Richard Francis Burton.

The book of the thousand nights and a night; a plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments, with introd., explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men and a terminal essay upon the history of the nights (Volume 16) online

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NY PUBLIC LIBRARY THE BRANCH LIBRARIES

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398.2 ARABIAN NIGHTS H H49096

Bock of the thousand nights and

night

Vol. 16 (4



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MID-MANHATTAN LIBRARY
History & Social Science Department

8 East 40th Street
New York, N. Y. 10016



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HOT TO bb' TAKUi *^~ THE



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TO THE BOOK OF THE



Mgftts antr a Nt



WITH NOTES ANTHROPOLOGICAL AND EXPLANATORY



VOLUME VI.



BY



RICHARD F. BURTON



A-




PRINTED BY THE BURTON CLUB FOR PRIVATE
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY



Shammar Edition

Limited to one thousand numbered sets,
of which this is






3

f



\J, II*



TO THE CURATORS OF THE BODLEIAN LIBRARY, OXFORD
Especially REVD. B. PRICE and PROFESSOR MAX MULLER.



GENTLEMEN,

I take the liberty of placing your names at the head of this Volume which owes
its rarest and raciest passages to your kindly refusing the temporary transfer of tht
Wortley Montague MS. from your pleasant library to the care of Dr. Rost, Chie!
Librarian, India Office. As a sop to "bigotry and virtue," as a concession to the
' Scribes and Pharisees," I had undertaken, in case the loan were granted, not to translate
tales and passages which might expose you, the Curators, to unfriendly comment. But,
possibly anticipating what injury would thereby accrue to the Volume and what sorrow
to my subscribers, you were good enough not to sanction the transfer indeed you refused
it to me twice and for this step my clientele will be (or ought to be) truly thankful to
you.

I am, Gentlemen,

Yours obediently,

RICHARD F. BURTON

BODLEIAN LIBRARY,

August yh, 1888.



(V\ 2 1



CONTENTS OF THE FIFTH VOLUME.



PAGE

1. THE HISTORY OF THE KING'S SON OF SIND AND THE

LADY FATIMAH

2. HISTORY OF THE LOVERS OF SYRIA ... .19

3. HISTORY OF AL-HAJJAJ BIN YUSUF AND THE YOUNG

SAYYID 37

4. NIGHT ADVENTURE OF HARUN AL-RASHID AND THE

YOUTH MANJAB 61

THE LOVES OF THE LOVERS OF BASSORAH . 65

STORY OF THE DARWAYSH AND THE BARBER'S BOY AND THE

GREEDY SULTAN 105

TALE OF THE SIMPLETON HUSBAND 116

NOTE CONCERNING THE " TlRREA BEDE," NlGHT 655 . . .119

5. THE LOVES OF AL-HAYFA AND YUSUF 121

6. THE THREE PRINCES OF CHINA 211

7. THE RIGHTEOUS WAZIR WRONGFULLY GAOLED . . .229

8. THE CAIRENE YOUTH, THE BARBER AND THE CAPTAIN . 241

9. THE GOODWIFE OF CAIRO AND HER FOUR GALLANTS . 251

10. THE TAILOR AND THE LADY AND THE CAPTAIN . . .261

11. THE SYRIAN AND THE THREE WOMEN OF CAIRO . . 271

12. THE LADY WITH TWO COYNTES . .279



viii Contents.

13. THE WHORISH WIFE WHO VAUNTED HER VIRTUE . . 287

14. CCELEBS THE DROLL AND HIS WIFE AND HER FOUR

LOVERS ........... 295

15. THE GATE-KEEPER OF CAIRO AND THE CUNNING SHE-

i HIEF ..



16. TALE OF MOHSIN AND MUSA ....... 319

17. MOHAMMED THE SHALABI AND HIS MISTRESS AND HIS

WIFE ............ 333

18. THE FELLAH AND HIS WICKED WIFE ..... 345

19. THE WOMAN WHO HUMOURED HER LOVER AT HER

HUSBAND'S EXPENSE . . _. . . -355

20. THE KAZI SCHOOLED BY HIS WIFE . .... 361

21. THE MERCHANT'S DAUGHTER AND THE PRINCE OF

AL-IRAK ... . . .371

22. STORY OF THE YOUTH WHO WOULD FUTTER HIS

FATHER'S WIVES ... . -439

23. STORY OF THE TWO LACK-TACTS OF CAIRO AND

DAMASCUS .... -453



24



. TALE OF HIMSELF TOLD BY THE KING ..... 463



glpprntoix 5.

