Copyright
C. E Kennaway.

Consolatio, or, Comfort for the afflicted online

. (page 1 of 17)
Online LibraryC. E KennawayConsolatio, or, Comfort for the afflicted → online text (page 1 of 17)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Ex Libris
C. K. OGDEN



Consalatfoi



OR,



WORKS

BY THE

REV. C. E. KENNAWAY.



i.

SERMONS PREACHED at BRIGHTON.
Second Edition.

II.
SECOND SERIES of the ABOVE. 7s. 6d.

in.

S E R M p N S -for the YOUNG;

Also adapted for Country Congregations.

Second Edition. Small 8vo. 5*.

IV.

SERMONS on the LORD'S PRAYER.
Small 8vo. 4*. 6d.

v.
POEMS. 5*. 6<J.

" We ran, perhaps, best express our sense of the merit of these composi-
tions by expressing a wish that the Author could be permitted, by his sacred
vocations, to undertake and complete some lonsier poems than any which
are included in the present publication. There is that in the character of his
poetry which reminds us forcibly of Cowper, and orcasionally of Wordsworth.
There is something of the affection and simplicity of the one, and the high
philosophy of the other.

" Mr. Kennaway is already advantageously known to the theological world
by an excellent little work on Baptism, and i>y his Sermons ; and the volume
before us will add to his reputation. ' Eoglith Rrtirtc.

YI.

The CHURCHMAN'S MANUAL of BAPTISM.
Second Edition. 4. 6d.

VII.

FOUR TRACTS on UNITY.
12mo. 4d.



(ffotufolartfo;



OB,



tTomfort for We Rfflitteb.



ty tin
KEV. C. E. KENNAWAY.



BY

SAMUEL WILBEEFORCE, D.D.
of ifort.



TWELFTH EDITION.
LONDON;

EIVINGTONS, WATEELOO PLACE :

AND HIGH STREET, OXFORD.

I860.



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH



SAMUEL WILBEKFOECE, D.D.

BISHOP OF OXFORD.



THE history of this book will best explain its pur-
pose, and the use to which it should be put.

It is the fruit of the long and patient acquaint-
ance of a renewed soul with the precious dis-
cipline of weakness and pain. The trials of such
a state, and the blessings to be gained from it,
may be traced in these pages : they contain, in
brief, a library for the sick and the sad-hearted.

The extracts here brought together are pas-
sages which, in such hours of trial, have come
with thoughts of strength and refreshment to one



1077181



VI BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.

true sufferer *. They are gathered from every source
which lay open to her ; not from those writers
only whose general tone of doctrine would agree
with the whole tone of this work, but from all to
whom it had been given to speak a word in season
to one who was bearing the burden of the Lord.
Thus they are not intended to direct the reader to
the other writings of all the authors here quoted,
but to be complete in themselves, to serve as
key-notes for thought and meditation, in those
intervals of stillness and silence, which form so
large a portion of life in the sick chamber.

To say thus much, makes it necessary to say
something more concerning her whose patient
hand traced, first, for her own use, and eventually
for that of other sufferers, the following pages.
Yet to say much would be utterly at variance
with her whole life and character, which shrank
instinctively from all display, and expanded only
in the sheltered retirement of domestic inter-
course. " Her heart," says one well able to judge,
" was a well- tuned instrument of most delicate
touch, responding to every high and holy thought

1 See note, p. 195.



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH. VU

or desire. There was a dignity, and a purity, and
a devotedness, and a heavenliness in all her ways,
from her very childhood her sweet childhood
which seemed to mark her out as one called to be
a special witness for the Holy One against all
kinds of pollution." How faithfully she bore this
witness, they best know whom her bright presence
gladdened most constantly.

