belle fourchette (greatly respected) . 219

Bilking (popular form of) . , 145

Bishr Barefoot (Sufi ascetic) . . 21
Breslau edition quoted 33; 42; 59; 63;

156; 159; 169; 185; 187.

Brethren (for kinsfolk) ... 26

(of trust and brethren of

society = friends and acquaint-
ances) . 75
Bunr> = kind of cake . . T 72
Buffalo = bceuf a 1'esra (?) . , 181
Bulak ed. quoted v. . . , 185
Burning (a foretaste of Hell-fire) , 158



CALIPHS :

Mu'tazid (A1-) . 229

Mutawakkil (A1-) . , 232

Mu'tasim (A1-) .... ib.

Carelessness of the story-teller . . 4

Carpet (let him come to the King's

= before the King as referee) . HO
Carpet-room = Throne-room . . I?.I
Citadel (contains the Palace) . . 102
"Cloth" (not "board" for playing

chess) 209

Clothing and decency , . . 182
Clout (hung over the door of a bath

shows that women are bathing) . 153
Coffee (mention of probably due to

the scribe) 14!

(its mention shows a compara-
tively late date) .... 255
"Come to my arms, my slight

acquaintance" .... 177
Conciseness (verging on obscurity) . 1 71
Confusion (universal in the unde-
veloped mind of man). . . 78
Contrast (artful, between squalor and

gorgeousness) . . . . I?O
Cousin (has a prior right to marry a

cousin) 225

Cowardice of the Fellah (how to be

cured) .... .5
Craft (many names for, connected

with Arabic) . . . .138
Creation from nothing ... 77
Crescent of the breakfast-fete . . 250
Cruelty (the mystery of explained
only by a Law without a Law-
giver) 37

Curtain (screens a reverend woman

from the sight of men-invalids) . 347

DAIRAH = circle, inclosure . . 287

(for a basin surrounded by

hills) 317

Dandan (monstrous fish) . . 179
Darfil = dolphin .... 346
Dawa = medicine (for a depilatory) 155
Dawat = wooden ink-case with reed-
pens 122

Day (when wealth availeth not) . 16

(ye shall be saved from its

misery) ..... 215

Dayyus = pimp, wittol . , . 297



Index.



353



Debts (of dead parents sacred to the

children) . . . , . 311

Delicacy of the female skin . . 321

Democracy of despotism ... 94
Devil (allowed to go about the world

and seduce mankind) ... 82
Diamond (its cutting of very ancient

date) 325

Diaphoresis (a sign of the abatement

of a disease) .... 146

Dfn al-a' raj = the perverted faith . n

Dinar = denarius (description of one) 294

Diwan (fanciful origin of the word) . 108

Don Juan quoted .... 190
Drowning (a martyr's death) . .158
Dukhan == smoke (meaning tobacco

for the Chibouk) . . .156
Dula"b = waterwheel ; buttery ; cup-
board ..... 306
Durbar of idols .... 325
Duwamah = whirlpool 93

EGYPT (derivation of the name) . 286
Elliptical style of the Eastern story-
teller 160

Emirs (of the wild Arabs =Phylarchs) 322
Emma (hides her lover under her

cloak) 8

Epistasis without prostasis . . 240
Euphemistic speech . . 1805224

Euphuistic speech .... 43

Euthanasia and anaesthetics . . 90
"Eye of the needle'' (for wicket -

door) 320

Eyes (no male has ever filled mine =

none has pleased me) . . . 222

FAK! R (the, and his jar of butter ;

congeners of the tale) ... 40
Farz (mentioned after Sunnah be-
cause jingling with Arz) . . 15
Faswan Salh al-Sibydn (Pr. N.) =

Fizzler, Dung of Children . . u

Faswah = susurrus . . . 291

Fatalism and predestination . . 45

Fate and Freewill .... 80
Fath (A1-) bin Khakan (boon com.

