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the kpfk folio

Vol. VIII, No. 8 - Feb. 1-28, 1967





pacifica

kpfk-fm 90.7



VOL. IX, No. 1- February 1-28, 1967

The KPFK Folio is published each month for all subscribers by Pacifica Foundation
at 3729 Cahuenga Blvd., North Hollywood, California 91604, 877-5583, 984-2420.
The yearly subscription rate is $15.00. The student and retired rates are $10.00 per
year or $5.00 for six months. Subscriptions are transferable to KPFA, serving Northern
California, 2207 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley, California 94704, and to WBAI, serving
the New York area, 30 E. 39th St., New York 10016. Please WTite or call KPFK,
Subscription Department for changes of address or other subscription information.

POSTMASTER: Please send Form 3579 to
3729 Cahuenga Blvd.
North Hollywood 91604






WHY A LARGER FOLIO?

We think that the Folio, in this new format, will provide clearer listings for your convenience. It will also afford us
greater space to print material of interest with regard to our broadcast programs.

It is our intention, in the months to come, to provide written background material about some of our featured programs,
information that we have not been able to give you before because of space limitations. We start this new venture with
an article by William Malloch, our Music Director, in which he comments on the thirteen symphonies of Shostakovich
that his department is featuring this month. As we produce Public Affairs specials, or our own theater productions, or
any of the variety of special programming we offer, we will ask the producers to "tell you something of what went into
the making of these broadcasts.

The Folio will become something more than just a listing of names and times. We hope this new enlarged Folio will
serve as a link between yourselves and ourselves, wherein we will share some of the adventure and excitement of pro-
ducing KPFK's unique kind of programming.

You will find a calendar in our center spread. We have listed some of the programs we think are of special interest and
left room for you to add your own particular choices. If you would like to make comments there too, and send the calen-
dar to use at the end of the month, we will find your notes most useful in our efforts to provide you, our supporters,
with the kind of programs you wish to hear.

Thank you.



cover art by Pat Dallas



interior art by Bill Merkens
and a 19th century dictionary



SHOSTAKOVICH -WE PREMIERE THE 3rd AND BROADCAST THE OTHER 12!



This month KPFK will broadcast Shostakovich's practically un-
known 3rd Symphony. As far as we know, this will In- the first
broadcast performance of the work outside the Soviet Union.
With the acquisition of this tape, due to the zeal nl Russophile
fin- Cooper, we become tin- only station outside Russia to be able
to broadcast all thirteen of the Russian composer's symphonies.
We'll broadcast the other twelve to celebrate the event during
the first week ol February. Although Shostakovich is a highly
uneven composer, we should not let tin's obscure the fact that
In' is capable ol producing great music. All great composers' lesser
winks are revived from time to lime and sometimes, to our sur-
prise the) don't seem so had as all that (e.g., finale ol Beethoven's
Battle Symphony, Verdi' The- Battle of Legnano). Talking of
"battle" pieces, Leonard Bernstein seems to see something, alter
all, of value in Shostakovich's 7th ("Leningrad") Symphony — a
piece which really bears the scars ol World War II from which
it emerged. Incidentally, Charles O'Connell contended that this
work was a "fake" because Shostakovich hadn't written all ol it
under fire — in Leningrad! We'll revive the World Premiere
broadcast of this work with Toscanini and the NBC Symphony
(RCA has just issued it on I.P). We'll have Eugene Mravinsky,
Shostakovich's favorite conductor, well in view with perform-
ances by that conductor and the Leningrad Philharmonic of sym-
phonies 5, S, 10 and 12. Kondraslrn conducts the 4th and 13th,
Koussevitzky the 9th, Rachlin the 11th, Cauk the 6th and Ormandy
the 1st. Leonid Yigner leads the Latvian Radio Symphony Orches-
tra in the 2nd and 3rd.

The words, "controversial" or "problematical", seem to find their
way to the great body of Shostakovich's symphonic output. The
man is preoccupied with revolution. The revolution, Soviet-style.
The 1st Symphony bears not title, but its final two movements
seem to stem from the violent 20's ot which it was a product. It,
along with the 5th, is a universally accepted part of the orchestra!
repertory. The Second, subtitled "Dedication to October", begins
dramatically and contains many striking ideas, but its "optimistic"
ending is anticlimactic. The 3rd ("May Day") is a much more
conventional work. After many well-worked-out passages it too
lapses into banality in the choral finale. Toward the work's be-
ginning we hear in a long passage for horn and trombone, the
influence of Mahler for the first time.