Through that hour of great darkness, which
in some degree overshadows all, when first the
conscience apprehends the presence of a personal
God, she passed early into the clear calm light of
glad and holy service. God had given her a
spirit in which were habitually blended the most
simple tenderness and the purest gaiety : she was
the delight of all around her, her husband, her
family, her friends. " I shall never forget," says
the friend whose words are quoted above, "the
way in which she last took leave of me. Pure,
earnest, loveable spirit, in a most fitting taber-
nacle ! She was such stuff as friends are made of ;
she was the stuff undiluted ; a thousand friends
could have been made out of that stuff that was
in her."



Vlll BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.

But she was thought worthy of a better portion
than the best this world can give, and was early
cast into the refining fires.

Her health, which had never been strong, failed
wholly in 1836 ; and from that time till her re-
lease, in 1843, her life was one scarcely inter-
mitted sickness. All forms of this sharp but
loving discipline were sent to her in turn. Weak-
ness, weariness, exhaustion, pain, the ebbing of a
scarcely-perceptible decay, and the sore struggles
of hardly-retiring life, all in turn tried her faith,
and, through God's abounding grace, perfected
her patience. To these must be added the priva-
tions which belong to such a state of health, and
which none could feel more acutely. The glad
spirit which God had given her, delighted to pour
forth its chastened gaiety in the sunshine hours of
family and friendly intercourse. Few ever loved
the beauties of nature with so pure and ardent an
affection, or rejoiced more in free and open con-
verse with the works of God in earth, and air,
and sky, and, beyond all, perhaps, in " the great
and wide sea." Yet from these, for lengthened
periods, she was altogether withdrawn ; and with



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH. IX

them/from that assembling of the saints in prayer
praise, which was dearer to her by far than
every glorious sight or sound in nature.

The last left to her of these external things was
the sea-shore ; and often did she speak of God's
great goodness in so long continuing to her this
enjoyment. But the time came when this also
was withheld : when the sick-room and the sick-
bed, with their weariness and their pain, were, as
far as outward things could reach, her only and
unrelieved portion : when days of languor, suc-
ceeding restless nights, found and left her on the
couch of stillness and suffering.

Such is not unfrequently the appointed course
if those whom God is pleased specially to honour.
From them are held back those outward gifts, by
which others were gladdened and sustained, that
they may enter more fully here into the secret of
His presence. What a heavenly brightness gathers
round the brows of such well-trained sufferers !
men look on them when they come down from
their tarrying in the mount, and mark with awe
how their " faces shine." True, they wear over
them the veil of present anguish ; they are weaker




X BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.

and more marred than any ; they are " partakers
of the sufferings of Christ :" but it is that the
power of Christ may rest upon them ; that they
may know Him as others know Him not; that
by His mighty grace, self and the lower nature
may be almost consumed : that, by bearing the
temptations of weakness and weariness, without
yielding to repining, selfishness, or impatience,
they may be drawn out of themselves and nigh
unto Him, and made indeed chosen vessels full of
His power and glory.

Nor do their solitary trials edify themselves
alone. In a thousand ways they become blessings
to the Church around them. What "intercessions
and giving of thanks " are theirs ! to how many an
open and observed labourer in Christ's vineyard
may the secret sighs and wrestlings of such lonely
chambers minister their strength and might ! What
an example do they set of patience, of meekness,
of the heavenly mind, of submission to the will
of God ! what living witnesses are they of His
almighty power and certain faithfulness ! how
does one and another see beside such sufferers
the "fourth form like unto the Son of God,"



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH. XI

whose near presence makes their furnace flame
" like unto a pleasant whistling wind ! " how often
is it granted to them to minister with words of
peace and counsels of wisdom to those around
them who are yet in the open conflict !

Such eminently was she whom God has lately
taken : fervent were her prayers ; child-like her
submission ; great her patience ; full of wisdom
were her lips.