panion) ..... 245
Fatihah (pronounced to make an

agreement binding) * . . 138

Fellah = peasant, husbandman 40
VOL. IX,



Fellah chaff . . ^ . .152

Fingers (names of) . . . . 160

Finjan = egg-shell cup for coffee . 268

Firdaus = Paradise . . . 214

Fire = Hell (home of suicides) . 25

' Forcible eateth feeble" . . 179

Fore-arm (for proficiency) . . 306
Freedom (granted to a slave for the

sake of reward from Allah) . 243
Fumigations (to exorcise demons,

etc.) 29

Furat = Euphrates (derivation of the

name) 17

Futur = breakfast .... 307

Fuzayl bin 'lyaz (Sufi ascetic) . . 21



GATE (of war opened) ... 9
Gates (of Heaven are open) . .221

(shut during Friday devotion) . 259

Ghalyun cr galleon . . . . 138
Ghazalah = gazelle (a slave-girl's

name) ..... 209

Ghayb (A1-) = secret purpose ; future 314

Ghaza-wood ..... 27

Ghullrr iron collar. . . . 333
Ghuls (whose bellies none may fill

but Allah) 152

Ghurbah (A1-) Kurbah= "Travel is

Travail" 257

Gift (is foi him who is present) . 225

Godiva (an Arabic of the wrong sort) 261
Good news, Inshallah = is all right

with thee ? . . . . . 224
Gourd (Ar. Hanzal) . . .165

Grammatical double entendre . . 272
Green garb (distinguishing mark of

Al-Khizr) 324

Guadalajara = Wady al-Khar (of

dung) 10

HABfBf WA TABfsf = my love and

leach 29$

Halimah = the mild, the gentle (fem.) 265
Halummu = draw near (plur.) . 44
Hamadan (town in Persian Irak) . 212
Hamid (fem. Hamidah) = praise-
worthy, satisfactory . . 7*>
Hanzal = gourd . . 165
Harami = one who lives on unlawful

gains ..* '47



354



A If Laylah zva Lay la ft.



Harf al-Jarr = particle governing the
oblique case, mode of thrusting,
tumbling

Hark, you shall see

Harun al-Rashid (as a poet)

' (said to have prayed

every day a hundred bows) .

Hashimi == descendant of Hashim .

Hattin (battle of) ....

Hawi =r Serpent-charmer

Hazar Afsaneh (tales from the).

Hind (A1-) al-Aksa = Outer Hind
or India .....

Honey (simile for the delights -of the
World)

House (the Holy of Allah = Ka'abah)

Hulwan al-miftah = denier a Dieu .

Huwayna (A1-) = now drawing near
and now moving away .

iBLfs =r diabolus ....
Ibn Hamdun (transmitter of poetry

and history) ....

Ibn 'Irs r= weasel ....

Ibrahim of Mosul ....

Irk = root, also sprig, twig .

Ishk 'uzri (in the sense of platonic

love)

Istahi = have some shame
Istita'ah = ableness
( = freewill)

JABABIRAH (pi. of Jabbar = giants .

(= conquerors)

Jabal = mountain (for mountainous
island)

Jah = high station, dignity

Jahabiz (pi. of Jahbaz) = acute, in-
telligent)

Jalalikah = Gallicians .

Janazir (for Zanajir) chains .

Jannat al-Khuld = the Eternal Gar-
den

Jawa"sfs (pi. of Jdsus) = spies (for
secret police)

Jilbab = gown ....

Junayd al-Baghdadi (Sufi ascetic) .

KABASA = he shampoo'd
Kddus (pi. Kawadis) = pot of a
water-wheel



272
14
17

339

24
19

56
32

116

64
178

212

250

300
229



34
251

250

255
So

83

109
323

315

174

62
156
309

214



290

21

213
21 8



q.v.



the



the



Kaff Shu rayk = a single " Bunn
Kahratnanah = duenna etc.
Kahwah (A1-) = coffee-house .
Kallim al-Sultan (formula of sum-
moning) .
Kamar al-Zaman = Moon of

Age

Kanz = enchanted treasure .
Kaptan =: Captain . . ,
Karah = budget, large bag
Karkh (A1-), quarter of Baghdad
Kasab (A1-) = acquisitiveness
Kasidahs (their conventionalism)
Kasr = upper room
Kaukab al-Salah = Staj of

morning .

Kaun = being, existence
Khadim = eunuch ....

Khadiv (not Kedive), Prince .
Khafz al-Jinah = lowering the wing

(demeaning oneself gently) .
Khaliyah (pun on) .
Khara al-Sus =: Weevil's dung
Khatt Sharif = noble letter .
Khayr wa'Afiyah = well and in good
ease ......