The 4th Sv-mphony is the composer's most puzzling, but it may
well turn out to be his greatest. It pits trivialities against monu-
mentalities. No matter how often one hears it, one is never nuite
prepared for its quixotic turns of thought. It seems to be drawn
along epic lines. Though superficially a rag-bag, junkyard, natch-
work, dumping-ground for all sorts of musical irreeoncileables, it
has i remarkable formal "lightness" to it in the end — the com-
poser merely goes a very very long way about — a la Albee's
Zoo Story hero — to get at things the right way. It always reminds
me, with its epic tone-painting and quick cuts, of music to some
great un-made Eisenstein epic. There is much influence of Mahler
in the score and in the following 5th, but one would never mistake
a passage' ol one composer for that of the other (as one would,
for example confuse some Strauss, or Schoenberg!, with Wagner).

The 5th is the composer's most solid and well-rounded effort. It
is said that it was written to please Stalin — after the composer
had withdrawn his 4th after the preliminary rehearsals — to make
up for the 4th's irregularities and irreverancies. Stalin should
have been well-pleased, and it does show, of course, that it is
possible to produce masterpieces under very trying conditions —
let's hope it's not the only way! Certainly Shostakovich's desire to
please his government — and it is undoubtedly a deeply-rooted
very sincere very Russian desire — has been responsible for much
of the inconsistency of quality in his output. His 6th is really
chunks of two incomplete symphonies. The first movement, written
as a memorial to Lenin, is not followed by anything of equal
weight or tone, but by a pair of highly entertaining but very
inappropriate Scherzo-burlesques (Shostakovich has never been
able wholly to suppress his enthusiasm for the parody). The 7th
hailed during the last World war as a masterpiece, was damned
thereafter as totally synthetic, but seems to be making its way —
not exactly quietly! — back into concert halls and onto record
shelves. From the 7th on. the words "too long" (more Mahler-
aping-but not Mahler sound) apply to some extent to all sym-
phonies but the 9th. The first movement is too long, too loud, and
too empty. It obscures the rather fine following Scherzo. The
8th again, is overdrawn. I hear in the climax of the first move-
ment what sounds like a quote from Tchaikovsky's Manfred
symphony, something that makes me want to give up the whole
work for lost then and there, but that movement is followed bv
two fine Scherzos. The first Scherzo shows that Shostakovich
must have been aware by 1942 anyway of the sketches for the
second movement of Mahler's 10th Symphony. The second scherzo
is an exhilarating perpetum mobile. The 9th is Shostakovich's
temporary answer to the "too long" question — but at the ex-
pense of once again raising the "triviality" question.



The Shostakovich Kith is probably the best shaped symphony

overall since the earlier 5th, and one in which one notices certain

turns of mind — a kind ol freshness - not noticeable before

(many people thought the composer was "written out" by the time
he got to the 7th — or before - perhaps they are right but the
10th stands as something lor those people to think about).

The 11th ("The Year, 1905") is again "too long". It is clearly
program music, based in part on revolutionary songs from the
unsuccessful 1905 Revolution. But although the music is repeti-
tious, it is not trivial, nor is the work out ol shape. Currently it
appears to me this work is underestimated (we had a chance
to find out, "live", when Andre Clnytens conducted it here with
the Philharmonic this season).

One can see the commissars (in the year 1957) standing about, a
mite ruefully, after the premiere of the 11th, saying to the com-
poser, "Well, what about writing one about the Bolshevik (i.e.,
"successful") revolution of 1917?" and Shostakovich dutifully going
home and cranking out his most trivial symphony to date, the
12th trivial largely once again because of its banal Moscow-style
ending — because, as usual, there are some fine earlier passages)
—and then putting together his most "controversial" and "revolu-
tionary" (in another sense) symphony to date, the 13th. Did he
write this anti-establishment work, to the words of Yevtushenko,
out of perversity, or, perhaps because he thought the Soviet gov-
ernment had really opened things up that much and wanted in
all good faith to make his contribution? The irony was that
Shostakovich's 13th was suppressed within a year after his long-
suppressed 4th had been premiered in a "revised" version. Subse-
quently, some of the poetry was revised (to do with anti-Semitism
in Russia) and it is this revised version we will hear — but try to
get a score and parts!