Through all her sufferings her faith and patience
endured unshaken and unwearied, even till her
peaceful and blessed end. To her reconciled
Father in Christ Jesus she had trusted all her
hopes, and by Him she was kept in perfect
peace, until He had completed His work within
her, and made her meet for that nearer presence
after which her loving spirit thirsted ardently.
"What a wonderful world," she says in one of
her last letters, " this is ! but He will set all things
right at last ! Oh, that He would come ! Oh,
how I long sometimes to hear His voice! that
voice ! and to see His face ! .... to hear Him say,
' Thou art mine ; I have loved thee with an ever-
lasting love ! ' to fall at His feet and worship Him,



Xll BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH.

in the still and satisfied hush and rapture of love's
deep adoration, when the heart knows it has pos-
session of perfect blessedness ! "

And so she passed from us into the rest of
Paradise, and the waiting for her crown.

May this little book be her memorial, and lead
to the wider fulfilment of her own words, when,
speaking to a friend of the one ground of all her
hopes, she said " It is through the merits of my
dear Saviour, ' by His agony and bloody sweat ! '
Perhaps sometimes you will think of me when you
are saying those beautiful words in the Litany at
church."

S. OXON.



INDEX.



ADAM



ANON. . .



No. Page

, 1. 47.

2. 51.

3. 55.

4. 93.

5. 102.

6. 110.

7. 112.

8. 125.

9. 136.

10. 148.

11. 158.

12. 170.

13. 177.

14. 183.

15. 186.

16. 190.



Thoughts.



XVII. Sanctifying meanings of affliction, p. 48.
XLI. Life the practice of the Cross, 116.
XLIX. Thoughts on patience, 151.

XVI. Things to come ours, 43.
XL. Suffering a higher path than doing, 113.
L. Comfort to the Christian, that God
knows him, 159.

. VII. Effects of the peace of God, 18.
VIII. Reasons why God removes earthly

idols, 19.
XL VII. God the Author of our sorrow, and what

it is to be with Christ, 143.

BoYLBjRoBEBT.LXIII. Delay in succour the means of refine-
ment, 192.



BLUNT . .



BBADLET



XIV



INDEX.



No.

CBCIL . . XXXI.
XXXII.

LXI.
LXII.

DOITGLAS,P.W.XLVIII.

LIII.



F.l:r- k I N K. T.



. V.
VI.

XXII.
XXIII.

XXXVII.

XXXIX.

LVI.

LVII.
LVIII.



HALL, BISHOP . . I.
II.

XXV.

XLIII.

H MU- , AHCHDN. LXIV.
LXV.

HOPKIKS, BISHOP . X.
KEMPIS, THOMAS A. IV.



The Christian in trial a spectacle, 93.
Prayers for holiness usually answered

by sorrow, 94.
Tests of loyalty, 191.
Trust lightens load, 192.

Great suffering, a preparation for great

glory, 149.
The sight of God the soul's reward,

173.

Necessity and means for the subjection
of the will, 14.

God's purpose of grace in all provi-
dential dealings, 16.

The love of God, all-satisfying, 64.

God's moral training of us, and self-
crucifixion, 65.

Affliction intended to make us feel the
all-sufficiency of God, 108.

The faith of Jesus, the channel of suf-
fering grace, 112.

A thorough entering into God's plan for
our cure, the only proper state of
heart, 183.

The preciousness of the doctrine of a
Mediatorship, 184.

Reasons for desiring that all God's will
should be accomplished in us, 185.

Meek and reverent submission, 1.
Affliction like the night-storm on the

sea of Galilee, 2.
The sleep of death and the absence of

Jesus, 70.
Songs in the night, 125.

The Jubilate of Nature, 193.
Personal union with Jesus Christ, 194.

Light affliction working glory, 27.

The cross the fountain of happiness.
It can only be well borne by the help
of grace, 10.



INDEX.



XV



No.
KENNAWAY, C. E. XIV.

XV.
XXI.
XXX.

XLII.
LII.

LIX.

LEIGHTON,ARCHBP.XI.



LI.

MANNING, XXVIII.
ARCHDEACON.

XXIX.

LIV.
LV.

NEWMAN, J. H. . IX.

XIX.

XX.

XXXV.