Khinsir =. little (or middle) finger .
Khitab == exordium
Khizanah (A1-) == treasury
Kidrah = pot, kettle, lamp-globe .
Killing (of an unfaithful wife com-
mended by public opinion) .
Kimkhab =z brocade
Kitab al-Kaza = book of law-cases .
Koran quoted (ix. 33)

(xxvi. 88, 89 ; iv. 140)

(Ivii. 88) .

Ixxxi. 40) ....

(xii. 28) ....

(xl. 36 ; Ixvii. 14 ; Ixxiv. 39 ;

Ixxviii. 69; Ixxxviii. 17)
- (cviii. 3) . .



172

221



(xxiv.)

(ex. i) . .

(xxxvi. 55-58) .

(li. 18-19)

Kundur =: frankincense . . .
Kurdiis = body of horse .
Kutr Misr = tract of Egypt

LA'ALLA = haply, belike ; forsur
certainly ^



224

247
320

139

216

313

80

250

283

301

63

237
119

33

291

10

39

94
1 60
126

22
320

297

221

IIO

15

16

33

59

119

1 66
185
3i6

317

322

324

7

in



49



Index.



355



I.d baas = no harm is (yet) done . 102
La" rajma ghaybin =:- without stone-
throwing of secrecy ... I
Li tankati'i = sever not thyself from

us 245

Lait = one acting like the tribe of

Lot, sodomite .... 253
Lajlaj = rolling in the mouth, stam-
mering 322

Lane quoted, 32; 33; 146; 168 ; 170;

171 ; 183 ; 221 ; 222 ; 224 ; 226 ; 229 ;
246; 291; 304; 307

Ldvandiyah (A1-) = Levantines . 275
Laylat al-Kabilah = to-night . .271
Lazuward = Ultramarine . .190

Legs (shall be bared on a certain day) 253
Lie (only degrading if told for fear of

telling the truth) ... 87

(simulating truth) . . . 223

Lieu d'aisance (in Eastern crafts) . 332
Light (of salvation shining from the

face of Prophets) . . . 324

Lijam shadfd = sharp bit . . 70

Loathing of prohibition . . . 279
Lot (this is ours = I have been

lucky and will share with you) . 328

Luluah = Union-pearl ; wild cow . 218

Luss = thief, robber . . . 106
Lymph (alluding to the " Neptunist "

doctrine) 77

MA DAniYATAK = What is thy mis-
fortune? 137

Mahdf (A1-), Caliph . . . 334
Ma kaharani = none vexeth (or has

overcome) me . . . .156
Maghrib (al-Aksa) = the land of the

setting sun .... 50

Mahall al-Zauk rr seat of taste, sen-

sorium ..... 83
Mahr = dowry (mode of its payment) 32
Maintenance (of a divorced woman

during 'Iddah) .... 32
Male children (as much praised as

riches) 316

Malik (A1-) al-Nasir (Sultan Saladin) 19
Malocchio or Gettatura (evil eye) . 247
Man (created after God's likeness) . 79

(I am one of them = never

mind my name) .... 238

(of the people of Allah =. a

Religious) . . . . .51



Man (his wrong is from the tongue) 309
Mankind (superior to the Jinn) . . 339
Mansur (Pr. N.) = triumphant . 310
Ma'rifah = article .... 272
Martyrdom of the drowned . . 340
Massacre (\he grand woyen of Eastern

state-craft) i ro

Matarik (pi. of Mitrak) = targes . 225
Matta'aka 'llah = Allah permit thee

to enjoy . . . . i 125
Maulid = nativity .... 289
Mausul (A1-) = the conjoined (for

relative pronoun or particle) . 272
Meniver = menu vair (Mus lemmus) 312
Menstruous discharge (made use of

as a poison) . . . . 101
Mer-folk (refined with the Greeks,

grotesques with other nations) . 169
Messiah (made a liar by miscreants) . 15
Mi'lakah =r spoon .... 141
Miracles (growing apace in the East). 336
Mishannah ~=. old gunny-bag . . 171
Miskal = about three penny weights 262
Mohammed (sent with the guidance

and True Faith) . . . 15

Money (let lying with the folk =. not

dunned for) . . . 311

Moon (taking in hand the star =. girl

handing round the cups) . .192
Moslem (on a journey, tries to bear

with him a new suit of clothes for

the festivals and Friday service).
(bound to discharge the debts

of his dead parents) .