CATALOGUE OF WORTLEY MONTAGUE MANUSCRIPT CONTENTS 497



BY W. F. K I R B Y.

I. NOTES ON THE STORIES CONTAINED IN VOL. IV. OF

"SUPPLEMENTAL NIGHTS" . . 5S

II. NOTES ON THE STORIES CONTAINED IN VOL. V. OF

"SUPPLEMENTAL NIGHTS" . . . . . . 5*3



THE TRANSLATOR'S FOREWORD



THIS volume contains the last of my versions from the Wortley
Montague Codex, and this is the place to offer a short account
of that much bevvritten MS,

In the " Annals of the Bodleian Library," etc., by the Reverend
William Dunn Macray, M.A. (London, Oxford and Cambridge,
1868 : Svo. p. 206), we find the following official notice :

"A.D. 1803."

"An Arabic MS. in seven volumes, written in 1764-5, and con-
taining what is rarely met with, a complete collection of the
Thousand and one Tales (N.B. an error for " Nights ") of
the Arabian Nights Entertainments , was bought from Captain
Jonathan Scott for 50. Mr. Scott published, in 1811, an edition
of the Tales in six volumes (N.B. He reprinted the wretched
English version of Prof. Galland's admirable French, and his
" revisions " and " occasional corrections " are purely imaginative,)
in which this MS. is described, (N.B. after the mos majorum).
He obtained it from Dr. (Joseph) White, the Professor of Hebrew
and Arabic at Oxford, who had bought it at the sale of the library
of Edward Wortley Montague, by whom it had been brought from
the East. (N.B. Dr. White at one time intended to translate it
literally, and thereby eclipse the Anglo-French version.) It is

VOL. V. &



x Translator's Foreword.

noticed in Ouseley's Oriental Collections (Cadell and Davies),
vol. ii. p. 25."

The Jonathan Scott above alluded to appears under various
titles as Mr. Scott, Captain Scott and Doctor Scott. He was an
officer in the Bengal Army about the end of the last century, and
was made Persian Secretary by "Warren Hastings, Esq.," to
whom he dedicated his " Tales, Anecdotes and Letters, translated
from the Arabic and Persian" (Cadell and Davies, London,
1800), and he englished the " Bahar-i-Danish " (A.D. 1799) and
" Firishtah's History of the Dakkhan (Deccan) and of the reigns
of the later Emperors of Hindostan." He became Dr. Scott
because made an LL.D. at Oxford as meet for a " Professor (of
Oriental languages) at the Royal Military and East India
Colleges " ; and finally he settled at Netley, in Shropshire, where
he died.

It is not the fault of English Orientalists if the MS. in question
is not thoroughly well-known to the world of letters. In 1797
Sir Gore Ouseley's " Oriental Collections " (vol. ii. pp. 25-33)
describes it, evidently with the aid of Scott, who is the authority
for stating that the tales generally appear like pearls strung at
random on the same thread ; adding, " if they are truly Oriental
it is a matter of little importance to us Europeans whether they
are strung on this night or that night." x This first and somewhat



1 In the same volume (ii. 161) we also find an " Introductory Chapter of the
Arabian Tales," translated from an original manuscript by Jonathan Scott, Esq. ;
neither MS. nor translation having any merit. In pp. 34, 35 (ibid.) are noticed the
"Contents of a Fragment of the Arabian Nights procured in India by James Anderson,
Esq., a copy of which " (made by his friend Scott) " is now in the possession of Jonathan
Scott, Esq." (See Scott, vol. vi. p. 451.) For a short but sufficient notice of this
fragment cf. the Appendix (vol. x. p. 497) to my Thousand Nights and a Night, the
able and conscientious work of Mr. W. F. Kirby. " The Labourer and the Flying
Chain" (No. x.) and "The King's Son who escaped death by the ingenuity of his
Father's seven Viziers" (No. xi.) have been translated or rather abridged by Scott in
his " Tales, Anecdotes and Letters " before alluded to, a vol. of pp. 446 containing
scraps from the Persian " Tohfat al-Majdlis" and " Hazliyat'Abbid Zahkanf " (Facetiae
of 'Abbid the Jester), with letters from Aurangzeb and other such padding much affected
by the home public in the Early XIX th Century.



Translator 's Foreword. xi

imperfect catalogue of the contents was followed in 1811 by a
second, which concludes the six-volume edition of " The

ARABIAN NIGHTS

ENTERTAINMENTS,
Carefully revised, and occasionally corrected

jprom tbe Arabic.