XXXVI.

.
XLVI.

NOEL, GEBARD . XII.
XXXIII.



Jesus the source and the object of life.
Death the saint's great gain, 35.

Prayers and sighs the Christian's me-
morial with God, 41.

The Lord's second Advent the panacea
for care, 58.

" Ephphatha," the meaning of our Sa-
viour's sigh, 87.

The cleansing of the clouds of life, 117.

Jesus Christ an High Priest, merciful
and faithful, 170.

The Communion of Saints, 195.

How to commit our souls to God. The
necessity for innocence and holy
walking. Affliction comes from God,
and He is our Father, 27.

Suffering not strange. Communion
with Christ in trial and in glory, 160.

The brethren of Christ, men of sorrows.
Perfection through suffering, 78.

The mistake so often made in the view
of the Christian life, 83.

The blessedness of the faithful de-
parted, 177.

The unobserved but true participation
of the cross, 181.

The lot of all God's saints found by
experience to be the same, 20.

Trial, evermore the portion of the true
disciple, 52.

Consolation of the sympathy of Jesus
Christ, 55.

Bodily pain most congruous with the
Christian state, 102.

God's particular providence, 105.

Spring and the final regeneration, 137.

Communion with the invisible world a
source of strength and comfort, 141.

God's work of moral regeneration ne-
cessarily slow, 32.

A time of need, a time of prayer and
of refreshment, 94.



XVI



INDEX.



No.
PLAIN SEBMONS LX. Sorrow an angel to be entertained, 190.

ROMAINE . XXVII. The fruitfiilness of the branch in Christ,
increased by praying, 75.

Reasons for submission. Affliction the
time for faith to fight her agonis-
ticon, 4.

XLIV. Admirable directions for a sick person
to follow, 131.



TAYLOB, III.

BISHOP JEBEMY.



WlLBEBFOBCE, XIII.

BISHOP S.

XXIV.
LIX.

WILLIAMS, I. XXXIV.

WOODWABD . XVIII.

XXVI.
XXXVIII.

LX.

BISHOP JEEEMT
TATLOB . .



ABCHBISHOP LEIGHTON.

ANONYMOUS ....

LXVI.

ANONYMOUS ....

BISHOP JEEEMY
TAYLOB .....



Jesus Christ, the light to see our sor-
rows by, and the companion to be
with us when they come, 33.

The lessons taught by God's delay in
answering our prayers, 67.

Sorrow the consequence of sin, and an
instrument for purification, 186.

Effect of the death and burial of Christ
upon death and the place of the
dead, 97.

" My son, give me thy heart," a most

comfortable command, 51.
The blessedness of acting as in God's

presence, 73.
Bereavements, special occasions for

God's consolations, 111.
Prayers to be said by sick persons, 223.

For submission, 223.

For submission, 236.

For submission, 254.

Meditation, 256.

On the peace and health of heaven, 256.

On the parts and mysteries of the Pas-
sion, 257.



Conoolatio.



i.

HE is not worthy to pass for thy child that re-
ceives not thy stripes with reverent meekness :
tears may be here allowed ; but a reluctant frown
were no better than a rebellion.

Let infidels, then, and ignorants, who think
they suffer by chance, repine at their adversities
and be dejected with their afflictions : for me, who
know that I have a Father in heaven full of mercy
and compassion, whose providence hath measured
out to a scruple the due proportions of my sor-
rows, counting my sighs, and reserving the tears
which He wrings from me in his bottle ; why do
I not patiently lie down and put my mouth in the
dust, meekly submitting to his holy pleasure, and
blessing the hand from which I smart ?

BISHOP HALL.
B



Z BISHOP HALL.

II.

MATTHEW xiv.