The 13th is unquestionably one of the composer's finest works
(but it is too long!). I particularly enjoy the contemplative and
pastoral last movement. The work ends with a benediction. What
will the 14th be like? Indeed, will there be one? We've heard only
too recently of a serious heart attack suffered by the composer
(and heard with pleasure that he's produced a second cello con-
certo since). It seems incredible that Shostakovich, like Walt
Disney, will not be with us some day. Then will not many of
his "defects" seem suddenly to shine forth like virtues! And
though Dimitri Shostakovich may only be destined to play second
trombone in the heavenly orchestra, might we not then trumpet,
"Whence comes such another?"

William Malloch
Music Director




Wednesday, February 1

7:00 A.M. KPFK-AM: Are you still looking

for a good morning concert?
9:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . .
WINTER CAMP? To safeguard the sanity
of Folio readers, once again we are not
listing the guests that Richard Lamparski
has on his show. Maybe if we knew, we'd
tell you. Then again, maybe we wouldn't.
9:30 MUSIC BY HUGO X. ALFVEN
Dalecarlian Rhapsody. (21)
Festival for Full Orchestra. Stockholm
Phil. Westerberg. (6)
10:00 THE STRANGER: By Albert Camus,

read by Edward Binns.
10:45 "LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI CON-
DUCTS MOZART: The Serenade for
Thirteen Wind Instruments in B-flat,
K. 361. With members of the American
Symphony Orchestra. (Vanguard VSD
71158)
11:30 DISCUSSION FOR TWO: Dennis
Gaston and Christopher Blaine, students,
discuss American domestic policy. (Jan 31)
12:30 HUMAN RIGHTS INTERVIEW

(Jan 31)
12:45 OPINION: Marshall Windmiller
(Jan 31)
1:00 EVENINGS ON THE ROOF: Pre-
sents pianist Frances Mullen Yates in the
2nd of two taped "live" recitals. Mrs.
Yates plays HAYDN's Sonata No. 52 in
E-flat.
2:00 PO IT-RLN: Edwin Honig reads his
Poetry. This is one of a series of readings
that took place at The Poetry Center of
S. F. State College. (KPFA)
3:00 MUSIC NOT FOR EXPORT: ED-
WARD ELGAR-The Founding Father,
record collector Joseph Cooper presents
the first program in a Survey of Modern
English Music.

Violin Sonata — Alan Loveday/violin,
Leonard Cassini/piano. (Delta DEL-
12016)
Piano Quintet — Leonard Cassini/piano.
Aeolian String Quartet. (Delta SDEL-
18204)
The above program will be followed by
a recording of Elgar's Wand of Youth
Suite No. 1. Edward Van Beinum con-
ducts the London Philharmonic Orch.
(London LLP 43)
4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE:

See page 5.
5:30 OPINION: R. H. Darden, "For the
Right,'' on "The Catholic Gentry as
Guardians of the Right". (FEB 2)
5:45 NEWS
6:00 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: With

Clair Brush
6:15 PIPES ON PARADE: With Don

Wallace.
6:45 IT'S ONLY MONEY: A. J. Falick,
management consultant, on the world of
finance and business. (FEB 2)
7:00 THE OPEN HOUR: A time reserved
for programs of timely or continuing in-
terest which should be aired before sched-
uling at a later time.
8:00 "ALFRED DELLER - AWAKE
SWEET LOVE: The Deller Consort per-



forms seven airs and partsongs by JOHN
DOWLAND. (Bach-Guild BGS 70673)
(FEB 3)
8:30 YANKEE NOMAD: This is the title
given his latest book by David Douglas
Duncan, world-renowned "photo-journal-
ist". The former Life photographer, and
creator of Picasso's Picassos, et al., talks
with Julius Shulman, foremost photog-
rapher of architecture, interior design and
environment. They talk about Duncan,
the man both behind the camera and in
front of it. (Published by Holt, Rinehart
& Winson, 1966.) (FEB 2)
9:30 MUSIC OF EDGAR VARESE: Mem-
bers of the Vancouver Orchestra are con-
ducted by Victor Feldbrill in three com-
positions by Varese, Density 21.5, (4);
Octandre, (7) and Integrales, (10). The
works are introduced by the composer.
FEB 17)

10:00 THE HEBREW PROGRAM: News
and commentary, folklore and music, pre-
sented first in English, then in Hebrew.
Produced by Dan Eshel.