TO WHICH IS ADDED

A SELECTION OF NEW TALES,

Now first translated

Jprom tf)t Arabic Originals.

ALSO,

AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES,

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE

RELIGION, MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF THE MAHOMMEDANS."

The sixth volume, whose second title is "Tales | selected
from the Manuscript copy | of the | 1001 Nights | brought to
Europe by Edward Wortley Montague, Esq.," ends with a general
Appendix, of which ten pages are devoted to a description of the
Codex and a Catalogue of its contents. Scott's sixth volume,
like the rest of his version, is now becoming rare, and it is
regretable that when Messieurs Nimmo and Bain reprinted,
in 1882, the bulk of the work (4 vols. 8vo) they stopped short
at volume five.

Lastly we find a third list dating from 1835 in the " Catalog!
| Codicum Manuscriptorum Orientalium | Bibliothecse Bodleianse
I Pars Secunda | Arabicos | complectens. | Confecit | Alexander
Nicoll, J.C.D. | Nuper Linguae Heb. Professor Regius, necnon
./Edis Christi Canonicus. | Editionem absolvit | et Catalogum
urianum ' aliquatenus emendavit | G. B. Pusey, S.T.B. | Viri

1 So called from Herr Uri, a Hungarian scholar who first catalogued "The

Contents."



xii Translator's Foreword.

desideratissimi Successor. [ Oxonii, | E Typographic Academico |
MDCCCXXXV." This is introduced under the head, Codicis
Arabic! Mahommedani Narrationes Fictae sive Historian Roma-
nenses J in Quarto" (pp. 145-150).

I am not aware that any attempt has been made to trace the
history of the Wortley Montague MS. ; but its internal evidence
supplies a modicum of information.

By way of colophon to the seventh and last volume we have,
" On this wise end to us the Stories of the Kings and histories of
various folk as foregoing in the Thousand Nights and a Night,
perfected and completed, on the eighteenth day of Safar the
auspicious, which is of the months of (the year A. H.) one thousand
one hundred and seventy-eight" ( = A.D. 1764-65).

" Copied by the humblest and neediest of the poor, Omar-al-
Safatf, to whose sins may Allah be Ruthful !

" An thou find in us fault deign default supply,
And hallow the Faultless and Glorify."

The term " Suftah " is now and has been applied for the last
century to the sons of Turkish fathers by Arab mothers, and many
of these Mulattos live by the pen. On the fly-leaf of vol. i. is
written in a fine and flowing Persian (?) hand, strongly contrasting
with the text of the tome, which is unusually careless and bad,
" This Book | The Thousand Nights and a Night of the Acts and
deeds (Sfrat) of the Kings | and what befel them from sundry |
women that were whorish | and witty | and various | Tales j
therein." Below it also is a Persian couplet written in vulgar
Iranian characters of the half-Shikastah type :

Chih goyam, o chih poyam ? Na mi-danam hkh o piich.

(What shall I say or whither fly ? * This stuff and this nonsense know not I.)

Moreover, at the beginning of vol. i. is a list of fifteen tales
written in Europeo-Arabic characters, after schoolboy fashion,



Translator's Foreword. xiii

and probably by Scott. In vol. ii. there is no initial list, but by
way of Foreword we read, " This is volume the second of the
Thousand Nights and a Night from the xciii d - Night, full and
complete." And the Colophon declares, " And this is what hath
been finished for us of the fourth (probably a clerical error for
" second ") tome of the Thousand Nights and a Night to the
clxxvii th - Night, written on the twentieth day of the month
Sha'ban A.H., one thousand one hundred and seventy-seven "
( = A.D. 1764). This date shows that the MS. was finished during
the year after incept.