Jesus is now on the mount ; the disciples on the
sea : yet, while He was in the mount praying and
lifting up his eyes to his Father, He fails not to
cast them about upon his disciples tossed on the
waves. Those all-seeing eyes admit of no limits.
At once He sees the highest heavens and the
midst of the sea ; the glory of his Father, and the
misery of his disciples. Whatever prospects pre-
sent themselves to his view, the distress of his
followers is ever most noted. How much more
dost Thou now, O Saviour ! from the height of thy
glorious advancement, behold us thy wretched
servants, tossed on the unquiet sea of this world,
and beaten with the troublesome and threatening
billows of affliction !

Thou foresawest their toil and danger, ere Thou
dismissedst them ; and purposely sendedst them
away, that they might be tossed. Thou that
couldest prevent our sufferings by thy power, wilt
permit them in thy wisdom, that Thou mayest
glorify thy mercy in our deliverance, and confirm
our faith by the issue of our distresses. How do all
things now seem to conspire to the vexing of thy
poor disciples ! The night was sullen and dark ;
their Master was absent ; the sea was boisterous ;
the winds were high and contrary. Had their



BISHOP HALL. 3

Master been with them, howsoever the elements
had raged, they had been secure ; had their Master
been away, yet if the sea had been quiet, or the
winds fair, the passage might have been endured :
now both season, and sea, and wind, and their
Master's desertion, had agreed to render them
perfectly miserable. Sometimes the providence
of God hath thought good so to order it, that to
his best servants there appeareth no glimpse of
comforts ; but so absolute vexation, as if heaven
and earth had plotted their full affliction. Yea,
O Saviour ! what a dead night, what a fearful
tempest, what an astonishing dereliction was that,
wherein Thou Thyself criedst out in the bitterness
of thine anguished soul, "My God, my God,
why hast thou forsaken me l ? " Yet, in all these
extremities of misery, our gracious God intends
nothing but his greater glory and ours; the
triumph of our faith, the crown of our victory.

All that longsome arid tempestuous night must
the disciples wear out in danger and horror, as
given over to the winds and waves ; but in the
fourth watch of the night, when they were wearied
out with toils and fears, comes deliverance. At
their entrance into the ship, at the rising of the
tempest, at the shutting-in of the evening, there
was no news of Christ ; but when they have been
all the night long beaten, not so much with storms
1 Matt, xxvii. 46.
B 2



4 BISHOP TAYLOR.

and waves, as with their own thoughts ; now in
the fourth watch (which was near to the morning)
Jesus came unto them, and purposely not till
then ; that He might exercise their patience ; that
He might inure them to wait upon Divine Provi-
dence in cases of extremity ; that their devotions
might be more whetted by delay ; that they might
give gladder welcome to their deliverance. O
God ! thus Thou thinkest fit to do still. We arc
by turns in our sea ; the winds bluster, the billows
swell, the night and thy absence heighten our
discomfort, thy time and ours is set : as yet it is
but midnight with us; can we but hold out
patiently until the fourth watch, Thou wilt surely
come and rescue us. Oh ! let us not faint under
our sorrows, but wear out our three watches of
tribulation with undaunted patience and holy
resolution! BISHOP HALL.

III.

(1.) Remember that God hath bound this sick-
ness upon thee by the condition of nature; for
every flower must wither and droop: it is also
bound upon thee by special providence, and with
a design to try thee, and with purposes to reward
and to crown thee. These cords thou canst not
break; and therefore lie thou down gently, and
suffer the hand of God to do what lie please, that
at least thou muyest swallow an advantage, which



BISHOP TAYLOR.

the care and severe mercies of God force down
thy throat.

Prevent the violence and trouble of thy spirit
by an act of thanksgiving; for which in the worst
of sicknesses thou canst not want cause, especially
if thou rememberest that this pain is not an
eternal pain.

Propound to your eyes and heart the example
of the holy Jesus upon the cross. He endured
more for thee than thou canst either for thyself or
Him ; and remember, that if we be put to suffer,
and do suffer in a good cause, or in a good man-
ner, so that in any sense your sufferings be con-
formable to his sufferings, or can be capable of
being united to his, we shall reign together with
Him. The high way of the cross, which the King
of sufferings hath trodden before us, is the way to
ease, to a kingdom, and to felicity.