11:00 RADIO FREE OZ: My name is the
Wizard of Oz




Thursday, February 2

7:00 A.M. KPFK-AM: Belkin helps you
throw off your shackles and raise your
hackles on Groundhog Day.
9:00 THE OPEN HOUR: A repeat of last
evening's programs for our morning lis-
teners.
10:00 THE STRANGER: By Albert Camus,

read by Edward Binns.
10:45 "JASCHA HEIFETZ AND GREGOR
PIATIGORSKY: The famed violinist and
cellist perform three works.
ARENSKY. Trio in d (with pianist Leonard
Permario). (RCA LSC 2867) (25)
VIVALDI.Concerto in B-flat for Violin,
Cello, String and Harpsichord (with
harpsichordist Malcolm Hamilton. (10)
MARTINU. Duo for Violin and Cello. (7)
11:30 YANKEE NOMAD (Feb 1)
12:30 OPINION: R. H. Darden (Feb 1)
12:45 IT'S ONLY MONEY: A. J. Falick
(Feb 1)

1:00 ELEMENTS OF JAZZ (Jan 29)
1:30 GREATEST ADVENTURE: With

Mitchell Harding (Jan 29)
2:00 FROM THE MIDWAY: "A Psychol-
ogist Views Freedom." A talk by Marvin
Frankel, Assistant Professor of Psychology
at the University of Chicago (KPFA)



3:00 JASCHA HEIFETZ IN CONCERT

ON HIS 66th BIRTHDAY.

BEETHOVEN. Serenade in D. William

Primrose/viola and Gregor Piatigorsky/

cello. (RCA LM 2550) (24)

MOZART. Sonata No. 10 in B-flat, K.

378. (RCA LM1958) (17)
MENDELSSOHN. Trio No. 1 in d. Ar-
thur Rubinstein piano and Gregor Pia-
tigorsky/cello. (RCA LM1119) (27)
SPOHR. Violin Concerto No. 8 in a. RCA
Orch./Isler Solomon. (RCA LM2027)
(17)

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE:
See page 5.

5:30 MISCELLANY

5:45 NEWS

6:00 THIS WEEK AT THE U.N.: From
United Nations Radio, New York.

6:15 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N.:
With Betty Pilkington. (WBAI)

6:45 OPINION: Stephen Kandel, television
and film writer with "Uncommon Sense".
(FEB 3)

7:00 FRANK WIGGLESWORTH-COM-
POSER AND TEACHER: An active com-
poser in New York City, Mr. Wiggles-
worth is chairman of the music depart-
ment at The New School for Social Re-
search. He speaks with Ann McMillan
about his work, and we hear the follow-
ing composition: A Short Mass (18), Duo
for Oboe and Violin (7) and Quintet for
Brass (10). (FEB 8)

8:30 A PUERTO RICAN COMMUNITY
LEADER DISCUSSES NEW YORK: Mr.
Frank Espade is Chairman, City-Wide
Coordinating Committee of Welfare
Groups; Chairman, Community Commit-
tee of Brownsville-East New York Com-
munity Progress Center; Chairman, City-
Wide Community Action Groups; Vice
President, Council for a Better East New
York and Training Association, Puerto
Rican Community Development Project.
He talks with Ted Rubin on the subjects
of Poverty, Welfare, the Police, the
Board of Education, Anti-Poverty Pro-
grams, East Harlem Riots, and many oth-
er matters — and presents his program
for avoiding riots — and at the same time
forgetting what he terms a peaceful revo-
lution for the poor, and the disadvantaged
minorities. (WBAI) (FEB 3)
10:00 LOOKING IN: Elliot Mintz and
guests explore the world of the D.J. Two
of L.A.'s most important disc jockeys will
talk with you on the phones.
11:00 A.M. RADIO FREE OZ: If there's
anything anyone doz




Friday, February 3

7:00 A.M. KPFK-AM Payday! Yeaaah!

9:00 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . .
WINTER CAMP? To safeguard the sanity
df Folio readers, once aagin we arc not
listing the guests that Richard Lamparski
has on his show. Maybe if we knew, we'd
tell you. Then again, maybe we wouldn't.

9:30 ALFRED DELLER - AWAKE

SWEET LOVE (Feb L)
i0;00 BLACK ELK SPEAKS: By John G.