The text from which our MS. was copied must have been
valuable, and we have reason to regret that so many passages
both of poetry and prose are almost hopelessly corrupt. Its
tone and tenor are distinctly Nilotic ; and, as Mr. E. Wortley
Montague lived for some time in Egypt, he may have bought it at
the Capital of the Nile-land. The story of the Syrian (v. 468) and
that of the Two Lack-tacts (vi. 262), notably exalt Misr and Cairo
at the expense of Sham and Damascus ; and there are many other
instances of preferring Kemi the Black Soil to the so-called " Holy
Land." The general tone, as well as the special incidents of the book,
argues that the stories may have been ancient, but they certainly
have been modernised. Coffee is commonly used (passim)
although tobacco is still unknown ; a youth learns archery and
gunnery (Zarb al-Risas, vol. vii. 440) ; casting of cannon occurs
(vol. v. 1 86), and in one place (vol. vi. 134) we read of " Taban-
jatayn," a pair of pistols ; the word, which is still popular, being a
corruption of the Persian " Tabancheh "= a slap or blow, even as
the French call a derringer coup de poing. The characteristic of
this Recueil is its want of finish. The stories are told after per-
functory fashion as though the writer had not taken the trouble to
work out the details. There are no names or titles to the tales,
so that every translator must give his own ; and the endings are
equally unsatisfactory, they usually content themselves, after



xiv Translator's Foreword.

; * native" fashion, with "Intihd " = finis; and the connection with
the thread of the work must be supplied by the story-teller or the
translator. Headlines were not in use for the 'MSS. of that day,
and the catchwords are often irregular, a new word taking the
place of the initial in the following page.

The- handwriting, save and except in the first volume, has the
merit of regularity, and appears the same throughout the succeed-
ing six, except in the rare places (e.g. vi. 92-93), where the lazy
copyist did not care to change a worn-out pen, and continued to
write with a double nib. On the other hand, it is the character of
a vilh ! master whose literary culture is at its lowest.

Hardly a sheet appears without some blunder which only in rare
places is erased or corrected, and a few lacunae are supplied by
1 hands, Oriental and European, the latter presumably
.ott's. Not unfrequently the terminal word of a line is divided,
Hgfl of great incuria or ignorance, as "Shahr|baz" (i. 4),
" Shahr | zad " (v. 309, vi. 100";, and " Fawa | jadtu-h "= so I found
him (v. Koranic quotations, almost always lack vowcl-

.'r,tv, and are introduced without the usual ceremony. Poetry
o, that crux of a skilful scribe, is carelessly treated, and often
enough two sets of verse are thrown into one, the first rhyming in
ur, arid t} .'. -'.'.ond in i'r (e.g. vol. v. 250"). The rhyme-words also
repeat'. d within unlawful limits (passim and vol. v. 308, 11. 6
and iiy. Ver.e i', thrust into the body of the page (vii. 112)
without sirens of citation in red ink or other (Hi. 406) ; and rarely
find it, as it should be, in distichs divided by the normal
COl .rial marks, asterisks and -.imilar separations. Sometimes

it appears in a column of hemistichs after the fashion of Europe
f r/. ill ; iv. 232, etc.) : here fv. 226; a quotation is huddled into

e (v. 242) four lines, written as monostichs, are
followed by tv/o eir.t.idjs in as many lit

' the i ..< -Uieal part Dr. Stcingass writes to me, "The
f: c , in A!-Hayf and Yusuf, w)i r<- MM mere doggerel, are spoiled



Translator's Foreword. xv

by the spelling. I was rarely able to make out even the metre
and I think you have accomplished a feat by translating them as
you have done."

The language of the MS. is generally that of the Fellah and
notably so in sundry of the tales, such as, " The Good\vife of
Cairo and her four Gallants " (v. 444^. Of this a few verbal and
phrasal instances will suffice. Ad mi = here am I (v. icS> ;
Ahna (passim, for nahnu) nakhaf = we fear ; 'Alayki (for 'alayki)
= on thee ; and generally the long vowel (-ki) for the short (-ki)
in the pronoun of the second person feminine ; Antah (for anta)
= thou (vi. 96) and Antii (for antum) = you (iii. 351) ; Araha
and even aniha, nihat and riiha (for raha) = he went (vii. 74
and iv. 75) and Atiihu (for ruhu) = go ye (iv. 179); Bakarah