It may be, that this may be the last instance
and the last opportunity that ever God will give
thee to exercise any virtue, to do Him any service,
or thyself any advantage. Be careful that thou
losest not this ; for to eternal ages this never shall
return again.

(2.) Sickness is the opportunity and the proper
scene of exercising some virtues. It is that agony
in which men are tried for a crown. And if we
remember what glorious things are spoken of the



6 BISHOP TAYLOR.

grace of faith, that it is the life of just men, the
restitution of the dead in trespasses and sins, the
justification of a sinner, the support of the weak,
the confidence of the strong, the magazine of pro-
mises, and the title to very glorious rewards ; we
may easily imagine, that it must have in it a work
and a difficulty, in some proportion answerable to
so great effects. If you will try the excellency,
and feel the work of faith, place the man in a per-
secution ; let him ride in a storm ; let his bones
be broken with sorrow, and his eyelids loosened
with sickness ; let his bread be dipped in tears,
and all the daughters of music be brought low ;
let God commence a quarrel against him, and be
bitter in the accents of his anger or his discipline ;
then God tries your faith. Can you then trust
his goodness, and believe Him to be a Father,
when you groan under his rod? Can you rely
upon all the strange propositions of Scripture,
and be content to perish if they be not true ?
Can you receive comfort in the discourses of
death and heaven, of immortality and the resur-
rection, of the death of Christ and conforming to
his sufferings ? Truth is, there are but two great
periods in which faith demonstrates itself to be
a powerful and mighty grace : and they are, per-
secution and the approaches of death, for the
passive part ; and a temptation, for the active.
In the days of pleasure and the night of pain



BISHOP TAYLOR. 7

faith is to fight her agonisticon, to contend for
mastery ; and faith overcomes all alluring and
fond temptations to sin ; and faith overcomes all
our weaknesses and faintings in our troubles.
By the faith of the promises, we learn to despise
the world, choosing those objects which faith dis-
covers ; and, by expectation of the same promises,
we are comforted in all our sorrows, and enabled
to look through and see beyond the cloud ; but
the vigour of it is pressed and called forth, when
all our fine discourses come to be reduced to prac-
tice. For in our health and clearer days it is easy
to talk of putting trust in God ; we readily trust
Him for life when we are in health, for provisions
when we have fair revenues, and for deliverance
when we are newly escaped ; but let us come to
sit upon the margent of our grave, and let a tyrant
lean hard upon our fortunes, and dwell upon our
wrong ; let the storm arise, and the keels toss till
the cordage crack, or that all our hopes bulge
under us, and descend into the hollowness of sad
misfortunes ; then can you believe, when you
neither hear, nor see, nor feel any thing but ob-
jections ? This is the proper work of sickness :
faith is then brought into the theatre, and so ex-
ercised, that if it abides but to the end of the con-
tention, we may see the work of faith, which God
will hugely crown. God hath crowned the memory
of Job with a wreath of glory, because he sat



8 BISHOP TAYLOR.

upon his dunghill wisely and temperately ; and his
potsherd and his groans, mingled with praises
and justifications of God, pleased Him like an
anthem sung by angels in the morning of the
resurrection. God could not choose but be pleased
with the delicious accents of martyrs, when in
their tortures they cried out nothing but " Holy
Jesus," and "Blessed be God;" and they also
themselves, who with a hearty resignation to the
Divine pleasure, can delight in God's severe dis-
pensations, will have the transportations of Che-
rubim when they enter into the joy of God. If
God be delicious to his servants when He smites
them, He will be nothing but ravishments and
ecstasies to their spirits, when He refreshes them
with the overflowings of joy in the day of recom-
penses. No man is more miserable than he that
hath no adversity. Fathers, because they design


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Online LibraryC. E KennawayConsolatio, or, Comfort for the afflicted → online text (page 1 of 17)