Neihardt, read by David Ossman.
10:30 THE FOLK DANCE: Julie Russo
talks with folk dancing authorities Rudy
Dannes and Ethan Karas. In answering
the question "What is folk dancing?" they
discuss its history, its relationship to other
dance forms, its music, and its effect on
the human personality. The music and
dancing heard in the background was re-
corded live at The Intersection, a Los
Angeles folk dancing club. Produced by
Bob Atwood.
11:00 A PUERTO RICAN COMMUNITY
LEADER DISCUSSES NEW YORK (Feb
2)
12:30 MISCELLANY
12:45 OPINION: Stephen Kandel (Feb 2)

1:00 "TWO SYMPHONIES BY BOHUS-
LAV MARTINU: Robert Whitney con-
ducts the Louisville Orchestra in the
Fifth and we also hear a Polish recording
of the Third. (Louisville 663)

2:00 FROM THE CENTER - THE UNI-
VERSITY IN AMERICA-HI: "The Is-
sues'—Robert M. Hutchins, President of
the Center for the Study of Democratic
Institutions in Santa Barbara, opens the
three-day Convocation on "The Univer-
sity in America." He is introduced by Wil-
liam O. Douglas, Associate Justice of the
United States Supreme Court. (Jan 30)

3:00 "FIVE CONTEMPORARY COMPO-
SITIONS

HAROLD FARBLRMAX. Elegy, Fanfare
and March. Stuttgart Philharmonia/Far-
berman. (Serenus SRS 12016)
RICHARD DONOVAN. Epos. Polish Na-
tional Radio Orch./Jan Krenz. (CRI)
ARTHUR HONECCER. Piano Concer-
tino. Monique Berard/solo; French Na-
tional Radio Orch. /Georges Tzipine.
(Pathe FCX 665) (12)
VACLAV NELHYBEL. Horn Quartet.
Members of the Rome Symphony. (Se-
renus SRS 12007)
HARRY PARTCH. Oedipus - excerpts.
The Sausalito Gate 5 Ensemble. (38)

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE:
See page 5.

5:30 MISCELLANY

5:45 NEWS

6:00 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: With
Clair Brush

6:15 GABRIEL FAURE'S COMPLETE
PIANO MUSIC V: Evelyne Croche plays
three Valse-Caprices. (VOX BOX 423)

6:45 OPINION: William R. Gruver, editor
of Mercury News Service. (FEB 6)

7:00 THE OPEN HOUB: A time reserved
for programs of timely and continuing in-



terest which should be aired before sched-
uling at a later time.

8:00 COMMUNITY DISCUSSION PROJ-
ECT: PROGRESSIVE ZIONISM IN THE
WORLD OF TODAY: An address by
Avraham Schenker, National Chairman of
Americans for Progressive Israel, before
Hashomer Hat/air seminar. For meeting
locations picas,, call NO 2-1402. (FEB 6)

9:00 THE COMPLETE SYMPHONIES
OF SHOSTAKOVICH-I: The First Sym-
phony (ca. 1924-25). Eugene Ormandy
conducts the Philadelphia Orchestra. This
is the first of eight programs to be broad-
cast this evening, Saturday and Sunday,
on which we shall broadcast all thirteen
of Dmitri Shostakovich's symphonies as
well as some of his other works. This se-
ries will include the western hemisphere
premiere broadcast of the Third Sym-
phony (Sat. the 4th at 1:00 p.m.).

9:40 FANTASTIC FLIGHT: Dr. F. O.
Rittenhouse, president of Pacific L'nion
College, tells Bill Plymat of the flight of
a 707 jet-liner out of San Francisco when
an engine caught fire, a wing-tank ex-
ploded and the engine and part of the
wing fell off— yet the plane landed with
no injury to its 152 passengers and crew.
(KFMG-FM, Des Moines)
10:00 THE COMPLETE SYMPHONIES
OF SHOSTAKOVICH-II: We repeat a
program originally broadcast on Music
Not For Export. This program featured
the western hemisphere premiere broad-
cast of the Second Symphony, "Dedica-
tion to October", (ca. 1927) performed by
the Latvian Radio Symphony Orchestra
conducted by Leonid Vigner. The sym-
phony is preceded by a suite from the
score for the film, Five Days and Five
Nights, by Shostakovich. E. Khachaturian
conducts the Symphony Orchestra. (MKD-
11.327)
11:00 JAZZ ARCHIVES: With Phil Elwood.
12:00 THE CONTINUING CARROT: The
amazing and unpredictable world of
Mitchell Harding.




Saturday, February 4

8:00 A.M. PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG
PEOPLE: THE KOOLIBAH TREE

10:00 THE OPEN HOUR: A repeat of last
evenings program for our morning lis-
teners.