* * allazi (for allati) = a cow (he) who, etc. ; (see in this
vol., p. 253; and generally a fine and utter contempt for gene.
t'. 6 -. Hum (for hunna) masc. for fern. (iii. 91 ; iii. 146 ; and v. r;; N ;
Ta'ali (for ta'al) fern, for masc. (vi. 96 et passim) ; Bihim
bi-him) = with them (v. 367) ; Bi-kam (for bi-kum) = with you
(iii. 142) are fair specimens of long broad vowels supplanting the
short, a peculiarity known in classical Arab., t.^-. M if:..:: j'or
Miltah) = a key. Here, however, it is exaggerated, e.g. Ba':d (for
ba'j'd) = far (iv. 167); Kim (for kam) = how many? K ..:::
kum) = you (v. nS) ; Kul-ha (for kul-ha) = tell it (iv. 58) : I
(for man) =who ? (iii. 89) ; Mirwad ^I'or Minvad) = a branding iron ;
Xatanashshad (for natanashshad) = we seek tidings (v. 211) ;
Rajal (pron. Ragil, for Rajul)= a man (iv. i iS and passim) ; Sahal
(for sahal)=easy, facile (iv. 71); Sir (for sir) = go, be off!
(v. 199) Shil (for shil) = carry away (i. ill) ; and Zahab (for
zahab)=gold (v. iS6). This broad Doric or Caledonian articu-
lation is not musical to unaccustomed organs. As in popular
parlance the Dal supplants the Zil ; e -.^. Dahaba (for zahaba) =
he went (v. 277 and passim); also T takes the place of Th. as
Tult for thulth = one third (iii. 348) and Tamrat (for thamrat) =



xvi Translator's Foreword.

fruit (v. 260), thus generally ignoring the sibilant Th after the
fashion of the modern Egyptians who say Tumm (for thumma)
= again ; " Kattir (for kaththir) Khayrak " = God increase thy
weal, and Lattama (for laththama) = he veiled. Also a general
ignoring of the dual, e.g. Haza 'usfurayn (for 'Usfurani) = these be
birds (vi. 121) ; Nazalu al-Wazirayn (do) = the two Wazirs went
down (vii. 123) ; and lastly Al- Wuzara al-itnayn (for Al- Wazirani)
= the two Wazirs (vii. 121). Again a fine contempt for numbers, as
Nanzur ana (for Anzur) = I (we) see (v. 198) and Innf (for inna)
naruhu = indeed I (we) go (iii. 190). Also an equally conscientious
disregard for cases, as Min mal abu-ha (for abf-ha) = out of the
moneys of her sire (iv. 190); and this is apparently the rule of the
writer.

Of Egyptianisms and vulgarisms we have Ant, ma ghibtshayy
= thou, hast thou not been absent at all ? with the shayy (a thing)
subjoined to the verb in this and similar other phrases ; Baksish for
Bakhshish (iv. 356) ; Al-Jawaz (for al-ziwaj) = marriage (i. 14) ;
Faki or Fikf (for fakih) = a divine (vi. 207 and passim) ; Finjal
(for finjan) = a coffee-cup (v. 424, also a Najdi or Central Arabian
corruption) ; Kuwayyis = nice, pretty (iv. 179) ; Layali (JUV for
lialla }13) = lest that (v. 285) ; Luhumat (for luhurn) = meats, a
mere barbarism (v. 247) ; Matah (for Mata) = when ? (v. 464) ;
Ma'ayah (for ma'i) = with me (vi. 13 et passim); Shuwayy (or
shuwayyah) Mayah, a double diminutive (for Muwayy or Muwayh)
= a small little water, intensely Nilotic (iv. 44) ; Mbarih or Em-
barah (for Al-barihah) = yesterday (v. 449) ; Takkat (for Dakkat)
= she rapped (iv. 190) ; IJzbasha and Uzbashd (for Yuzbashi) =
a centurion, a captain (v. 430 et passim) ; Zaidjah for Zaijah
(vi. 329); Zaraghit (for Zaghant) = lullilooing (iv. 12); Zmah
(for Zina) = adultery, and lastly Zuda (for Zada) = increased
(iv. 87). Here the reader will cry jam satis ; while the student will
compare the list with that given in my Terminal Essay (vol. x.
168-9).



Translator s Foreword. xvii

The two Appendices require no explanation. No. I. is a
Catalogue of the Tales in the Wortley Montague MS., and No. II.
contains Notes upon the Storiology of the Supplemental Volumes
IV. and V. by the practised pen of Mr. W. F. Kirby. The sheets
during my absence from England have been passed through the
press and sundry additions and corrections have been made by
Dr. Steingass.

In conclusion I would state that my hope was to see this
Volume (No. xv.) terminate my long task ; but circumstance is
stronger than my will and I must ask leave to bring out one more
The New Arabian Nights.

RICHARD F. BURTON.



ATHENAEUM CLUB,

September 1st, 1888.