(doctrine ignores the dictum

"ex nihilonihil") .

Moslems (deal kindly with religious
mendicants) ....

(not ashamed of sensual

appetite) .....

(bound to abate scandals

amongst neighbours) .

(husbands among them divided



into three classes)

Mourning (normal term of forty days)

Mubarak = blessed (a favourite slave-
name) ... .

Mubarakah =: the blessed (fem.)

Muhdrabah =. doing battle

Munazarah = dispute

Munazirah = like (fem.) . .

Munkar and Nakir .



5'
3"
63
Si
84
98

263
3"

58



92

243

ib.

163



356



A If Laylah wa Laylah.



Musafahah =: joining hands . . 34 2

Music (forbidden by Mohammed) . 31

Musta'fn bi 'Hah (Caliph) . . 246

Mu'tasfm (A1-) bi 'llah (Caliph) . 232

Mu'tawakkil (A1-) 'ala 'llah (Caliph) ib

Mu'tazid (A1-) bi Mlah (Caliph). . 229

Mu'tazz (A1-) bi 'llah (Caliph) . . 242

Muunah =: provender . . 104

NABf ~ prophet . . .178
Nafakah := sum necessary for the ex-
penses of pilgrimage . 178
Naivete (of the Horatian kind) . 215
Najis = ceremonially impure . 337
Nakisatu 'aklin wa din = failing in

wit and faith .... 298

Nakkar = Pecker (a fabulous fish) . 184
Names (approved by Allah) . .165
Napoleonic pose (attitude assumed by

a slave) . ... 320

Nasik = a devotee .... 40

Nasir (Pr. N.) = triumphing . . 310

Naysabur (town in Khorasan) . . 230
Nemo repente fuit turpissimus (not

believed in by Easterns) . . 9 1

Nilah = indigo, dye-stuff . . 144
New moon of the Festival = Crescent

of the breakfast . . 249 ; 250

Nimr = leopard .... 63

Niyah (A1-) = ceremonial intention

of prayer 254

Nukl = quatremendiants, dessert 177; 213
Nusf = half-dirham . . 139 5167
Nusk = piety, abstinence from women 243

' OFF-WITH-HIS-HEAD" style (not

to be taken literally) . . . 308

Omar-i-Khayyam (astronomer-poet) 230

Othello (even he does not kill Emilia) 300

PARADISE (of the Moslem not wholly

sensual) 3 22

Parent (ticklish on the Pundonor) . 288

Pay-chest (of a Hamma'm-bath) . 152
Payne quoted, 22 ; 28 ; 79 ; 84 ; 86 ; 89 ;

171 ; 212 ; 224 , 226 ; 227 ; 250 ; 251 ;

265 ; 268 ; 282 ; 290

Pearls (resting on the sand-bank) . 164
People of His affection = those who

deserve His love. ... 82



Persians (delighting
jokes)
Petrified folk .
Pilgrimage quoted


in practical
77
. 3'8


(i. 235)
(iii. 66)
(i. 20) .
(ii. 285-287)


. 51
. 81
. 165

'75
. 178
. . . 262


Ui. 2.24, -i^o;


(ii. 4 8)


37
?i ;



Pilgrims (offcast of the =^ a broken
down pilgrim left to die on the

road) 290

Poisons in the East . . . . loi
Policeman (called in, a severe punish-
ment in the East) . . . 137
Poltroon (contrasted with a female

tiger lamb) 224

Potter (simile of the) ... 77
Power (whoso has it and spareth for

Allah's reward he prepareth) . 340
Praying against (polite form of curs-
ing) 293

Presence (I am in thy = thy slave to

slay or pardon) . . . .124
Price (without abatement = without

abstracting a large bakhshish) . 152

(shall remain) .... 262

Priest hidden within an image (may

date from the days of Memnon) . 324
Prince (of a people is their servant) . 99
Prison (in the King's Palace) . . 52
Pun 278; 287



Online LibraryRichard Francis BurtonThe book of the thousand nights and a night; a plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments, with introd., explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men and a terminal essay upon the history of the nights (Volume 9) → online text (page 37 of 38)