11:00 THE BAROQUE CIMBALOM: Ala-
dar Racz plays works by COUPERIN,
DANDRIEU, and CANDEILLE-RACZ.
(Qualiton 1142)

11:30 CALLING CQ: Ray Meyers, W6MLZ,
with news for the radio amateur.

12:00 THE SET: With Hostess Melba
Jackson. Look for Teen-reporters Susana
Taylor, Stu Cronan, Meredith Karike,
Tom Grubbs, and Dave.



1:00 THE COMPLETE SYMPHONIES
OF SHOSTAKOVICH-III: Joe Cooper

presents the first broadcast outside Russia
of Shostakovich's practically unknown
Third Symphony, "Max Day", (ca. 1930).
The Latvian Radio Symphony Orchestra
and Chorus are conducted by Leonid
Vigner. Following the Third, we hear the
first U.S.A. broadcast of a new cantata
written by Shostakovich to the words of
Yevgeny Yevtoshenko, The Execution of
Stepan Razin. Kiril Kondrashin conducts
the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra and
Chorus (MK D ol5471). (The above two
works will soon be re-broadcast in the
series Music Not For Export.) Following
the cantata, Kiril Kondrashin conducts the
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra in a So-
viet recording of Shostakovich's Fourth
Symphony (ca. 1935-36) (A 09807-10). Fi-
nally Eugene Mravinsky, the composer's
favorite conducter, leads the Leningrad
Philharmonic in Shostakovich's Fifth
Symphony (ca. 1937) (A 5289-56). None
of the above recordings is available in
the United States.

4:00 OPEN HOUR-THE ARTS

5:00 A MUSICAL JOURNEY TO
GREECE: With Jim Papadatos.

5:30 BACK TALK FROM THE BACK
HALL: The opinion of Rogers Wills in
conversation with Mitchell Harding. (FEB
5)

5:45 NEWS

6:00 CAN COMPUTERS WRITE POET-
RY? Jon Wheatley, an associate professor
of Philosophy at the University of Cali-
fornia at Santa Barbara, discusses the cy-
bernation of poesy. (FEB 5)

7:00 THE COMPLETE SYMPHONIES
OF SHOSTAKOVICH-TV: Alexander
Gauk conducts the Moscow Symphony
Orchestra in a Soviet recording of Shosta-
kovich's Sixth Symphony (ca. 1939) (A
4894-5)

7:30 ESCAPE: Anthony Boucher brings
you review and commentary on the Sci-
ence Fiction, Fantasy and Mystery scene.
(KPFA)

8:00 THE COMPLETE SYMPHONIES
OF SHOSTAKOVICH-V: We're holding
this spot open for Arturo Toscanini's his-
toric performance of Shostakovich's Sev-
enth Symphony, "Leningrad", (ca. 1941-
42). This NBC Symphony recording is
supposed to be released by RCA early
this year.

9:30 OLD TIME RECORD REVIEW: A
survey of the regional musical styles of
America, as preserved in rare 78 rpm
discs from the archives of the John Ed-
wards Memorial Foundation. This week-
music from Tennessee. (FEB 5)
10:00 LOOKING IN: Tonight's topic for
discussion will be birth control. Host, El-
liot Mintz will talk about different meth-
ods of contraception and you are invited
to call in.

11:00 THE LAST MUSKETEER: With

Patrick Troughton and Denys Blakelock.
This week, Kidnapped! (BBC)



11:30 THE MUSICAL CHAIR: With Wil-
liam Mallocli. Reviews, reviews reviewed,
guesses, very new and very old record-
ings. Phone-ins, too. 1 a.m. signoff?

Sunday, February 5

8:00 A.M. THE COMPLETE SYMPHO-
NIES OF SHOSTAKOVICH-VI: Eugene
Mravinsky conducts the Leningrad Phil-
harmonic in Shostakovich's massive
Eighth Symphony (ca. 1942). (O 9615-17).
Then Serge Koussevitsky leads the Boston
Symphony in a newly-reissued recording
(RCA VCM6174) of the Ninth Symphony
(ca. 1945). Finally Mravinsky and the
Leningrad Philharmonic reappear, per-
forming the Tenth Symphony (ca. 1953).
(Concert Hall CHS 1313)

10:30 CAN COMPUTERS WRITE POET-
RY? (Feb 4)

11:30 THE BACKGROUND OF OUR
COMMITMENTS IN SOUTHEAST
ASIA: Masamori Kojima, editor and


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