THE HISTORY OF
THE KING'S SON OF SIND

AND

THE LADY FATIMAH



THE HISTORY OF THE KING'S SON OF SIND
AND THE LADY FATIMAH. 1

IT is related that whilome there was a King of the many Kings
of Sind who had a son by other than his wife. Now the youth,
whenever he entered the palace, would revile 2 and abuse and
curse and use harsh words to his step-mother, his father's Queen,
who was beautiful exceedingly ; and presently her charms were
changed and her face waxed wan and for the excess of what she
heard from him she hated life and fell to longing for death.
Withal she could not say a word concerning the Prince to his
parent. One day of the days, behold, an aged woman (which had
been her nurse) came in to her and saw her in excessive sorrow
and perplext as to her affair for that she knew not what she
could do with her step-son. So the ancient dame said to her, " O
my lady, no harm shall befal thee ; yet is thy case changed into
other case and thy colour hath turned to yellow." Hereupon
the Queen told her all that had befallen her from her step- son of



1 W. M. MS. iv. 165-189: Scott, vi. 238-245) "Story of the Prince of Sind, and
Fatima, daughter of Amir Bin Naomaun" : Gauttier (vi. 342-348) Histoire dit Prince
de Sind et de Fatime.

Sind is so called from Sindhu, the Indus (in Pers. Sindab), is the general name of the
riverine valley : in early days it was a great station of the so-called Aryan race, as they
were migrating eastwards into India Proper, and it contains many Holy Places dating
from the era of the Puranas. The Moslems soon made acquaintance with it, and the
country was conquered and annexed by Mohammed bin Kasim, sent to attack it by the
famous or infamous Hajjaj bin Yusuf the Thakafite, lieutenant of Al-'Irak under the
Ommiade Abd al-Malik bin Marwan. For details, see my " Sind Re-visited " : vol. L
chapt. viii.

2 [In MS. " shakhat," a modern word which occurs in Spitta Bey's " Contes Arabes
Modernes," spelt with the palatal instead of the dental, and is translated there by
'' injurier." ST.]



6 Supplemental Nights.

the whole in a single night. Now here is sufficient to engross
thine intellect, O my son, but take thou no heed and I will do
thy task for thee." Quoth the other, " O my uncle, puissance and
omnipotence are to Allah ! " and quoth the Shaykh, " Go, O my
son, and may the Almighty forward the works of thee." So the
Prince farewelled him and travelled for the space of two days,
when suddenly the ferals and the Ghuls opposed his passage and
he gave them somewhat of provaunt which they ate, and after
they pointed out to him the right path. Then he entered upon a
Wady wherein flights of locusts barred the passage, so he scattered
for them somewhat of fine flour which they picked up till they
had eaten their sufficiency. Presently he found his way into
another valley of iron-bound rocks, and in it there were of the
Jann what could not be numbered or described, and they cut
and crossed his way athwart that iron tract. So he came forward
and salam'd to them and gave them somewhat of bread and meat
and water, and they ate and drank till they were filled, after
which they guided him on his journey and set him in the right
direction. Then he fared forwards till he came to the middle
of the mountain, where he was opposed by none, or mankind or
Jinn-kind, and he ceased not marching until he drew near the
city of the Sultan whose daughter he sought to wife. Here he
set up a tent and sat therein seeking repose for a term of three
days; then he arose and walked forwards until he entered the
city, where he fell to looking about him leftwards and rightwards
till he had reached the palace * of the King. He found there over
the gateway some hundred heads which were hanging up, and he
cried to himself, " Veil me, O thou Veiler ! All these skulls were
suspended for the sake of the Lady Fatimah, but the bye-word
saith: Whoso dieth not by the sword dieth of his life-term,
and manifold are the causes whereas death be singlefold." There-

1 In text " Sarayah," for " Sarayah," Serai, Government House : vol. ix. 52.



History of the King's Son of Sind and the Lady Fatimah. 7

upon he went forwards to the palace gate - And Shahrazad
was surprised by the dawn of day, and fell silent and ceased
saying her permitted say. Then quoth her sister Dunyazad,
" How sweet and tasteful is thy tale, O sister mine, and how
enjoyable and delectable ! " Quoth she, " And where is this
compared with that I would relate to you on the coming night
an the Sovran suffer me to survive ? ' Now when it was the
next night and that was



DUNYAZAD said to her, "Allah upon thee, O my sister, an thou
be other than sleepy, finish for us thy tale that we may cut short
the watching of this our latter night ! " She replied : With love



Online LibraryRichard Francis BurtonThe book of the thousand nights and a night; a plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights' entertainments, with introd., explanatory notes on the manners and customs of Moslem men and a terminal essay upon the history of the nights (Volume 16) → online text (page 1 of 40)